Author Topic: Anyone for Korean?  (Read 58745 times)

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #60 on: November 07, 2007, 05:19:44 PM »
KIMCHI UPDATE:

I was just discussing the nuances of kimchi making with my MIL and I guess she has discovered what's wrong with my kimchi.  I guess I haven't been curing it long enough, so for anyone who is following my previous recipe, she told me to cure it until it wilts.  If you try to break it and it snaps, then it's not done.  It should bend like rubber.  She estimates about 2 hours for cabbage, but less for cucumbers.

I had a batch go moldy on me and she decided that this was the reason for my problem.

I'm working on getting recipes written for turnip kimchi and dorage (bell flower root) and also turnip soup and cooked greens.  I'll post them when I get them perfected.

Happy eating.   ;D
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #61 on: November 12, 2007, 12:06:58 PM »
This recipe from my MIL is good for most greens including:  spinach, lamb's quarter, dandelion (leaves & stems only) & swiss chard.

Clean and chop greens to desired size.  Blanch until they turn bright green (about 30-60 seconds).  Drain and rinse with cold water to suspend cooking.  Add (don't have measurements because I haven't made it yet), to taste, toasted sesame seeds, sesame oil (just a little, this stuff is strong), Korean hot sauce [bean paste] (Chinese ground red pepper could be substituted, but the consistency won't be the best), chopped garlic, chopped green onions and sea salt.
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #62 on: November 12, 2007, 12:31:56 PM »
Ingredients listed are for 1 Gallon of finished product

Doraje (Bell Flower Root) Kimchi

This root is usually obtained dry.  Soak dry root for 1-2 days (else it will be bitter).  The 2nd day drain and refill the water.  No need for regular curing with salt, just salt to taste when ingredients are added.

Drain.  Using a small knife split the roots lengthwise until they resemble shredded pieces.

Add

5-10 chopped scallions
sea salt (table salt may be substituted)
1/2 cup of ground red pepper
3 Tablespoons minced garlic
½ - 1 tablespoon sugar
1 tablespoon kimchi sauce (also called fish sauce) optional
½ tablespoon minced ginger root (very strong flavor – may want to leave out - I don't use it)
4 tsp white vinegar
Generously sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds

surgical type gloves to protect hands from hot pepper (spoon may be used)



Korean Turnip Kimchi


click to enlarge

(Diakon radish may be substituted)
NOTE added 10/19/08:  I also helped a friend make up some shredded turnip kimchi out of diakon radish.  It was good, but tasted very radishy.  The Korean turnips are better, but the diakon worked.


click to enlarge

Clean and shred or cube turnip (2 of these listed in picture should make about 1 gallon).  The shredded and diced taste quite different and the diced sours and keeps longer than the shredded (not sure why, but MIL said so).  There is no need to cure these either.  Salt to taste and allow to sit for a few minutes because they will produce lots of juice.  Drain the juice before you add other ingredients.

Ingredients listed are for a gallon, but MIL suggests making only 1 quart at a time.

Add

5-10 chopped scallions
sea salt (table salt may be substituted)
1/2 cup of ground red pepper
3 Tablespoons minced garlic
½ - 1 tablespoon sugar
1 tablespoon kimchi sauce (also called fish sauce) optional
½ tablespoon minced ginger root (very strong flavor – may want to leave out - I don't use it)


[ONLY FOR THE SHREDDED:  4 tsp white vinegar, Generously sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds which is supposed to be eaten fresh.  The cubed can be soured and stored for much longer]

     
CUBED/DICED                        SHREDDED
(click to enlarge)                                  (click to enlarge)



Turnip Green Kimchi

Tops of the turnips in above pictures.  If harvested early, MIL puts turnips in whole with the greens, the turnips for this are only about 2-3 inches long or smaller.

This is made the same way as nappa cabbage.

