Author Topic: Potty Training a Baby [an Infant]  (Read 33084 times)

Offline likemanywaters

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Re: Potty Training a Baby [an Infant]
« Reply #30 on: June 28, 2007, 03:02:04 PM »
What potty seat do you use for the big toilet?  I have had a hard time finding one that catches a boy's pee.

I've never used one. Just held him under the pits & plopped him on the big seat. Then leaned him forward so he's pointed down. Only had occasional leaks through the seat, usually early in the morning if he is a little "stiff".  When he could stand on a small stool & point it over "like Daddy" he loves to do that, but only about half the time. I sould probably be encouraging him to do it like that more.  ;D Then maybe he'll be totally trained. 3 years is just around the corner (july), so I said I'll just stop buying training pants for him then & he'll just have to learn to go! Right now he still never admits it when he has to go unless I bug him.  :-\

I love the little Baby Bjorn small potty for camping. It's nice not to break habits when you're away from home. I always felt like those little setbacks of 2-3 days were counterproductive. (b/c I never wanted to take them on public toilets when they were really small.)
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Offline Kimandtheboys

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Re: Potty Training a Baby [an Infant]
« Reply #31 on: June 28, 2007, 05:11:14 PM »
Yes, I changed the diaper at any sign of wetness as soon as I discovered it.  I also found it easier to hold my baby facing away from me with my hands under his thighs over the toilet.  This is also how I would pee him outside.  We went to the bathroom every 45-60 minutes at first.  In the morning though, he would pee upon waking and then have to go again 15 minutes later, but that was when he was pretty tiny.  Laurie Boucke has a more expanded book out that I have called "Infant Potty Training" with lots of good ideas and testimonies.  Also some articles on her website.

Offline Jessarie

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Re: Potty Training a Baby [an Infant]
« Reply #32 on: June 29, 2007, 08:09:17 AM »
Today was rough in the am, no pees caught at all, but then my boy woke up from his nap, peed on the big  pot, and a couple minutes later fussed again.  Took him to the big pot again and he pooped start to finish in the pot for the first time since his poops started to become more solid. 

I don't think he's ever pooped in the plastic potty - when he was little and exclusively nursing I could tell when he had to poop and would take him to the pot to avoid cleanup on the little one, and now I wouldn't want to clean out the poops either!  Pee's not so bad. 

ANYWAY - I like the idea of having a stool for him to stand on in front of the big potty; I think he's like that.  WE do have an inner seat for our big pot, but the opening is a little too big for his little tush yet.  Plus he's used to facing the back of the pot (sitting backwards) because I usually sit on the pot with him between my legs when he goes, facing the back of the toilet... I tried putting him on the inner seat, facing the back of the toilet, but he seemed scared and tried to climb off.  I tried a few times and then gave up - guess I should try again and be more consistent.  I know this seems like a lot of work to some, but that poop in the pot is thrilling!  I'd much rather go through this and have success now than keep scraping it out of diapers and off his tush!  (ewww!!!)

Offline ~esposita~

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Re: Potty Training a Baby [an Infant]
« Reply #33 on: June 29, 2007, 09:25:44 AM »
What potty seat do you use for the big toilet?  I have had a hard time finding one that catches a boy's pee.

One from Baby's R Us (online) that had a removable "pee shield."  We didn't need it for DD, obviously, but it sure helps with DS!  It was $10.  I don't know the brand. 
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Offline kcb

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Re: Potty Training a Baby [an Infant]
« Reply #34 on: June 29, 2007, 09:39:29 AM »
How old was your son when you used it?  I haven't had so much trouble with toddlers, but infant boys seem to be experts at hitting other targets.  I actually used the bathtub/shower at first because it was easier to hit!  (How could you miss THAT?)

Offline Jessarie

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Re: Potty Training a Baby [an Infant]
« Reply #35 on: June 29, 2007, 03:48:08 PM »
I found that when I first started (he was about 3 mos) I would have to gently put a finger over his penis to aim him down into the toilet, otherwise I'd have pee everywhere.  Maybe that will help?  I hold my son with my arms under his, and my hands now are either just above or below his knees.  This gives me a good grip and I can also tilt him if I need to, to help aim at the right place.  He's also supported against my thighs and stomach... there are good photos on Laurie Boucke's website and in her book Infant Potty Training if that sounds confusing (I had to look at photos to understand what to do).  I don't have the link off the top of my head, but I found it easily before by searching infant potty training on google. 

