Author Topic: Broken Ribs  (Read 26250 times)

Offline Soñadora

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Broken Ribs
« on: June 15, 2006, 04:50:22 AM »
My husband just came home from work with broken ribs. He said it cracked so loudly that the boss heard it. :'( The doctor's said there is nothing they can do for it, so I am wondering if anyone knows of anything that may help in any way. This is the second time in a year that this has happened -- it's that wonderful Marfan's Syndrome again! Anyone got anything?? Thanks!
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Broken Ribs
« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2006, 10:11:08 AM »
Quote
Bone Fracturehome remedy:


from  Home Made Medicine


When  a bone in the body breaks or cracks it’s called fracture. There are two types of fractures: closed or simple, when the skin that covers the bone remains intact or it’s open or compound when the bone breaks the skin.

When a fracture occurs, cause terrible pain and tenderness in the area fractured, along with swelling, the appearance of some blood under the skin and some numbness, tingling or paralysis below the injured area.

When a person fractures an arm or leg, he or she could lose the pulse below the fracture. Fractures are more common in young children and in older adults. As we grow older, our bones get weaker and more fragile, and they take more and more time to heal themselves.

A fracture requires professional attention, what we offer here are recommendations that will aid in healing after the bone has been set.
 
 
NOTE: Bone mass increases continually throughout life until approximately 30-40 years of age. In later years, net bone loss occurs when bone resorption exceeds the amount of bone formed. In fact, bones lose their density continuously each year after the age of 30 in both men and women. To assist in promoting the health of our bones, studies have long shown that a daily intake of Calcium is critical. Get Calcium Here

We recommend

*Eat half pineapple every day until it's completely healed. It contains Bromelain, an enzyme that helps to reduce swelling and inflammation. Do not eat canned or processed pineapples. If you don't  like fresh pineapple, take the supplement Bromelain. It has the same effect as pineapple.
 

*  It is very important to regain Bone Strength as soon as possible to avoid future injuries and to insure a solid bone fusion. we recommend that you take this.

*Do not eat red meat, and avoid drinking colas and all products containing caffeine.

*Avoid eating foods with preservatives, they contain Phosphorous which can lead to bone loss.

*Take Boron, is important for the health and healing of the bone.

*Take Calcium + Magnesium + Potassium.  They are essential to repair bone damage and to maintain a good muscle and heart condition.

*Take Zinc, helps repair tissue damage.

* Calcium Information
Essential Calcium Information for osteoporosis treatment,arthritis pain relief,to prevent bone disease,to improve bone density,back pain relief and promoting healthy strong bones.

Quote
Bone Fractures: Broken Bones Can Take Longer To Heal With Painkillers

from theHealthierLive.co.uk
There are plenty of good reasons to avoid extended or everyday use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

In several e-alerts we've told you how NSAIDs (such as aspirin, ibuprofen, and COX-2 inhibitors) have been shown to contribute to liver and kidney impairment, gastrointestinal problems, and even an increased risk of congestive heart failure.

Now a new study demonstrates that if you fracture a bone, a NSAID is not the best choice for managing pain. Fortunately, there's a natural alternative that's much safer.

Foot bone's connected to the leg bone
In the most recent issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, two US researchers from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine (UNC) review several studies that examine the use of NSAIDs as analgesics for patients recovering from fractures.

One of the studies - as reported in the Journal of Bone Joint Surgery (2000) - compared the recovery of nearly 100 patients who had fractured a femur (the long bone that runs from the hip to the knee). The fractures of 32 subjects healed improperly and were classified as "nonunion," while fractures repaired correctly in a control group of 67 subjects.

The researchers found a significant association between the use of NSAIDs and the nonunion of fractures. More than 60 percent of the nonunion group reported regular NSAID use compared to only 13 percent in the control group. Among the subjects who used NSAIDs, the average healing time was a full two months longer than among those who used no NSAIDs at all.

Based on this and other similar studies, the UNC researchers concluded that during the healing of fractures, NSAIDs should be avoided. They also noted that COX-2 inhibitors not only have an adverse effect on bone healing, but may also impair the healing of ligaments.

Pineapple pain relief
It's one thing for a researcher to crunch some numbers and recommend that NSAIDs not be used to manage fracture pain. But that same researcher might have a different opinion if he were to suddenly find his own femur in two pieces rather than one.

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The problem is, there aren't a lot of pain relief alternatives out there.