Large bowl with sealable lid
1 gallon jar
3 small – medium heads Nappa (Chinese) Cabbage (5 lbs)
5-10 chopped scallions
sea salt (table salt may be substituted)
1/2 cup of ground red pepper
3 Tablespoons minced garlic
½ - 1 tablespoon sugar
1 tablespoon kimchee sauce (also called fish sauce) optional
½ tablespoon minced ginger root (very strong flavor – may want to leave out)
surgical type gloves to protect hands from hot pepper (spoon may be used)

Cut greens into 1-2 inch squares.  Spread and layer in large bowl and sprinkle with sea salt.  Put lid on bowl and let cure until greens are limp and will not snap when you try to break it in two (about 2-3 hours).  Rinse 3-4 times thoroughly and drain DO NOT SQUEEZE.  Salt again to taste.  Add all other ingredients and mix with gloved hand.  Add hot pepper a little at a time until desired hot (I've practiced with this and we like 1/2 cup but you might like a little less.  Put in jar and refrigerate.  Kimchi will taste best after 1-2 days in frige to cure.

This can be eaten like regular kimchi, but we seldom eat it this way - it's bitter.  My favorite is to boil this kimchi with chicken.  I fill the pot with layers of chicken and kimchi and add enough water to cover and boil until chicken is done.  The greens taste fabulous when flavored with the chicken fat and the chicken becomes flavored with the kimchi.  This also works well simmered for about 20 minutes with canned salmon.  Yum Yum.

NOTE added 10/19/08:  I have used this recipe last summer on chard, swiss chard, mustard greens, brocorob greens, and various other American greens that were given to me by a friend.  They were all delicious cooked with chicken.  The mustard greens were hubby's and my favorite.




« Last Edit: October 19, 2008, 06:20:18 AM by healthybratt »
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #63 on: November 12, 2007, 12:35:29 PM »
Turnip soup.

See previous post for pictures of turnips and diakons.  Either of these may be used.  Slice turnip into thin bite sized pieces (like fried potatoes).  Use about 1/2 of one of the large turnips in the pics to 3 quarts of water. 

For beef:  Cut 1/2 lb roast or equivalent into bite size pieces and bring to boil in about 3 quarts of water.  Add sliced turnips and boil again until turnips are tender.

For fish:  Boil turnips with 1 lb of pollack (or any other white fish) until turnips are tender.

Add salt, pepper and Chinese ground red pepper to taste.

Reduce heat to very low and add chopped green onions and minced garlic to taste (about 6-10 green onions and 3-5 cloves garlic).

This is usually served with rice in it (white precooked separately) and a dab of Korean bean paste mixed in.  Very tasty and guaranteed to kick any cold.

Turnips may be frozen for future use in soup.  Slice and boil until slightly tender but not fully cooked.  Drain well and freeze in airtight container for later use.
« Last Edit: January 08, 2008, 10:45:26 AM by healthybratt »
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #64 on: November 27, 2007, 06:21:07 AM »
I added pictures for the two types of turnip kimchi if you're interested.
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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #65 on: January 08, 2008, 04:50:36 AM »
I got a huge bag (16 oz.) of "coarse hot pepper powder" at an Asian market yesterday (that was a very interesting field trip).  They said there that this is indeed used to make kimchi.  So hopefully this go around will work.   I only got one head of cabbage though.   :-\

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #66 on: January 08, 2008, 06:04:48 AM »
I got a huge bag (16 oz.) of "coarse hot pepper powder" at an Asian market yesterday (that was a very interesting field trip).  They said there that this is indeed used to make kimchi.  So hopefully this go around will work.   I only got one head of cabbage though.   :-\
Put your pepper in the freezer after you open it to prevent mold.
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Offline blondiegreen

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #67 on: January 08, 2008, 08:25:01 AM »
My DH LOVES kimchi! We both taught in Korea for a spell, so we love their food.
I tried to make it once with a prepackaged spice mix thingy but it didn't work too well. I left it out in the garage so the smell wouldn't fumegate my house, but it froze and is useless now.
Nowadays, we make the 7hr trip every few months to the nearest Asian superstore to pick up huge jars of kimchi.
Definitely worth it as it helps DH's digestive system and guts!
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Offline ShabbyChic

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #68 on: January 08, 2008, 08:26:16 AM »
Make sure you check the expiration dates on the foods at the Asian Markets in Raleigh/Cary.  My friend Ashlee and I have both experienced buying out of date food there.  I'm sure it happens at all markets; just glad we caught it before we ate it.
That's Shabby SHEIK not Shabby CHICK.  Hee-hee.

