Author Topic: Kombucha: Alcohol, pH, Caffeine, Sugar & Culture Content  (Read 124567 times)

Offline savedbygrace

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Re: Kombucha: Alcohol, pH, Caffeine, Sugar & Culture Content
« Reply #120 on: May 10, 2007, 11:11:24 AM »


Ok, I am guessing you meant SC juice?

Why would I want to squeeze poor dear SC?  :D

 ::) LOL

Offline Beth

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Re: Kombucha: Alcohol, pH, Caffeine, Sugar & Culture Content
« Reply #121 on: May 10, 2007, 12:01:42 PM »
Okay, I'm going to try brewing the next batch with sucanat. Will that work or do I need  EC juice? (not SC juice)        Also I'm gonna try the  21 day brew to get more sugar out. I believe, I understood that should  take more of the sugar out. 
« Last Edit: May 11, 2007, 06:11:09 AM by Beth »
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Offline savedbygrace

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Re: Kombucha: Alcohol, pH, Caffeine, Sugar & Culture Content
« Reply #122 on: May 10, 2007, 12:03:49 PM »
Okay, I'm going to try brewing the next batch with sucanat. Will that work or do I need  EC juice? (not SC juice)        Also I'm gonna try the  21 day brew to get more sugar out. I believe, I Understood that should do take more of the sugar out. 

ok, ok, its not SC juice! Got it ::) But it should be!! :D

Offline savedbygrace

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Re: Kombucha: Alcohol, pH, Caffeine, Sugar & Culture Content
« Reply #123 on: May 10, 2007, 12:05:33 PM »
or maybe ESC... I mean how are you to know that it is SUGAR cane. EC could be bamboo for all I know! ;D
« Last Edit: May 10, 2007, 12:08:17 PM by savedbygrace »

Offline SarahK

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Re: Kombucha: Alcohol, pH, Caffeine, Sugar & Culture Content
« Reply #124 on: May 16, 2007, 11:21:23 AM »
If anyone is interested (as if this is interesting..), I decided to order the kombucha book by G. Frank used from someone in the states.  Amazon put it on backorder again.  They say they have the book... but don't believe that.   My used one will be here in 4-8 days.

I hope to be enlightened.  Or at least given a 2nd opinion.

Sarah K
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Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: Kombucha: Alcohol, pH, Caffeine, Sugar & Culture Content
« Reply #125 on: May 17, 2007, 03:43:16 PM »
Herbfever,

Okay, so what does it mean?  This is good or bad? Relate it to us physics-challenged people.  ;D

Offline SarahK

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Re: Kombucha: Alcohol, pH, Caffeine, Sugar & Culture Content
« Reply #126 on: May 17, 2007, 03:55:34 PM »
Now I have book envy again.
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Offline Beth

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Re: Kombucha: Alcohol, pH, Caffeine, Sugar & Culture Content
« Reply #127 on: May 18, 2007, 04:30:50 AM »
Herbfever,

Okay, so what does it mean?  This is good or bad? Relate it to us physics-challenged people.  ;D

I am one of those physics challenged people! ;D

I just posted the info to show that there was caffiene and sugar left in the tea after it brewed 7 days. Mr. Hobbs says in the book that there is generally 3-4% sugar left in the tea. If using black tea bags there is also caffeine left. I know some were wondering.

He discusses acids, yeast, sugar, caffeine, and all aspects of Kombucha in the book.
Does he say if they tested any that had been brewed longer?  Such as the 21 days instead of 7. I read that was supposed to help? Also how does this compare to how it starts out? Does the caffeine and sugar drop from what it started out with?
"discontenment is not a product of circumstances; it is the state of the soul." ~ Debi Pearl ~    ...and be content with such things as ye have Hebrews 13:5

Offline happy2Bhome

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Re: Kombucha: Alcohol, pH, Caffeine, Sugar & Culture Content
« Reply #128 on: July 04, 2007, 11:23:13 AM »
Did this thread continue anywhere else?  Just wondering what you all decided regarding sugar and caffeine content.

I started making and drinking Kombucha a few months ago.  I began having headaches but didn't relate it to the tea until I remembered this thread.  Yesterday, I splurged and had a cup of coffee from a coffee shop.  I got the same kind of headache I get from the Kombucha.  How can I tell if it's the sugar or caffeine?  I rarely ever have either one in my daily diet, and I hardly ever have headaches.  Maybe it's all a coincidence.  Does anyone else get headaches from kombucha?

thank you!

Offline SarahK

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Re: Kombucha: Alcohol, pH, Caffeine, Sugar & Culture Content
« Reply #129 on: July 05, 2007, 05:49:47 AM »
I am researching this topic now again (finally getting to that part of the book stack) and will be posting info as I find in in my digging.

At this point I only have personal experience.  I believe that the caffeine in the tea used is not decreased because I have caffeine headaches after caffeinated tea, coffe, pop & kombucha with green, black or decaf green/black tea - all the same symptoms.  I make my kombucha with 100% herbal tea and have none of those symptoms.