Acetaminophen isn't an NSAID, and it can be an effective pain killer, but as I've mentioned in previous e-alerts, acetaminophen products can create health problems that are arguably worse than those of NSAIDs.

A safe alternative to both acetaminophen and NSAIDs is a natural agent called bromelain,[/b][/color][/i] which we've written about in previous issues of HSI. Bromelain is an enzyme found in pineapple, and it's been shown to reduce pain, inflammation, and swelling, AND help thin the blood as well.

Some people are allergic to bromelain, and ulcer patients should avoid using it. For most people, however, bromelain is free of side effects. A dose of 500 mg, taken three times each day, is typical for general pain management. But before starting a bromelain regimen, you should consult an doctor or healthcare professional who's knowledgeable about alternative medicine.

Food tip
In most cases, supplements are absorbed most effectively when taken with meals. But bromelain is the exception to that rule.

In an email to me, US HSI Panellist Dr. Richard Cohan wrote, "I believe that it is important that you draw the distinction between bromelain's activity as a digestive aid when consumed with a meal, and its effectiveness as a pain modulator when consumed before a meal or three hours thereafter (depending on how much fat was consumed and therefore how long digestive juices are present in the stomach). It apparently has no effect on pain when consumed with a meal."

So if you do use bromelain to control pain after a fracture, save it for between mealtimes and you may end up healing faster and more effectively than if you use an NSAID.

Quote
Bone Fractures

from alive.com


Symptoms

A fracture can occur in any bone in the body, including the vertebrae or the ribs, although it is most common in the extremities. Broken bones are called simple fractures when the skin is intact and compound fractures when the skin is broken. Compound fractures cause complications because open *wounds are more susceptible to infection and substantial blood loss.

A fracture is obvious if a cracking sound occurs with injury, or when the affected part is deformed and immobile. If swelling, *bruising and *pain are marked after an injury, or if the injured part is difficult to move, a fracture should be considered. Fractured bones near *joints are often mistaken for a bad *sprain. Fractured ribs are particularly painful on breathing and *coughing, but are no more painful than bruised ribs. If you are uncertain, an X-ray is often the only sure method of confirming a break. Immediate medical attention is recommended before the bone sets improperly. It usually takes between two weeks and six months to heal a fracture, depending on the age and health of the person afflicted and the severity of the injury.

Causes

A bone fracture is a break that results from an injury-often a fall or a traffic accident. Any bone disease will increase a predisposition for fractures, so much so that a mild injury causes multiple breaks. The older the individual, the more common this is, and it is often related to *osteoporosis. Minerals are essential for bone strength, while protein added to the diet will provide tissues with flexibility. If either element is lacking, bones will become too soft or too brittle to withstand injury. A poor diet will not provide the essential nutrients for bone structure. Nutrient absorption is often hindered by digestive problems. Contributing to osteoporosis are hormonal imbalances and inadequate physical activity

Nutrition

A diet rich in silica, particularly from raw oats, is essential for bone maintenance. Eat rolled oats as porridge or soak them overnight to make a Swiss muesli.

Include adequate quantities of calcium and phosphorus, which the body deposits among protein fibers to form new bone. Figs are an excellent healing food for broken bones. They contain phosphorus and calcium, and are also a good source of magnesium, which keeps calcium soluble and builds bones.

Fresh, raw, organic, green vegetables and whole grains should form the mainstay of the diet. They provide calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and silica, as well as enzymes for boosting metabolism. Eat some fresh fruit daily. Mangos, apricots, papayas and cantaloupe are excellent sources of vitamins A and C and potassium, all important for bone development and maintenance.

Fatty fish such as salmon and mackerel are good food for bones.Their oil is the best dietary source of vitamin D, needed for calcium absorption. They also contain magnesium, calcium and phosphorus. Eat nuts and seeds for boron, an important trace mineral for building strong bones.

Avoid red meats and sugar, which cause phosphorus-calcium imbalance. Vegetarians have denser, better-formed bones because their calcium comes from vegetables. Contrary to popular belief, milk alone does not build strong bones. It does not contain the magnesium needed to keep calcium soluble, so that its calcium tends to remain unused in the body, forming unwanted deposits.

Nutritional Supplements

Since the bones are composed of proteins and minerals, these are the most essential nutrients needed to heal a broken bone. Silica, calcium and magnesium are the most vital minerals. Silica is available in water-soluble vegetal silica capsules or in gel form, called silicea. Vitamins C and D promote the absorption of calcium. Vitamin C is also important for healthy bones. Green food supplements rich in chlorophyll are also recommended for their trace mineral supply.

