Author Topic: Plantain: When, Why & How to Use  (Read 40057 times)

Offline Mama Bear

  • Adept
  • Posts: 51
Re: Plantain: When, Why & How to Use
« Reply #90 on: June 18, 2008, 09:58:36 AM »
Can you use a plantain poultice on an open wound?

Offline LKS

  • Master
  • Posts: 930
Re: Plantain: When, Why & How to Use
« Reply #91 on: June 19, 2008, 07:04:24 AM »
I would say 'yes' because I used when my son got a huge rope burn that was about 2in wide & 6 in long & raw. It helped a great deal.

Offline Whiterock

  • Jesus Knows Me, This I Love
  • Guru
  • Posts: 3410
  • Eph 6:16
    • Yarb d'Farb Knarb
Re: Plantain: When, Why & How to Use
« Reply #92 on: June 19, 2008, 05:40:31 PM »
Y'all may already know this (it may already be posted somewhere), but I found out a while back, kept intending to post it, and kept forgetting (seeing some plantain seedheads in the yard today reminded me)... plantain seeds are psyllium!

So go out and gather the seeds as well as the leaves!

Man, plantain is such a useful plant, ain't it?!

WR
« Last Edit: June 19, 2008, 05:42:48 PM by Whiterock »
Who Needs God?

My Blog - Yarb d'Farb Knarb Check out the Wellness Wednesday tag for your health-related blog posts!

Offline healthybratt

  • administrator
  • Administrator
  • Guru
  • Posts: 11503
  • administrator
    • wouldn't you like to know?
Re: Plantain: When, Why & How to Use
« Reply #93 on: June 20, 2008, 03:30:48 AM »
Can you use a plantain poultice on an open wound?
Absolutely!!!!  We do it all the time.  ;D
  My favorite herb book!!

Offline healthybratt

  • administrator
  • Administrator
  • Guru
  • Posts: 11503
  • administrator
    • wouldn't you like to know?
Re: Plantain: When, Why & How to Use
« Reply #94 on: June 20, 2008, 03:31:53 AM »
Y'all may already know this (it may already be posted somewhere), but I found out a while back, kept intending to post it, and kept forgetting (seeing some plantain seedheads in the yard today reminded me)... plantain seeds are psyllium!

So go out and gather the seeds as well as the leaves!

Man, plantain is such a useful plant, ain't it?!

WR
I looked this up as I was curious about your other post.  This is what I found on psyllium.

Quote
Definitions of Psyllium on the Web:

    * A plant, also known as "fleawort," that is valued for its high fiber content. The powdered seeds of this plant are often used as a laxative.
      www.dietsoftware.org/nutseed.shtml
  My favorite herb book!!

Offline SamsGirl

  • Proverbs 3:5&6
  • Adept
  • Posts: 114
Re: Plantain: When, Why & How to Use
« Reply #95 on: June 20, 2008, 03:34:01 AM »
Yes, and is nice and easy for emergency's because you can normally just walk out into your backyard and get it.....my 8 yo brother was in need of some just 3 days ago and my mom sent my sister outside with a walmart bag and she gathered a whole bag in less than 5 mins..... :)
my earthly walk focuses on following Jesus, wife to Samuel, momma to Adela Grace and one more on the way

Offline Whiterock

  • Jesus Knows Me, This I Love
  • Guru
  • Posts: 3410
  • Eph 6:16
    • Yarb d'Farb Knarb
Re: Plantain: When, Why & How to Use
« Reply #96 on: June 20, 2008, 04:59:33 AM »
Y'all may already know this (it may already be posted somewhere), but I found out a while back, kept intending to post it, and kept forgetting (seeing some plantain seedheads in the yard today reminded me)... plantain seeds are psyllium!

So go out and gather the seeds as well as the leaves!

Man, plantain is such a useful plant, ain't it?!

WR
I looked this up as I was curious about your other post.  This is what I found on psyllium.

Quote
Definitions of Psyllium on the Web:

    * A plant, also known as "fleawort," that is valued for its high fiber content. The powdered seeds of this plant are often used as a laxative.
      www.dietsoftware.org/nutseed.shtml

Yeah, I found that it's sometimes called fleawort or flea plant too because of the tiny seeds. I will post more on the other thread when I get back from my milk run.