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #69 on: January 08, 2008, 09:20:50 AM »
My DH LOVES kimchi! We both taught in Korea for a spell, so we love their food.
I tried to make it once with a prepackaged spice mix thingy but it didn't work too well. I left it out in the garage so the smell wouldn't fumegate my house, but it froze and is useless now.
Nowadays, we make the 7hr trip every few months to the nearest Asian superstore to pick up huge jars of kimchi.
Definitely worth it as it helps DH's digestive system and guts!
It's not hard to make.  The hardest part for me was getting the ingredients and directions out of my MILs head.  Once I did that, the rest wasn't any different than learning to make pickles or a casserole.
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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #70 on: January 08, 2008, 09:41:47 AM »
HB, oh Kimchi Queen:

I am thinking of making this recipe for kimchi:

http://koreanfood.about.com/od/vegetarian/r/Kimchi.htm

Ingredients are:
2 Chinese cabbages, cut in quarters or two-inch wedges
1 cup salt
1/2 gallon water
1 medium white radish
1/4 cup scallions, cut into one-inch pieces
1/2 cup Korean ground red pepper
1 head garlic, finely chopped
2 teaspoons fresh ginger, finely chopped
1/4 cup fish sauce or Korean salted shrimp, optional

I have only one head of cabbage so should I half everything else?  Also, what is one "medium" white radish?  I got a daikon radish but it is HUGE!  How much of it should I use?  I have all the other ingredients.  If I do NOT use all that radish, what are other ways to use it?  That was just too long a trip to the Asian market to waste anything!   :o     
« Last Edit: January 08, 2008, 09:44:37 AM by ~Nickole~ »

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #71 on: January 08, 2008, 10:32:32 AM »
yes, I'd probably just 1/2 your ingredients; however, that looks like alot of fish sauce.  it has a very strong "fishy" taste and it's very salty (Korean shrimp paste is even saltier  :P).  you might want to add this to "taste" rather than all at once.

that's also alot of ginger unless you really like the taste.  i don't like my kimchi to taste like ginger, so I rarely add it.  It's very strong and my MIL uses maybe 1 tsp for 1-2 Gallons of kimchi.  Just a warning for the more delicate palates.  ;D

I would estimate on the radish.  You probably want more radish than sauce, but not so much that your cabbage doesn't get the benefits of the sauce marinade.  Check my pics above and you'll get the idea.  It's not an exact science and you'll find that one batch may not taste exactly like the last, but you'll get the hang of what you like and what you don't. ;D

Here are some pics that your recipe will most likely resemble.

   


For the extra radish, check my recipe for Turnip soup above.  Or use one of my turnip kimchi recipes - the shredded is the most popular around here, but you'll need to roast some sesame seeds.
« Last Edit: January 08, 2008, 10:51:28 AM by healthybratt »
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Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #72 on: January 08, 2008, 10:43:51 AM »
http://www.lovethatkimchi.com/

Found a neat website that might help.  From what I have found with Kimchi is everyone has a different recipe.  Some recipes even have oranges and apples in it? :P Trial and error is probably the best way.  Fix one recipe and keep it if you like it.  I made the NT kimchi, but it wasn't hot enough for my liking. 
So, this summer I hope to experiment some more. Or just visit all my WTM friends and eat theirs.  ;D

Offline SimplyPut

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #73 on: January 08, 2008, 10:49:49 AM »
This is definitely more mild than kimchee  :D....it is a very thick rice dish (think oatmeal consistency).  I like the mild, smokey flavor...it is good for breakfast too! (Could be made in crockpot as well, I imagine.)