Sarah K
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Offline happy2Bhome

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Re: Kombucha: Alcohol, pH, Caffeine, Sugar & Culture Content
« Reply #130 on: July 05, 2007, 06:29:28 AM »
Sarah,

Can you give me specifics of exactly how you make yours with the herbal tea, please?  (Including what flavor, brand, type of tea you use & what kind of sugar).  I don't want to give up kombucha, but I cannot tolerate the headaches. :'(

Thank you!!!

Offline NotLuckyButBlessed

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Re: Kombucha: Alcohol, pH, Caffeine, Sugar & Culture Content
« Reply #131 on: July 05, 2007, 06:36:28 AM »
I am sure the headaches could be from caffeine...but is it possible some of them could be from detox? H2O might help since it helps with detox symptoms, plus I read that kombucha is a diuretic so would help then too. FFT
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YoopreMama

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Re: Kombucha: Alcohol, pH, Caffeine, Sugar & Culture Content
« Reply #132 on: July 10, 2007, 10:29:03 AM »
Calling SarahK!   ;D
Here's a tip from the Kombucha Yahoo group that I belong to. This may help with those of you who have problems with caffeine. "A home decaffeinate water-process: Immerse the tea in one cup of boiling water. Wait 30 seconds and remove the tea. Discard that water. Now use the tea in your regular water. 80% of caffeine is naturally extracted in hot water within the first 30 seconds. It is debated the role or benefit that caffeine plays in our lives as well as that in the life of the kombucha. Most kombucha brewers believe that some caffeine is necessary for kombucha brewing. True, depending upon the balance of the ferment as well as the time fermenting some - of the caffeine is reduced."

There is a LOT of great information on this yahoo group. I highly recommend joining it if you're interested in Kombucha or have questions about any part of the process. There's an especially good article on there right now about the benefits of the various types of teas.

http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/original_kombucha/

The guy who wrote the above comment also says this on his site:

"Higher anti-oxidants may be expected with white tea, while cholesterol lowering affects achieved with pu-erh tea. For caffeine sensitivity, herbal teas like Rooibos produce a tasteful energetic - yet caffeine free kombucha tea. A more cooling soothing relaxing KT is created by Dragon Pearls."  www.happyherbalist.com
Thanks for that post and links!  I'm wondering about caffeine content w/ my children.  We drink a good glass of 'bucha around 10:30 AM after our PO trek.  They don't nap in the summer and they have unusual amounts of energy.   :o

I had forgotten how to naturally decaffeinate tea...thanks for reminding me.

Now if SarahK would elaborate on her herbal 'bucha... ;)

Oh!
I am sure the headaches could be from caffeine...but is it possible some of them could be from detox? H2O might help since it helps with detox symptoms, plus I read that kombucha is a diuretic so would help then too. FFT
I don't get headaches, and I'm pretty sure the children don't either, even when we skip it for a few days. We use black/white teas...and drink a little most days...Yes, 'bucha is a diuretic, so more water would help (pineapple, too).
« Last Edit: July 10, 2007, 10:32:06 AM by YooperMama »

Offline SarahK

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Re: Kombucha: Alcohol, pH, Caffeine, Sugar & Culture Content
« Reply #133 on: July 10, 2007, 04:45:55 PM »
On caffeine in Kombucha tea:

The following is taken from Kombucha: Healthy beverage and natural remedy from the Far East (9th ed. 1995) by Gunther W. Frank in the section titled "What are the disadvantages of herbal tea compared with black tea?"

QUOTING:
 "Bing (1928) conciders the purine content of black tea to be the characteristic element of the nutrient medium." ... "In the plant and animal kingdom purine is found in great amounts as physiologically important combinations, such as uric acid,  building blocks of the nucleinic acids (guanine, adenine) and xanthine alkaloids (caffeine, theophylline and theobromine).  Bing describes the Kombucha culture as a community of living things which are particularly adapted to a nutrient milieu rich inpurine, and which need this rich supply of purine to maintaim their own metabolism.  Bing thus explains the breakdown of purine in the human metabolism - and so of uric acids as well - through drinking Kombucha."

My translation:  Bing says purine to be very important in the food for the SCOBY.  Purine is found naturally in lots of forms & caffeine is one of them.  So, he thinks ya' just gotta have purine in there for it to be ready for gen-U-ine Kombucha.  (no offense to the author or Bing intended - just fits in my brain better this way.)


QUOTE CONTINUES:

"In 1929 Bing writes that the Kombucha maker often "commits the sin" of using elderflower tea, camomile tea and other herbal decoctions instead of good Russion or Chinese tea for the nutrient solution, which alone contains the necessary purine.  He consders that it "goes without saying that under such circumstances the desired process of fermentation cannot take place and the effects fail to materialise"."

My translation:  Bing says if you use something other than regular tea with the purines in it - you won't get the same results as others who do use regular tea.

After this point in the book, caffeine is not addressed anymore as far as I can tell.  There is a brief mention of it in the discussion of sugar, but it seems to be as a side note as an example of other elements of different food products containing sugar.  It doesn't address our question of 'how much is left in there?'