WR
Who Needs God?

My Blog - Yarb d'Farb Knarb Check out the Wellness Wednesday tag for your health-related blog posts!

Offline AgainstTheGrain

  • Adept
  • Posts: 354
  • John & Me
    • My Blog: For Such A Time As This
Re: Plantain: When, Why & How to Use
« Reply #97 on: June 27, 2008, 07:17:23 PM »
I was so disappointed 2 years ago when there was NO plantain in our yard because we had new sod from new construction :-\  BUT then last year I noticed some right next to my garden!! ;D Yeah!! The perfect spot. So, this year I told DH not to mow it around the garden so I could have some big plants to dry/use. I'm so excited!! :D ;D 

Now the seeds too!! How great since mine have some tall spiky seeds. So, then my question is . . . Is there a "best time" to pick and dry the seeds/psyllium? And what would you use it for? Are there medicinal qualities? In my short search it seems the biggest thing is the fiber content :-\
_____________
Never mind - I found the thread on Psyllium
http://www.welltellme.com/discuss/index.php/topic,18992.0.html



« Last Edit: June 27, 2008, 07:19:48 PM by AgainstTheGrain »
Vanessa in Iowa
Mom to 5 boys and 1 baby girl ages Newborn to 12

Offline Whiterock

  • Jesus Knows Me, This I Love
  • Guru
  • Posts: 3410
  • Eph 6:16
    • Yarb d'Farb Knarb
Re: Plantain: When, Why & How to Use
« Reply #98 on: July 01, 2008, 08:31:08 AM »
I posted the link to this page somewhere, but I thought I'd go ahead and post the info too...

Kingdom: Plantae (plants)
 Subkingdom: Tracheobionta (vascular plants)
 Superdivision: Spermatophyta (seed plants)
 Division: Magnoliophyta (flowering plants)
 Class: Magnoliopsida (dicotyledons)
 Subclass: Asteridae
 Order: Plantaginales
 Family: Plantaginaceae (Plantain family)
 Genus: Plantago (plantain)
 Species: Plantago major
 Common Plantain
 
   Common Plantain came to the United States with the Europeans. The native Americans, observing its spread, named it "white man's footprint" or "Englishman's foot". Perhaps they saw the same resemblance to feet (or affinity for paths) as the Greeks. "Plantago" is derived from a Latin word meaning "sole of the foot". Plantain is now naturalized throughout the United States.

   This is a perennial plant, which dies to the ground each winter and sprouts anew from its fibrous taproot around mid-spring. The oval, ribbed, short-stemmed leaves form basal rosettes which tend to hug the ground. The leaves may grow up to about 6" long and 4" wide.

   Between early summer and late fall, leafless flower stalks, 6" to 18" tall, arise from the center of the rosette. The flower stalks bear densely packed greenish white flowers each of which will become a small capsule-like seedpod containing 10 to 20 seeds. When the seeds are mature, the seedpods split in half, and the seeds fall to the ground to start the whole thing over.
 
   I commonly find plantain in gardens and lawns, along trails, in sidewalk cracks, and in similar habitats. It prefers full sun, but will grow in partial shade. It also prefers rich moist soil, but it will grow even in poor, fairly dry soils.

   Plantain is edible. The very young leaves can be added to salads, or cooked as greens. The leaves do become stringy and strongly flavored rather quickly as they age, particularly where they grow in hot, dry, or very sunny locations. This does not mean they are no longer edible, only that at this point, they are better suited to making stock or tea.

   Plantain is very high in beta carotene (A) and calcium. It also provides ascorbic acid (C).

   The immature flower stalks may be eaten raw or cooked. The seeds are said to have a nutty flavor and may be parched and added to a variety of foods or ground into flour.
 
   Among the more notable chemicals found in plantain are allantion, apigenin, aucubin, baicalein, linoleic acid, oleanolic acid, sorbitol, and tannin.