My husband holds him midair about a foot above the toilet and he's used to pottying and is old enough to hold his head up, etc so this works fine for the 2 of them.  It would hurt my back bending over like that, but DH is fine with it. 
« Last Edit: June 30, 2007, 10:56:10 AM by Jessarie »

Offline kerimae

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Re: Potty Training a Baby [an Infant]
« Reply #36 on: June 29, 2007, 05:59:28 PM »
I have a funny story to share.  I was potty training my 6 month old  infant, and left her with a couple of friends while I had an appointment.  I called to check in on her after 45 minutes, and they said she was just whiny and upset.  I said, "Oh, she probably has to go potty."  I could just hear the  :o over the phone!   So, anyhow, they figured they had nothing to lose, and tried it.  Guess what?  She totally PEED in the pot.  It was hilarious to hear them talking all about it when I returned.  One was trained as an MD, the other was an RN........I'm the "weird natural health" girl, but hey, that was one less diaper to deal with AND it solved the fussy baby bit.

The sad part of all that was that by the time she was walking we were "inbetween" our apartment and the home we were building, bouncing around the homes of our friends, and awaiting the birth of our next child.  Soooo....the potty training went out the window, and all that time spent training her did too.  She was 2 1/2 by the time she was finished with diapers.  She is now 5 yo and still wearing a diaper at night (although I'm not sure that's related).  Two babies later and I still haven't gone back to infant training.  It does take a lot of commitment, but I tell you what, the looks we got from family and friends were priceless ;D

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Offline mrsmattdaggy

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Re: Potty Training a Baby [an Infant]
« Reply #37 on: July 25, 2007, 11:09:39 AM »
So, does anyone have any thoughts on what kind of potty seats (preferbly that go on the toilet) are good for petite one year olds and younger babies?  I am so tired of cleaning yucky dirty diapers but don't want to get impatient with holding her up and don't want her falling in!  ;)

Thanks!

Offline Whiterock

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Re: Potty Training a Baby [an Infant]
« Reply #38 on: July 25, 2007, 02:18:11 PM »
So, does anyone have any thoughts on what kind of potty seats (preferbly that go on the toilet) are good for petite one year olds and younger babies?  I am so tired of cleaning yucky dirty diapers but don't want to get impatient with holding her up and don't want her falling in!  ;)

Thanks!


I highly recommend the Safety 1st 3-in-1 Comfy Cushy Potty -- but ONLY for small kids as most of the complaints against this seat are from people potty training larger kids (3 year olds and such) and they find it to be too small for kids that big. It can be used as a standalone potty or you can put the seat on the toilet and use the base as a step stool. The seat is so soft and easy to clean, and the pot is easy to empty-- although, we didn't use the clips that came with it because they would have made emptying it a bit more work, and I just didn't see any reason to use them. But if you are using it on the toilet seat you will have to use the clips.

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« Last Edit: July 25, 2007, 02:19:48 PM by Whiterock »
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Offline likemanywaters

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Re: Potty Training a Baby [an Infant]
« Reply #39 on: July 25, 2007, 02:57:40 PM »
I've never used one even for my 4 month old & she always did just fine. For me, it was just one more thing to clean. For trips though, it's great to keep my little baby bjorn mini-potty in the van under the back seat & they can go, then we dump it in the bushes.
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Offline mrsmattdaggy

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Re: Potty Training a Baby [an Infant]
« Reply #40 on: July 31, 2007, 08:59:16 AM »
Hey, Thanks!  I had seen that seat at Babies R Us so we went with our coupon and bought it.  She's been on it twice, hasn't done anything on it yet  :-\, but it seems to be a perfect size!!   ;D

Offline Whiterock

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Re: Potty Training a Baby [an Infant]
« Reply #41 on: August 29, 2007, 03:37:16 AM »
I'm not doing the infant training but I saw this website and didn't think that link had been posted yet. So here it is http://www.diaperfreebaby.org/
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Offline jessicah

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Re: Potty Training a Baby [an Infant]
« Reply #42 on: September 07, 2007, 08:31:43 PM »
a good website www.tribalbaby.org
also, there is a yahoo group for EC - elimination communication

www.theECstore.com sells things to make it easier

I have 7 and my last 3 babes were all infant pottied (my youngest is 7 months now)

I have done it all ways:

used the big toilet with  seat, without seat, used the sink and bathtub (yes, I let my babe pee in the sink and tub- he was heavy and this was best on my back)
I used a baby bijorn potty (currently my dds favorite), peed outside, in a plastic bowl, on a prefold

We use cloth fitteds,prefolds, and sometimes disposables.  I started one at birth, one at 1 month old and one at 4 months old.