I'm not convinced that the purine/caffeine, as an important nutrient for the SCOBY, is actually decreased or converted in large amounts.  I have no other evidence than my caffeine headaches when drinking caffeinated tea/kombucha on odd occasions and my caffeine 'hooked' headaches I get if I drink caffeinated tea/kombucha for 3-4 days running and then skip it one day (go without caffeine after having it regularly). 

Next post: Herbal Teas discussed in the same book...
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Offline SarahK

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Re: Kombucha: Alcohol, pH, Caffeine, Sugar & Culture Content
« Reply #134 on: July 10, 2007, 05:28:06 PM »
On herbal tea for Kombucha:

The following is taken from Kombucha: Healthy beverage and natural remedy from the Far East (9th ed. 1995) by Gunther W. Frank in the section titled "Herbal teas."

QUOTING:

"As a basic principle, black tea is recommended." This is explained briefly in my previous post. "In spite of the advantages of black teas as nutrient solution, there are plenty of people who use herbal teas to make Kombucha with, either because black tea doesn't agree with them, or because in addition to the effect of the kombucha culture they want to bring in the therapeutic value of the herbs as well, or for whatever reason." 

The author goes on to quote Mollenda in a study in 1928 who writes "From experiments which have been made, it has been established that Kombucha thrives best with sugar in an infusion of sweetened Russina tea. (...) The culture can also be raised on any other decoction containing nitrogen, such as lime flower tea or strawberry leaf tea."

There are several leaf options listed by the author including "ready-made commercially available herbal teas". 

QUOTE CONTINUED:

"However, no variety of tea should be used which contains too many volatile oils (e.g. sage, pepppermint, camomlie, St.John's Wort), because tea mixtures can in the long run alter the active substances in the Kombucha cluture.  As a guideline I have drawn up a list which can be found at the end of this chapter."  (I intend to get this list into the "Teas that don't work" post ... eventually.)

The author then goes on to "thoroughly recommend this mixture, if you don't want to use black tea:

30g yarrow
20g dandelion
10g nettle
10g club moss"

And there are 3 other mixtures listed in this chapter as well.

QUOTE CONTINUED:

"At any rate, it is always best to add to your own mixture at least a portion of black tea or green tea, as this makes the best nutrient solution for the Kombucha culture."

This section seems to validate herbal tea for Kombucha as an 'acceptable alternative' - though the use of black/green tea is recommended as a final note.
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Offline SarahK

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Re: Kombucha: Alcohol, pH, Caffeine, Sugar & Culture Content
« Reply #135 on: July 10, 2007, 05:41:23 PM »
Sarah,

Can you give me specifics of exactly how you make yours with the herbal tea, please?  (Including what flavor, brand, type of tea you use & what kind of sugar).  I don't want to give up kombucha, but I cannot tolerate the headaches. :'(

Thank you!!!

Sorry it took me so long....

OK, here's what I do.

5 bags commercial herbal tea   I put these in my drip coffee pot where the grounds would go & run a 12 cup pot of water through the bags.

1.25 c white sugar  Sometimes a bit less I am sure cuz I don't measure accurately.  I have done 1.5 cups and like that too.  I also made some with Sugar in the Raw (a turbinado sugar) - same amounts

Well water to make a nearly full gallon jar  Allow space for scoby and 3/4 c (give or take) of kombucha from previous batch

Days under a coffee filter rubberbanded on top.  I used to do 7.  Then 10.  Then 14.  Then our son was in the hospital and it was in for 24+ days.  We drink it all.

In my tea rotation I have:
Celestial Seasonings: True Blueberry,  Tropic of Strawberry, Country Peach Passion, Raspberry Zinger, Very Berry Cherry, & Wild Berry Zinger
Lipton Herbal: Mango & I have tried their Ginger Twist, but I'm all out now
Snapple: Wild 'Bout Berries

These are all 100% herbal & naturally caffeine free.
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Offline ArmyWife

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Re: Kombucha: Alcohol, pH, Caffeine, Sugar & Culture Content
« Reply #136 on: February 18, 2008, 04:18:16 AM »
Quote
Laboratory Analysis of Kombucha Tea

We collected a sample of Kombucha Tea, in a sterile container, from a household that had no previous knowledge of our request, and sent it directly to a certified food lab (Irvine Analytical Laboratories, Inc) for analysis. The tea was made with 5 bags of black tea to 3 quarts of water and one cup of table sugar and had been fermenting for exactly one week. we received the following results.

Simple Acids

Gluconic 1.9%
Acetic .5%
Lactic .7%
Caffeine 3.42mg/100ml

Ok, I've read through about 20 pgs. of kom. info, and am still trying to figure out if this is something that I want to give to my kids b/c of the possible caffeine and also sugar content.  On the side of my Good Earth tea box there is a caffeine meter, which compares coffee, black tea, green, decaf and red tea.  The decaf tea contains 4 mg of caffeine, while the red tea (and I'm assuming all herbal teas) contain 0 mg.  From the above quote, it looks like the amount of caffeine left in the k-tea is about the amount you'd get drinking decaf tea, if I'm understanding it correctly.  If caffeine is important for the health of the scoby, does anyone know if using decaf black tea has enough caffeine in it to do the job? 
On another note, I was thinking about testing with the ph strips. Does that show the amount of sugar in some way?  I try to stay away from white sugar, and definitely don't want to be giving it to my girls.  And if there's sugar left over, and you're making it w/ teas that don't have the health benefits (from what I've understood about what's needed for it to be a detox drink) what's the difference from drinking a regular soft drink?    And about where to get the ph strips, I know my dad has some that he uses in gardening (mixing fertilizers I think), so I'm wondering if those could be purchased at a seed and feed type store.  I think I'll ask him...