   Medicinally, plantain is astringent, demulcent, emollient, cooling, vulnerary, expectorant, antimicrobial, antiviral, antitoxin, and diuretic. It effects blood sugar, usually lowering it. It has been used to treat lung disorders and stomach problems. For these purposes, a tea is made from either the leaves or the whole plant and taken internally. This same tea may be used as a mouthwash to treat sores in the mouth and toothaches. It may also be used externally to treat sores, blisters, insect bites and stings, hemorrhoids, burns, rashes, and other skin irritations. Alternatively, a poultice of the leaves may be applied to the afflicted area. This is probably plantain's most common use. For relief from a bee sting or insect bite, simply shred (or chew) a plantain leaf and hold it on the bite for a few minutes.

   I've begun making a plantain ointment which is proving to be remarkably effective. Reports so far (and personal experience) indicate that it very rapidly relieves itching and swelling from bee stings, insect bites, poison ivy rash, and other allergic rashes. It also seems to speed healing of sores and bruises. The best part is that not only does this ointment work as well as or better than the usual commercial preparations, it's also completely non-toxic.

   I should add that plantain is currently being marketed as a stop smoking aid. The claim is that it causes an aversion to tobacco. I suppose the simple version of this would be to chew on a plantain leaf whenever you want to smoke. Doing this will freshen your breath, at least, and who knows, maybe you won't want that cigarette so much.

   Plantain seeds are very high in mucilage and fiber, among other things. The seeds of a closely related species (P. psyllium) are the primary ingredient in laxatives such as Metamucil. Common plantain seeds may be used in the same fashion.

   The plant provides food for butterfly caterpillars, rabbits, deer, and grouse. A wide variety of birds eat the seeds.

   To control or eradicate plantain, pull up the plants before they go to seed, or cover them with a thick layer of mulch. The best long-term control for plantain in a lawn is probably to shade it out, which can be done simply by setting your lawnmower a bit higher.

 http://www.kingdomplantae.net/commonPlantain.php
Who Needs God?

My Blog - Yarb d'Farb Knarb Check out the Wellness Wednesday tag for your health-related blog posts!

Offline redeemed

  • Wide Eyed
  • Posts: 1
Re: Plantain: When, Why & How to Use
« Reply #99 on: July 07, 2008, 05:53:02 PM »
Being very new to herbs, it all seems a bit overwhelming (tincture vs. salve...differing recipes...), but exciting, too! My biggest question is about heating the plantain--
I've read you can let it soak in water or alcohol for a couple weeks and press it out, but you can also cook it in vaseline or beeswax. Won't the heat destroy some/all of it's properties?

Offline Mrs. B

  • Master
  • Posts: 1317
Re: Plantain: When, Why & How to Use
« Reply #100 on: July 08, 2008, 05:36:51 AM »
Being very new to herbs, it all seems a bit overwhelming (tincture vs. salve...differing recipes...), but exciting, too! My biggest question is about heating the plantain--
I've read you can let it soak in water or alcohol for a couple weeks and press it out, but you can also cook it in vaseline or beeswax. Won't the heat destroy some/all of it's properties?
When you "cook" it you don't bring it to a real high temperature; you wouldn't boil the herb... my salves tend to be around 180 degrees for anywhere from 2-4 hours if done on the stovetop.
Also think of it as being like a tea... you heat the water to release the herbal properties from the plant and put it into the water to drink...
Heating the herb in an oil to make a salve draws out the properties of the herb, and doesn't destroy these properties.  This way the herbal properties are transferred into the oil and can then be more readily utilized and absorbed into the skin.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2008, 05:40:51 AM by Mrs. B »

Offline hi_itsgwen

  • Master
  • Posts: 1428
    • Gwen's Nest
Re: Plantain: When, Why & How to Use
« Reply #101 on: October 28, 2008, 09:13:17 AM »
I was asked how to make plantain salve, so I decided to post it here for future reference:

Plantain Salve

It is a very useful, all purpose skin healer for insect bites, poison ivy, etc.  The plantain speeds circulation to the area, and is anti-inflammatory.  We have noticed that it quickly erases the pain, itching, and swelling from all kinds of insect bites and stings, as well as poisonous plant encounters. 

Here is how I make my plantain salve. 

