Author Topic: Sensory Integration Disorder? Please Help!  (Read 114360 times)

Offline mamaoffour

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Sensory Integration Disorder? Please Help!
« on: January 31, 2007, 06:28:43 PM »
I really need some help from all of you moms who have a child with sensory problems.  I'm not sure if my child has this or not, I just know something in his little brain is not working properly.  Let me give you a little background: Noah will be 3 in April and has been acting strange.  He has been fully vaccinated(we didn't with my second, that was before we researched and decided it was in the best intrest for her not to be) until 12 months.  He has always been a very bright child IMO.  He talked at 10 months, learned all his colors by 12 months, could identify 18 different animals and their sounds they made, knew all his shapes, and the list goes on.  We never really thought anything of it until he learned his ABC's by 17 months. We were amazed at what a wonderful memory he had!!  He then learned all his sounds(included short and long vowel sounds also) by 19 months.  That's really when we knew we weren't dealing with a typical toddler.  He has always been a really good talker also.  He has great language skills.  He also learned to read at age two!!  At first we thought he was just memorizing, but later on we learned he was actually sounding words out that he didn't know.  He can also spell over 200 words or so.  We never really realized how different he was until someone comments on how smart he is.  We are used to it.  Here are some of the symptoms he is exhibiting:

Lots of sensory issues:
hates all tags on clothes
doesn't want to wear socks
doesn't want his hands wet or dirty(including at bath time, but not when washing them)
doesn't like to be crowed on the couch(when we read, he will get upset if his baby sister's foot is on top of his--he is not being mean to her when he complains about it--you can tell it just bugs him.
is sensitive to light
doesn't like the elastic on his "big boy pants"
coats bother him
hats bother him
sweaters bother him(I used to think he was just being defiant, but now I think he may truly have a problem with sensory issues)
Doesn't like anything restricting as far as clothes go
Doesn't even like his bibs
can be overly sensitive to falling(even when I know he isn't hurt)

is very clumsy
only likes to play cars or trucks on the table
lines them up on the table
I think he is almost obsessed with his cars and trucks!!  LOL
watches the wheels go around
loves anything that rolls or spins
gets upset if someone else closes a door(ex: if I'm getting something out of the fridge and close the door, he gets all upset and says he wants to close it)
has a very good ear
sometimes he hears "white noise" that I don't even hear ex: a faint sound of a far away dog barking

He can also pick out a song even if the volume is turned way down.  He knows a ton of songs by memory, and I mean by every word.
He over hears conversations while he's apparently playing.  He doesn't appear to be listening, but hangs on every word.
memories his books
good sense of humor
strong willed child
when he moves his stool in the bathroom he has to have it in the "exact position" or he will not get on it.  He thinks it's upside down!! LOL!  It really matters to him!
has a strong drive to learn anything..
very loving
not aggresive at all
strictly routine--wants it to be the same everyday(ex:same thing for breakfast, same clothes, wants the same cup to drink out of....
motor skills are not up to par
gets easily frustrated when things fall,break,or if something doesn't work
little patience when trying to do things with his hands
knows his ABC's in sign language



And the list could go on...

These are just a few things that I could think of ( I'm having brain fog right now hehe) at the moment.  There is so much more that I just can't remember.  I'm not sure what to do.  Should I take him to a therapist?  I really don't want anyone talking to him that's going to try to "get into his head".  Ya know?  I also don't want to be questioned on our disciplinary actions.  I have heard that some therapists come to your home.  Is that correct?  I would not be comfortable with that at all.  Is there somewhere else I can turn to for help that respect parent's decisions on spanking there children?  I don't like anyone getting into our family business.  I'm just clueless on where to go now.  I have read Unraveling The Mystery Of Autism which was an eye opener for me!!   Great book!!  I have also checked out Raising a Sensory Smart Child from the library, haven't finished yet, but so far is very interesting.  We have been doing the GFCD diet for about 2 weeks and is really helping with the hyperactivity.  I have also been giving him Natural Cellular Defense ( detox-heavy metals from vaccines) for 2 weeks also, it is also helping him.  Is it possible that Noah is a "High Functioning" Autistic child?  Everything I read on the Autism Spectrum seems to fit his symptoms.  Am I overreacting?  I just want to be sure that I'm doing all I can to  help him if something is wrong with his little brain. Everyone else just says, "Oh, he's just one of those smart,strong-willed children, he will grow out of it."  I just don't think that's the case anymore.  I sit here and think that maybe I'm all he needs to heal and not some therapist, but maybe I'm wrong.  Please help.  So many questions.  Please, any input would be great.  Please let me know what you think.

Praying for my son,
Misty
"Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it(Prov. 22:6).

Offline Lavender~Rosemary

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Re: Sensory Integration Disorder? Please Help!
« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2007, 07:01:44 PM »
I am in no way an expert on this but it  is something I have thought about a lot.  I have suspected my daughter to have some troubles in this area.  Even talked to the doctor about it...they didn't help much but did give me the number of a sensory integration specialist (I tired to call but the number didn't work :-\)
My nephew
is on the autism spectrum so I have learned a little from my sister-in-law about it.
I found this link that lists a number of things to look out for, you may want to check it out:
http://www.incrediblehorizons.com/sensory-integration.htm

Some things that the therapists have suggested for my nephew are skin brushing and floor rolling.