Daily Dosages:

    * Silica, 1,000 mg

    * Calcium, 1,000-1,500 mg in divided doses

    * Magnesium, 500-750 mg in divided doses

    * Vitamin C, with bioflavonoids, 500 mg

    * Vitamin D, 400 IU

    * Chondroitin sulphate, 500 mg

    * Glucosamine sulphate, 500 mg

    * Boron, 10 mg

    * Green food supplements, 1 tbsp.

Herbal Remedies

To reduce swelling, help absorb calcium and rebuild bones, herbal remedies provide effective results.

    * Horsetail baths help reduce chronic swellings around broken bones. The silica in horsetail is a great rebuilder of bones, aiding the body to absorb and use of calcium. Add 5 drops of horsetail oil to bath water.

    * Apply a comfrey tincture to the injured area, followed with herbal packs of sorrel or goldenrod.
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Offline Soñadora

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Re: Broken Ribs
« Reply #2 on: June 15, 2006, 10:19:39 AM »
I haven't read it all yet, but that's awesome. Thank you so much.

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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Broken Ribs
« Reply #3 on: June 15, 2006, 10:50:07 AM »
I haven't read it all yet, but that's awesome. Thank you so much.

P.S. Are you a robot?


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« Last Edit: June 15, 2006, 11:02:48 AM by healthybratt »
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Offline Soñadora

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Re: Broken Ribs
« Reply #4 on: June 15, 2006, 03:45:23 PM »
"The Force is strong with this one."

You should just have a "Just ask HB" site. You're better than Google! ;D
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Broken Ribs
« Reply #5 on: June 15, 2006, 03:56:18 PM »
"The Force is strong with this one."

You should just have a "Just ask HB" site. You're better than Google! ;D

Aye Obi One.  ;)
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Offline ForeverGirl

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Re: Broken Ribs
« Reply #6 on: June 26, 2006, 12:41:11 PM »
Is the problem with Marfan syndrome just the lengthening of ligaments, or does it also make your bones weak?

Have you considered prolotherapy?

Rebekah
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Offline Soñadora

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Re: Broken Ribs
« Reply #7 on: June 26, 2006, 02:58:49 PM »
Rebekah,

Yes, it makes your bones more porous, and so, more fragile, and then, it takes longer for the bones to heal when they do break.  ::)

No, I had never even heard of prolotherapy before you mentioned it. I'll check it out, though. Thanks.
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Broken Ribs
« Reply #8 on: June 26, 2006, 03:39:36 PM »
  My favorite herb book!!

Offline ForeverGirl

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Re: Broken Ribs
« Reply #9 on: June 26, 2006, 04:39:56 PM »
I have several friends that have benefited tremendously from prolotherapy - Gabe's dad, my father-in-law being one of them.

I asked a Doctor that does prolotherapy (via email) what he thinks about Marfan Syndrome's being treated with prolotherapy.  Hopefully he will respond.  :)


Rebekah
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Offline Soñadora

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Re: Broken Ribs
« Reply #10 on: June 26, 2006, 06:01:00 PM »
Prolotherapy via email?? I'm all for that!! Ha Ha. It sounds pretty interesting, but when I mentioned it to my husband he gave me the old squinty eye, which means he's not so sure about me after all...  :P

I did read him a little about it, and we thought maybe it will be good for a little while, but then he would be back to the same old thing again?? I don't know. I am curious to hear what your doc person thinks.
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Offline ForeverGirl

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Re: Broken Ribs
« Reply #11 on: June 27, 2006, 06:51:18 AM »
Here is the Doc's response:

Rebekah,

We've never treated Marfan's per se with prolo, but have had some
success with treating other congenital hyper-mobility syndromes.  The
issue is that all of these syndromes involve the production of collagen
that isn't normal, so its baseline properties are also not 100%.  Having
said that, as an example I can think of a recent patient with Ehler
Danlos who had recurrent knee cap dislocation who did well with prolo.
This seemed to work by tightening the attachments of the fascia to the
knee cap. 

I learned prolo at the University of Wisconsin course as well as from
local docs who performed the procedure and have performed about 1,000
procedures over the last 10 years.  I've attached a research study we
have published in Pain Physician a few years ago.

Christopher J. Centeno, M.D.



