Author Topic: Nourishing Traditions  (Read 138417 times)

Offline Clementine

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #60 on: September 19, 2006, 06:21:53 AM »
Boiled lungs?! Yuk! :P

Ok, I put out some yogurt last night to drain.  The leftover cream cheese tastes good, but the kitchen towel soaked up most of the whey.  There are still several tablespoons, but nowhere near what it should be.  What do you all use to strain your yogurt?  Would a coffee filter work, or maybe a smaller cloth? 

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Offline mexmarr

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #61 on: September 19, 2006, 06:45:35 AM »
Boiled lungs?! Yuk! :P

Ok, I put out some yogurt last night to drain.  The leftover cream cheese tastes good, but the kitchen towel soaked up most of the whey.  There are still several tablespoons, but nowhere near what it should be.  What do you all use to strain your yogurt?  Would a coffee filter work, or maybe a smaller cloth? 



I use a tea towel.  A good alternative would be an old tee-shirt.

Offline Pink Lady

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #62 on: October 13, 2006, 08:08:33 AM »
As for making bread without buttermilk, before raw milk was available in our area, I learned from an older lady at the hfs that you can substitute a teaspoon of lemon juice in a cup of water for a cup of milk. I always thought that milk was needed for its richness, but it's the lactic acid, so the juice pinch-hits for that just fine. I made many a batch of pancakes for my daughter and bread in the bread machine with that substitution.
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Offline Clementine

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #63 on: October 17, 2006, 06:29:45 PM »
I made the cream cheese breakfast pastries today from this book and they turned out really well.  They were a big hit with my husband, probably because they have pecans in them.  As with most recipes in this book, it takes some prep time, but they're easy to roll out and bake.  It was nice to know that I was using homemade cream cheese, and pure ingredients.  I did use a substitute for the rapadura because I just can't afford that right now.  :)
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Nickole

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #64 on: October 18, 2006, 02:00:25 AM »
I made the cream cheese breakfast pastries today from this book and they turned out really well.  They were a big hit with my husband, probably because they have pecans in them.  As with most recipes in this book, it takes some prep time, but they're easy to roll out and bake.  It was nice to know that I was using homemade cream cheese, and pure ingredients.  I did use a substitute for the rapadura because I just can't afford that right now.  :)

I love these pastries! You can substitute Sucanat for Rapadura.  When this book was published, Sally Fallon did not recommend Sucanat anymore b/c the processing had changed for the worse.  Now, the makers of Sucanat have improved how they process it (I think it was way overprocessed before) and she recommends it again.  That's nice to know, since rapadura is extremely expensive.  I buy my Sucanat at Whole Foods in bulk. 

Offline musicmommy

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #65 on: October 18, 2006, 05:11:59 AM »
Hi ladies,

I've had trouble getting the muffin and some of the bread recipies to turn out.  They tend to be tough and flat.  I just made gingerbread this morning...and it's not how I thought it should be.  Hmm.  Anyone else w/ a similiar experience?  I feel like I wasted my time since it took over 24 hrs to make.  Is it because I soaked the grain?

(Most of the other recipies I've tried have turned out.)

Also, if I substitute honey for rapadura, does that alter the texture?  Just curious.
« Last Edit: October 18, 2006, 05:17:35 AM by musicmommy »

Offline MarkTracy

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #66 on: October 19, 2006, 02:27:04 AM »
Thanks,

I will eat it.  But if I don't post anything here in the next few weeks, you will know why. ;)

How hilarious!
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Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #67 on: October 22, 2006, 02:18:07 PM »
I made and ate the NT cream cheese pastries this morning and they weren't as tasty as I hoped they would be.  I used regular organic wg pastry flour.  I don't have a grain grinder, even though I have a bag of whole wheat .  I wonder if I will be able to use it somehow?  Anyways, I could not get my dough to roll out very thin and it stuck like crazy to everything.  Overall, the pastries were very hard.  Like little sweet rocks!! Anyone have this problem?
I seem to be having a problem with A LOT of recipes out of this book.  My oatmeal is good and I think the beverages and soups are okay, but the breads and beans are so nasty.   :P

Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #68 on: October 22, 2006, 03:29:04 PM »
Just tried a sip of the Ginger ale.  Can you say..Blech?!!! :P