BTW, regular black tea has 50 mg caffeine, green tea has 30, and coffee has 100.  So if the black tea starts off with 50 mg per cup when the Kom. is started, and ends up with less than 4 mg, according to this particular test above, then it's really not that much caffeine I guess.  Still, I'd like to know if there's enough caffeine to begin with in the decaf black tea for what the komb. "needs." 
« Last Edit: February 18, 2008, 06:08:45 AM by ArmyWife »
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Offline blessedmama

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Re: Kombucha: Alcohol, pH, Caffeine, Sugar & Culture Content
« Reply #137 on: February 18, 2008, 06:34:54 AM »
Our favorite tea to make Kombucha with is organic green tea, it has a great flavor and I only use 1 cup of white sugar.  This is the ONLY thing we use white sugar in.  The small amount of sugar and caffeine from Kombucha once done is such a small risk compared to all of the benefits we have seen from drinking it.  My husband's narcolepsy is improved when he drinks KT on a daily basis.  HTH
« Last Edit: July 15, 2008, 11:26:37 AM by blessedmama »
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Offline Unkabuzz

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Re: Kombucha: Alcohol, pH, Caffeine, Sugar & Culture Content
« Reply #138 on: May 08, 2008, 09:32:53 PM »
Wow!! There is a lot of information on the net about Kombucha.
  After reading so much on this forum and seeing all the questions and guesses and such I found this scientific information. I edited out all the references to make it easier to read. I know this is a huge amount of information, but if you take the time to read the whole thing, I'm sure you'll learn something new. Before I include that though, I could not open the old Cran-bucha recipe. From what I remember of it, I made my own recipe only I used Blueberry juice. "Excellent" Kombucha and a really cool "purple" scoby...........
  Here's the info;
This document has been extracted by the author from the Gaia Organics catalogue. It represents what is probably the most accurate synoptic review available of scientific research into the "Kombucha" phenomenon. The Gaia Research Institute and its associated funding pedigreed Kombucha cultures are purist in that they are personally laboratory raised exclusively on high quality imported peasant grown Chinese green tea and fueled with natural brown sugar, as per its two millennium evolutionary milieu, empowering you to access high integrity pedigreed cultures and perpetuate a centuries old tradition of producing your household's own "Divine Che", "Mo Gu", "Cajnii grib", "Hongo", "Manchurian Tea" or "Kargasok Tea", which are just some of 100-odd names by which the slightly sweet/tart beverage produced is known and which every fortnight doubles its production capacity, which is why it is often given away as a gift and has been called "Le champignon de la charité", the "fungus of charity". Consumption of Kombucha was first recorded in 220 BC in Manchuria, from whence it spread throughout the Far East, Pacific, India, Russia, Germany, eventually to the rest of Europe, to Africa and more recently across the entire globe.
Kombucha is not simply a fungus but a jellyfish-like zoogleal mat, a near-lichen, a symbiosis of beneficent non-toxic yeasts and bacterium which for two milennia has enjoyed great popularity in the far East and for a century in Eastern Europe for its tasty and refreshing tonic beverage which fell into relative oblivion due to economic circumstances during World War II, prior to which many households sustained a culture which they were forced to let die out as the tea and sugar which were so essential to its preservation became unavailable. Kombucha however is experiencing a phenomenal resurgence of popularity internationally as a healthful tonic beverage. Kombucha comprises of split or fission yeasts and hence does not usually contain the yeast spores from which so many suffer. Due to improved colon ecology, it actually helps rather than aggravates the battle against candidiasis. It has been widely reported that especially with elderly people, Kombucha beverage has rejuvenating effects, causing hair to colour again, as well as having the effect of tightening the skin and enhancing the overall feeling of health and vitality.
The widespread use of the Kombucha beverage has been well documented throughout this past century. Kombucha's liquid medium (tea kvass) and mass (zoogloea) (Medusomyces gisevii Lindau -botanical name) have also been intensively investigated to as a result of numerous early observations that this medium showed distinct antibiotic (bactericidal and bacteriostatic) effects against a number of disease organisms and was used for several therapeutic purposes in veterinary and human medicine. Contrary to public health and medical ignorance or propaganda, the beneficial properties of Kombucha have been rather well documented for a full scientific century and is still contemporarily so for such a relatively obscure natural food product. Early to mid 20th century, mainly German medical research, documented Kombucha primarily as an intestinal regulator and as having excellent effects on general body functions, but also progressively established specific efficacy in cases of digestive disturbances, constipation, haemorrhoids, kidney stones, gall bladder problems, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, cholesterol, high blood pressure, angina, gout, gouty eczema, arthritis, rheumatism, atherosclerosis, irritability, anxiety, headaches, dizziness, fatigue, tiredness. (The specific early references for these are available on request)
Approaching mid century, Kombucha was established in official pharmacopoeia, with eg the Director of the "Academy of Chemists" at Braunschweig recording that it invigorates the entire glandular system, is highly recommended for gout, rheumatism, furunculosis, arteriosclerosis, high blood pressure and aging problems; that by harmonizing and balancing metabolism, unwanted fat deposits removed or prevented; and that damaging deposits of uric acid and cholesterol are converted into more soluble forms, more easily excreted via the kidneys and intestines. As German medical researchers turned increasingly to synthetic pharmaceuticals, Soviet researchers discovered that Kombucha produces Vitamin C, besides many other valuable health substances (References are in Russian and being meaningless to most readers, are provided in abbreviated form) Russian scientists demonstrated a distinct antibiotic effect aside from that of the acids, bacteriostatic and bacteriocidal efficacy against pneumococcae, conjunctivitis and xerophtalmia, and against anaerobic dysentery and colibacillosis.
Russian research continued to establish efficacy in wound healing and various intestinal diseases intestinal typhus, infantile stomatitis, toxic dyspepsia, pediatric dysentery, paratyphus and brucellosis, high cholesterol and blood pressure and infantile toxic dysentery and healing of infected wounds. As a feed additive for chickens, it increased growth by 15%.
By the 1960's Kombucha research fell victim to the cold war, with the Russians withholding details of their research, with many known documents still remaining classified and the only available literature thereafter being mainly German, but not before professor Barbancik published the first book fully devoted to the subject, translated as "The Tea Mushroom and Its Therapeutic Properties". After covering earlier data from Russian hospital settings, in particular efficacy in tonsillitis, enterocolitis, inflammatory internal diseases, stomach catarrh due to deficient acid production, intestinal inflammations, dysentery, arteriosclerosis, high blood pressure and sclerosis, Prof Barbancik records later observing fast healing after tonsillitis, lacunar, follicular and catarrhal angina and clearing of associated nasal and even intestinal catarrh following gargling. Barbancik mentions success in healing of sub-acidic gastritis and chronic enterocolitis and also surprisingly good results in dysentery patients. Arteriosclerosis and hypertony with sclerosis were also improved and blood cholesterol levels decreased. Prof Babancik emphasised strongly that the possibility of a cancerogenic action lacks any foundation from a scientific- medical point of view.
A definitive Kombucha literature compilation in German followed. More recently, Dr. R Sklenar M.D. reported therapeutic success with the tea fungus with which he successfully treated gout, rheumatic conditions, arteriosclerosis, arthritis, dysbacteria, constipation, impotence, non-specific draining, obesity, furunculosis, kidney stones, cholesterol and cancers, concluding: "An outstanding natural remedy which acts detoxifying in every regard and which dissolves microorganisms as well as cholesterol." The medicinal properties and health benefits of Kombucha relatively recently again became the topic for a dissertation for a degree. The Germanic people especially have publicly maintained a keen health interest in Kombucha, as witnessed by the trend of just a half-decade of common references in the popular press:
Initially, due to a lack of research in the English language, I assumed that Kombucha owed most of its beneficial properties to the tea with which it is brewed, since its benefits dovetail well with the outstanding properties already scientifically documented for Chinese tea. Translations of Russian and German research and chemical analysis have altered this view. The Kombucha ferment contains various metabolic by-products, including acetic, ascorbic, butyric, glucuronic*, hyaluronic, lactic, usinic and chondroitin sulphate acids, glucosamines, heparin, beta-glucans (cell-wall only), B-vitamins, including B-12 and also antibiotic substances
 
