Author Topic: Flax Seed: Benefits, Recipes, Tips & Tricks  (Read 11096 times)

Offline mexmarr

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Flax Seed: Benefits, Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« on: May 27, 2006, 06:22:01 PM »
I bought some flax seed to make the gel mentioned on the homeade gel forum.

I know that flax is very good for you, so I want to use the rest of it, but I am not sure what to do with it, how to grind it, or if you even have to grind it.  Any tips or suggestions?  Thanks!

Offline nursegirl

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Re: Flax Seed: Benefits, Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2006, 07:29:15 PM »
I've heard some people say that they sprinkle them (whole) on salads or yogurt.  They are supposed to be very good for you. 

Sarah

Offline mishy

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Re: Flax Seed: Benefits, Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #2 on: May 27, 2006, 07:36:31 PM »
I use mine in our oatmeal in the morning.  I grind them in the coffee grinder.
:)

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Flax Seed: Benefits, Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2006, 09:28:12 PM »
I bought some flax seed to make the gel mentioned on the homeade gel forum.

I know that flax is very good for you, so I want to use the rest of it, but I am not sure what to do with it, how to grind it, or if you even have to grind it.  Any tips or suggestions?  Thanks!

Grind it in your blender or coffee grinder.  It tastes a bit like sunflower seeds and a bit oily.  Good in breakfast cereal cold or hot.  Good on salad as sprinklin's.  I had some the other day sprinkled on some toast with peanut butter - yummy!  Good in your granola.  Good in your smoothies.  Good on sandwiches like a seasoning.  It's very high in fiber and full of healthy fats.  I love what it does for my digestion.
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Offline natural

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Re: Flax Seed: Benefits, Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2006, 03:04:54 AM »
I used to use ground flax in my pancakes, cookies, waffles and various other bajed goods...guess what I found out...the only benefit which remained after cooking it was the fiber.

The best way to eat flax and get the full benefits of the healthy oils would be to buy it whole, as many of you do, then gind it in a coffee grinder and put it on cold stuff like most of the ideas above have suggested...I even put it in smoothies..you must use it all right away or quickly seal it and transfer to the freezer.

--Sandra
« Last Edit: March 08, 2007, 02:32:51 PM by natural »
4 yo Maciah: Mamma I am scared the wind is howling.
Me: Go to sleep Jesus will protect you.
4 yo Maciah: (stretching his chin to chest) But, but I can't see Jesus my head can't reach into my heart.

Offline sarajane

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Re: Flax Seed: Benefits, Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2006, 04:05:38 AM »
From what I have researched whole flax seeds pass right through you and you don't get anything out of them, they have to be ground. Salads and smoothies. That is how I eat ground seeds or flax oil.
Mommy to Neveah, 2 year old who lives with Jesus, Larissa 4, Gavin 2. Help meet to Jason for 9 years.

Offline mexmarr

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Re: Flax Seed: Benefits, Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #6 on: May 28, 2006, 05:33:36 AM »
So, the flax seed needs to be freshly ground.  What can I do if I want to use a little here and a little there?  I don;t have a coffee grinder, and it seems like I would waste so much if I tried to grind it by the tablespoon in my big blender.  I have something, not sure the proper name, but it is like a blender on a stick.  I can stick it right into a cup or bowl, and blend things.  Would that wourk for flax seeds, or would they fly all over the place?  Thanks for all your help.  I will definately start adding flax to my yogurt smoothies.

Oh, I read somewhere that you should that a quart container, add one cup of flax and fill it up with water. The liquid would turn into a gel and you should use the gel in food.  Have you ever heard of that? 

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Flax Seed: Benefits, Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #7 on: May 28, 2006, 06:33:54 AM »
So, the flax seed needs to be freshly ground.  What can I do if I want to use a little here and a little there?  I don;t have a coffee grinder, and it seems like I would waste so much if I tried to grind it by the tablespoon in my big blender.  I have something, not sure the proper name, but it is like a blender on a stick.  I can stick it right into a cup or bowl, and blend things.  Would that wourk for flax seeds, or would they fly all over the place?  Thanks for all your help.  I will definately start adding flax to my yogurt smoothies.

Oh, I read somewhere that you should that a quart container, add one cup of flax and fill it up with water. The liquid would turn into a gel and you should use the gel in food.  Have you ever heard of that? 

Maybe that's the hair gel, she's talking about.

Your shake maker won't work, but a mini food chopper probably would.  This or a small coffee grinder you can probably get at Walmart for $10.  I however, buy mine already chopped at Walmart.  They just started carrying organic flax seed already ground and vaccuumed packed.  I keep it in the fridge but it does recommend the freezer for maximum freshness.  I think personally if you keep them sealed that their nutritious benefits should remain intact.  The main benefit is fiber and fats.
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Offline LilyEilis

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Re: Flax Seed: Benefits, Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #8 on: May 30, 2006, 04:31:31 AM »
Oh, I read somewhere that you should that a quart container, add one cup of flax and fill it up with water. The liquid would turn into a gel and you should use the gel in food.  Have you ever heard of that? 