My sis starts hers at 8-12 months old. My friend waits until her babes are 11-12 months old.

My point: do what works for YOU and YOUR babe. Just relax,keep trying and be creative.

I currently keep my babe in just a diaper-no cover- when at home. I changer her immediately if wet, and generally take her to potty every 30 min.-1 hour.  For outings she wears a wool cover or nylon cover or disposable. I relax more for outings and only potty her when I think about it or she clearly lets me know she needs to go.
Since I am home most of the time this works for us.

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Offline lovinmomma

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Re: Potty Training a Baby [an Infant]
« Reply #43 on: January 11, 2008, 09:31:30 AM »
This was a great thread with lots of great stories and links on infant potty training.  In about 3 months we'll have our fourth baby.  The other three are all girls and are now 42 months and 21 month old twins.  None are potty trained completely, but the 42 month old is making progress, FINALLY!!!  As the sole diaper changer/potty training professional/laundress, I was eager for an easy way out of diapers, but it looks like EC is a lot of work!  It may be worth it, but I think I'll stay low key on it with this new baby.  Maybe we'll start around 4 months old.  Perhaps it'll motivate the older sisters to get moving with going on the pot!  Thanks for all your suggestions and stories.  God Bless all you loving momma's out there.
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Offline his.silly.wife

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Re: Potty Training a Baby [an Infant]
« Reply #44 on: January 11, 2008, 09:43:18 AM »
Maybe we'll start around 4 months old. 

Why wait until 4 months?  By then the infant has already established the habit of diapers.  I recommend starting around 2 weeks, if you don't start at birth.
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Offline floydian

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Re: Potty Training a Baby [an Infant]
« Reply #45 on: January 11, 2008, 09:49:00 AM »
For boys, we start after they are circ.  We usually start a day or two after they are born then have to start over sorta cuz they are so fussy.

Extra work--yeah  probably.

Worth it--Ohhhhhhh yeah!!!!!!
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Offline SarahK

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Re: Potty Training a Baby [an Infant]
« Reply #46 on: January 11, 2008, 11:39:41 AM »
And the extra work is in small time/energy amounts.  It's a few quick minutes (or less) instead of strip-down diaper changes and diaper maintenance.

It is a mind-set change.   But I really like the fewer diapers and nearly non-exhistant rash issues.  (Had lots of these with standard diaper care.)
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Offline jessicah

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Re: Potty Training a Baby [an Infant]
« Reply #47 on: January 11, 2008, 01:23:10 PM »
yes, I have had 7 children and did EC with the last three- definitely worth the extra time. IF you dress your baby right , taking of the diaper to potty every now and then is not inconvient. If you have a 3 yr. 2yr twins  and a baby pottying- it may be MORE convient than you think.

You can take them ALL to the potty at the same time. Get two little potties (baby bijorns) make the twins use those, baby can use what ever you like (sink, bucket, newborn baby potty pot, etc.) and take them all at the same time. The 3 yr. can sit on the regular toilet. And the baby wil probably have to go more often than the others. You can put him with a diaper on in the inbetween times.  But the good thing is that even if you can only manage pottying the newborn once an hour or so He WILL benefit from it. By time your baby is 4 months old he will probably be able to "hold it" a whole hour, the twins will problably have just a few misses every now and again and the 3 yr old should be doing great.

TRUST me- it is worth it! It is NOT more work- just a different KIND of work..... that pays in the long run.



« Last Edit: January 11, 2008, 01:29:59 PM by jessicah »
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Offline jessicah

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Re: Potty Training a Baby [an Infant]
« Reply #48 on: January 11, 2008, 01:30:33 PM »
Benefits of Elimination Communication
112 Reasons to EC your baby
(adapted from contributions from members of the Elimination Communication Yahoo!Group)

A DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVE
•   Gradually, then drastically reduces nappy use.
•   Ends nappy usage earlier than current toilet training trends.
•   After starting EC, it is very hard to find reasons not to do it
•   Conventional toilet training starts with learning to "hold it", while EC starts with learning to "let go" - this can make a big difference on a baby's perception of elimination and of life in general.
•   Contrary to the promises in advertisements, nappies don't keep the baby clean and dry, only their clothes and the environment.
•   Who would want to wear their toilet?

