Author Topic: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?  (Read 37944 times)

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #30 on: December 30, 2008, 03:43:19 PM »
Anyway, I write this because he shared some very interesting info with me.  I always find out something new from him.  He said that after eating something made with lard - but especially with beef tallow, you have to drink something hot - not cold.  Why?  Because the lard/beef tallow will harden and plug up your arteries, etc.
I don't have a specific resource to refute this; however, this sounds a little "off" to me for a couple of reasons.

1)  The fats do not travel directly into the bloodstream.  They are dissolved by gastric juices and bile in the stomach before even traveling into the large intestine where nutrient absorption begins and by this time the nature of the fats have already been changed.

2)  The internal temperature of the body is 98 degrees which is generally warm enough to melt lard or tallow.


I could be way off here, but it sounds like a wive's tale to me unless there's some other explanation for the hot drinks.
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Offline boysmama

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #31 on: December 30, 2008, 04:12:56 PM »
Thankyou HB. I've been thinking the same things and haven't taken the time to verbalize them.
The only thing I can think of that might explain a benefit would be that cold water can slow digestion. Somewhere I read about hot drinks speeding up your metabolism and stimulate increased production and release of enzymes.

Offline stebs7

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #32 on: December 31, 2008, 11:59:25 AM »
Could very well be an old wive's tale - but I doubt it.  Knowing that in many parts of the world like Russia, China, Japan, Turkey - Europe, England and South America (besides lots of Coffee (isn't there where it grows:)  Yerba Mate is drunk all day in countries there).   - hot drinks are the norm   I haven't checked out many countries like Africa, Mexico, Canada.  Chinese and Japanese restaurants,  all serve hot tea free with meals.  I it would seem more to me that the (rarer) country that has cold water with each meal served in a restaurant might be the one that is off:)  I remember when I did my first summer missions in 1985, I was so disappointed in not being able to get free cold water at the restaurants we ate at:)  Now, I am used to drinking cool water - and don't even like ice water anymore (of course if it was a super hot day, I wouldn't have anything against it - but normally in the summer we eat less fatty foods - interesting)

Lard actually has almost as much saturated fat (39%) as it does monosaturated fat (45%).   Eating saturated fat, trans fats and dietary cholesterol  increases how much LDL Cholesterol we have.  Its the cholesterol that causes plaque that causes arteries to be clogged.

Plaque that accumulates on the inner walls of your arteries is made from various substances that circulate in your blood. These include calcium, fat, cholesterol, cellular waste, and fibrin, a material involved in blood clotting. In response to plaque build-up, cells in your artery walls multiply and secrete additional substances that can worsen the state of clogged arteries.  (WEB MD)

I would also agree with Boysmama's line of thinking - she wrote: 
The only thing I can think of that might explain a benefit would be that cold water can slow digestion. Somewhere I read about hot drinks speeding up your metabolism and stimulate increased production and release of enzymes.

Of course, there are alot of customs and traditions that could be old wive's tales - but Nourishing Traditions is the outcome of 6 years of research done by the Prices - learning from the cultures they visited and seeing what they did and ate - that made them healthy!  I put my cousin's comments into the latter category.  I think the Prices would have enjoyed sitting down with my Uncle's family - talking about their eating habits :)

Happy New Year - one and all - it is now 11:25 pm - the family just gathered to celebrate together (we had a time of prayer earlier- then fireworks - then a neat video - with a short break - and now back at it!) 

God bless you, Nancy in Poland

Offline Whiterock

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #33 on: January 04, 2009, 07:41:11 AM »
Ooh, mention of arterial plaque reminded me that I wanted to post some info on this thread.....