JOOK

All you do is put two cups of rice in a large stockpot and add a ton of water. Add a couple of pieces of fresh ginger and a few garlic cloves, chopped.
I also add a smoked ham shank. You can also use chicken or even left-over turkey.
You then just let it simmer for a LONG time (a couple hours) until it is REALLY thick. Make sure you stir it often so it doesn't stick to the bottom of the pan. When it is done, remove the bones of the meat and shred the meat and add it back to the pot.
Serve it in individual bowls with a splash of soy sauce(it is generally bland, so, you season it with soy sauce instead of salt) and a few drops of sesame oil on top...you can also sprinkle top with chopped green onion, if you like.



« Last Edit: January 08, 2008, 11:12:52 AM by SimplyPut »
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Offline blondiegreen

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #74 on: January 11, 2008, 01:30:55 PM »
Back to the kimchee topic - does it get all its health benefits by making it like this? Doesn't traditional kimchee have to cure for months? I lived in Korea for awhile and know that November is traditionally kimchee making month, but I can't remember details.
I will DEFINITELY have to try out all the recipes. Mmmm, I love bulgogi and galbi.
Anyone have a good recipe for galbi?
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Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #75 on: January 12, 2008, 08:43:43 AM »
Doesn't traditional kimchee have to cure for months?


I believe it does.  I read that they blend all their ingredients, put it in a pot, and place it in the ground for months.  I am not sure I would remember where I put it.  :D

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #76 on: January 13, 2008, 05:09:10 PM »
Ok, I finally made some good kimchi, thanks to HB!!!  :-*
See my pic?  Aren'tchya proud, aren'tchya proud, aren'tchya proud?  *wag* *wag*

HB helped me "fix" the NT recipe (yes, HIO, a NT recipe was actually a little "off"  ::) ;)) and so here is what I did:  This makes a very small batch of kimchi, so a nice size to try it out. 

1 head  Napa cabbage
1/2 cup grated daikon radish (optional, but I used it)
1 cup grated carrot
1 t. grated fresh ginger
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 bunch green onions, chopped
1/4 - 1/2 cup coarse hot pepper powder (comes in 1 lb. bag from the Asian grocery store) - I cannot remember how much I used.  Sorry! I provided the pic though, b/c I think that is the color it is supposed to be.  It was REALLY REALLY SPICEY!!!!   

I cut up the cabbage in big chunks and spread it in layers in a casserole dish with salt in between the layers.  I put the lid on and it did not wilt after may hours, so I put a LOT more salt in and then finally added water, which I heard was good to use.  SO it seems that very salty water worked best.  I soaked it about 12 hours, seriously, in all, for it to get that "bend like rubber" quality HB mentioned is important.  You want the cabbage not crunchy anymore.  Then I rinsed (and did not squeeze) and placed that and the other ingredients, plus a little more salt, maybe a half a teaspoon, in a glass jar, loosely, and placed a lid on.  After 3 days in the fridge we ate it tonight with the NT Korean Beef recipe which I think is just like HB's Korean steak recipe, and some rice.  We all loved it.  The kimchi was eaten cold next to the rice and beef but the kids mixed it all up b/c that kimchi is VERY spicey.  And SO SO yummy!  Hubby was about in heaven.  I loved it too.  So, yay, success!!!  Thanks HB! (Does it look like the right color?)

 

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #77 on: January 14, 2008, 07:00:04 AM »
Back to the kimchee topic - does it get all its health benefits by making it like this? Doesn't traditional kimchee have to cure for months? I lived in Korea for awhile and know that November is traditionally kimchee making month, but I can't remember details.
I will DEFINITELY have to try out all the recipes. Mmmm, I love bulgogi and galbi.
Anyone have a good recipe for galbi?

It only takes about 3 hours to "cure" (treated with salt) and a few days to a few weeks for fermentation to occur.  Eating it fresh is also healthy just because of the large amounts of raw veggies & garlic in the mix.

