Author Topic: Puberty and menstrual pain  (Read 17754 times)

kenshelpmeet

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Puberty and menstrual pain
« on: November 25, 2006, 05:18:37 AM »
I've got a question for those of you with coming-of-age daughters.  My 11-year-old has been having lower back pain as well as stomach pain off and on for three days now.  We have been giving her a pain reliever to help her sleep.

At first, I thought she was having menstrual pain and backaches like I do (she's too young for all of this, isn't she?? :o), but I thought it would only last a day or two.

Do y'all think this could be something else, like constipation?  :-\  Poor thing, I really need some insight and advice on how to treat this.  I don't want to give her anymore meds.  I have given her Tummy Tune-Up once, but don't know if this is the right solution because of the possible nature of the pain.  :P

Thanks for your help!  Gina

Offline heatheronthehill

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Re: Puberty and menstrual pain
« Reply #1 on: November 25, 2006, 05:27:54 AM »
I had lower back pain when I first started my period.  That was the first sign - I told my mom that my back was sore, and she said that I might be about to start, and low and behold!  That evening, I did!  (At church no less... :P)  So, I suppose that could be it, but if it has been a few days, it could be something else!

Girls living in the same household tend to be in sync with one another.  Some things to think about - Are you also "in that time?"  or other daughters?  Has she been extra "hormonal" lately?     ;)

The constipation alternative is a good one too though.  Have you talked to her about this?  I'm sure an eleven-year old girl is going to love telling her mom the details of her BM's, but once she's done rolling her eyes, perhaps you'll find out that this is what is going on.  It may be as simple as drinking a couple of glasses of apple cider (as raw as you can find it!).  Hey - it wouldn't hurt to do that anyway!  It's sooooo yummy, and easier to find this time of year!  :)

I don't think Tummy tune-up would do any harm, even if that is not the source of the pain. 
« Last Edit: November 25, 2006, 05:30:38 AM by heatheronthehill »

Offline dara

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Re: Puberty and menstrual pain
« Reply #2 on: November 25, 2006, 05:52:55 AM »
Red Raspberry leaf tea is good for flu, contains calcium and other nutrients, and is good for any and everyone... so a couple cups of tea may help resolve her issue wether it is related to hormones, or some other random discomfort...
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kenshelpmeet

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Re: Puberty and menstrual pain
« Reply #3 on: November 25, 2006, 09:46:28 AM »
Thank you both for your ideas and insight.  As far as being "in sync" with the other females in the house, she is my oldest and I'm still nursing our youngest and don't have to deal with it again yet.  As far as moods go, she has been doing great because Daddy just returned home from Iraq.   ;D ;D ;D

I'm going to give her both apple cider as well as Red Raspberry tea, and of course, question her further about her BM's.  We've talked about it a bit, but she didn't seem to think they were lacking. ::)

Thanks again for taking the time to help me think through this. Gina :)

Offline ShabbyChic

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Re: Puberty and menstrual pain
« Reply #4 on: November 25, 2006, 04:06:22 PM »
My niece just started, too, and she's the same age.  She's perfectly sized, but bigger.  She's 5'6" tall and about 115 lbs.  When I was eleven I was 5 feet tall and weighed about 75 lbs.  She's just gone through her growth spurt earlier than I did (she's my husband's sister's daughter). 

Anyway, since she's started her cycle she has spent each week that she has her cycle in bed with cramps.  Evidently they're pretty severe.  She's had migraines and used heating pads on her lower back.  She was asleep in her room with the blinds closed to make it dark and we all had to be quiet.  So my SIL can definitely relate.
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Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: Puberty and menstrual pain
« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2008, 01:11:09 PM »
My daughter is having pain in one of her n*pples.  She hasn't developed, yet, but I am wondering if pain is a precursor to development?  Is this normal before developing?

Offline maceoghain

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Re: Puberty and menstrual pain
« Reply #6 on: August 12, 2008, 02:01:47 PM »
This was the case with me. I remember experiencing those symptoms at about 9 years of age. I began menstruating at 11 years old. This is also common for me when I am pregnant. (I think it's just hormone-related.)

HTH!  :)

My daughter is having pain in one of her n*pples.  She hasn't developed, yet, but I am wondering if pain is a precursor to development?  Is this normal before developing?
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Offline wyomama3

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Re: Puberty and menstrual pain
« Reply #7 on: August 12, 2008, 05:07:29 PM »
My daughter is having pain in one of her n*pples.  She hasn't developed, yet, but I am wondering if pain is a precursor to development?  Is this normal before developing?
I recall having had the same pain.  Dd10 has just started the soreness here, and we discussed the development of her body.  She had a scared/excited/almost dreamy look on her face.  I had to watch my expression and voice becasue it made me want to laugh out.  :-X

Offline floydian

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Re: Puberty and menstrual pain
« Reply #8 on: August 13, 2008, 03:14:44 AM »
Yep.  I had it too.

