Author Topic: Wild Grapes: Uses, recipes  (Read 7423 times)

Offline wlwest

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Wild Grapes: Uses, recipes
« on: July 11, 2010, 02:57:47 PM »
Hi.  I didn't see a topic on wild grapes?  we have a bunch growing and I was going to put them through my juicer and then freeze the juice.  Are there any other ideas or recipes for grapes?  They are smaller than the store grapes, and I think they will be that dark purple color.  The seeds are pretty big, so to just eat them probably won't be that great for my little guys. :P

thanks,
Wendy

Offline BJ_BOBBI_JO

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Re: Wild Grapes: Uses, recipes
« Reply #1 on: July 13, 2010, 05:27:02 PM »
I have wild grapes probably by the 1000s growing. I eat them just as is sometimes but as you know they are small and bitter sour and full of seeds which all make them hard to eat.

I make them into a juice and then make jelly with them. The jelly taste pretty good. I dont understand how or why but some how when I eat the homemade wild grape jelly it helps lower my blood sugars for that day (Im a diabetic). It doesnt make any since due to all the sugar in jelly.

Also there is some info out there that claims eating the leaves of the wild grapes is safe for us. Using the leaves in place of bread for sandwhiches since they are large. Ive tried eating the leaves and didnt fall over dead so Im assuming it is safe to eat. LOL.

Offline wlwest

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Re: Wild Grapes: Uses, recipes
« Reply #2 on: July 14, 2010, 02:34:07 AM »
I never thought about making jelly!  That's a good idea too.   :)

Wendy

Offline wlwest

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Re: Wild Grapes: Uses, recipes
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2010, 09:30:09 AM »
Made jelly out of my grapes!  Tastes good and made alot. 

 ;D
wendy

Offline Precious

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Re: Wild Grapes: Uses, recipes
« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2010, 06:41:58 AM »
Do you live in the South?  If the wild grapes are dark purple, then they are probably "Nesbitt" muscadines.  Ripe ones look almost black.  Green muscadines are called Scuppernongs.

I made muscadine jelly/jam a few days ago.  I learned the technique from my grandmother.  You cover the de-stemmed muscadines with water, then boil until soft--skim off any scum.  Be sure to use the whole muscadine--there are loads of wonderful vitamins and minerals in those hulls that you don't want to lose (as well as the beautiful purple color).  While the juice and hulls are still hot, use a chinois or similar apparatus to strain the juice and pulp from the hulls.  If you work hard enough, you won't have much leftover material.  You can use the leftover hulls to make fried pies.

You can use the juice for a variety of things.  Muscadine wine is popular.  We used some of ours to flavor our water kefir.  I saved the rest to make jelly using Pomona's pectin.  Muscadine hulls can be bitter, so I chose local honey as my sweetener.  I used the currant jam recipe from the box insert.  The result was delicious and beautiful!  The resulting taste is tart, but not bitter.  We're going to give the jelly as gifts this Christmas.

Offline DHW

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Re: Wild Grapes: Uses, recipes
« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2010, 09:11:09 AM »
The seeds of muscadines are full of good stuff, too.  From www.sciencedaily.com,

Muscadine grapes have been shown to be more potent in antioxidants than any other variety of grapes, and laboratory studies have suggested that grape seeds have higher antioxidant capacity than grape skins. Studies in humans have shown improved antioxidant capacity when grape seed supplement is added to the diet, as well as improvements in blood vessel function. However, the studies did not specifically include muscadine grapes, which have extremely high levels of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compounds when compared to other fruits.
« Last Edit: September 18, 2010, 09:14:48 AM by DHW »