   
Acetic acid (as in the popular folk remedy - Apple Cider Vinegar) is capable of conjugation with toxins, making them more soluble for subsequent elimination from the body. Similarly, glucuronic acid is one of the few agents that can detoxify petroleum-based products. Physiologically, in the liver, glucuronic acid binds up toxins, both environmental and metabolic via UDP-glucuronyltransferase and brings them to the excretory system, so the concentrations of glucuronic acid could explain some of the speculative curative effects attributed to kombucha. Recent epidemiological studies promote the notion that high intake of food rich in Phytochemicals protects against degenerative diseases such as coronary heart diseases and cancer. Potential toxins in Phytochemicals are also detoxified in mammalian tissues by conjugation with glucuronic acid, yielding less active glucuronide conjugates.
Glucuronic acid could also partly scientifically explain much of the cancer successes attributed to Kombucha against cancer. Dr. R Sklenar M.D. developed a biologic cancer therapy in which Kombucha held an important place for the sanitation and balancing of the intestinal flora and achieved success with cancer in the early stages of detection. Sklenar reported that: "Kombucha effects an outstanding detoxification of the organism. Through enjoying this beverage there is, additionally, a noticeable invigoration of the entire glandular system and enhancement of the metabolism. For cancer patients, this detoxification process that is triggered by the ingestion of glucuronic acid is good news indeed, for many medical specialists feel that there is a direct link between the overall toxicity of the body and the potential for the onset of tumors and other malignant growths".
Mainstream cancer research is complex and expensive. A decade following Kohler's and Sklenar's, pioneering research, one Hauser, noting Sklenar's first-hand long-term clinical experience based claims for Kombucha to be a prophylactic and therapeutic agent in countless diseases such as rheumatism, intestinal disorders, aging and cancer, critiqued Dr Sklenar's use of Kombucha infusion in biological cancer therapy, claiming that based on 'case histories without solid medical data', there is 'so far no evidence' to support the claim that Kombucha offers 'effective biological treatment for cancer'. Hauser was correct, but in fairness to Sklenar, the latter was not attempting to assemble evidence of the unaffordable standard required to make Kombucha a cancer drug. Interestingly, a decade later, proprietary glucuronide analogs had been developed and Ohio State University researchers triumphantly reported that their long-term safety and chemopreventive potency had been established against mammary tumor development and growth. Specifically, tumour latency was longer, tumour incidence was decreased, and tumour multiplicity was also markedly decreased. The study concluded that glucuronide was 'clearly effective'. 
Another by-product of Kombucha glucuronic acid is the glucosamines. In the body, glucosamines and related chondroitin sulfate are associated with cartilage, collagen and the fluid, which lubricate the joints. These two agents have shown substantial benefit in the treatment of osteoarthritis. In rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis, hyaluronic acid and its two sub-components, D-glucuronic acid and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, play a role in protecting articular tissues from oxidative damage. Both the size and concentration of hyaluronic acid in synovial fluid are diminished in osteoarthritis. Glucosamines increase synovial hyaluronic acid production. Hyaluronic acid functions physiologically to aid preservation of cartilage structure and prevent arthritic pain with relief comparable to NSAIDs and advantage over glucocorticoids. Hyaluronic acid enables connective tissue to bind moisture thousands of times its weight and maintains tissue structure, moisture, lubrication and flexibility and lessens free radical damage, whilst associated collagen retards and reduces wrinkles.
Butyric acid, also found in Kombucha, protects human cellular membranes and combined with glucuronic acid, strengthens the walls of the gut and so protects against parasites, including yeast infections such as candida. The antibacterial properties are considered to be due to the presence of the usinic acid. Unfractioned heparin, beyond its established anticoagulant activity, also exhibits a broad spectrum of immunomodulating and anti-inflammatory properties which specifically aids in the healing of an ulcerated mucosa. Heparin may represent a safe therapeutic option for inflammatory bowel disease, in particular for severe steroid-resistant ulcerative colitis.