My mom took me to the doctor and he said stay away from caffein and white sugar. :-\

I'm sure those are big items of consumption in your home. ::)
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Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: Puberty and menstrual pain
« Reply #9 on: August 13, 2008, 03:16:50 AM »
I had to watch my expression and voice becasue it made me want to laugh out.  :-X

LOL! 

Thanks maceoghain, wyomama, and floydian.  I am relieved that it is nothing serious, yet so not ready for this!  :P

Offline SC

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Re: Puberty and menstrual pain
« Reply #10 on: August 13, 2008, 08:49:22 AM »
For those who are trying to kick-start or balance their cycles, wanting to balance hormones, correct painful cycles, etc. here is a no-cost way to help things along.
Honoring Our Cycles, page 50 (Katie Singer, 2006, ISBN: 0-9670897-6-X)
Quote
To be healthy, we need sunlight during the day and darkness at night. Some women who do not ovulate regularly or who have difficulty getting pregnant and keeping pregnant have found that night lighting affects their cycles.

Usually, a woman needs to sleep in complete darkness -- except around the days she ovulates. Sleeping in complete darkness means that 15 minutes after you turn offyour bedroom light, you can not see your hand in front of your face. Getting your room totally dark takes time and attention. You might cover your window one night and the crack under the door the next. While it may take several months, healthier cycles often result.

. . . If you need light in the middle of the night (in the bathroom or while nursing), use dim light. You can buy a red bulb (like those used in a photographer's darkroom) from a camera store. . . .

To support healthy cycles, sleep in complete darkness. Then:
  • After you have two days of wetness, [Edit note: refers to v*ginal sensation when checked after urination] on the night of the second day, sleep with a light on in your foom for three nights. Or, keep a light on in a nearby room and keep its door open. After three nights with light, go back to sleeping in darkness for the rest of your cycle.
  • If you are not ovulating and have not bled for a month or longer, first sleep in completee darkness for 12 days. Then sleep with a light on for the next three nights. Then go back to sleeping in darkness for two weeks. Continue with this pattern to encourage healthy, ovulatory cycles.
  • Once you are pregnant, sleeping in complete darkness can help you keep a healthy pregnancy. After your baby is born, sleep in complete darkness until you are ready to ovulate again.


Here are a couple of additional web sites with articles on fertility/ovulation and the affect of light at night:
http://fertility.amuchbetterway.com/lunar-fertility-boost-your-fertility/
http://www.shanspirations.org/?p=87

page 51
Quote
EMMA I went on the Pill when I was 17 to regulate my cycles, because they were so long and far apart. By the time I was 18 (and still on the Pill), my cramps were very intense on days that I bles. When I was 23, I learned I had endometriosis. For 12 years, I kept taking the Pill. Then I stopped taking it and tried sleeping in darkness except around the days I ovulate. I have been amazed! For five months, I have ovulated within two days of sleeping with light. I feel healthier than I have in years.
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Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: Puberty and menstrual pain
« Reply #11 on: August 14, 2008, 12:00:18 PM »
Okay, what can my daughter take to ease her pain in her n*pple/pre-br*ast area?  She says it hurts and is sore.  Does she need more calcium?(I have been giving her extra raw milk)  Or would RRL work? 
She cannot swallow pills, otherwise I would give her white willow bark for the pain.  What can you take for puberty discomfort that isn't ovarian related?  I couldn't find anything on the web.

Offline createddaisy

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Re: Puberty and menstrual pain
« Reply #12 on: August 14, 2008, 12:25:57 PM »
My daughter has been going through this and what we have found to help is calcium and potassium.  Some extra vit c seems to help also.  I give her 1 packet of Emergency every other day.  And liquid calcium on the opposite day of the emergency. (we cannot get raw milk)   I do this till she has no pain and her body catches up then stop.   It usually only takes a day or 2.  She has gotten to the point that she knows when her body is getting ready for another growth spirt and takes care of it herself. HTH!

Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: Puberty and menstrual pain
« Reply #13 on: August 14, 2008, 02:01:47 PM »
 I do this till she has no pain and her body catches up then stop.   It usually only takes a day or 2. 