For the skin brushing you need a special brush that you use all over their body in one motion (top to bottom).  I believe it is supposed to help desensitize them ( i can really relate to that one.  My daughter has terrible trouble with clothing and shoes - she will sit and cry on the ground outside a store because her foot is itching - it is not disobedience but real discomfort).
One website said this about skin/body brushing:
"Therapeutic body brushing is often used on children (not infants) who overreact to tactile stimulation. A specific non-scratching surgical brush is used to make firm, brisk movements over most of the body, especially the arms, legs, hands, back and soles of the feet. A technique of deep joint compression follows the brushing. Usually begun by an occupational therapist, the technique is taught to parents who need to complete the process for three to five minutes, six to eight times a day. The time needed for brushing is reduced as the child begins to respond more normally to touch. In order for this therapy to be effective, the correct brush and technique must be used."
From http://www.answers.com/topic/sensory-integration-disorder-1
I have seen a special catalog that sells this sort of thing.  You may be able to find it if you search on-line.

With the floor rolling you simply have them lay down and roll them along the floor.  It sounds strange but I hear it works.

Also heavy exercise like running hard or jumping on a trampoline is supposed to help.

Since I am still trying to figure all this out I can't tell you if it works or not.  I do know that my daughter loves the skin brushing.  At first she care barely stand it..after a while she settles down.

If you are at all interested in homeopathy, there is something called Kali Phos that your son could take. It is a cell salt.  I have used it with my daughter and feel that it has helped.  It is for simple nervous tension, stress and irritability from inability to cope.  I noticed her not "freaking out" so much after she began to take it.  I only recently heard thats some people question the use of homeopathy so you may want to check into that for yourself.

It sounds like you have a bright young man there!!  I know you must want to do anything to help him better cope with "life".  I hope you find something that helps.  Please share if you do!
Stacy

P.S.  I also know what you mean about your son being bothered by people being close to him - like on the  couch reading a story.  When we first tried the homeschool co-op I thought we would never make it because my daughter could not stand people sitting close to her.  The only way I found to deal with that was to practise having her sit close to someone - her brother or me. 

Offline Lavender~Rosemary

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Re: Sensory Integration Disorder? Please Help!
« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2007, 07:08:55 PM »
I also don't like the idea of people getting into our family business like you mentioned.  I am always afraid that they will ask lots of questions baout discipline etc.  I know that can be a factor with therapists.
Stacy

Offline servantgirl

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Re: Sensory Integration Disorder? Please Help!
« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2007, 08:48:14 PM »
Hi mamaoffour,

I can relate!!! My guy, now 10, fits almost everything you said. He didn't have great language skills though, because till he was 3 practically everything he said was something he had heard somewhere else (echoalia). He barely ever used his own words. He surely would have learned all the letter sounds, reading, etc, like your guy, except we didn't teach them to him. The sense of humor could use help, and I think he is perhaps mentally a few years slower than his age. Otherwise, everything is the same.The spinning obsession was a very strong one when he was a baby.  Man, life was tough!  :'( He seemed so miserable all the time. He still has a lot of those characteristics, but they are under control. He is still obsessed with closing doors, all doors. Everything has to be in the right place, for example, his spoon, fork, cup and napkin all have to me in the exact proper place (only he knows where that is) or he can't eat. And yes, he hears everything! Alll sorts of things. And play two notes of a song- he knows what it is and every word if it has words. He's hypersensitive with smelling too. Also very loving and non agressive, still is. And he still has practically no patience or skill when it comes to doing things with his hands, fine motor stuff. But trust me- everything is incredibly better than it was. Some things he has gotten over to a degree, some are still there but rather than being a source of frustration for him, they are just facts of life, and some things still bother him but he can control himself a lot better.  :)

I have never had a proper diagnosis, but by myself I called him Moderate to high functioning autistic. It fit him incredibly well when I first read about it 3 years ago. I am still sticking with the HFA "label". I know some people don't like labels, but sometimes it makes things a lot easier.

If your kiddo is socially developing well, maybe you just have the sensory aspects to deal with and not autism. Or maybe asberger's. Bravo on the diet and NCD, those things helped my guy too. Look into some type of probiotic, he may really benefit from that. We used Primal Defense and it did a lot. For evaluation/ treatment/ suggestions on how you can get control of the autistic symptoms, I suggest you contact NACD, National Association for Child Development. They don't do the things for you, they evaluate the kid and tell you how to help them yourself. They work from a neurodevelopmental, sensory approach. Check them out and see if they ever do evaluations in your area. BTW, they don't come to your home, you meet them at the evaluation location, such as a church or school. SC could tell you more, as she has had experience with them too.

I have been there, and I know that your son is a wonderful person. You are so blessed to have him! 8)

jen :-*
Life is what happens to you while you're busy making other plans.

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Sensory Integration Disorder? Please Help!
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2007, 09:24:52 AM »
I don't know as much about this sort of thing as many others, but I thought I would throw this out there "just in case".

Your son sounds like case studies I've read about.  I believe they are called autistic savants; however, in his case it seems relatively mild in comparison to the ones I've read about.  You didn't mention any social issues, mostly just touching and crowding, but it sounds very similar nonetheless.  Hopefully, someone with some more background in this subject can either help me out or let you know just how much I don't know. 

If this is in fact your situation, there is tons of info available about how it happened and what to do about it.  Most info will be related to vaccinations, heavy metal toxicity, yeast/candida overgrowth, leaky gut syndrome, and gluten (wheat protein) and casein (milk protein) intolerances.

Here are some links and references on this subject.