Beta glucan is only significantly available from the well-pressed or very finely shredded mass, which develops during Kombucha production. Dr Ted Johnson, PhD, Professor of Biology at St Olaf College, has suggested that since most of the beneficial compounds remain inside the cells of the mass, these could be compared to medicinal capsules waiting to be broken down in the intestines to detoxify and strengthen our bodies. Beta-glucan, a cell-wall component, is a completely orally safe, potent free radical scavenger, insulin stimulator and non-specific stimulator of the human immune response, in particular macrophages, which play a pivotal role in the initiation and maintenance of the immune response. When macrophages (including phagocytes), which are the front line of defence, are activated, a myriad of immunological reactions occur against challenging stimuli such as viruses, bacteria, fungi, endotoxins and foreign debris, including the up-regulation of cytokines, bone marrow production, monocytes, neutrophils, natural killer cells. Beta-glucans can also have topical applications.
Gaia Research has successfully pioneered the use of Green Tea Kombucha cell-wall components in several of its leading edge Gaia Organics range of personal care products. Several progressive cosmetic houses use animal products and some have even changed over to synthetically produced materials in order to reduce or delay wrinkles, sun damage and risk of skin cancers. The Kombucha yeast cells are eukaryotes, ie of a class that includes all plants and animals, including humans. Consequently substances traditionally obtained by others from animal sources, eg hyaluronic acid, which is collected from aborted fetus, womb, umbilical cord, vitreous humour or synovial fluid of sacrificed animals, is uniquely humanely obtained by us from Kombucha without involving animals at all, as is our strict research ethic and manufacturing policy. Some 15 years after our pioneering this application, Croda, a leading industry supplier is now actually offering Kombucha extracts to “decrease glycation, increase adipocyte population, reduce skin roughness and increase skin radiance”. “We lead; others follow”.
Green tea and to a lesser extent, black tea, provides all the components and growth factors required by the Kombucha culture additional to sugar, including the important stimulant components, caffeine and theophylline, which belong to the purine groups required by the micro-organisms as a source of nitrogen for building nucleic acids, and which green tea reportedly provides more than twice that of black tea, and which phenomenon explains the 25% diminishing caffeine levels in Kombucha as fermentation proceeds, rendering it more suitable than tea in pregnancy. Green tea also contains vitamin-C, whereas black tea does not. In symbiotic exchange, Kombucha produces B-spectrum vitamins and additional vitamin-C, just a few reasons why green tea is superior to black for Kombucha production. Dr H Golz determined that the Kombucha symbiont requires the purin from the tea for its metabolism, during which uric acid, which is generally difficult to dissolve and which leads to gout, is turned into an aqueous solution, more easily discharged from the body via the bladder.
The widespread and safe use of the Kombucha beverage has been well documented throughout this past century in other than the advocate press 
As Kombucha's popularity grew in developed countries, so did anecdotal medical reports of associated adverse effects and illness, including hepatoxicity and even possibly death. Interestingly, not one of these toxic reports are linked to Kombucha made with Green Tea. All were linked to Black Tea. Memory serves me to recall over two decades, similar episodes in South Africa, including the use of Rooibos Tea.
Recall that Green Tea exhibited phenomenally potent and diverse antimicrobial properties capable of selectively maintaining Kombucha's 2000 year evolutionary microbial integrity until it produces its own arsenal, recently scientifically verified as capable of inhibiting amongst other documented pathogenic micro-organisms: Staphylococcus aureus, Shigella sonnei, Escherichia coli, Aeromonas hydrophila, Yersinia enterolitica, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter cloacae, Staphylococcus epidermis, Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella enteritidis, Salmonella typhimurium, Bacillus cereus, Helicobacterpylori, and Listeria monocytogenes, and the mechanism for several being progressively active long before the acetic acid stage previously believed to exert the effect.  Bearing in mind the combined antimicrobial properties of Green Tea and Kombucha, risk-benefit analysis adjudicates a positive health potential second to none.
Whilst most modern reports quite rightly advise caution in the use of black tea Kombucha, continuing research has recently confirmed that Kombucha has in vitro antimicrobial activity, enhances sleep and pain thresholds has potent anti-oxidant and immunopotentiating activities and in rodent studies, both male and female mice which drank Kombucha, demonstrated enhanced cognition, decreased appetite and weight and all lived longer natural lives than the controls.
 You're tired from all that reading, "go have some Kombucha"............ ;D