He sent me a pdf of the study he mentions, and I can't figure out how to attach it... if you're interested I'll figure it out...

Rebekah
« Last Edit: June 27, 2006, 08:45:13 AM by BeeyoutifulGirl »
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Offline Soñadora

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Re: Broken Ribs
« Reply #12 on: June 27, 2006, 07:08:54 AM »
It's weird that he should bring up Ehlers-Danlos, because a couple of days ago my husband came across it on the internet, and he thought he sounded more like an Ehlers than a Marf (affectionately spoken). :) If it's possible, we're interested in the pdf, but it's no problem if you can't. Thanks.
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Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: Broken Ribs
« Reply #13 on: October 23, 2007, 05:40:04 AM »
HELP!!! My husband and son were Karate fighting and my son kneed hubby in the back ribs.  He was a little sore for a couple days, but all of a sudden at work, today he could not move.  He says he is in severe pain. 
I already have inflammation ideas and arnica, etc. but what should I do about the rib?  Does it need to be wrapped up?  How do I know if it is a broken rib compared to a pinched nerve?  UGH!!  I am a little stressed right now! :-\
« Last Edit: October 23, 2007, 05:42:54 AM by healthyinOhio »

Offline AllinHisTime

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Re: Broken Ribs
« Reply #14 on: October 23, 2007, 05:53:23 AM »
HELP!!! My husband and son were Karate fighting and my son kneed hubby in the back ribs.  He was a little sore for a couple days, but all of a sudden at work, today he could not move.  He says he is in severe pain. 
I already have inflammation ideas and arnica, etc. but what should I do about the rib?  Does it need to be wrapped up?  How do I know if it is a broken rib compared to a pinched nerve?  UGH!!  I am a little stressed right now! :-\

HIO, I found this online.  It's for children but I think it can apply to adults as well:

Rib Injury
What is a rib injury?
The 12 ribs on each side of your child's chest may be bruised, strained, broken, or separated. All of the ribs are attached to the vertebrae (backbone) in the rear. In the front, 10 of them are attached to the sternum (breastbone) by pieces of cartilage. Direct blows to the ribs may bruise or break the ribs or injure the rib cartilage. The ribs may tear away from the cartilage that attaches them to the breastbone. This tearing away from the cartilage is called a costochondral separation.

How does it occur?
Rib injuries usually result from a direct blow to the chest wall. Breaks usually occur in the curved portion of the outer part of the rib cage. A costochondral separation may occur from an injury, when your child lands hard on the feet, or even when coughing or sneezing violently.

What are the symptoms?
A rib injury causes pain and tenderness over the place of injury. Your child may have pain when you breathe, move, laugh, or cough.

How is it diagnosed?
Your child's health care provider will review the symptoms, examine the rib cage, and listen to the lungs. He or she may order a chest x-ray to look for rib damage, lung damage, or bleeding around the lungs.

How is it treated?
To help your child's injury heal, your child's provider may recommend that your child:

Rest.
Put an ice pack over the injured rib for 20 to 30 minutes every 3 to 4 hours for 2 to 3 days or until the pain goes away.
Take an anti-inflammatory or other pain medicine.
Wear a rib belt. This is sometimes used for very painful injuries. The belt works as a girdle for your child's chest and helps support the ribs. It limits movement when coughing, breathing, or moving the body in other ways. This helps decrease pain. If your child wears a rib belt, your child's provider will give them breathing exercises to help them avoid lung problems.

How long will the effects last?
Bruised ribs and a costochondral separation usually take 3 to 4 weeks to heal. Broken ribs take 6 to 8 weeks to heal.

http://www.deancare.com/crs/pa/pa_ribinju_hhg.asp
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Broken Ribs
« Reply #15 on: October 24, 2007, 06:14:35 AM »
My husband hurt one of his ribs and the doc told him, he pulled the muscle and nothing more.  He finally decided to go to the chiro and found out the rib was actually out of place.  Once it was put back, he was given much relief and it finally began to heal.
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Offline his.silly.wife

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Re: Broken Ribs
« Reply #16 on: October 24, 2007, 06:39:23 AM »
My husband hurt one of his ribs and the doc told him, he pulled the muscle and nothing more.  He finally decided to go to the chiro and found out the rib was actually out of place.  Once it was put back, he was given much relief and it finally began to heal.

I discovered a side effect of T-tapp...My rib stays where it belongs!  I've been battling a rib that slips in and out of place for about 9 years, so I am very thankful for T-tapp.