Generation Rescue
Candida / Yeast: Symptoms & Cures
Treating Children for Candida/Yeast
Leaky Gut:  The Cause of it All?
I Think I Have Candida and/or Leaky Gut:  What Now?
Researched Autism Information
Autism-related disorders...where to start?
Looking for info on chelation therapy for autism spectrum kids

« Last Edit: February 01, 2007, 09:32:47 AM by healthybratt »
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Offline mamaoffour

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Re: Sensory Integration Disorder? Please Help!
« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2007, 06:44:15 PM »
servantgirl, healthybratt,aussieinamerica, Thanks for all the helpful info.  Healthybratt, As far as Noah's social skills go, he would much rather be involved in adult company than children's his age.  He does interact with other children, but would just rather be with adults.  The more I read about these types of disorders, the more I think Noah fits the mold.  I have been denying this for months.  It's hard to think that something I did in the past might have caused these problems(MMR vaccine?) to my innocent child.  It makes me very angry to think of the vaccines being the culprit of his problems.  I wish I would have known better then. I will fight this to the end, just like all mothers hope to do for their little ones.  I will help him get better if it's in God's Will.  I am already detoxing, doing the GFCD diet, and I ordered him a candida treatment kit.  Every since I have started detoxing him I have noticed a slight rash on his legs and groin area.  My theory is it's from the mercury leaving his body which is causing his system a little stress?  His mood swings are getting better, he had some awful ones in the first week of detoxing. I really hope this will do him some good in the long run.  Since the diet and the detoxing, he has had more formed BM's than usual, and I know that's a great sign. There is so much to learn about this.  I just feel like I'm in the dark sometimes. Ya know?  My family thinks he is just a weirdo and has nothing wrong with him, but my gut says to keep researching to find answers to his wacky behavior.  I hope I'm doing the right thing.  My husband and I have come to the conclusion that if I was working after he turned 18 months, he would have been full blown autistic.  I stopped working when he was 13 months and literally taught him everything he knows.  I guess it was therapy 1 on 1 for him; IMO that's why he doesn't suffer from language delays, and doesn't have problems socially?  We are still trying to figure out why he doesn't fit the category(Autistic Spectrum) in the language department.  We do "school" everyday and do alot of phonics, read, and do puzzles.  I'm thinking this has really helped his language skills.  Anyway, Noah is still showing problems with his motor skills, sensory integration, and other problems.  i appreciate everyone's input.  It's nice to know that I can trust the advice given to me. Thanks for your time.


Misty
"Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it(Prov. 22:6).

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Sensory Integration Disorder? Please Help!
« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2007, 06:55:13 PM »
Quote
My family thinks he is just a weirdo and has nothing wrong with him, but my gut says to keep researching to find answers to his wacky behavior.  I hope I'm doing the right thing.
I don't think anyone here would fault you for this error.  Most of us have made this exact error or something similar and some of us have suffered as a result and others have been blessed and missed it by a hair's breadth, but it sounds as if your son is doing very well compared to many with his same symptoms and the fact that you're so diligent to find the answers despite the lack of support from family, peers, doctors and the media makes you a great mom in my eyes.  You just keep on going.  The answers will present themselves and your son will thank you for it.   :D
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Offline Lavender~Rosemary

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Re: Sensory Integration Disorder? Please Help!
« Reply #7 on: February 01, 2007, 07:11:51 PM »
mamaoffour - I am so impressed with everything you are doing.  Wow!  You are so diligent.  I'm sure you will see success as you persevere.  What a blessed child to have you for a mother.

I did have a question, what is the GFCD diet?

Keep us posted on your progress.  There are others who will be going through the same thing and benefit greatly from what you share.

Stacy

Offline dara

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Re: Sensory Integration Disorder? Please Help!
« Reply #8 on: February 02, 2007, 05:22:31 AM »
Misty, I'm not an expert on this either, but I'm wondering if he is more aspergers than autistic. Kids with aspergers often have amazing laguage skills, but exibit some of the traits you describe. It is considered to be on the autism spectum, but has some different characteristics.

http://artzoo.com/health/autism.htm
Then again, if it doesn't fit, he may just need some of the same treatments because perhaps his issues are from the same root causes, like the mercury poisoning.

The GFCF diet is the gluten free, casien free diet, meaning a diet free of grains containing the gluten protien, and dairy products which contain the milk protien casien. Many children on the autism spectrum cannot tolerate/digest these protiens, and it often exaberates their behavioral problems.
« Last Edit: February 02, 2007, 05:35:17 AM by dara »
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Offline makingchanges

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Re: Sensory Integration Disorder? Please Help!
« Reply #9 on: February 02, 2007, 05:23:07 AM »
My daughter had so many of your child's symptoms. I never thought about the connection of shots. Can you tell me the connections? My Dd had the basic 3 shots and MMR through four. We stopped then. Like you, oh how I wished I had known. She got a tetanus booster at 8 and we thought she might never walk again. She does not do well with shots. I know the drugs messed with her. I just never thought it messed with her learning, sensory problems.

Anyway, we did go to NACD. We drove across the state of TX for the testing and did the work at home. It did work for us. We did not take her until High School. We did not know any of this at preschool. We were the typical American family. NACD is pricey, but my daughter would not be successful today without it. It cost us $500 every 3 months. They give you exercises for you to do at home for the 3 months. NACD teaches your brain to be organized. I wish we had done it at your child's age. My Dd is in college and doing great. In fact, she is on an English scholarship and one of their top students. I used to cry that she would never read and go to college even though I knew she was smart.

You can contact them at:

http://www.nacd.org

They also have a tape series that helps. It explains the program. I can't remember the name of it. Do ask SC if you are interested. They require you to listen to it before you start with them, or at least they used to. We did NACD about 5 yrs. ago.

I believe in it so much that I am looking at going through the training to evaluate kids. I homeschooled all my kids and my last graduated this past May. I'm spending the year resting and learning more about health.

