Author Topic: Nourishing Traditions  (Read 138413 times)

cecac

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #330 on: June 18, 2008, 06:39:32 AM »
Hey MQM,

I can tell you what I do, because I soak grains and beans as well.  Don't apologize for asking, though, NT type cooking is kinda foreign to us and so I wonder about it too like many others, I"m sure.

I do not cover any of my soaking things, I leave in a glass or stainless steel bowl to soak for the time recommended.  I don't worry about temp either.  I would think that with some things (like fermented sauerkraut and kombucha) the temperature is more important than with the grains and beans.

For beans, I cover them with water and throw in some whey.  Let's see, I soaked 5 cups of kidney beans for 24 hours before cooking for dinner last night, and so I covered with distilled water and put in about 1/4 cup whey.  I walked by one time in the 24 hours and the beans had soaked up all the water, so I just poured some more in to cover again.

For the flours, I follow the directions in the recipe.  I use kefir instead of buttermilk because we make kefir every week anyway.  For the corn flour recipes I have been adding the water with the kefir altogether right now because I do not have the pickling lime. 

I soaked some rice with water and whey overnight for cooking.  She does not recommend soaking rice, but we like it better that way.  I think we soaked equal portions of water/rice and I had my daughter put about 1/4 cup whey for 5 cups of rice (to be eaten twice by a large family).  We then rinsed the rice and cooked it in fresh water.

I follow the recipe for the oatmeal.

I think you asked for my recipe modifications to the cornbread.  Here that is:

I put in 3 cups of cornmeal to soak with kefir as opposed to the other flours.  Right now I add the water and kefir altogether for 24 hours as opposed to soaking for 7 hours in pickling lime first.  I won't do that until I get ahold of that lime.

I follow the rest of the directions, and then as I'm stirring in all the ingredients to bake the cornbread, I also add about 1/3 cup of organic unsweetened applesauce.  We find that helps with a little more moisture. 

HTH some,
Cara

Offline mom24boys

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #331 on: June 18, 2008, 07:34:24 AM »
I don't want to be too meticulous here, but I have a few very basic questions about basic things in the book. Some of my questions might sound ridiculous, but since I have read in this thread that you have to be precise about the directions, I just want to be sure I have been doing it right for the most healthful benefits and so that things turn out correctly. That and since I have had NO training in any cooking, my entire cooking career has been one huge experiment. So please bear with my ignorance, as these questions have plagued me for awhile and I finally made the time (and found the courage) to ask. ;D  Here goes:

1) When soaking beans, do you need to simply "cover" the beans with no regard to the water that will be absorbed or evaporate. Should it be just barely enough to cover with no excess to account for what is absorbed or evaporated?  When I have soaked my beans in the past, most of the water mixture evaporates. This is what should happen, correct?

2) She doesn't say to cover the soaking beans. So, no covering?

3) When you are instructed to cover something soaking, as in oatmeal, I have assumed it should not be seal-tight to prevent rancidity?  Just cover with a towel, not a tight lid or plastic wrap?

4) "Cover with WARM water"?  With my neurotic little mind, "warm" is too vague? ;D Unless the temperature isn't that crucial.  How crucial IS the temperature for soaking purposes? When I soak things, I usually leave things in the oven with no heat, or sometimes in the garage. I live in FL and our thermostat setting ranges from 75 to 78.  Would the oven be warm enough if it is turned off or should I put them in the garage where it is warmer, probably 80 - 90 degrees.

Thanks for your patience, ladies!

When it says to cover beans or whatever with water, you can be pretty generous *IF* you will be draining the soak water.  I always drain my beans and add fresh water before I cook.

If you are soaking things in your oven, you don't really have to cover with a towel or whatever because it is a closed environment and dust, bugs and such won't get in it.

Warm usually means it feels warm enough to keep your hand in indefinitely but hot enough for it to feel "hey, that's nice and warm!"

