Author Topic: Glasses on a baby  (Read 5925 times)

Offline mexmarr

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Glasses on a baby
« on: May 16, 2006, 03:02:42 AM »
Has anyone else had to put glasses on their baby? My eighteen month old with be getting glasses next week.  She was a preemie, and developmentally, she is more like 11-12 months.  We went to try some on and she HATED it.  My generally sweet passive little girl turned into a furious little bear when we tried to put them on.  Any sugestions? 

Let me give you a little background on her situation.  The vitreous of her eyes did not develop correctly in the uterous.  At four months she was completely blind, not even able to see a flashlight shined in her face.  The doctors said that because of the nature of the problem, she could possibly gain some vision. (Though will always be legally blind.) At that time, I didn't believe it, but he was right.  She is now able to grab for things within a foot of her face, although still unable to focus on anything.  Our hope is that the glasses will reduce some of the strain off her eyes and enable her to begin focusing.  We are not sure if it will help or not, though. It is pretty much an experiment. 

If it helps even a little it will be worth it!!!!  The question is, how in the world will I keep them on her??????  Any advice would be greatly appreciated!!!!  Thanks!


Offline nursegirl

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Re: Glasses on a baby
« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2006, 10:51:20 PM »
I understand what you mean about the "furious little bear"-- my daughter does the same thing sometimes!  My first thought is to just keep putting them on her--no matter how many times she takes them off, put them back on.  Obviously, you couldn't do this all day, just for a period of time.  Maybe, if she's calm enough, you can put them on and then distract her with something she loves to do.  Also, my daughter loves praise.  She hates having her hair put up, but after a few times of me telling her how pretty she looks ("Pretty hair!"), she is now reconciled to it.  You can just see her waiting for a compliment after I do her hair. 

Hopefully, these tactics will get your daughter to keep her glasses on a little longer every day, until you can leave them on all day.  HTH!

Sarah

Offline mexmarr

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Re: Glasses on a baby
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2006, 12:26:16 PM »
We get the glasses tomorrow.  Anyone else with any suggestions?  Thanks

Offline jaemom

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Re: Glasses on a baby
« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2006, 12:57:43 PM »
I've never had to deal with this, but thought it was an interesting issue.  Found a website for you... www.yourbabyseyes.com/Glasses.html
Hope it helps!
Wife to J (10 yrs)
Mom to B (9), G (7), G (2), and B (1)

Offline AC in SC

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Re: Glasses on a baby
« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2006, 02:27:22 AM »
My friend's daughter has had glasses since she was a toddler.  I was amazed that such a young child would leave glasses on (I can't seem to keep sunglasses on either of my children).  According to my friend, once her daughter realized that the glasses helped her see better she left them on willingly.

Hopefully, your daughter will discover the same.

Offline CinCapri

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Re: Glasses on a baby
« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2006, 07:30:47 PM »
My dtr was just under 2yo when she got her first glasses. Now 6 yrs later another dtr of mine who is just over 2yo slipped on her first pair of glasses. Both children re-acted differently to having glasses. Here's what we did with each of them.

My first dtr had no bridge so her glasses always fell down off her nose and down into her mouth. From there she effectively chewed her nose pads off constantly.  We were in the eye dr's many times a day to get them replaced. She took them off a few times and "warped" them in a matter of seconds. That's when we learned to go to wal-mart for baby glasses cause they replace them for free the first year. We had 4 new pairs of glasses for my little darling that first year.  As far as keeping them on her face. We tried the straps that tighten in the back but she just looked awful with her hair all munched up and glasses tighten against her face. We switched to more comfortable glasses, some without nose pads (plastic frames) and those worked well for a bit until she got older and we were able to switch back to nose pads.

My second dtr was just over two and pulled the glasses off constantly.  When we were trying them on before we picked one, I'd put a pair on her then take them off and say "no those are too big" (at 2yo they need pretty small frames) well, we tried soo many glasses on that I would put the frame on and take it off saying "too big". Well my little darling started yanking the glasses off saying "too big" :-) and it stuck. Funny what they pick up. 

So after we finally picked a frame and we were told she had to wear them full time I put he under constant supervision. When we drove in the car I would post a child next to her and put her glasses on. They were to watch her and only her, make sure she didn't pull them off, distract her, and if needed, give the glasses to me if none of the above worked.  At first it was slow going. She barely wore her glasses. She pulled them off constanlty not because she was irritated by them but because they were something new she wasn't use to. So we kept putting them on her only at times when she could be watched one on one. When she did pull her glasses off I would, or the kids would, offer to put them back on for her. If she still protested (yanking them off, swatting them away etc...) we'd let it go so as not to have a battle and make her glasses a bad thing.

After a couple of weeks (maybe not that long) I would put her glasses on her at the dinner table, when she was helping me do the dishes, when we'd go for a walk, when she was at the table coloring. More and more we intergrated them into her life.  And it didn't take long at all. 

Another approach that worked well was I would put my glasses on when she was hesitant to wear hers.  I would show her mama wears glasses, and let her point, touch and examine my glasses. Then I would get her glasses and as I was placing them on her face I would say "And Gianna wears glasses." And smile real big.  She is usually satisfied with that. If no one wears glasses in your family, maybe buy some inexpensive ones from good will just for show so she won't feel singled out.