Do look into options,

Offline ladyhen

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Re: Sensory Integration Disorder? Please Help!
« Reply #10 on: February 02, 2007, 05:34:00 AM »
mamaoffour,

Keep up your hard work!  I just read this thread and I remember all the hard work, tears, and heartache we had with our oldest.  He had behavior problems, extremely intelligent, and very demanding of me.  The first 5 or 6 years were the worst for us.  I did a lot of research and found ways to work with him to improve his health and condition.
My family, too, thought we were making too much of all of it.  They just didn't understand, as they didn't see the day to day struggles firsthand.  
We feel blessed that God led us to the information that He did, and we did not have vaccines for our other children and have made tremendous dietary changes in our family.  Our oldest, now 26, is healthy and well adjusted.  He can function well in any setting, has a wonderful wife and children, and is still extremely intelligent.
  His wife dreads the thought that they may have a child like he was, as we believe that the tendency may be hereditary.    ;D

You are the best qualified expert on your own child.  You are his best advocate.  I will be praying for you.
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Offline Lavender~Rosemary

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Re: Sensory Integration Disorder? Please Help!
« Reply #11 on: February 02, 2007, 06:15:01 AM »

The GFCF diet is the gluten free, casien free diet, meaning a diet free of grains containing the gluten protien, and dairy products which contain the milk protien casien. Many children on the autism spectrum cannot tolerate/digest these protiens, and it often exaberates their behavioral problems.
Thanks dara.  I couldn't figure it out. :)
My nephew, who is autistic, has had great success with a casien free diet.
Stacy

Offline mamaoffour

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Re: Sensory Integration Disorder? Please Help!
« Reply #12 on: February 02, 2007, 07:27:43 AM »
i will be back to email yall.  Thanks so much!!  I'm busy with Noah right now.  We are having a very hyperactive day today. >:( >:(  Be back in touch soon.
"Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it(Prov. 22:6).

Offline here-n-there-a-little

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Re: Sensory Integration Disorder? Please Help!
« Reply #13 on: February 02, 2007, 08:18:46 AM »
I guess it was therapy 1 on 1 for him; IMO that's why he doesn't suffer from language delays, and doesn't have problems socially?  We are still trying to figure out why he doesn't fit the category(Autistic Spectrum) in the language department.  We do "school" everyday and do alot of phonics, read, and do puzzles.  I'm thinking this has really helped his language skills. 

That very well could be a great influence on him!

Although I know quite a bit about language development, I am no expert on sensory issues.  I think you are on the right track to keep pursuing all that you are.  I have worked with many children before I stayed at home that fall on the autism spectrum.  It was one of my favorite 'disorders' you could say.  But, I certainly don't claim to be an expert.  I just wanted to encourage you to keep at it.  Look into help that is best for YOUR family. 

The organization mentioned a few times on this thread I am unfamiliar with, but it sounds interesting.  Otherwise there are private clinics which you can be more 'in control' of what you do and don't do with them.  These clinics are under the 'rehabilitation' category in the yellow pages: look for one specializing in children.  Sometimes, if there is a university near you, they may have a 'teaching clinic' of some sort in occupational therapy (occupational therapy is often the specialty that deals with sensory integration).  I used to participate in several developmental clinics, but I can't for the life of me remember how a family got in contact with them!  ???

Also, hospitals may have a pediatric department that could help you.  If you inquire into these, you could just get information without committing to participate.  I know what you mean about not wanting some of them to intrude into your family.  That is PERFECTLY acceptable.  I have lived in two state.  In one, I would NEVER let some of these professions into our lives.  Yet, in another, which is much more conservative, I wouldn't be as concerned.  Do what the Lord leads you to do.

The longer I live, the more I am amazed at how the Lord leads us step by step down the path He has for us.  Keep your eyes on Him and He will direct your path.

Offline kamom

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Re: Sensory Integration Disorder? Please Help!
« Reply #14 on: February 02, 2007, 09:09:56 AM »
  I read through this thread and have some questions. Not accusingly, but why do you want to give it a label, whats wrong with being smart for his age? Really, I have no intensions of offending, I'm just wondering. Unless your are having issues that you just can't handle I would NOT let anyone get involved.
  I too, have a son that fits allot of these catagories, I always thought he was just very smart and therefor took extra disciplining. He's the one that hummed a tune at 9 months, as I  mentioned here before. Although we had our hands full in training him, and I'm not talking about potty training, good old fashioned training him up in the way he should go and trust the Lord with it. He is doing wonderful at 6yrs old. I too, spent allot of time with him and we HS so I can't imagine what would have become of him otherwise.
    Just to encourage you that maybe you can do it by yourself without the added stress in his life of Dring. I have to add though that he never said he heard sounds, but very many of the other "symptoms".  It's very rewarding now to have a 6yr old who knows all the states and challenges me on the capitals  ;D  Who loves to sing, is a wiz at math, who loves to read and writes stories ;D We're biligual so when he started talking he knew two languages and now he's learning his third.
  Yes, he too lined up cars, mermorized  books at 3 yrs old,the bumps on his socks drove him nuts et.c etc.
   I'm just wondering whats wrong with just being extra smart, does it have to have a
label?    :) :)..please, no offence meant.
 
« Last Edit: February 02, 2007, 11:02:40 AM by kamom »

Offline servantgirl

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Re: Sensory Integration Disorder? Please Help!
« Reply #15 on: February 02, 2007, 09:38:17 AM »
Kamom,
No offense taken, but from my perspective, it is not just a matter of having a kid with special abilities. It is also sometimes a matter of having a kid with a lot of stumbling blocks. For mine, his "special abilities" were often actually stimming, or coping mechanisms for dealing with the confusion and discomfort he faced all the time. Sometimes these kids seem to be extra smart. If you look at it from the right angle, mine is too, but he is also a little slow and does have social issues, which seems to be something different what other moms on this thread are saying. 