When I soak oatmeal, I do it in my crock pot with the glass lid on.  It doesn't seal so any built up gasses can escape.  When I soak flours (and I will use the "soak" in the recipe - no draining), I either cover with a towel or or just a plastic lid set over the top.  My sister uses a mesh "splatter screen" and then a towel because she has had her towel drop down in and get all goopy.

Hope these things help.

Offline skelliott2

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #332 on: June 18, 2008, 02:29:10 PM »
Those questions aren't ridiculous at all!  This is a very weird way of cooking, so, like Cara said, we all had to learn it.  I don't always use warm water for soaking.  Sometimes my filtered water is a little cold.  I use it anyway.  I think that, as long as you soak it for a longer time, the temp. of the soak water isn't terribly important.  At least, that's been my experience.

Thanks to my inspiring sister-in-law, who just got her first Nourishing Traditions book, I've been going back through mine.  We had the muesli-style oatmeal this morning.  It was so YUMMY!  Soaked oatmeal is so much better for us than unsoaked, since it doesn't cause any digestive trouble.  :)

I've soaked some navy beans, and am making her baked beans recipe in the crock pot overnight, to have for lunch tomorrow.  I'll let you all know how they turn out!

Offline skelliott2

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #333 on: June 20, 2008, 05:13:18 PM »
The beans turned out OK.  They were kind of bland.  they needed bacon or green peppers or something.  Also, even though I cooked them in the crock pot all day, they were pretty hard.  So, next time I make them, I'll cook them in a pot with water for several hours to soften them.  Then, I'll put them in the crock pot or casserole dish with her baked bean recipe plus some bacon and green peppers.  I guess we girls from the south expect baked beans to taste better than the ones in the can.  :)

They were, easier to digest, though.  So, soaking with lemon water overnight is here to stay!!

Offline lotsaboys

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #334 on: June 22, 2008, 12:19:51 PM »
The beans turned out OK.  They were kind of bland.  they needed bacon or green peppers or something.  Also, even though I cooked them in the crock pot all day, they were pretty hard.  So, next time I make them, I'll cook them in a pot with water for several hours to soften them.  Then, I'll put them in the crock pot or casserole dish with her baked bean recipe plus some bacon and green peppers.  I guess we girls from the south expect baked beans to taste better than the ones in the can.  :)

They were, easier to digest, though.  So, soaking with lemon water overnight is here to stay!!

Bland is how mine turned out too, but the bacon and/or gr. peppers sounds like a great idea!

cecac

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #335 on: June 22, 2008, 01:53:58 PM »
Using distilled water for soaking and cooking may help with the hard bean problem.  We have Very hard well water here, and I don't think beans would ever cook in it, and so distilled water has been my solution.

In my experience, if I soak the beans 24 hours, then when I cook them it only takes 2-3 hours to finish.   

One thing I like to fix with beans:  a purple or yellow onion and a bell pepper sauteed in olive oil.  And then I add the meat.  In white beans, we really enjoy sausage with a can of diced tomatoes and the onion and bell pepper (sometimes only put in to simmer the end until soft, sometimes sauteed in olive oil). 

HTH,
Cara

Offline southmom2k

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #336 on: June 26, 2008, 05:15:18 PM »
I forgot to add when cooking beans, they need to come to a boil and then turn the heat down low. Yes, they will eventually boil in the crockpot. I think that is one of the keys to good soft beans!
Speaking of that...I need to get my beans soaking now...
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Offline mommyoftwins

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #337 on: August 30, 2008, 03:06:13 PM »
Has anybody made the apple cider? I have loads of apples & was thinking of trying it.

Offline mommyoftwins

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #338 on: September 01, 2008, 05:46:44 AM »
bump

Offline hi_itsgwen

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #339 on: September 01, 2008, 05:30:17 PM »
http://bethany.preciousinfants.com/search.aspx?q=apple%20peel&sc=t&dt=3m&al=none

I remember seeing a mention of making acv on this blog...hth!

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Offline Lovin'myHoneyinVT

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #340 on: October 28, 2008, 01:52:20 AM »
Has anybody made the apple cider? I have loads of apples & was thinking of trying it.