Once when my dtr took her glasses off and didn't want to put them back on, I received help from another child that we were sitting next to.  He was wearing glasses. He asked her to put her glasses on "for him". Funny thing was, she promptly put them on.

Now she asks to have her glasses on but she still has to be supervised just not so closely. She has worn glasses now for less than 2 months.  A lot can happen in a short time just keep smiling and keep at it.

~Cinnamon

Offline mexmarr

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Re: Glasses on a baby
« Reply #6 on: May 21, 2006, 10:41:15 AM »
Wow, Thanks for all the great help!  I am looking forward to checking out the website, too.  We didn't get her glasses yesterday, after all.  They will be mailed to us next week.

Walmart doesn't carry any glasses small enough for my daughter, since she is so little (Only 18 lbs!)  I can't believe that with what we paid for those glasses, I forgot to even ask about a warrenty.....  I'll have to check into that!

Offline Sewbusy

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Re: Glasses on a baby
« Reply #7 on: April 11, 2013, 06:34:21 AM »
There maybe a better thread for this but this was the only one that came up when I searched (and I hate starting new threads if it isn't necessary).  My 7 month old is getting glasses. She has always had a problem with her eyes crossing and we told ourselves we'd give it till 6 months and if it hadn't improved we'd get it checked out. So we went to dr yesterday who promptly sent us to eye dr. After checking he said she was farsighted. She would focus up close for a short time then her eye/eyes would begin to wander or cross (right eye is the worst) She really can't focus on anything beyond 3-4 ft.  He said her eyes are short and hopefully it will grow and lengthen as she grows and she won't end up needing glasses later. For now though glasses prevent her eyes from getting too tired and crossing, which can end up being a permanent problem later . SO I guess my question is: Anyone know what else (herbs, vits, exercises) I can do to help encourage her eye to grow/strengthen?


Offline mykidsmom

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Re: Glasses on a baby
« Reply #8 on: April 11, 2013, 01:03:03 PM »
Our boy was like this as a baby.  He went into glasses as a toddler and NEVER took them off because he could see for the first time in his life really.  Typically this is amblyopia and/or strabismus and to my knowledge eye exercises will not cause the muscles to lengthen enough to fix.  Our boy still wears glasses at 13 but his vision has improved tremendously with a whole foods diet.  He went from a +2.5 as a toddler up to a +6 at one point and is now back down to a +3.74 and +4.  So he did get good improvement from diet.
For I know whom I have believed and am persuaded that he is able to keep that which I've committed unto him against that day.

Offline Precious

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Re: Glasses on a baby
« Reply #9 on: April 11, 2013, 04:35:49 PM »
I would strongly recommend that you get an appointment with a developmental optometrist.  This site can help you find one in your area.  If you find one, give them a call and ask if they have experience working with infants.

Question: Is she crawling yet?  This milestone is VERY important for visual development.  Don't let your baby "skip" it!

Offline Sewbusy

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Re: Glasses on a baby
« Reply #10 on: April 12, 2013, 06:06:19 AM »
Amazingly there is one of those dr in town. I wouldn't even have to go to the city :) She isn't crawling yet, not even attempting. She is just now sitting up though she still falls over from time to time. I have another child with delays and didn't crawl till 13 months and walked at 22 months after PT. Dr and I are watching and not going to wait that long to get her therapy if shes having trouble getting going.  SO what is so special about one of these developmental optometrist? Now that we've gotten in with a dr I don't know that insurance will let us switch until next year and drs are quite expensive here. So I have to KNOW that it would be worth the expense before I would pay for out of pocket. KWIM?

Offline Precious

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Re: Glasses on a baby
« Reply #11 on: April 12, 2013, 08:03:28 AM »
Yes, I definitely know what you mean.  Typical optometrists test for visual acuity (20/20 vision), refractive error (nearsighted or farsighted) and eye health only.  A developmental optometrist will be trained to test for more complex issues such as visual efficiency (accommodative insufficiency or excess, binocular vision disorders such as amblyopia and strabismus, eye movements/tracking disorders) and how the brain is processing visual information.  They can also provide vision therapy.

A quote from the COVD (College of Optometrists in Vision Development) website:
Quote
Established in 1971, COVD provides board certification for eye doctors and vision therapists who are prepared to offer state-of-the-art services in:

Behavioral and developmental vision care
Vision therapy
Visual rehabilitation

These specialized vision care services develop and enhance visual abilities and correct many vision problems in infants, children, and adults.
Optometrists who successfully complete their certification process are Board Certified in Vision Development and Vision Therapy and are designated Fellows of COVD (FCOVD). Vision therapists are certified to work with COVD Fellows as Certified Optometric Vision Therapists (COVT).

Associate members of COVD are practicing optometrists who have not yet completed the Fellowship process. COVD associates are required to participate in professional continuing education to enhance their knowledge and skills in behavioral vision care.

Vision care provided by all COVD members is based on the principle that vision can be developed and changed. For example, we know that infants are not born with fully developed visual abilities and that good vision is developed through a learned process.

If your daughter's eyes are both crossing in, that is called an "esotropia" and is a type of strabismus.  A strabismus is defined as a misalignment of the eyes.