What you’ll need:
A small saucepan
Small jars or tins with lids to pour your finished salve into
The herbs listed below (dried or fresh both work well)
Olive oil (Vaseline can be used, but we prefer a natural oil to a petroleum based product)

Optional:
Beeswax -this hardens the oil into a salve consistency…the olive oil works just fine without it, but the harder salve is less messy, which we like.
Lavender oil (as a preservative)

Ingredients:
3/4 c. Plantain (you can also add complimentary herbs...Comfrey and Burdock are great skin healing herbs as well...use equal parts of each herb to yeild a total of 3/4 cup of herbs)
1 c. Olive oil
1/4 c. Beeswax
35 drops Lavender oil (optional: speeds healing and acts as a natural preservative)
2 small or 1 large fresh aloe leaves, scraped (optional: speeds healing, cools and soothes irritated skin)

If using fresh herbs, rinse them off and coarsely chop them.  Mix herbs and olive oil.  (reserving aloe and lavender for later)

Stir the herbs down into the oil, and turn on the heat to very low*. 

Keep the heat low, and allow to cook until the herbs are dry and crispy looking and the oil is dark green.  This may take anywhere from one to three hours. 

Pour your herb mix through a strainer into a larger heat proof bowl**. Press the herbs with the back of a spoon to extract all the oil you can, then discard the herbs.  **I use my glass mixing bowl so that I can see how many cups I made, as I have a tendancy to just dump stuff in and not measure. 

Grate in 1/4 c of beeswax per cup of olive oil mix, and let it melt into the warm salve.  Stir until it melts, then stick your spoon in the fridge for a minute to check consistency.  If your mix is too mushy, then add more grated beeswax and melt in, testing again.  If it is solid enough, then mix in the aloe and lavender oil (5 drops per ounce of oil), and pour into your containers. 

Some other tips:
Jot down any notes on your recipe as you go, or as soon as you’re done: your methods, changes, measurements, and total yield and note any changes you’d like to make for next time. 
Label and date all of your containers. 
We like to store ours in the fridge, as we like it to be cold. 
I have used Altoids or old candle tins, or mini plastic containers from the dollar tree to put the salve into.  I have also considered adding in more beeswax, and using a chapstick container for a travel version for my purse. 
You can make pretty labels with instructions for use if you'd like...I end up giving a lot of it away...and it's always much appreciated!

~Gwen


* Crock Pot Method: If your stove won’t co-operate with very low temps, you may alternately use the following crock pot method of making a salve.  It will take longer, but it works just as well.  Fill a glass canning jar with your herbs and oil.  Place a folded washcloth or kitchen towel into the bottom of your crockpot.  Put your glass jar in on top of the towel. Fill your crock pot with water, so your jar is sitting in a ‘bath’.  Turn it on low heat.  Allow it to cook at a very low simmer.  You can let it go overnight, or up to a couple of days, until the herbs are crispy and the oil is dark green.  Continue with recipe above.

And here are some links that I've found to be helpful.

Gwen’s Plantain Salve
http://www.welltellme.com/discuss/index.php/topic,289.msg204365.html#msg204365

Q&A on salve making with Shoshanna
http://www.welltellme.com/discuss/index.php/topic,8494.msg118843.html#msg118843

Bulk Herb Store “Poison Ivy on the Run Oil” recipe:
http://www.bulkherbstore.com/sharing-remedies/poison-ivy-on-the-run

Bulk Herb Store “Simple Green Plantain Salve” recipe:
http://www.bulkherbstore.com/sharing-remedies/simple-green-plantain-salve

« Last Edit: October 28, 2008, 03:08:37 PM by hi_itsgwen »
Come see me at www.gwens-nest.com
♥ Check out our family favorite recipes, funny kid stories, natural remedies and other creative and fun stuff.

Offline Lady of the Wood

  • Learning
  • Posts: 12
Re: Plantain: When, Why & How to Use
« Reply #102 on: August 15, 2013, 08:21:41 AM »
Is plantain used for burns? My friend got a burn from a campfire and I put plantain oil on it and it started stinging. now I know that St. John's wort is better for burns. :) Thank you in advance!

-Lady of the Wood
Have I not commanded you? Be strong and courageous. Do not be terrified; do not be discouraged, for the Lord your God will be with you wherever you go.

Joshua 1:9