The traditions of making kimchi have very little to do with "nutrition" and more to do with available facilities.  My MIL, said most families or family groups owned a large pot big enough for a person to climb down into, buried in the ground.  The purpose of this technique was to keep the jar from breaking, make it more accessible to humans and keep the kimchi from freezing in the wintertime.  Kimchi was made in "layers" throughout the harvest season in this jar.  Each batch was just thrown in on top of the last batch.  In the freezing months, a lid was placed on the jar and it was covered with dirt or straw for insulation.
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #78 on: January 14, 2008, 07:01:57 AM »
Thanks HB! (Does it look like the right color?)
Looks like kimchi to me, but mine would probably be a bit darker.  We like it HOT.  ;D 
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Offline blsd2bhome

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #79 on: January 14, 2008, 08:37:10 AM »
I just made some Kimchi last night, before I read this thread :-\
I used the NT recipe, which calls for 1T salt for a quart?

It seems like your recipe, HB calls for much less, especially if it is "to taste".  I bet mine is going to be REALLY salty,  :P  but everyone I have asked so far, said it was supposed to be like that.

Is is supposed to me more spicy than salty?  I think I need to make a new batch with your recipe to see.

Do you think that the NT recipe is just Sally Fallon's version of kimchi?  Yours really sounds delic!  :D

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #80 on: January 14, 2008, 08:51:32 AM »
I just made some Kimchi last night, before I read this thread :-\
I used the NT recipe, which calls for 1T salt for a quart?

It seems like your recipe, HB calls for much less, especially if it is "to taste".  I bet mine is going to be REALLY salty,  :P  but everyone I have asked so far, said it was supposed to be like that.

Is is supposed to me more spicy than salty?  I think I need to make a new batch with your recipe to see.

Do you think that the NT recipe is just Sally Fallon's version of kimchi?  Yours really sounds delic!  :D
Kimchi is salty, but not too salty in my opinion.  You need more than enough salt "to taste" as you need it to cure the cabbage.  The cabbage should be well coated with salt during the curing process.  By well coated, I don't mean like a sugar coated donut, but that salt will touch all sides and parts of the leaves or will draw out enough liquid from the leaves to have them soaking in a naturally salty solution. 

After curing, the leaves are rinsed very well.  Depending on the amount of "salty" taste left behind from the curing you may or may not need to add more salt for taste.

I would guess that I use somewhere between 1/8 to a 1/4 cup of salt to cure 1-2 gallons of kimchi.  I don't measure, I just sprinkle and watch the curing to make sure that the leaves are responding (wilting) as they should.  If it's taking to long to cure (more than 2-3 hours), I would add more salt and stir or flip the leaves to make sure they are coated well.  The darker greens could take from 3 hours to overnight even with enough salt to cure properly.
« Last Edit: January 14, 2008, 08:53:37 AM by healthybratt »
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Offline blsd2bhome

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #81 on: January 14, 2008, 08:56:27 AM »
I just made some Kimchi last night, before I read this thread :-\
I used the NT recipe, which calls for 1T salt for a quart?

It seems like your recipe, HB calls for much less, especially if it is "to taste".  I bet mine is going to be REALLY salty,  :P  but everyone I have asked so far, said it was supposed to be like that.

Is is supposed to me more spicy than salty?  I think I need to make a new batch with your recipe to see.

Do you think that the NT recipe is just Sally Fallon's version of kimchi?  Yours really sounds delic!  :D
Kimchi is salty, but not too salty in my opinion.  You need more than enough salt "to taste" as you need it to cure the cabbage.  The cabbage should be well coated with salt during the curing process.  By well coated, I don't mean like a sugar coated donut, but that salt will touch all sides and parts of the leaves or will draw out enough liquid from the leaves to have them soaking in a naturally salty solution. 

After curing, the leaves are rinsed very well.  Depending on the amount of "salty" taste left behind from the curing you may or may not need to add more salt for taste.