Nickole

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #69 on: October 22, 2006, 03:47:46 PM »
I made and ate the NT cream cheese pastries this morning and they weren't as tasty as I hoped they would be.  I used regular organic wg pastry flour.  I don't have a grain grinder, even though I have a bag of whole wheat .  I wonder if I will be able to use it somehow?  Anyways, I could not get my dough to roll out very thin and it stuck like crazy to everything.  Overall, the pastries were very hard.  Like little sweet rocks!! Anyone have this problem?
I seem to be having a problem with A LOT of recipes out of this book.  My oatmeal is good and I think the beverages and soups are okay, but the breads and beans are so nasty.   :P

Hey, girl, I've made these several times, and one thing with the stickiness, I had to use TONS of unbleached flour to roll it out.  So that's normal.  Did you soak your flour?  That makes the dough nice and airy.  Maybe next time soak it for 24 hours instead of 12?  Or maybe you cooked them too long??  B/c ours were never hard. I do use freshly ground flour - maybe that does make a difference, but I think I made them before I ground my own flour. 
I just read the recipe and one thing I do different that may help.  I do not roll then cut, roll then cut, roll then cut.  I don't make three rolls of dough and then slice into pastries.  I just roll the whole thing up and then slice into pastries.  This makes bigger ones, about the size of a half dollar or slightly bigger, so maybe that helps.  Too small, and I can see how they could get hard in the oven.  SO maybe that one thing makes a difference?  And then use lots of flour to roll up.  Hope this helps!  If not, I'll trade some for some fermented gingered carrots that don't taste like cow spit!  ;D     

Offline boysmama

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #70 on: October 22, 2006, 04:08:18 PM »
I am very new to NT but it seems like the baking times are seriously overestimated. It only takes about 1/2 the time in the things I've tried. Either less time or I end up anding more liquids...

And the fermented drinks ::) do they improve with aging like a good wine? BTW we all ready did kefir and like it just fine.

Offline mxmom

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #71 on: October 22, 2006, 04:36:37 PM »
I made and ate the NT cream cheese pastries this morning and they weren't as tasty as I hoped they would be.  I used regular organic wg pastry flour.  I don't have a grain grinder, even though I have a bag of whole wheat .  I wonder if I will be able to use it somehow?  Anyways, I could not get my dough to roll out very thin and it stuck like crazy to everything.  Overall, the pastries were very hard.  Like little sweet rocks!! Anyone have this problem?
I seem to be having a problem with A LOT of recipes out of this book.  My oatmeal is good and I think the beverages and soups are okay, but the breads and beans are so nasty.   :P

You know, I just posted under the Carbonated Water thread about this very thing.  Some of the recipes are just not palatable to our particular tastes and then some I have just ruined all by myself  ;)!!!  My daughter has had some of the sweet recipes turn out really well.  But, it seems to me, that if I was a cook who read recipes and adapt them to my family's tastes, this book might serve me better.  I am, however, one of the culinary challenged people of this world, and have to precisely follow a recipe or yuck!  ;)  ::)   :D

Offline mishy

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #72 on: October 22, 2006, 04:52:17 PM »
Just tried a sip of the Ginger ale.  Can you say..Blech?!!! :P

I was so excited about the Ginger ale, but YES!! Ewwwwww.  I ended up tossing it.  I am willing to try it again, just with 100% different expectations.  Ginger is SO strong.  I made a batch of kombucha with it and phew!  strong stuff.  Either way it still releases its fiz up into my nasal cavity which always amuses my boys. 
Are our tastebuds so far gone that we can't get used to this stuff, or are we just making it wrong?  :D

Nickole

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #73 on: October 22, 2006, 04:55:10 PM »
Just tried a sip of the Ginger ale.  Can you say..Blech?!!! :P

I was so excited about the Ginger ale, but YES!! Ewwwwww.  I ended up tossing it.  I am willing to try it again, just with 100% different expectations.  Ginger is SO strong.  I made a batch of kombucha with it and phew!  strong stuff.  Either way it still releases its fiz up into my nasal cavity which always amuses my boys. 
Are our tastebuds so far gone that we can't get used to this stuff, or are we just making it wrong?  :D

Maybe it's just an acquired taste - I liked it but can't remember if anyone else in the family did.  It's been a while.  My kids LOVED the punch!  Punch has shown up so much in Dickens novels, I just had to try it!  Has anyone tried the small beer? 

Offline mishy

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #74 on: October 22, 2006, 04:56:56 PM »

Maybe it's just an acquired taste - I liked it but can't remember if anyone else in the family did.  It's been a while.  My kids LOVED the punch!  Punch has shown up so much in Dickens novels, I just had to try it!  Has anyone tried the small beer? 