PARENTING
Parents want the best for their little ones, which means they want to communicate, be responsive and provide excellent hygiene. And because babies and their parents are so closely linked, many of the benefits listed below as benefits for parents are also benefits for the baby.
•   EC is flexible, with families tailoring it to their specific situation.
•   Gives parents another tool for responding to and helping their baby. What could be better than to be responsive to your infant's signals and needs?
•   Helps settle a fussy baby during breastfeeding and at night.
•   Encourages natural and unique communication, fostering the development of a trusting relationship between parent and child.
•   The closeness you experience is a wonderful form of bonding.
•   Fosters closeness between the baby and other caregivers by allowing dad, sibling(s) and other trusted people to bond and communicate with the baby.
•   Provides more opportunities to hold one's baby.
•   It is more comfortable to carry a baby not wrapped in a big nappy.
•   Fosters greater security for the baby - "Mummy and Daddy listen to what I am saying and respond when I need to go."
•   Protects against practices of "crying it out" - the crying child may have to pee.
•   Provides an additional, positive response to a crying baby - see if the baby needs to go to the bathroom.
•   A great explanation of why a baby does not sleep through the night - she sleeps without nappies and wakes to use the potty!
•   Provides additional support for "extended" breastfeeding - not weaning the baby early will NOT cause the baby to remain in nappies "forever." The baby will be completely "potty trained" long before weaning.
•   Demonstrates respect for your baby. Many babies cry when they are wet or soiled, but we ignore their signals and communication, teaching them to use a nappy as a toilet, then expecting them to unlearn this behavior later.
•   Fits with many Attachment Parenting practices as desired by the family.
•   Can be used in conjunction with carrying your baby in a sling - sling-time increases parent/baby communication and contact, leading to observation of more subtle signals.
•   You know in advance when your baby is about to reach a new developmental milestone due to increased "misses" that often precede a developmental change.
•   Provides a way for parents of all walks of life to "make a difference" for the environment.

HEALTH
•   Provides excellent hygiene for your baby as they are not wearing a toilet.
•   Prevents irritation from nappy rash and thrush by reducing exposure to chemicals in disposables and keeping bodily waste off the baby’s skin.
•   Prevents heat rash from nappies during warm weather.
•   No need to catheterize a baby for urine sample.
•   Supports positive views about bodily functions.
•   Children learn how to urinate on cue which is not only convenient, but can prevent health problems due to holding urine or faeces.
•   Reduces the incidence of nocturnal enuresis (bed wetting) in childhood by encouraging children to be aware of their eliminations from an early age.
•   Parent can develop a better sense of your child's digestive system, therefore detecting problems and reacting to irritants more quickly.
•   No need to thoroughly clean the child’s most sensitive area multiple times a day. This is bad for the skin, no matter how gentle the cleaning.
•   May save boys from some infertility problems later ("Scrotal Temperature is Increased in Disposable Plastic Lined Diapers," Archives of Disease in Childhood 83, Oct 2000. from “The Politics of Diapers” http://www.mothering.com/articles/new_baby/diapers/politics.html )
•   Reduces likelihood that baby will eliminate in the bath or in a swimming pool.
•   Helps parents overcome any fears/phobias about bodily functions.
•   Protects baby from germs on public change tables.

ENVIRONMENT
Most parents are conscientious, wanting to conserve natural resources, reduce pollution and cut down on the use of and/or exposure to potentially harmful chemicals. For this reason, the cloth v disposable nappy debate still rages strongly. But EC is the ultimate solution to this argument: Reduce and end the use of nappies as soon as possible. That’s got to be better for the environment! EC has other environmental benefits such as: (Note that some of the benefits for the environment can also be classified as health and sanitation benefits.)
•   Far less laundry to do, not only in terms of cloth nappies but also in terms of soiled clothing, bedding and towels, as well as rinsing or washing dirty baby bottoms, hands, legs and other body parts.
•   Reduces waste water pollution and sludge. Water is polluted by laundering cloth nappies and manufacturing disposables. Flushing disposables down the toilet creates tons of sludge every year.
•   Cuts down on use of fuel and air pollution. If you use disposables, you need to drive to a shop to buy them; if you use a nappy service, someone has to drive to and from your home.
•   Less contact with urine and faeces. Whichever type of nappy one uses, by reducing and ending use, baby does not have to come into (frequent) contact with urine and faeces.