Well, the only question I have is if it takes 2 days for the symptoms to disappear, how do we know that the calcium/potassium is what is working?  The reason I ask is my daughter has been having this pain on and off for almost a week, and ironically it comes in 2 day intervals.  So, either the cal/pot is working, or toughing it out is working.  How to know?  :-\

Offline createddaisy

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Re: Puberty and menstrual pain
« Reply #14 on: August 14, 2008, 02:44:20 PM »
My daughters would last longer than 2 days and she had it more frequently when she did not take anything.
When we did it the first time we did it for a full week and went a day without.  Trial and error to see what she needed. She does not have them very often now.   What she does now is take calcium in the morning and the emergency at night before bed. 
Now it takes very little to build back up.  When she is extremely busy, working hard physically, is when we notice it the most.  Or she is tired.
Not to mention just plain ol growth spurts!!

One other thing we stumbled across by accident is yarrow.
She just reminded me!  She likes the taste. :P  Her body would crave something in it? 
She would take a dropper full (or tea when I was out of the tincture) when she was in pain and it would help take away the pain.  She has terrible muscle cramps in her legs because her bones grow faster than the muscle.  Instead of drugs we found this helps tremendusly.   


Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: Puberty and menstrual pain
« Reply #15 on: August 14, 2008, 03:00:32 PM »

One other thing we stumbled across by accident is yarrow.
She just reminded me!  She likes the taste. :P  Her body would crave something in it? 
She would take a dropper full (or tea when I was out of the tincture) when she was in pain and it would help take away the pain.  She has terrible muscle cramps in her legs because her bones grow faster than the muscle.  



Ditto yuck on the yarrow! LOL  But that is good news as I have just finished drying some that I found growing wild. I will try the yarrow tea(with peppermint), tomorrow. Thanks!

Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: Puberty and menstrual pain
« Reply #16 on: August 25, 2008, 02:47:42 AM »
Well, the yarrow didn't work for my daughter, and she was in a lot of pain last night, so I tried some arnica tablets.  They seemed to work fairly well.  I will try it again to make sure that that is what worked.

Offline ladyhen

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Re: Puberty and menstrual pain
« Reply #17 on: August 25, 2008, 05:05:58 AM »
My girls have started taking cramp bark - kava kava tincture and finding that it works well for them to ease the cramping.  They also drink RRL + peppermint tea.   Lots of outdoor, physical activity the week before their p*riod really seems to help, too. 
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Offline 1bolinha

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Puberty
« Reply #18 on: December 04, 2008, 07:06:53 PM »
My daughter is 11. In recent months she has shown completely uncharacteristic mood changes--her behavior becomes impatient and grumpy. She recongnizes it and has asked us for help b/c she does not know how to make it stop. We have discussed it both from a physical and spiritual persepctive. I believe it is hormonal and wonder if there is a natural remedy for this season of her life. She has not yet begun her cycle. I welcome feedback!

Offline Mama Sita

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Re: Puberty
« Reply #19 on: December 05, 2008, 03:55:01 AM »
My daughter is 11. In recent months she has shown completely uncharacteristic mood changes--her behavior becomes impatient and grumpy. She recongnizes it and has asked us for help b/c she does not know how to make it stop. We have discussed it both from a physical and spiritual persepctive. I believe it is hormonal and wonder if there is a natural remedy for this season of her life. She has not yet begun her cycle. I welcome feedback!

I can completely relate! My dd is 11, going on 12 here in December. She was also moody, cried at the drop of a hat, and snaps at her brothers, all of which is rather uncharacterisitic for her. I've found that Evening Primrose helps as well as a good quality Cod Liver Oil.

Her mood swings are still there, but they are WAAYY less diminished than they used to be.

The thing that helped her the most is praying over her.  :)
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Offline floydian

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Re: Puberty
« Reply #20 on: June 26, 2009, 06:32:39 PM »
My daughter is 11. In recent months she has shown completely uncharacteristic mood changes--her behavior becomes impatient and grumpy. She recongnizes it and has asked us for help b/c she does not know how to make it stop. We have discussed it both from a physical and spiritual persepctive. I believe it is hormonal and wonder if there is a natural remedy for this season of her life. She has not yet begun her cycle. I welcome feedback!

This is a little late, sorry about that, but Evening primrose oil is great to help with moodiness.  I also second the cod liver oil.  That will help a bunch too.
And as He stands in victory,
Sin's curse has lost its grip on me;
For I am His and He is mine—
Bought with the precious blood of Christ.