Hmm.  I'll have to go try the punch.  No beer here yet!  Have to get some hops first. :)

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #75 on: October 22, 2006, 07:46:18 PM »
You guys are really making me want to run right out and buy a copy....yum yum.  Rocks with cow spit, my favorite  :-X

Ginger is very strong and definately an acquired taste.  I drink it straight in tea, but it took some getting used to.  I make the ginger kombucha too, but I don't use very much - maybe about 2 T sliced per gallon.
« Last Edit: October 22, 2006, 08:14:14 PM by healthybratt »
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Offline Lovin'myHoneyinVT

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #76 on: October 23, 2006, 01:24:29 AM »
What do you all use to strain your yogurt?  Would a coffee filter work, or maybe a smaller cloth? 
I use cheesecloth that I got at the local store.  It is thin but works very well.  Melissa ;)

Offline WithLoveAndJoy

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #77 on: October 23, 2006, 02:12:37 AM »
I have successfully used a coffee filter inside of a strainer.  The coffee filter might rip if it doesn't have the structure of a strainer.
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Offline linemansgirl

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #78 on: October 23, 2006, 02:42:18 AM »
What good experiences has anyone had with the NT fermented veggies?  I made the ginger carrots first, as they suggest, several months ago.  YUCK!!!!!!   :o :P  I don't know if I did something wrong or what, but I have not been brave enough to try anymore.
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Offline mishy

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #79 on: October 23, 2006, 03:22:23 AM »
What good experiences has anyone had with the NT fermented veggies?  I made the ginger carrots first, as they suggest, several months ago.  YUCK!!!!!!   :o :P  I don't know if I did something wrong or what, but I have not been brave enough to try anymore.

I make the sauerkraut, kimchee ones all the time.  Love 'em. :) 

Offline linemansgirl

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #80 on: October 23, 2006, 03:28:59 AM »
Thanks, I'll give the sauerkraut a try and see how that goes.  It definitely couldn't be any worse. 
And let us not be weary in well doing: for in due season we shall reap, if we faint not.    Galatians 6:9

Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #81 on: October 23, 2006, 04:02:31 AM »


Hey, girl, I've made these several times, and one thing with the stickiness, I had to use TONS of unbleached flour to roll it out.  So that's normal.  Did you soak your flour?  That makes the dough nice and airy.  Maybe next time soak it for 24 hours instead of 12?  Or maybe you cooked them too long??   

Yes, I soaked it and it was soaking for 24 hours, too.  I think I cooked them too long, perhaps, but I am just following her times.  She said to cook them for 45 min., now, just reading that made me go...uh, I don't think so, Miss Fallon.  But I trusted her cooking expertise and set the timer.  Well, at 34 min. I could smell them so much that I checked them and they were hard.  It wasn't time to take them out, yet, but I thought that if they got any harder my children could use them in their sling shots.   ;)

I make my fermented veggies without whey.  I use the extra salt.  You have to able to stomach the saltiness, otherwise you are eating something slimy. 

I really didn't think the ginger ale was too strong of a taste, just slimy and not sweet.  Maybe my mouth is just expecting a "soda" like taste.  I think since I made it I will drink it.  But for each cup I will add a little carbonated water and another teaspoon or so of sugar.  I know, I am really bad.

The baking times are really off in this book.  I think we ought to contact Miss Fallon and set up a forum just for the cookbook!!

Offline chopchop

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #82 on: October 23, 2006, 07:36:00 AM »
You know what............ I love reading this cookbook!

Cooking with it is a different story!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
I have been cooking for years, much of it very healthy, all of it from scratch.  Most of the recipes I actually haven't tried because they just didn't look good.  And the ones I have made, I have to admit, I have only made them once.  Hmmm!  Does somebody out there actually use this cookbook and enjoy the food?

My boys do eat the soaked oatmeal stuff (almost every morning) and are fine with it.  (I personally am not in love with oatmeal in any cooked variety, Dh hates it with a passion. That is ok since he leaves for work at 7 AM each morning and the boys eat after saying goodbye to him ;))
I do use the big 900 page Rodale's Basic Natural Foods Cookbook quite a bit, adding salt to all recipes since they happen to be salt free. And do a lot of my own concoctions and altering of other recipes.