Disposables
•   Reduces the use of disposable nappies, a major contributor to landfill. Even biodegradable nappies take a long time to decompose (over 100 years) in a landfill.
•   Reduces the use of disposable wipes used to clean baby's bottom.
•   Does not support the manufacture of dioxins, chemical gels, dyes, glues and other toxic chemicals used in the productions of nappies and nappy products.
•   Reduces use of plastic bags used to individually wrap dirty disposable nappies
•   Reduces groundwater contamination. Groundwater can become contaminated by viruses carried in the human feces and urine from disposables. Flies and other insects can spread viruses and bacteria.
•   Saves trees. It takes trees to provide the pulp for disposables, so by reducing/ending disposable nappy use, you cut down on the amount of trees felled for faeces
•   Less contact with chemical gels, dyes, glues and other synthetic irritants for both baby and caregiver. This can eliminate nappy rash and allergic reactions.
Cloth
•   Conserves water and reduces the use of detergents used to wash cloth nappies.
•   Conserves electricity by cutting down the amount of electricity used for washing and drying laundry; to a lesser extent, the same applies if you use a nappy service.
•   Conserves water and reduces the amount of bleach used in the production of cotton by reducing the amount of nappies needed for the child’s nappy stash, especially for sized cloth nappies.

CHILD DEVELOPMENT/CAPABILITIES
•   Shows that babies have sphincter control from birth, and encourages them to develop muscular and neural control at the earliest moment possible, in line with his or her own natural development
•   Shows that babies are able to communicate their needs from birth.
•   Taps into the sensitive period for toilet learning.
•   Gives the child freedom by letting the baby learn early control (reasonable control starts around 9-12 months) and complete potty training at a relatively young age (around 24 months).
•   Frees baby from nappy bulk, giving greater movement and making it easier to roll over, crawl, walk and perform other activities at the earliest moment possible.
•   Allows toddlers to be free to play and explore rather than spending this time potty training.
•   Provides more opportunities to play in the bathroom mirror.
•   Gives baby a chance to show how smart she is and how well she can communicate.
•   An EC child will be more active earlier in pulling up and down his or her pants because of earlier involvement (versus being forced to lie passively on a changing table).
•   Encourages the use of sign language for enhanced communication with baby.
•   Babies gain more skills as they grow, so help them gain confidence by starting with what they know and can control.
•   Teaches older siblings about communicating with the baby and provides them with a practical way to help with baby care.
•   Helps older siblings develop healthy attitudes about bodily functions.
•   Eliminates embarrassing "accidents" and bedwetting for toddlers and older children, helping to build their self esteem.
•   Teaches you healthy skepticism about things "everybody knows," such as "babies have no control..."

FINANCES
One benefit and joy for many parents is the ability to save money on nappies and laundry. It's fun to be a tightwad! And for many, it's a necessity. Whether you are an at-home parent or use EC on a part-time basis, it is a practical and efficient way of handling the disposal issue.
•   Disposable nappies can cost nearly $3000 for the three years of average nappy usage.
•   Cloth nappies can cost $1000 for three years of average nappy usage
•   Reduces the amount of water and detergent used in washing not only cloth nappies but also soiled clothing, bedding and towels.
•   Reduces the amount of nappies needed from nappy services.
•   Reduces the amount of use cloth nappies get, making them more likely to last through subsequent children.

HISTORY
•   People have been doing it for centuries.
•   You will find out that your grandmother EC'd your mother or father before the "experts" told them what to do about toilet training.
•   It is used in about 75 countries around the world still today as the “traditional” infant hygiene method.

CONVENIENCE
•   Fewer nappies to change.
•   Far fewer soiled nappies!
•   It is faster to flush than to lay down, take off, wipe, put on, sit up, etc.
•   You never have to worry about running out of nappies.
•   Cuts down on washing.
•   If you use cloth nappies as backup and your washing machine dies, it's not so much of a problem.
•   You can travel lighter - no nappies to lug around, so there’s more room for baby's clothes.
•   A baby without nappies fits on your hip much better.
•   It's rather unlikely you'll have "two in nappies".
•   How do you change a nappy in a restaurant bathroom (teeny tiny) or an aeroplane toilet anyway?
•   You don't need to worry about running out of supplies while traveling.
•   You can take your baby anywhere.
•   You don't have to find the super leakproof and absorbant nappy. If you are using nappies for backup, almost anything will do - it's just in case and won't have to hold much and not for long.
•   In hot weather you can have your baby nude, and therefore cooler than if they had to wear a nappy.

HAPPY BABIES, HAPPY PARENTS
•   A nappy-less baby smells wonderful!
•   Babies think it is fun.
•   Wearing underwear is a lot more comfortable than disposables or wet cloth nappies.
•   The baby’s genitals are not out of their reach, hidden under a nappy for the first formative years. Even when wearing pants babies can explore their bodies more freely.
•   You have more freedom to hold your baby, anytime, anywhere, any amount of clothing.
•   Watering trees outside is fun for baby.
•   Baby doesn't have to be forced against his/her will to lie still while being changed.