Something to consider if the rib moves again.
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Offline Clementine

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Re: Broken Ribs
« Reply #17 on: October 24, 2007, 12:03:41 PM »
I would be very cautious about using any type of rib belt or strap. They are not often used anymore because there is such a high risk of pneumonia with them.  There is some risk even without using them because broken ribs are painful and you tend to take shallow breaths.  This also limits healing.  It's helpful to hold a pillow up against the injured side to splint yourself when moving, coughing or deep breathing, but an actual belt or strap is usually discouraged.  With ribs, I think it's a good idea to get an xray, because there is potential for a punctured lung if the rib is out of place.  Medically, there is not usually much treatment, other than medication for pain/inflammation.
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Offline AllinHisTime

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Re: Broken Ribs
« Reply #18 on: October 24, 2007, 12:10:41 PM »
I would be very cautious about using any type of rib belt or strap. They are not often used anymore because there is such a high risk of pneumonia with them.  There is some risk even without using them because broken ribs are painful and you tend to take shallow breaths.  This also limits healing.  It's helpful to hold a pillow up against the injured side to splint yourself when moving, coughing or deep breathing, but an actual belt or strap is usually discouraged.  With ribs, I think it's a good idea to get an xray, because there is potential for a punctured lung if the rib is out of place.  Medically, there is not usually much treatment, other than medication for pain/inflammation.

Thanks for the tip!  It's nice to know for the future incase anything like that happens here.
A truth's initial commotion is directly proportional to how deeply the lie was believed...When a well packaged web of lies has been sold gradually to the masses over generations, the truth will seem utterly preposterous and its speaker a raving lunatic.-- Dresden James

Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: Broken Ribs
« Reply #19 on: October 26, 2007, 07:21:35 AM »
Thanks, HB for sharing your husband's "adjustment" story.  It helped convinced him to see a chiropractor.  It was exactly what was wrong.  A rib was out of place. 
But I did treat it first as a broken rib, and the half a pineapple a day helped with the pain and inflammation of it!

Offline AndysJess

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Re: Broken Ribs
« Reply #20 on: October 26, 2007, 07:37:25 AM »
Ok here is our situation.  A couple of weeks ago, my husband was working out at the gym.  He was doing leg presses, lifting a considerable amount of weight, but no more than usual.  During one of the presses, he felt something pop on his left side so hard that he actually felt it hit his left arm.
Since then, he cannot put any pressure on that side.  He doesn't have any trouble breathing, which kind of makes me doubt it being a broken rib.  However, he has not been able to work out since then (which is horrible for him..it is such a stress reliever).  He told me yesterday that it even hurts to bend over to tie his shoes.  I feel so bad for him..do any of you think it is a rib out of place?  Or maybe just a pulled muscle?
Oh yeah, there has not been any swelling or discoloration that I can see.
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Offline Mrs.Visser

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Re: Broken Ribs
« Reply #21 on: March 05, 2008, 09:41:37 PM »
Sounds like a pulled muscle to me. Does it hurt to touch it...put even the tinyest amt. of pressure on it? I don't really know how he would have popped it out of place if he's used to doing this type of weight lifting with that amt. of weight. You can still pull a muscle though...could have been sitting crooked or something. HTH

Offline herbalmom

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Re: Broken Ribs
« Reply #22 on: March 05, 2008, 09:54:21 PM »
An old neighbor of mine once told me how his Dr checked to know for sure if he had broken a rib when the x-rays were inconclusive. Lay flat on your back, legs straight & raise BOTH legs together at the same time. It has to be both legs together, lifting one leg at a time won't do any good. If you lift both legs together & you have a broken rib, you will know it b/c it will cause major pain in the rib area. HTH Blessings ~herbalmom
« Last Edit: April 08, 2008, 09:11:34 PM by herbalmom »

Offline mamaoffour

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Re: Broken Ribs
« Reply #23 on: December 05, 2008, 02:58:58 AM »
Okay, this has been literally nagging at my side for almost two years.  ::) ::) I remember my husband and I wresting a long time ago, ::) well now I have had major pain on my left rib cage.  I believe it's my floater rib that is broken.  My question is this, should a rib that broke over two years ago be healed already? I can't lean over on the left side because it feels like my rib cage is caving in.  I can't do crunches or any ab exercises either because it moves.  I can put my fingers under my left side and actually move the rib to where it should be.  What would the doctors do for me, or could they do anything for me?  I can't exercise or do anything that's twisting because it aggravates it.  I also notice that my back hurts on the left side as well.  If I breathe really deeply and suck my stomach in it looks like my left side of my rib cage is really really crooked and pops out.  It looks really really ugly.  Anyway, is the something I should get looked at?  I have waited almost two years and it is still giving me problems.  Thanks in advance.