My point is that I spent all my life wondering what was the matter with me... you see I was one of those kids too- but more along the "smart" variety like these mom's kids. But very socially inept as a kid and truly miserable in that way and also from sensory issues. No one ever helped me. I recognized these problems in my son as soon as he was born but since I never knew what was happening for myself, I didn't know what to do about him. For all his miserable first 7 years of life I did the best I could but I really had no clue what to do. Finally identiying it as Autism changed my life and his. It was incredibly helpful and freeing to have a label! I know it is not helpful for some to be labeled, but it was an answer to prayer for me. Having a label meant being able to research how to help him! And you are right, there is a LOT you can do yourself without doctors. :)

In love,
Jen
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Offline ladyhen

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Re: Sensory Integration Disorder? Please Help!
« Reply #16 on: February 02, 2007, 09:42:30 AM »
 ~  I know what you are saying.
 I have 5  children and they are all smart, 3 of them could be catagorized as 'genius'.  However, one of them has a severe health problem and it affects his behavior and emotions as well as his relationships.  Our day to day life with him, at the age of two, was more tiring than with all of our children put together.
It helped us to be a part of a study group at a nearby university.  We were overjoyed to meet other parents struggling with the same problems as we were and to be able to share ideas.  Grouping like this helped us to realize that we were sane and that our child's condition could be helped.  
Children who need this sort of extra attention, dietary help, etc. are not 'normal' smart kids ~ they are smart kids with problems attached.  It is really difficult to just explain to someone else what the problems are, as they don't always fit into a  " 1, 2, 3" type of checklist and when isolated the symptoms may not sound too severe.  
I guess it's another of those things where we need to trust the parents' intuition and God's plan that parents know what is best for their children.
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Offline kamom

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Re: Sensory Integration Disorder? Please Help!
« Reply #17 on: February 02, 2007, 09:53:44 AM »
    Thanks blesses213
  I get it...I think I'm getting it is because we had so many issues that we faced by ourselves with him. and I OFTEN wondered is this normal behaviour?  I guess looking back it wasn't quite "normal" and though I don't regret that we didn't have anyone interfering into our lives , it would have been comforting to know that we were dealing with something "extra". 
   Well, I guess the original poster will have to decide if she can handle it or not. I do want to encourage you that tho we faced lots of 'issues' he doing very well now, without extra an outside help.   
 

Offline mamaoffour

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Re: Sensory Integration Disorder? Please Help!
« Reply #18 on: February 02, 2007, 10:47:50 AM »
Quote
My family thinks he is just a weirdo and has nothing wrong with him, but my gut says to keep researching to find answers to his wacky behavior.  I hope I'm doing the right thing.
I don't think anyone here would fault you for this error.  Most of us have made this exact error or something similar and some of us have suffered as a result and others have been blessed and missed it by a hair's breadth, but it sounds as if your son is doing very well compared to many with his same symptoms and the fact that you're so diligent to find the answers despite the lack of support from family, peers, doctors and the media makes you a great mom in my eyes.  You just keep on going.  The answers will present themselves and your son will thank you for it.   :D

Healthybratt:  Thanks so much for your support. Sometimes I don't get any help from family members because they don't understand our situation. I will press on and continue to search for the right answers for my son and my family. Thank God for this wonderful website.  It's the best start for me so far.  Most of my info I have found has been found here.  Praise God WTM!!
"Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it(Prov. 22:6).

Offline mamaoffour

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Re: Sensory Integration Disorder? Please Help!
« Reply #19 on: February 02, 2007, 10:50:07 AM »
mamaoffour - I am so impressed with everything you are doing.  Wow!  You are so diligent.  I'm sure you will see success as you persevere.  What a blessed child to have you for a mother.

I did have a question, what is the GFCD diet?

Keep us posted on your progress.  There are others who will be going through the same thing and benefit greatly from what you share.

Stacy


AussieinAmerica:  Thanks for the kind words.  It's nice to know that someone thinks I'm not crazy for pursuing these things.  I will let you know what else I find out on anything and everything.  There is so much info out there!! It can be overwhelming at times.

"Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it(Prov. 22:6).

Offline mamaoffour

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Re: Sensory Integration Disorder? Please Help!
« Reply #20 on: February 02, 2007, 11:16:54 AM »
Misty, I'm not an expert on this either, but I'm wondering if he is more aspergers than autistic. Kids with aspergers often have amazing laguage skills, but exibit some of the traits you describe. It is considered to be on the autism spectum, but has some different characteristics.

http://artzoo.com/health/autism.htm
Then again, if it doesn't fit, he may just need some of the same treatments because perhaps his issues are from the same root causes, like the mercury poisoning.

The GFCF diet is the gluten free, casien free diet, meaning a diet free of grains containing the gluten protien, and dairy products which contain the milk protien casien. Many children on the autism spectrum cannot tolerate/digest these protiens, and it often exaberates their behavioral problems.