Offline Cheryl

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Re: Kombucha: Alcohol, pH, Caffeine, Sugar & Culture Content
« Reply #139 on: May 23, 2008, 10:39:48 AM »
Green tea and to a lesser extent, black tea, provides all the components and growth factors required by the Kombucha culture additional to sugar, including the important stimulant components, caffeine and theophylline, which belong to the purine groups required by the micro-organisms as a source of nitrogen for building nucleic acids, and which green tea reportedly provides more than twice that of black tea, and which phenomenon explains the 25% diminishing caffeine levels in Kombucha as fermentation proceeds, rendering it more suitable than tea in pregnancy. Green tea also contains vitamin-C, whereas black tea does not. In symbiotic exchange, Kombucha produces B-spectrum vitamins and additional vitamin-C, just a few reasons why green tea is superior to black for Kombucha production. Dr H Golz determined that the Kombucha symbiont requires the purin from the tea for its metabolism, during which uric acid, which is generally difficult to dissolve and which leads to gout, is turned into an aqueous solution, more easily discharged from the body via the bladder.
The widespread and safe use of the Kombucha beverage has been well documented throughout this past century in other than the advocate press 
As Kombucha's popularity grew in developed countries, so did anecdotal medical reports of associated adverse effects and illness, including hepatoxicity and even possibly death. Interestingly, not one of these toxic reports are linked to Kombucha made with Green Tea. All were linked to Black Tea. Memory serves me to recall over two decades, similar episodes in South Africa, including the use of Rooibos Tea.



Wow!  What a wealth of information.  That certainly is a find.  On other threads, there is the repeated question of safety during pregnancy.  Here it claims to be "more suitable than tea during pregnancy."

I've heard claims (by actual licensed and practicing M.D.'s) that Green Tea has a natural counter-effect to its caffeine and that's why people feel relaxed after drinking it and many drink it before bedtime to sleep more easily.  It's soporific.  And teriffic.  :D

Now I'm just going to have to find a baby and start brewing my own.  I just talked with someone I thought might have one and she's given it up.  She just found it too "gross."

Thanks for the info, Unkabuzz.


Offline Unkabuzz

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Re: Kombucha: Alcohol, pH, Caffeine, Sugar & Culture Content
« Reply #140 on: May 25, 2008, 08:45:33 PM »
 Glad to help. I found it quite interesting myself. Here is another little excerpt I found that is interesting. Seems it's the middle of a conversation though.

 :) [Glad to see a grower who's closer to the researched truth. Indeed the "synerism" is now classed a a pseudo Licheen owing to its' "conversion" capabilities. 2 yrs of analytical Lab tests have cinched the exact "brew-time" at 84 +- 4 degrees at between 6.5 and 6.75 days where the PEAK of "transients" occur.
The myth about Glucoronic acid is true in only one sense: The sybergism/sugar chemistry produced gluconic acid which in turn causes the liver to increase it's natural production of Glucoronic acid, a powerful anti-oxicent that literally encases toxins in a protective prison, so to speak, and transfers them SAFELY through the kidneys. Other "acids" kill both Cancer cells and AIDS virus. It has been used to stabalize the balance between healthy T-cells and killer Virus masses...in the proper proportions. The chemistry of the Synergism ALONE as a creamed drink with an acid medium such as Pineapple juice has even more going for it. It aids in curing cfs, macular degeneration, and reverse menopause which says that it has a beneficial affect on the Kreb's cycle.
 The product produced from brewing, if Yerba Mate' is used (can be used alone and produces great babies) and works specifically and rapidly on the Kreb's cycle alone reversing many calcium depletion problems such as cataracts as well as macular degeneration. The rest of the story is covered by those who've been cured of a plethora of unpleasantries connected to humans as a result of erroneous diets and use of non kosher eating habits. At 70, I am personally going on 29. My body for the first time in my life after 8 yrs of KombuCha and Lichen enhanced herbals is text book perfect. WOW what a feeling. Yours for continued success... Dr. L.B.T.]  :)

  I put up an ad at the local health food store and I am constantly giving away scobys myself, but I've never shipped one to anybody. I'm not even sure how you would do that...........