SENSE OF HUMOUR AND FUN
•   As if we needed another reason to appreciate how clever our babies are...
•   Pottying is more fun than changing nappies as you can sing and chat to them while they do their business.
•   Baby bottoms are only tiny for a short time; why cover up the cuteness?
•   Impress and amaze other people when baby pees or poops in the potty.
•   Teaches parents how to trust their intuitions (and practice ESP with baby!)
•   Keeps one humble (on the misses!!!)
•   A nappy-less baby turns the dullest shopping trip into an adventure in new territory
•   Creates fond memories of places where baby peed
•   The misses make funny stories (once you're done cleaning them up).
•   It's fun to see people's faces when you say that your 18 month-old still nurses but is out of nappies!
•   EC makes great material for silly nursery rhyme potty songs to sing while baby finishes his business.
•   Getting peed on by an infant can be funny (the first few times at least!)
•   Meet great people on EC-mailing lists
•   Boosts creativity with activities like sewing pants to fit with no nappy or finding the best toilets in town.

DISCIPLINE
•   Will not have to struggle with conventional potty training later.
•   Less frustration for parent and child.
•   Helping baby learn to use the bathroom in infancy avoids inconsistencies with discipline (i.e.: "No, Baby, you are NOT allowed in the bathroom...." then "Hey Toddler, you are REQUIRED to use the bathroom."
Jessicah

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Offline SarahK

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Re: Potty Training a Baby [an Infant]
« Reply #49 on: January 12, 2008, 03:22:16 AM »
TRUST me- it is worth it! It is NOT more work- just a different KIND of work..... that pays in the long run.

Exactly.

Even with my inconsistant application of these priniples, I have very nice benefits.

Sarah K
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Offline floydian

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Re: Potty Training a Baby [an Infant]
« Reply #50 on: January 12, 2008, 04:37:20 AM »
TRUST me- it is worth it! It is NOT more work- just a different KIND of work..... that pays in the long run.

Exactly.

Even with my inconsistant application of these priniples, I have very nice benefits.



Sarah K

Ditto!!!
« Last Edit: March 10, 2008, 05:02:00 AM by floydian »
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Offline SarahK

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Re: Potty Training a Baby [an Infant]
« Reply #51 on: February 25, 2008, 10:07:21 AM »
We use a tiny plastic bowl from Wal Mart.  Actually they come in graduated sizes, so when they grow a little, you already have the next size.

OK - I got my first Nurser-Pooper Baby since I started pottying babies however many years ago.  Floydian graciously helped out this Old Mom learn the new trick of potty-in-a-bowl.  (I had always done potty-in-the-sink.)

For you visual shoppers, the bowls are 4 white nesting batter-type bowls with rounded bottoms.  They are about $3 plus tax.  The super nice feature about these is the rounded edge that serves as a handle for the regular user.  This makes a nice, smooth surface for their little legs to hang over.

And, when you get your new little boy peeing in the bowl on your lap while you are typing one handed, be sure you pay close attention to how you position him.  Don't want to get pee on the keyboard.  Need to go get some dry clothing for myself though.

« Last Edit: February 26, 2008, 03:27:47 AM by SarahK »
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Offline jessicah

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Re: Potty Training a Baby [an Infant]
« Reply #52 on: February 25, 2008, 06:56:00 PM »
My first baby to potty did that and I used those same bowls. Now they make a  "top hat" shaped potty for that same purpose, but the bowl worked fine.
Jessicah

Let me share with you how I keep my family healthy!
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Offline babymakers

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Re: Potty Training a Baby [an Infant]
« Reply #53 on: July 29, 2008, 08:32:34 AM »
Do you know what the #1 danger of potty training your infant is??????

Your husband dropping him in the toilet!

LOL! It was the first time my DH took him and little Gabriel took it VERY personal. He didn't let completely go. He had the baby's legs on the toilet seat and the baby pulled them in close to his body. When he pulled them in gravity pulled them down and SPLOOSH in the water with half his body!!! LOL Dad thought it was funny. Oops!

Our baby is three weeks old today. From day one I put him in cloth diapers without waterproof covers. When he went pee or poop I told him what he was doing. At eight days old he has associated the words with him potty movements and I started holding him over the pot several times a day.. At three weeks old today if he starts fussing I start to figure out why. Does he need to eat? If not is he dry? If he is I take him potty and that always fixes him. The only problem I have is getting a boy to aim DOWN into the water. It wants to shoot straight or up. It is hard to get it to go down because I can't hold him at another angle because his head is to floppy. This of course will pass in the next few weeks as his neck muscles strengthen.