Dara:  I'm thinking too that Noah is pointing more to Asperger's Syndrome.  What gets me is his wonderful language skills.  He doesn't seem to have any problems there, just motor skill problems, sensory issues, and food allergies.  I just know deep down that his problems are from his vaccines.  I'm sure I damaged him when I took him to get those shots.  I just know if I treat the symptoms(mercury poisoning, leaky gut, yeast problems....and etc.) I can conquer his problems with sensory integration.  It's really weird how I stumbled on the all of this.  One day I just said, "God, I can't do this by myself, please help me with Noah.  If something is wrong with Noah please direct me in the right direction.  I prayed to him one day during their nap.  The next day I stumbled across a book recommendation by the famous Healthybratt(thank God for her wisdom and book smarts) which was Unraveling the Mystery of Autism.  God had answered my prayers!!  That was just it, reading this wonderful book.  I have been researching ever since!!   Noah is currently on Natural Cellular Defense(for detox) and doing the Gluten and Casein Free diet.  It is helping with the hyperactivity in his brain.  He still is extremely hyper.  You would think if you saw him that I gave him a whole bag of sugar!!  That is one of the reason we knew something was not right with Noah's brain.  He doesn't eat any sugar and is still really worked up all the time.  I also found that if Noah gets excited about anything, it takes him almost an hour to calm down.  It's like the parasympathetic part (responsible for calming the body) does not fire properly. Okay, I know we are talking big words here.  I probably spelled it wrong.  Anyway, I read in my Raising a Sensory Smart Child(great read for anyone struggling with a child like mine) that kids with sensory problems have trouble regulating these neurons that control "flight, fright, fight" responses.  Am I making any sense?  Sorry if I'm not.  Just thought I'd share that little piece of info.  Aparently, that's what's going on with our Noah.  The autonomic nervous system helps your body cope with changes in the environment(Noah has alot of trouble with transitioning between changes in his routine or anything for that matter) and ever-changing stimuli. The Sympathetic nervous branch activates your body to fight or flee in response to high stress and emergencies, while the parasympathetic nervous system branch helps your body calm down and self-regulate in the face of changing stimuli.  Noah has a lot of trouble with all three of his nervous systems.  This is all so interesting to me!!  I know I have found the source of Noah's problems!  Treating it and finding the ultimate cause will be much harder for me.  I will let you know of anything else I find and will post immediately.  Thanks for all the wonderful links and help with this important matter.
"Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it(Prov. 22:6).

Offline mamaoffour

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Re: Sensory Integration Disorder? Please Help!
« Reply #21 on: February 02, 2007, 11:28:27 AM »
My daughter had so many of your child's symptoms. I never thought about the connection of shots. Can you tell me the connections? My Dd had the basic 3 shots and MMR through four. We stopped then. Like you, oh how I wished I had known. She got a tetanus booster at 8 and we thought she might never walk again. She does not do well with shots. I know the drugs messed with her. I just never thought it messed with her learning, sensory problems.

Anyway, we did go to NACD. We drove across the state of TX for the testing and did the work at home. It did work for us. We did not take her until High School. We did not know any of this at preschool. We were the typical American family. NACD is pricey, but my daughter would not be successful today without it. It cost us $500 every 3 months. They give you exercises for you to do at home for the 3 months. NACD teaches your brain to be organized. I wish we had done it at your child's age. My Dd is in college and doing great. In fact, she is on an English scholarship and one of their top students. I used to cry that she would never read and go to college even though I knew she was smart.

You can contact them at:

http://www.nacd.org

They also have a tape series that helps. It explains the program. I can't remember the name of it. Do ask SC if you are interested. They require you to listen to it before you start with them, or at least they used to. We did NACD about 5 yrs. ago.

I believe in it so much that I am looking at going through the training to evaluate kids. I homeschooled all my kids and my last graduated this past May. I'm spending the year resting and learning more about health.

Do look into options,
making changes:

I have read in so many studies that it is linked to the MMR shot(the live measles virus in the actual shot).  When you read all of the mother's with children like ours you really start to worry what makes our children have sensory issues.  The only things that I have read to cause sensory integration issues are Vaccines, Autism, and genetic problems.  I sure there are more things out there about SID, I just haven't come across them yet.  Maybe someone can find the actual links for you about the dangers of MMR.  HEALTHYBRATT TO THE RESCUE!!

Thanks for the info on Nacd.  We probably wont be able to afford it, but it is worth a try.  Does insurance normally cover part of it?  If it actually helps the sensory part of the brain, I'm all for it.  Wow, that's great that your daughter completely recovered!!  I pray everyday for Noah because he is so smart, but yet so behind in other aspects. I will look into NAFd.  Thx again for the info. 

Misty
"Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it(Prov. 22:6).

Offline Lavender~Rosemary

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Re: Sensory Integration Disorder? Please Help!
« Reply #22 on: February 02, 2007, 11:38:46 AM »
I have a question in regards to some of the physical irritation these little guys feel....
I suppose answers to it can only be a matter of opinion but I will put it out there anyway since it is something I have been thinking about with my own child.
I am wondering when we should make allowances for these kids and when they need to learn to go with the flow.  I know that doesn't sound quite right.  I am having a hard time putting my thoughts into words.
Here is an example:
When I took my daughter to a homeschool co-op last year she was 5 years old.  I knew she felt a lot of discomfort from her shoes and socks.  So much that she had a hard time functioning with them on.  They irritated her immensly.
I allowed her to take her shoes off because I knew if I forced her to leave them on we may as well have stayed home.  I know this sounds like a discipline issue.....but if you could see her maybe you would understand.  After a while I thought that I would much prefer her to leave her shoes on as would the other people there  :)  The only thing I could think to do was to have her practice wearing them at home and somehow get used to the discomfort.  Shoes are still a big problem for her.  In writing this down I am kind of answering my own question...I think she will have to somehow learn to deal with the discomfort because as she gets older it will not be acceptable for her to have her shoes off.  I am doing my best to find shoes that won't be so uncomfortable...but that is another story.
A few years ago she had a huge screaming and crying fit over ballons popping.  I couldn't believe how upset she was over it.  Her whole body was shaking and she had her fingers in her ears for over an hour!  I talked to my husband about it (since he was not at the event) and we decided she needed to get over this.  She is a kid and there are going to be balloons at most birthday parties she was invited to and also other occasions.  She just could not scream and cry in fear everytime she saw a balloon.  So we started playing games with balloons and even had her pop some.  She is much better now.  She is still scared..but she handles it better than she used to.  But...there are things that are just so much for these kids to handle that sometimes it may be best to avoid them.  My sister-in-law often keeps her child in the back room during worship until the singing is over because the sound bothers him so much.  He is autistic and many autistic children have very sensitive hearing.  I don't know if this is something you can fully comprehend unless you have dealt with it.  I know before he was diagnosed with autism I thought he was an undisciplined child.  Now that I have learned more about autism I have more patience and understanding with him.  And I certainly would not blast music loudly around him because I know it bothers him so much - it is actually painful to him.  Am I making any sense?
My heart does hurt for those dealing with this because of the criticizing glares they receive from those who just don't understand.  No one knows how hard you are working behind closed doors to get your child to act appropriately and to behave properly in the midst of such irritation and frustration.
I know I am starting to ramble so I will quit now. I guess I just wanted to put this out there and see what you guys thought.
Blessings to you,
Stacy