I would guess that I use somewhere between 1/8 to a 1/4 cup of salt to cure 1-2 gallons of kimchi.  I don't measure, I just sprinkle and watch the curing to make sure that the leaves are responding (wilting) as they should.  If it's taking to long to cure (more than 2-3 hours), I would add more salt and stir or flip the leaves to make sure they are coated well.  The darker greens could take from 3 hours to overnight even with enough salt to cure properly.

Mine is so salty, my tongue curls up when I taste it! :P :P :P :P
I am glad to know it does not need to be that way in order to ferment!  I will definitely try your method--I have enough ing.  to try again! ;D

thanks HB!
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blsd2bhome

Offline joyful_mommy03

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #82 on: January 21, 2008, 09:20:07 AM »
Okay - I was reading the hummus thread and saw that HB has a recipe for bulgogi!!!!  Can you please please please post that recipe?  I LOVE bulgogi and the only restaurant I've ever had it at is now out of business!!

serious cravings are starting ....

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #83 on: January 21, 2008, 09:26:29 AM »
Okay - I was reading the hummus thread and saw that HB has a recipe for bulgogi!!!!  Can you please please please post that recipe?  I LOVE bulgogi and the only restaurant I've ever had it at is now out of business!!

serious cravings are starting ....
Go back to page 1 of this thread.  ;D
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Offline joyful_mommy03

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #84 on: January 21, 2008, 10:59:22 AM »
Okay - I was reading the hummus thread and saw that HB has a recipe for bulgogi!!!!  Can you please please please post that recipe?  I LOVE bulgogi and the only restaurant I've ever had it at is now out of business!!

serious cravings are starting ....
Go back to page 1 of this thread.  ;D

DOH!!  Sorry about that!!  I did a search for bulgogi before posting but didn't see the recipe.  Is there such a thing as "pregnancy eyes"  kinda like "pregnancy brain"!!??!!

Thanks a ton HB!!

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #85 on: January 21, 2008, 11:02:25 AM »
Okay - I was reading the hummus thread and saw that HB has a recipe for bulgogi!!!!  Can you please please please post that recipe?  I LOVE bulgogi and the only restaurant I've ever had it at is now out of business!!

serious cravings are starting ....
Go back to page 1 of this thread.  ;D

DOH!!  Sorry about that!!  I did a search for bulgogi before posting but didn't see the recipe.  Is there such a thing as "pregnancy eyes"  kinda like "pregnancy brain"!!??!!

Thanks a ton HB!!
no sweat.  glad I could help. ;D
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Offline SarahLaRae

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #86 on: February 06, 2008, 03:45:06 AM »
I made your Cucumber kimchee last night.  It was so tasty.  DH and I both love Korean so this was fun.  I also made bulgogi and it was great!  I'm very excited about the Kimchee though.  I know what I'll be doing with all my cucumbers from the garden this year.  ;D  Thanks HB!

Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #87 on: March 06, 2008, 08:03:18 AM »
HB's and Nickole's recipe for Kimchi is the BEST, you have to try it!  Much better than NT's recipe.  My new favorite way to eat Kimchi is over a baked potato. Also, I have found that a couple teaspoons of ranch dressing over it makes it WAY too tasty.  I could eat this stuff all day long!

Offline Melie

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #88 on: March 10, 2008, 10:24:11 AM »
HB or someone, I am looking for a recipe and I think it's Korean.
It is called Bahn Ma or something like that.  It's a sandwich with ground meat and some pickled something or other.  It was very spicy and delicious.  Our natural market had it as a special and I am intrigued and would love to know how to make it or at least to know what the real name of it is so I can order it if I ever come across a Korean restaurant.
« Last Edit: March 10, 2008, 12:19:23 PM by hhmom »

Offline Melie

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  • Posts: 1169
Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #89 on: March 10, 2008, 01:45:27 PM »
HB or someone, I am looking for a recipe and I think it's Korean.
It is called Bahn Ma or something like that.  It's a sandwich with ground meat and some pickled something or other.  It was very spicy and delicious.  Our natural market had it as a special and I am intrigued and would love to know how to make it or at least to know what the real name of it is so I can order it if I ever come across a Korean restaurant.
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