Yes, I've made it using a natural mother from organic, live acv i got at the hfs.  When processing my apples for dried apples, I kept the peels and cores and added them to the water with the mother and vinegar.  Kept it in a brown bag with a cheesecloth over the mouth, near my woodstove.  It was a perfect temp and worked well.  I guess you have to keep moving it around so the top doesn't get moldy before it becomes acv, and my first batch was beautiful.  The second batch, we won't talk about ;D

hth, Lovin'

Offline WellTellMommy

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #341 on: February 06, 2009, 06:13:46 PM »
I read on WTM some where that you can make live culture ACV from bragg's and generic ACV but I can't find it now and we have our bi-monthly stock-up trip tomorrow so could some one tell what to buy to do that?
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Sherri

Offline ladyhen

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #342 on: February 07, 2009, 06:16:25 AM »
I read on WTM some where that you can make live culture ACV from bragg's and generic ACV but I can't find it now and we have our bi-monthly stock-up trip tomorrow so could some one tell what to buy to do that?

I was told that you can use acv from, say, walmart to make a live culture vinegar by either inoculating it with culture from 'good', live vinegar or by leaving it open for a wild catch.  Once the culture begins to grow, you will be able to see a cloudy mass, or mother, floating in the bottom. 

When I have done this it has taken about 2 ro 3 weeks to see growth in inoculated acv and it took about a month or more for a wild catch. 

hth
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Offline WellTellMommy

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #343 on: February 11, 2009, 11:31:18 AM »
I found this in my "Wild Fermentation" book.
Pineapple Vinegar
1/4c. sugar
Peel of 1 Pineapple(organic)

Step1
Dissolve Sugar in 1qt. Water.
Coarsely chop and add peel. 
Cover with Cheesecloth, and leave to ferment at room temp.

Step2
After liquid darkens (about 1 week) strain out peel and discard.

Step3
Ferment the liquid 2-3 weeks more, stirring or agitating periodically, and your pineapple vinegar is ready.


Fruit Scrap Vinegar
 Most fruit scraps can be used with the same recipe as above.
Honey can be substituted, but the process may take longer. 


I'd like an opinion on what I've done and if you think it'll make vinegar.
1/4c. sugar dissolved in qt jar of warm water w/ 1/4c. Braggs and apple cores lightly covered and setting behind my wood stove.  ???
DD 5yo---Mom, I think we should take a camera with us when we go to Heaven, it'll be so beautiful up there.

Sherri

Offline daisey

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #344 on: July 21, 2010, 01:38:47 PM »
I have used some of the NT principles but I finally got the book and have a few questions.   When it says to soak your cornmeal in Lime Water..........there is no way you can drain that off is there?   That means you have lime water in your finished cornbread, right?   Is that good for you?
Also, when you Marinate..........in the book it says to save your marinate and use it later either in the sauce or to brush on the meat.   I have always heard that you should never save marinate sauce and reuse it.   Anyone????
I am thinking I will try some of these recipes but that if they aren't good like some have said I will use the principles with my own recipes.   
I could also not find recipes on that site that some of you mentioned earlier in this thread  www.cookingnt.com   Is it still active?
Thanks
Be Still my soul, the Lord is on Thy Side

Offline brightspot

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #345 on: July 23, 2010, 01:15:14 PM »
I have used some of the NT principles but I finally got the book and have a few questions.   When it says to soak your cornmeal in Lime Water..........there is no way you can drain that off is there?   That means you have lime water in your finished cornbread, right?   Is that good for you?
Also, when you Marinate..........in the book it says to save your marinate and use it later either in the sauce or to brush on the meat.   I have always heard that you should never save marinate sauce and reuse it.   Anyone????
I am thinking I will try some of these recipes but that if they aren't good like some have said I will use the principles with my own recipes.   
I could also not find recipes on that site that some of you mentioned earlier in this thread  www.cookingnt.com   Is it still active?
Thanks

If I were going to use the marinate sauce later or on cooked meat, I would boil the sauce first to be sure it is ok. Usually when I marinate something, I try to use only a little more than needed to coat the meat so there isn't any left over.