Offline mamaoffour

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Re: Sensory Integration Disorder? Please Help!
« Reply #23 on: February 02, 2007, 11:41:39 AM »
I guess it was therapy 1 on 1 for him; IMO that's why he doesn't suffer from language delays, and doesn't have problems socially?  We are still trying to figure out why he doesn't fit the category(Autistic Spectrum) in the language department.  We do "school" everyday and do alot of phonics, read, and do puzzles.  I'm thinking this has really helped his language skills. 

That very well could be a great influence on him!

Although I know quite a bit about language development, I am no expert on sensory issues.  I think you are on the right track to keep pursuing all that you are.  I have worked with many children before I stayed at home that fall on the autism spectrum.  It was one of my favorite 'disorders' you could say.  But, I certainly don't claim to be an expert.  I just wanted to encourage you to keep at it.  Look into help that is best for YOUR family. 

The organization mentioned a few times on this thread I am unfamiliar with, but it sounds interesting.  Otherwise there are private clinics which you can be more 'in control' of what you do and don't do with them.  These clinics are under the 'rehabilitation' category in the yellow pages: look for one specializing in children.  Sometimes, if there is a university near you, they may have a 'teaching clinic' of some sort in occupational therapy (occupational therapy is often the specialty that deals with sensory integration).  I used to participate in several developmental clinics, but I can't for the life of me remember how a family got in contact with them!  ???

Also, hospitals may have a pediatric department that could help you.  If you inquire into these, you could just get information without committing to participate.  I know what you mean about not wanting some of them to intrude into your family.  That is PERFECTLY acceptable.  I have lived in two state.  In one, I would NEVER let some of these professions into our lives.  Yet, in another, which is much more conservative, I wouldn't be as concerned.  Do what the Lord leads you to do.

The longer I live, the more I am amazed at how the Lord leads us step by step down the path He has for us.  Keep your eyes on Him and He will direct your path.

I really think that reading alone helps his brain not get "overloaded" with too much stimuli.  Do you know what I mean?  For example,  he will be reading and hear a truck outside, and then he will start talking about trucks, truck models,(wondering if it was a Dodge truck or not) and where they are going.  Ten minutes later, he has forgotten what we were doing or reading about.  This  happens a lot even with just "white noise" around the house.  Everything is distracting to him.  Stuff we don't even hear most of the time.  His brain just doesn't know  how to shut out the stuff that doesn't matter and take in the stuff that does.  I will continue to do school with him b/c I guess he is benefiting from it.  I never thought I would have to school a child so early!!  A two year old that reads, you just don't hear that very often.
"Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it(Prov. 22:6).

Offline Lavender~Rosemary

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Re: Sensory Integration Disorder? Please Help!
« Reply #24 on: February 02, 2007, 12:04:17 PM »
mamaoffour -
What an amazing child!! Reading at 2!  You probably need to do some school with him just to stop him from becoming overly bored  :) I'm so glad he has a mommy who is willing to do that with him. :)

Dr. Frank Lawlis did talk about the distractions that lead to thinking about this and then that  and on and on...like you described with the truck going by.  I will have a look and see if he said anything about how to help that.

I am also going to contact my sister in law and see what supplements she is giving her son.  I know there was something in particular that seemed to really help him to be more calm and so highly strung.

Stacy

Offline makingchanges

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Re: Sensory Integration Disorder? Please Help!
« Reply #25 on: February 02, 2007, 01:44:34 PM »
Stacy,
My daughter could not handle the feel of clothes. The evaluator from NACD said that her skin was over sensitive. Anyway, we did something called deep pressure and brushing.  We lightly brushed her arms, hands, legs, feet for 3 mins. and then we did deep, basically hard, pressure over the same area for 3 mins. If it is a young child you will do fine. I have had friends with older boys that needed their father to do it for the strength. My daughter was so ticklish at first, but slowly got better. (like 1 1/2 yrs. of it) No quick solutions. We repeated that 3 times a day.

Clothes really do drive them crazy. At this point I would only make my child wear the shoes short amts. of time. Do the above exercises and see what happens. If it was me with this sensory problem well, I can just imagine me squirming right now thinking about it. It is not a disobedience problem!!! My 21 old daughter can now look back with great objectivity and will tell you that it was not disobedience, but I did not understand what was going on inside her. Please do not let others put the guilt trip on you because he is not performing up to others standards. We all fall short of someones standards and God created and understands our children. God is not frustrated. So much of my daughters hurts came through other moms and me reacting to them. I wanted her to look good. How wrong I was. God does not look on the outside, but the inside. I hope this helps. I feel your frustration and brings back such hard memories.