Offline kings daughter

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Re: Kombucha: Alcohol, pH, Caffeine, Sugar & Culture Content
« Reply #141 on: May 26, 2008, 04:20:30 AM »
UNKABUZZ,
Thanks for sharing your knowledge about Kumbucha!
Are you really 70 yrs. old!!!!????
What are your favorite Kumbucha recipes? And how much do you personally drink per day? Do you think one could drink too much Kumbucha? I have been drinking 4-5 cups a day and could drink more.  I feel like my body is craving it, I can't seem to get enough...... :)

Offline Unkabuzz

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  • Posts: 7
Re: Kombucha: Alcohol, pH, Caffeine, Sugar & Culture Content
« Reply #142 on: May 26, 2008, 08:08:41 PM »
Thanks for sharing your knowledge about Kumbucha!

  First of all, it is knowledge that I have found elsewhere on the net, not my own.

Are you really 70 yrs. old!!!!????

WHOOAAAA there, not even close.
I said at the beginning......"Here is another little excerpt I found that is interesting. Seems it's the middle of a conversation though". Definitely not "my" conversation.....
  So far, (6 months into this process), I still like Black tea with blueberry from "enjoyingtea.com" (quality stuff) and I like to brew with natural brown sugar. I think that more than 8 oz. a day is pushing it, but that's just my opinion, I could be wrong.  Maybe it's the caffeine or sugar traces that you are craving???  ;D

  Sorry for any confusion as to who had the knowledge and/or experience..

Offline Unkabuzz

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  • Posts: 7
Re: Kombucha: Alcohol, pH, Caffeine, Sugar & Culture Content
« Reply #143 on: June 29, 2008, 10:55:37 PM »




 Has anyone tried honey??
Just finished a batch with honey right along side of a batch with raw sugar I didn't measure the amount of honey, just added to taste about the same sweetness as the sugar batch.
 After my ususal fermenting time, (8 days at about 73 degrees), The sugar batch had "way" more fizz was less sweet and had much less "kick".  The honey batch was still pretty sweet, not a lot of fizz and a much stronger "kick" to it. The honey batch also had a pretty odd SCOBY. Very rough surface and much softer. (I can scrape it off with my fingers)...
  I put the honey batch back for 3 more days and it is still sweeter than the sugar batch but has a great kick now. The honey batch also has a lot more sediment in it. Drank a couple small glasses today, and I feel feel feel feel feel  feel feel just fine.  ;)

Offline vpiotet

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  • Posts: 1
  • We "get it" thanks to Abraham & His descendants !
Re: Kombucha: Alcohol, pH, Caffeine, Sugar & Culture Content
« Reply #144 on: December 22, 2012, 02:41:34 AM »
Wow!! There is a lot of information on the net about Kombucha.
  After reading so much on this forum and seeing all the questions and guesses and such I found this scientific information. I edited out all the references to make it easier to read. I know this is a huge amount of information, but if you take the time to read the whole thing, I'm sure you'll learn something new. Before I include that though, I could not open the old Cran-bucha recipe. From what I remember of it, I made my own recipe only I used Blueberry juice. "Excellent" Kombucha and a really cool "purple" scoby...........
  Here's the info;
This document has been extracted by the author from the Gaia Organics catalogue. It represents what is probably the most accurate synoptic review available of scientific research into the "Kombucha" phenomenon. The Gaia Research Institute and its associated funding pedigreed Kombucha cultures are purist in that they are personally laboratory raised exclusively on high quality imported peasant grown Chinese green tea and fueled with natural brown sugar, as per its two millennium evolutionary milieu, empowering you to access high integrity pedigreed cultures and perpetuate a centuries old tradition of producing your household's own "Divine Che", "Mo Gu", "Cajnii grib", "Hongo", "Manchurian Tea" or "Kargasok Tea", which are just some of 100-odd names by which the slightly sweet/tart beverage produced is known and which every fortnight doubles its production capacity, which is why it is often given away as a gift and has been called "Le champignon de la charité", the "fungus of charity". Consumption of Kombucha was first recorded in 220 BC in Manchuria, from whence it spread throughout the Far East, Pacific, India, Russia, Germany, eventually to the rest of Europe, to Africa and more recently across the entire globe.
]
http://welltellme.com/discuss/Smileys/default/cheesy.gif

Thank you so very much for the info about Kombucha - first time I see there is so much clinical data available and references for it !!!

Also, thank you ladies for translating obscure long sentences to a few words in English.

You-all make my day !


Vince

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