Offline mykidsmom

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Re: Puberty and menstrual pain
« Reply #21 on: June 27, 2009, 04:17:04 AM »
My ND recently put my DD (11 1/2) on a B6 supplement.  It has helped tremendously with the moodiness and acne.  She's much more level now and she seems to only break out once a month.  She hasn't started her cycles yet but her break outs appear to time with my cycle starting. 

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Offline Libbyleigh

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Re: Puberty and menstrual pain
« Reply #22 on: March 31, 2013, 03:54:05 PM »
For those who are trying to kick-start or balance their cycles, wanting to balance hormones, correct painful cycles, etc. here is a no-cost way to help things along.
Honoring Our Cycles, page 50 (Katie Singer, 2006, ISBN: 0-9670897-6-X)
Quote
To be healthy, we need sunlight during the day and darkness at night. Some women who do not ovulate regularly or who have difficulty getting pregnant and keeping pregnant have found that night lighting affects their cycles.

Usually, a woman needs to sleep in complete darkness -- except around the days she ovulates. Sleeping in complete darkness means that 15 minutes after you turn offyour bedroom light, you can not see your hand in front of your face. Getting your room totally dark takes time and attention. You might cover your window one night and the crack under the door the next. While it may take several months, healthier cycles often result.

. . . If you need light in the middle of the night (in the bathroom or while nursing), use dim light. You can buy a red bulb (like those used in a photographer's darkroom) from a camera store. . . .

To support healthy cycles, sleep in complete darkness. Then:
  • After you have two days of wetness, [Edit note: refers to v*ginal sensation when checked after urination] on the night of the second day, sleep with a light on in your foom for three nights. Or, keep a light on in a nearby room and keep its door open. After three nights with light, go back to sleeping in darkness for the rest of your cycle.
  • If you are not ovulating and have not bled for a month or longer, first sleep in completee darkness for 12 days. Then sleep with a light on for the next three nights. Then go back to sleeping in darkness for two weeks. Continue with this pattern to encourage healthy, ovulatory cycles.
  • Once you are pregnant, sleeping in complete darkness can help you keep a healthy pregnancy. After your baby is born, sleep in complete darkness until you are ready to ovulate again.


Here are a couple of additional web sites with articles on fertility/ovulation and the affect of light at night:
http://fertility.amuchbetterway.com/lunar-fertility-boost-your-fertility/
http://www.shanspirations.org/?p=87

page 51
Quote
EMMA I went on the Pill when I was 17 to regulate my cycles, because they were so long and far apart. By the time I was 18 (and still on the Pill), my cramps were very intense on days that I bles. When I was 23, I learned I had endometriosis. For 12 years, I kept taking the Pill. Then I stopped taking it and tried sleeping in darkness except around the days I ovulate. I have been amazed! For five months, I have ovulated within two days of sleeping with light. I feel healthier than I have in years.

Ok, I know that it has been a long time since this thread has been active, but hopefully someone will find this.   :D

I have a question. How do you know when you are ovulating? My mom never really talked to me about that stuff, she just explained to me what was going to happen, and how to use pads, so I really want to learn about this to pass it on to my own daughters, Lord willing, one day.

I have noticed that about two weeks before I am supposed to start, (whether or not I actually do) , I have pains in my lower abdomen, that feels like appendicitis, but is not. Does this have anything to do with it? I also used to think that the... umm... discharge  :-[  meant that something was wrong, but from what I am learning, it is normal, and it means something. I'm just not entirely sure what.  :-\ 

Also, does anyone know how the darkness and light affect your cycles? Would I need to get out in the sun more often during the day, in addition to keeping my room dark at night? And if around ovulation, it does not need to be completely dark, how do you make it lighter without being too light?

I'm sorry if this is TMI! I just have been wanting to figure all of this stuff out, and this seems as good a place as any to ask the questions, no one else seems to know the answers to!

Offline IowaDove

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Re: Puberty and menstrual pain
« Reply #23 on: April 03, 2013, 03:35:17 AM »
Taking Charge of Your Fertility is an excellent book full of all the info you would need to learn all this stuff!  :)

Offline boysmama

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Re: Puberty and menstrual pain
« Reply #24 on: April 08, 2013, 08:47:16 AM »
libbeyleigh,

Taking Charge of Your Fertility is good. Even better, the Art of Natural Family Planning book and class taught through the couple to couple league.


Offline Libbyleigh

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Re: Puberty and menstrual pain
« Reply #25 on: April 19, 2013, 08:14:47 AM »
Thanks for the suggestions! I will definitely have to look into this!