Offline Lavender~Rosemary

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Re: Sensory Integration Disorder? Please Help!
« Reply #26 on: February 02, 2007, 01:51:42 PM »
Stacy,
My daughter could not handle the feel of clothes. The evaluator from NACD said that her skin was over sensitive. Anyway, we did something called deep pressure and brushing.  We lightly brushed her arms, hands, legs, feet for 3 mins. and then we did deep, basically hard, pressure over the same area for 3 mins. If it is a young child you will do fine. I have had friends with older boys that needed their father to do it for the strength. My daughter was so ticklish at first, but slowly got better. (like 1 1/2 yrs. of it) No quick solutions. We repeated that 3 times a day.

Clothes really do drive them crazy. At this point I would only make my child wear the shoes short amts. of time. Do the above exercises and see what happens. If it was me with this sensory problem well, I can just imagine me squirming right now thinking about it. It is not a disobedience problem!!! My 21 old daughter can now look back with great objectivity and will tell you that it was not disobedience, but I did not understand what was going on inside her. Please do not let others put the guilt trip on you because he is not performing up to others standards. We all fall short of someones standards and God created and understands our children. God is not frustrated. So much of my daughters hurts came through other moms and me reacting to them. I wanted her to look good. How wrong I was. God does not look on the outside, but the inside. I hope this helps. I feel your frustration and brings back such hard memories.
Dear Makingchanges...
You got me right on!!  My husband is a preacher and i feel extra pressure from people looking and judging just how well my children behave.  I want them(and me) to be right with God.  God knows what is going on.  Even with that knowledge I see myself fall into the trap of trying to please others - but that is IMPOSSIBLE!  And only makes life m,more miserable for my children.
I will definitely try what you suggested.  Thanks so much for the encouragement.  It means a lot to hear someone else tell me that it is not disobedience.  I know it isn't...but it is still nice to hear it from someone else.  Thankfully I have a supportive family in this regard (my husband was the same as a child,  so they know what we are going through).
Thanks again,
Stacy

Offline ladyhen

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Re: Sensory Integration Disorder? Please Help!
« Reply #27 on: February 02, 2007, 03:29:45 PM »
After much reading and talking with other parents of children with what was called "Hypertonic Disorder" in our son, we decided to tackle helping him at home.  This 'disorder' is supposedly " an excess of frustration".  I don't remember all the books we read, but I do remember reading Dr. Lendon Smith in particular and being amazed at the part food allergies played in our ds's case.  I don't care about the label, I just wanted to find a way to cope with a child that was making himself and his parents crazy!

We spent hours every day doing what we called 'reprogramming' him.  When I lay down with him at naptime, I would hold him close and stroke his bare arm, leg, and face firmly while I talked to him about all the possible happenings of the rest of the day.  I would do the same thing when he awoke from naps, at evening bedtime, and in the mornings.  He had a great deal of difficulty going to sleep and waking, often taking an hour or more to transition from sleep to wake or other way around.  This was not a pleasant time!  He fought this stroking and talking for over 8 months.  But we did see small changes in the way he was handling things during the day. 

We did this and other therapies with him for 5 or 6 years as well as carefully monitoring his diet, removing allergens from his environment, and avoiding people who disapproved and provoked him.  This was a very difficult time.  We found that clothing that pressed against his skin really DID hurt him, as he is allergic to detergents and to synthetic fabrics.  Things like this ~ well, the list just goes on.  I came down to us being our child's researchers, therapists, and advocates.

This all started following a bad reaction to a DPT vaccine.  I believe that there is a link.  We have not had the rest of our children vaccinated. 
Looking for that blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of the great God and our Saviour Jesus Christ;    Titus 2:13

Offline Lavender~Rosemary

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Re: Sensory Integration Disorder? Please Help!
« Reply #28 on: February 02, 2007, 03:32:58 PM »
As far as food allergies playing their part in all this do you recommend an elimination diet or going caesin and gluten free to see if that helps?
Are there tests that an be done to see if the child has allergies to certain foods.  My sister-in-law did something like that I'm sure. 
Stacy

Offline Melie

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Re: Sensory Integration Disorder? Please Help!
« Reply #29 on: February 02, 2007, 03:55:32 PM »
After much reading and talking with other parents of children with what was called "Hypertonic Disorder" in our son, we decided to tackle helping him at home.  This 'disorder' is supposedly " an excess of frustration".  I don't remember all the books we read, but I do remember reading Dr. Lendon Smith in particular and being amazed at the part food allergies played in our ds's case.  I don't care about the label, I just wanted to find a way to cope with a child that was making himself and his parents crazy!

We spent hours every day doing what we called 'reprogramming' him.  When I lay down with him at naptime, I would hold him close and stroke his bare arm, leg, and face firmly while I talked to him about all the possible happenings of the rest of the day.  I would do the same thing when he awoke from naps, at evening bedtime, and in the mornings.  He had a great deal of difficulty going to sleep and waking, often taking an hour or more to transition from sleep to wake or other way around.  This was not a pleasant time!  He fought this stroking and talking for over 8 months.  But we did see small changes in the way he was handling things during the day. 

We did this and other therapies with him for 5 or 6 years as well as carefully monitoring his diet, removing allergens from his environment, and avoiding people who disapproved and provoked him.  This was a very difficult time.  We found that clothing that pressed against his skin really DID hurt him, as he is allergic to detergents and to synthetic fabrics.  Things like this ~ well, the list just goes on.  I came down to us being our child's researchers, therapists, and advocates.

This all started following a bad reaction to a DPT vaccine.  I believe that there is a link.  We have not had the rest of our children vaccinated. 

I really respect what you were willing to do to help your child.  That is really beautiful.  I'm sure you did more for him than you can even see yet.