In fact the last few nights he has even gone potty at night. I keep him in bed with me. He has started fussing and won't take my breast. It takes me a minute but I wake up thinking "why is he fussing.... he won't eat?!?!" Then I figure out he needs to go to the potty. This has been a retraining of myself because he is the first of six I have trained from infancy. Normally, they only fuss at night because they want to eat. This time he is trained to NOT WANT To go in his pants.

This is going to be great not have to train him at night or during naps! No more frustrated children OR parents!
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Offline tynnille

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Re: Potty Training a Baby [an Infant]
« Reply #54 on: November 21, 2008, 11:41:30 AM »
What fun! When #5 came on to the scene I always made sounds to her when she peed and pooped. At 3 months I had yet to put her on the potty. But after I read the last article by Shalom Brand in the NGJ magazine, I was encouraged to try. I sat little Tessa on the potty and she peed for me...I think she even pooped for me. What fun.

What is cool about it is how proud I am of her. We do well in the morning and before and after nap times. Other than that we are quite hit or miss, but I think anything is better than nothing.

It can be frustrating when I try other than those times because I am not always catching her at the times she needs to go so I am sitting there holding her on the potty waiting and thinking, I need to go back to 'school,' or dinner or whatever else. But when she does go it is really encouraging.

She also enjoys it. She seems to like the potty. We have a toddler seat attatched to the potty that makes it easy to hold her on and less likely for her to fall in. :D

I also let her, from day one, sleep without a diaper. Instead she sleeps on a flat diaper that lays on top of a waterproof pad I made before she was born in anticipation of IPT.  THis method is getting a bit more difficult now that she is scooting around more and more. Some night she will go the first half without peeing at all. A couple nights she had gone all night without peeing. WOW!

Well, more on this later. She is calling for me now. The kids are very helpful, making the 'pooooopy Tessa, poooopy' ques to her while she is on the pot. Silly boys jsut love any kind of pooopy talk!
Tennille

Offline Mamatoto

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Re: Potty Training a Baby [an Infant]
« Reply #55 on: April 05, 2009, 07:10:17 AM »
I need some advice on "potty strikes."

Background:  I started potty training DS at 2 1/2 months in an effort to try and cut down on his crying.  I took him every time I couldn't figure out why he was crying, then noticed a particular cry associated with success and only took him when he did that cry, then realized he was going every 30 minutes so took him every 30 minutes.  By about 6 1/2 months he was going every 45 minutes, and by 8 months every hour.  When out in public he could usually hold it twice as long as normal and would go fine over public toilets.  We were to the point where we would only use 4 diapers over the course of 24 hours, and often went the entire night dry.  If he had to go, he would start within 5 seconds of holding him over the bathtub (maybe 10 seconds if out in public and holding him over the toilet).

Now: He is 9 months now, and has been on a "potty strike" for about the last month.  About two things happened a little before the strike started: (1) I started my own business and we are at the office from 12-7 M-F and 11-4 Saturday, and (2) I started an anti-candida cleanse.  He used to go fine at the office, but now he doesn't.  In fact, he doesn't go ever!!  I've tried taking him ever 45 minutes to see if his schedule has changed, but he just plain doesn't want to go.  The only time he really goes is right after he wakes up.  1 1/2 weeks ago I decided to give up on the office thing and just focus on the home thing, but now he won't even do the home thing.  He wiggles and squirms and cries whenever I hold him over the bathtub (or a public toilet for that matter).  I figure the only way I could possibly hold him still would cause broken bones.  He is the kind of boy who is always moving, moving, moving - so I'm wondering if he just doesn't like being held still.  But then again, changing a diaper is like torture, too,  because he's moving, moving, moving then as well.

I don't want all our work to be for nothing, but don't know what to do.  Should I just take a break for a little while and then start in again?  Or would that just be like starting over from scratch?  Help!!
These words, which I am commanding you today, shall be on your heart.  You shall teach them diligently to your sons and shall talk of them when you sit in your house and when you walk by the way and when you lie down and when you rise up.  Deut 6:6-7

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Offline khrys

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Re: Potty Training a Baby [an Infant]
« Reply #56 on: April 05, 2009, 09:08:34 AM »
I have a book called Diaper Free by Ingrid Bauer.  I found it to be extremely useful for us.  She has a section on potty strikes.  One idea is that the strike is a way for the child to communicate something to you.  That could be stress, illness, or changes in your lives.  Some examples she gave are that the child may be upset about teething or maybe he needs more time or attention from mom (in her case her son went on a potty strike after they moved and she was very busy). 