Offline linemansgirl

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #83 on: October 23, 2006, 07:47:11 AM »
So far we have loved the recipes that we have tried from NT.  With the small exception of fermented ginger carrots.  Oh!  There was also the bread from the rye sourdough starter that if I would have decided to throw them at someone I would now be in jail for homicide.  Yeah that hard.  :'(  Everything else has been wonderful, although it does take some getting used to.  I use the book almost daily, always several times a week.  Good luck.
And let us not be weary in well doing: for in due season we shall reap, if we faint not.    Galatians 6:9

Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #84 on: October 23, 2006, 07:51:54 AM »
I like the oatmeal, fermented veggies, and the Korean beef soup.  I am scared to try anything else, because so many things have failed me.   :(

Offline SC

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #85 on: October 23, 2006, 09:08:26 AM »
For me, I often find that my first attempt at a very new recipe (not just Nourishing Traditions) is a disaster. The way I combat this is I never plan to serve that dish for a meal the first time I make it. If it turns out okay, then it's just a bonus. If not, I haven't delayed our entire meal. I make notes in the margin of a recipe when I am making it the first time (or the second time after the failed first attempt). These include questions about techniques as well as details of what I did. This way, if it doesn't turn out well, I can make adjustments the second (and third) time I try the recipe. When it finally works, I know how to duplicate the results and exactly how long it really takes.

I try to have as much patience with myself as I would have with my children's attempts at new things. That seems to help.
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Offline jessyru

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #86 on: October 23, 2006, 10:34:20 AM »
I haven't had this cookbook for very long but here's what I've made so far:

Pancakes with yogurt and whole wheat flour pg 478--Very good!

Breakfast porridge pg 455-not a big fan of oatmeal, but still tasty and edible

Fried Mush pg 457--pretty good

Mustard & Ketchup pg 104--the mustard is VERY strong--somehow I want to fix it, but I'm not sure how to. The ketchup is different, but I would expect it to be as the ketchup sold nowadays is just high fructose corn syrup.

Sauerkraut pg 92--haven't eaten it yet (we're having it tomorrow on Reuben's) but it smells like sauerkraut

Chicken Stock pg 124--my mom made this and and she just left all the veggies in it and made it chicken soup. It was very good, much better than soup made from boullion.

Cultured Milk Smoothie pg 88--this is SO good. I like it best with Kefir, though I have made it with yogurt

Cottage Potatoes pg 397--these are SO good and SO simple I wouldn't even call them a recipe. I've done potatoes like this before but never thought to put both butter and olive oil on them.
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Offline HeatherRose

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #87 on: October 23, 2006, 11:28:22 AM »
I just made the grape spritzer and I make the beet kvass quite often.  They are both delicious.  I love to soak my rice with whey until it's a bit sour and the Indian idly recipe is very good.  I also love the raw salmon or tuna salad.  It keeps for at least a week.

I gave the book to my sister hoping she'd take her son off soymilk.  I call her about once a month to look up recipes for me.   :D

Offline chopchop

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #88 on: October 23, 2006, 12:30:13 PM »
okay, now I feel silly.  ::) I got the cookbook out this afternoon (I have owned if for 5 1/2 years) and started looking at all the recipes page by page.
I actually make a lot of them, regularly, just from a different cookbook. :o  I guess while looking through it I would just automatically not try recipes like Tabbouleh, Yogurt, Kefir,  Salad Dressings, Croutons,  Potato dishes, green enchiladas, fajitas, cooked veggies.... when I already made them either identically or with minute variations.  I tried the unique stuff, and well, it was unique.  I still don't particularly like vinegar added to my chicken broth, but I make stock regularly. And I do love the crispy pecans
 I guess I have to work on my sprouted grain thing and just ignore the liver, brains, kidney stuff that I think is GROSS.   ;D  So anyway!  This is to say that there are some great recipes in there and I do make things "from it" (more or less) on a regular basis.  Maybe I will try using it a bit more, and not be a chicken.   ;D
« Last Edit: October 23, 2006, 12:32:15 PM by chopchop »

Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #89 on: October 23, 2006, 03:12:41 PM »
I just made the carob fudge tonight.  It wasn't worth it.  The taste was pretty good, but never solidified up like fudge should.  She says to put it in the fridge for several hours.  Okay, to those who have common sense, what would several hours be to you?  I put it in for four hours and it still was soft. Then, I put it in the freezer for an hour.  It is still soft, like frosting.  Tastes okay, but if I wanted frosting I would have made frosting!!!  Getting a little frustrated with these recipes, here.