Ok, anyone contemplating the healthiness of lard and other fats should really take the time to read "The Skinny on Fats" (link below) but here's a section that describes lard....
Quote
Lard or pork fat is about 40% saturated, 48% monounsaturated (including small amounts of antimicrobial palmitoleic acid) and 12% polyunsaturated. Like the fat of birds, the amount of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids will vary in lard according to what has been fed to the pigs. In the tropics, lard may also be a source of lauric acid if the pigs have eaten coconuts. Like duck and goose fat, lard is stable and a preferred fat for frying. It was widely used in America at the turn of the century. It is a good source of vitamin D [it is one of the richest dietary sources of vit D and vit D helps prevent calcification of the arteries ~WR], especially in third-world countries where other animal foods are likely to be expensive. Some researchers believe that pork products should be avoided because they may contribute to cancer. Others suggest that only pork meat presents a problem and that pig fat in the form of lard is safe and healthy.
http://74.125.45.132/search?q=cache:EyjxcF6veJYJ:www.westonaprice.org/knowyourfats/skinny.html+site:www.westonaprice.org+westonaprice+myth+plaque&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=3&gl=us

This section of one of the Myth vs Truth pages, on the WAPF site, is a good read http://www.westonaprice.org/mythstruths/mtvegetarianism.html#6 Here's a small excerpt from that section but reading the entire thing is a good idea...

Quote
Although it is commonly believed that saturated fats and dietary cholesterol "clog arteries" and cause heart disease, such ideas have been shown to be false by such scientists as Linus Pauling, Russell Smith, George Mann, John Yudkin, Abram Hoffer, Mary Enig, Uffe Ravnskov and other prominent researchers (50). On the contrary, studies have shown that arterial plaque is primarily composed of unsaturated fats, particularly polyunsaturated ones, and not the saturated fat of animals, palm or coconut (51).

Trans-fatty acids, as opposed to saturated fats, have been shown by researchers such as Enig, Mann and Fred Kummerow to be causative factors in accelerated atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease, cancer and other ailments (52). Trans-fatty acids are found in such modern foods as margarine and vegetable shortening and foods made with them. Enig and her colleagues have also shown that excessive omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid intake from refined vegetable oils is also a major culprit behind cancer and heart disease, not animal fats.


A couple more links...
The Importance of Saturated Fats for Biological Functions

What Causes Heart Disease

WR
« Last Edit: January 04, 2009, 07:44:03 AM by Whiterock »
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Offline stebs7

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #34 on: January 04, 2009, 11:34:25 AM »
Thank you WR for that info - it is really interesting.  I should not have added my theory of why my cousin said to drink hot drinks after actually beef tallow - as I thought I understood him (my Polish is not perfect) say lard too - but I think it was was only beef tallow .  Anyway, I turned it into a discussion about arteries - which I came up with (not him) - and blew it to a wrong direction.  Sorry, I should have researched it more before spouting.  I did call my other cousin in a different part of Poland and she says they also know to drink hot after beef tallow - so I am interested in reading more about the makeup of beef tallow to see if it is different than lard.

The issue of drinking hot drinks after beef tallow( or with meals in general)  - is still worth examining - because that was his main point - and since hot drinks are taken with meals in so many countries - I still would like to know if this is something that is helpful - and in the case of beef tallow even necessary (as he says).  For instance, is the American typical restaurant meal and often at home - where we would have a cold or iced drink with a meal - hindering in someway - like it was shared - could that cause digestion problems.  Are hot drinks or no drinks to be taken after a meal - but cold drinks allowed between meals. 

So, again, sorry for taking this in the wrong direction and putting my theories out without researching it more thoroughly.

Blessings, Nancy in Poland

Offline abbilynn

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #35 on: January 04, 2009, 01:03:01 PM »
Well, I made an apple pie today and used lard instead of shortening in the crust.  Keep in mind that my pie crust is made with a GF flour mix and no eggs or dairy.  I have a recipe I really love, and using lard made it really crisp and flakey!  :)  It's usually not that flakey.  It did smell while mixing it (lard smell) and a small amount while baking, but hubby said he couldn't taste it when he ate it, and I didn't notice it much either.  So, later in the week I will be frying eggs with it in my iron skillet and we'll see how that goes.

As a side note, the lard I was given was kept in the freezer and was very white when I got it.  I am now keeping it in the fridge and noticed it is off white/beige colored now.  Is that just bc of the temperature change?  It doesn't smell rancid or anything.