Another possibility is that the parent sees a potty signal and takes the child to pee right away but the child feels that their play was suddenly interrupted and refuses to pee.  Some suggestions for this issue are: waiting for a pause in the child's play, telling them what you plan to do before picking them up, taking the child's toy with you to the potty, or bringing the potty to the child.  We kept a potty in the living room near ds's play area when he was crawling age.  We didn't have a downstairs bathroom, so that was the easiest option for us. 

Also, pee strikes are common at 8-9 months old as babies start to want to be more independent.  Some children who resist being taken to pee may want to do more themselves.  In that case, she recommends getting them a potty and leaving it in a place where they can get to it themselves.  Even if the child can't get their pants off yet, they might like to be able to crawl over to a potty and sit on it without help.  You only mentioned holding him to pee, so maybe he would like to sit by himself.  If you don't have a potty, the Baby Bjorn Little Potty is a great size for babies.  Here are a couple of places to get it:

http://www.toysrus.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2309032

http://www.theecstore.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=26&products_id=390

I hope this helps!
Helpmeet to dh since 8/99, SAHM to ds1 (3/05) and ds2 (12/09)

Offline Mamatoto

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Re: Potty Training a Baby [an Infant]
« Reply #57 on: April 05, 2009, 04:54:33 PM »
Wow!  Thanks so much for the information and different perspectives.  I'm inspired anew.  Looks like our strike could be related to a few different things, so I'll start trying out some of the suggestions you made and really make a fresh effort to try and understand DS's ever-changing cues (not just for potty, but for life).  And in the meantime I think I'll order a copy of the book you recommended, as well as the potty chair.  I've had my eye on that one (potty chair) for a while, so this is a good confirmation to just go ahead and get it.  Thank you again!
These words, which I am commanding you today, shall be on your heart.  You shall teach them diligently to your sons and shall talk of them when you sit in your house and when you walk by the way and when you lie down and when you rise up.  Deut 6:6-7

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Offline Mamatoto

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Re: Potty Training a Baby [an Infant]
« Reply #58 on: July 23, 2009, 07:08:26 PM »
Another potty strike again!  Shortly after I last posted, things went back to "normal" except that DS would only go potty outside :) This all started when the city turned off the water at the office for a day during construction, so I discretely took him to the parking lot.  I figured that homeless people and dogs pee there all day, why not a baby?  And since that day, he has loved going outside, whether in the parking lot or in bushes in the yard (other than right after waking up when he would go in the bathroom).  If he needed to poop, we would sit backward on the toilet together and everything was great and easy.  But for the past 2 weeks he has been on another potty strike.  I honestly can't figure out what might have changed about 2 weeks ago, other than maybe teething ??? So I can't figure out what to change.

I didn't end up buying the Baby Bjorn baby potty until he was about 12 months (he'll be 13 months in 2 days), but can definitely see why it would be a good idea to start with that from day 1.  I can't figure out how to get him to use it, even before he was on the potty strike.  Every time I have ever tried to get him to sit on it, he makes it clear there is no way he will sit still for longer than 1/2 a second!  Perhaps this is why he's on a potty strike to start with - he's a typical active boy who has been walking for about 1 1/2 months and has no interest in staying still for anything.  (I now understand the term "nursing gymnastics.") Actually, he does stay still when he squats to go potty (in his diaper), whether pee or poop.  So he definitely knows when he needs to go and assumes the "position" on his own.  I read the book Diaper Free and thought it was really good.  In re-reading her list of possible reasons for a potty stricke, I think this one is likely because he is now walking and doing things on his own, and doesn't want me to "take" him.  But I just can't figure out how to make the connection in his head between pottying and the potty.  I've said it to him, but he doesn't necessarily understand what I'm saying.  This wouldn't necessarily have been an issue if we had been using it all along, but it's too late now :-\ As far as right now goes, the only time he shows any interest in the potty is the same kind of interest he has in boxes and baskets - putting things in it, then taking them out again, then putting them in, etc.  Any ideas?
« Last Edit: July 23, 2009, 07:12:48 PM by Mamatoto »
These words, which I am commanding you today, shall be on your heart.  You shall teach them diligently to your sons and shall talk of them when you sit in your house and when you walk by the way and when you lie down and when you rise up.  Deut 6:6-7

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Offline khrys

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Re: Potty Training a Baby [an Infant]
« Reply #59 on: July 24, 2009, 05:34:58 AM »
Have you tried some entertainment on the potty?  I used to always read picture books to ds while he sat on the potty.  The distraction helped him relax so that it was easier to go.   
Helpmeet to dh since 8/99, SAHM to ds1 (3/05) and ds2 (12/09)