While I've never heard it made in that large of a quantity...you can use flaxseed ground with water as an egg substitute in baking...roughly it's one 1 T. flax seed ground with 1/4 c. water for each egg (make sure to grind the flaxseed WITH the water).  I've used this in baking muffins and cakes and it works quite well...I still prefer eggs (free-range), but the flax seed mixture works fine as long as you just use it in baking...obviously it wouldn't work for a quiche or something similar! 
"...Jesus Christ, whom having not seen you love. Though now you do not see Him, yet believing, you rejoice with joy inexpressible and full of glory, receiving the end of your faith—the salvation of your souls." ~1 Peter 1:7f-9

YoopreMama

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Re: Flax Seed: Benefits, Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #9 on: March 08, 2007, 12:35:07 PM »
I just discovered a ground nut/seed blend that's great in many places...smoothies, peanut butter sandwiches, sprinkled on fruit salads, veggie salad, hot cereal, pasta, etc.

From The Liver Cleansing Diet (Sandra Cabot):

3 cups Flax Seed
2 cups Sunflower Seeds
1 cup Almonds

Grind and store in dark container in refrigerator.  I halved it and it filled my peanut butter jar.  Good source of protein, essential fatty acids, minerals, fiber, and is definitely and anti-ageing mixture. 
« Last Edit: March 10, 2007, 10:50:37 AM by YooperMama »

Offline natural

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Re: Flax Seed: Benefits, Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #10 on: March 08, 2007, 02:39:26 PM »
I just discovered a neck wrap that was made with flax seeds.

There was a casing about four inches wide and the length that would wrap around the back of your neck (maybe 20-24 inches inseam) which held the flax seeds and then a fleece cover with velcro so you could wash it. You are to put it in the microwave then put it around your neck to soothe it. You could also put it in the freezer for a cool refreshing feel on a sore neck or hot neck  :)

I have seen this done with cherry pits and wild rice hulls too.

4 yo Maciah: Mamma I am scared the wind is howling.
Me: Go to sleep Jesus will protect you.
4 yo Maciah: (stretching his chin to chest) But, but I can't see Jesus my head can't reach into my heart.

Offline mommyjen

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Re: Flax Seed: Benefits, Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #11 on: March 08, 2007, 02:44:56 PM »
You can sub it for wheat germ in recipes.  Maybe bran too?
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Offline herbalmom

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Re: Flax Seed: Benefits, Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #12 on: March 08, 2007, 02:56:07 PM »
You can sub it for wheat germ in recipes. 

That's a great idea. I don't buy wheat germ anymore because it goes rancid so easily. In some recipes that call for it you can just skip it but for some you have to sub something. For some recipes I use ground nuts but I never thought of flax. For recipes that nuts don't work in I skip them altogether but if I use flax maybe I can make them again.  Thanks. Blessings ~herbalmom

Offline westernmama

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Re: Flax Seed: Benefits, Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #13 on: March 08, 2007, 03:07:37 PM »
My sister uses ground flax seeds in her bread and cookies.  It gives them such a soft texture.  The cookies were great!  She says it's the oil in the flax seeds that give it the extra softness. 

Offline mommyjen

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Re: Flax Seed: Benefits, Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #14 on: January 01, 2010, 03:20:43 PM »
T, here's some how to for the flax egg replacer. I think it's best when used in baking. I've ran out of eggs a few times and used this and it worked really well.

Flax Seeds

How to use it:
1 Tablespoon flax seeds plus 3 Tablespoons water replaces one egg. Finely grind 1 tablespoon whole flaxseeds in a blender or coffee grinder, or use 2 1/2 tablespoons pre-ground flaxseeds. Transfer to a bowl and beat in 3 tablespoons of water using a whisk or fork. It will become very gooey and gelatinous, much like an egg white. In some recipes, you can leave the ground flax in the blender and add the other wet ingredients to it, thus saving you the extra step of the bowl.

When it works best:

Flax seeds have a distinct earthy granola taste. It tastes best and works very well in things like pancakes, and whole grain items, such as bran muffins and corn muffins. It is perfect for oatmeal cookies, and the texture works for cookies in general, although the taste may be too pronounced for some. Chocolate cake-y recipes have mixed results, I would recommend only using one portion flax-egg in those, because the taste can be overpowering.

Tips:
Always store ground flaxseeds in the freezer because they are highly perishable. This mixture is not only an excellent replacement for eggs, it also contributes vital omega-3 fatty acids.

Where to get it:
Health food stores

http://theppk.com/veganbaking.html

« Last Edit: January 06, 2010, 08:33:44 AM by boysmama »
Billy's wife and mom to John, Charles, Gilbert, and Lewis.