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Offline Whiterock

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #36 on: January 04, 2009, 02:27:29 PM »
Oh, Nancy, I'm sorry I should have been more clear. I wasn't directing that at you or in response to your post (I really only skimmed your post), it was just that I saw arterial plaque mentioned and it reminded me that I had been meaning to post that info here.

I think you're right about there being health benefits to warm water. My theory is that a lot of icy water with a meal including saturated fats, could possibly cause the fat to harden in the stomach so that the acid, enzymes, peristaltic action, etc. aren't able to break it down as well as is needed. In that form, it may just pass right thru you instead of being used by the body. If this happens enough, then all the functions it's need for, are compromised. That's my theory anyway.  :)

WR
« Last Edit: January 04, 2009, 02:31:02 PM by Whiterock »
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #37 on: January 07, 2009, 11:29:45 AM »

As a side note, the lard I was given was kept in the freezer and was very white when I got it.  I am now keeping it in the fridge and noticed it is off white/beige colored now.  Is that just bc of the temperature change?  It doesn't smell rancid or anything.

abbilynn
That's normal.  ;D  Eggs fried in lard are wonderful--that's how I got my SIL to switch.  ;)
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Offline abbilynn

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #38 on: January 07, 2009, 03:13:00 PM »

As a side note, the lard I was given was kept in the freezer and was very white when I got it.  I am now keeping it in the fridge and noticed it is off white/beige colored now.  Is that just bc of the temperature change?  It doesn't smell rancid or anything.

abbilynn
That's normal.  ;D  Eggs fried in lard are wonderful--that's how I got my SIL to switch.  ;)

Thanks, I was a little worried about the color.  And we actually cooked eggs for the first time tonight in lard, they were yummy!!!   ;D  Ever used it to fry chicken in?  My dad gave me a Lodge cast iron chicken fryer I am itchin' to try out!

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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #39 on: January 15, 2009, 02:50:24 PM »

As a side note, the lard I was given was kept in the freezer and was very white when I got it.  I am now keeping it in the fridge and noticed it is off white/beige colored now.  Is that just bc of the temperature change?  It doesn't smell rancid or anything.

abbilynn
That's normal.  ;D  Eggs fried in lard are wonderful--that's how I got my SIL to switch.  ;)

Thanks, I was a little worried about the color.  And we actually cooked eggs for the first time tonight in lard, they were yummy!!!   ;D  Ever used it to fry chicken in?  My dad gave me a Lodge cast iron chicken fryer I am itchin' to try out!

abbilynn
I fry everything in it including chicken, eggrolls, wantons, cheeseballs, french fries, etc.
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Offline abbilynn

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #40 on: January 19, 2009, 12:16:50 PM »

As a side note, the lard I was given was kept in the freezer and was very white when I got it.  I am now keeping it in the fridge and noticed it is off white/beige colored now.  Is that just bc of the temperature change?  It doesn't smell rancid or anything.

abbilynn
That's normal.  ;D  Eggs fried in lard are wonderful--that's how I got my SIL to switch.  ;)

Thanks, I was a little worried about the color.  And we actually cooked eggs for the first time tonight in lard, they were yummy!!!   ;D  Ever used it to fry chicken in?  My dad gave me a Lodge cast iron chicken fryer I am itchin' to try out!

abbilynn
I fry everything in it including chicken, eggrolls, wantons, cheeseballs, french fries, etc.

We fried chicken in lard with the cast iron chicken fryer, it was soooo good!!!  That's the best friend chicken I've ever been able to make.  Even with the GF flour mix it was good!  I'm totally sold on frying stuff in lard.   :D ;D  HB, now you have me craving eggrolls, except I can't have them bc I can't find a way to make them GF!!  If you don't have a chicken fryer you should check into getting one.  ;D

I have also noticed that when using lard on my skillets, everything just slides right off.  I don't have to use much, just a thin layer enough to coat it, and nothing sticks.  I haven't had those results with any other oil so far.  My dad says that's probably why all the really old cast iron pans are seasoned so well, they all used lard back then.  ;) ;)

abbilynn
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