Misty
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Offline mamaoffour

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Re: Broken Ribs
« Reply #24 on: December 05, 2008, 11:11:38 AM »
Bump! ;D
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Offline ladyhen

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Re: Broken Ribs
« Reply #25 on: December 05, 2008, 11:22:30 AM »
If I were you, I would see a chiropractor.  Sounds like something that a chiro should be able to fix easily without surgery or pain.  Might take a couple of visits.  I have had ribs out of place in the past that felt like what you described.
hth
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Offline mamaoffour

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Re: Broken Ribs
« Reply #26 on: December 05, 2008, 05:26:39 PM »
Thanks.  That's kinda of what it seems like.  My whole spine and and rib area just aches.  It really uncomfortable.  Also, my pants fit me crooked??  They always ride over more on the left side.  I guess I just need an allignment??  That would be nice if it was that easy.  Thx for the advice.

Misty
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Offline khix

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Re: Broken Ribs
« Reply #27 on: June 02, 2009, 03:17:32 AM »
Hi.  I've been posting under the bruised rib thread, but I'm starting to think that my rib is actually either broken or dislocated.  I've been fighting a chest cold the past couple weeks, and have been coughing A LOT.  I believe that the excessive coughing caused this.  An area on my left side is painful & hurts when I cough, sneeze, laugh, & make certain movements.  This started Saturday.  Yesterday, I started feeling like something was loose or moving around in there whenever I would make certain movements.  Sometimes I would also feel like something was "poking" me from the inside.

My questions are:

- Has anyone else ever broken or dislocated a rib due to coughing? If so, please share your experience.
- Has anyone else who ever broke a rib recovered on their own, just fine, without ever seeing a doc about it?  I ask this, because I can't afford to see a doc or a chiro.  There is a low cost clinic in town, but even for that, money is tight, and besides, they don't do xrays & major things like that...that stuff would have to be referred out.
- Is there anything I can do for the pain & discomfort while the rib is trying to heal (it WILL heal on its own, right?).  Anything I can do to make coughing more tolerable?  Anything to make it heal faster?
- Will continued coughing make the rib problem worse, or does it not matter anymore?
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Offline IowaDove

  • Adept
  • Posts: 241
Re: Broken Ribs
« Reply #28 on: April 11, 2013, 02:51:32 AM »
Three weeks ago my husband was up on top of some farm equipment and slipped and fell directly on his rib cage. He has been in excrutiating pain ever since. He can't lie down without practically screaming-night time is horrible whenever he tries to turn over in his sleep  :'(
He went to a chiro (at least he called himself a chiropractor...he did absolutely nothing and seemed to know even less..) who took an X-ray and said it wasn't broken but he *thinks* my husband tore the muscle in between his ribs and there's nothing he can do about it except very expensive treatments. He wouldn't even adjust him, but kinda poked him and pushed here and there and said he was good, then he tried to charge us $70 more than he quoted us  ???
So....should we try another chiropractor? Should we wrap them? Should I do some sort of Comfrey poultice or tea? Shouldn't the pain start to decrease after awhile, because it hasn't at all and none of us can touch him. He can't really twist, bend, or lift at certain angles. I have never heard my husband yell out in pain, and now it's almost constant.

Offline mykidsmom

  • Guru
  • Posts: 2087
Re: Broken Ribs
« Reply #29 on: April 11, 2013, 05:32:54 AM »
First, I wouldn't go near a chiro if you think his ribs are broken!  What you can do is bind his rib cage well so everything is held together.  Think the type of old fashioned belly binding women did after having babies and do that to his mid-section.  I would give him symphytum 30C homeopathically 2x's a day for 5 days.  IF he starts to feel better before that then stop the symphytum.  Symphytum is homeopathic comfrey.  It is a bit easier to take one pellet (only take one not the 5 the vial says to!) then to wrap in a messy comfrey poultice.  :P  You can also give him a 200C arnica.  Just one pellet.  If it's muscles the arnica will help heal that and make him feel better. 
« Last Edit: April 11, 2013, 05:36:18 AM by mykidsmom »
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