Author Topic: Storing wheat, etc...  (Read 10654 times)

Offline KeepItSimple

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Storing wheat, etc...
« on: October 05, 2006, 03:15:33 PM »
Hi all...

I have very, very new to the whole world of 'healthy' eating.  I just got our first order from azurestandard...mostly organic things, and what not.  At any rate, I bought wheat to be ground for bread, as well as corn meal, kamut, rolled oats, and several other things.  I thought the wheat would come in buckets...and to be quite honest, I didn't think about the other stuff. 

At any rate...how in the world do should I store this stuff?  I was thinking big and small buckets for most of it, but can't seem to find a place that sells ones made for food. 

Any ideas??

Thanks - Camille

Wife to a wonderful man who happens to be a Chiropractor (aren't I blessed??) and home schooling mom to four great kids: Victoria ~16, Jacob ~13, Marlee ~8, David ~6

Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: Storing wheat, etc...
« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2006, 03:25:08 PM »
Hey Camille,

I just read in a book this week that wheat can be stored indefinitely.  You should store wheat in round cans, preferably.  But should you choose a "square" can then leave several inches open space on all sides of the can to allow the air to circulate.

It recommends for BULK wheat:  a round, 5-gallon, metal bucket, enamel coated interior, with an airtight lid and waterproof seal.  You can find these from restaurant suppliers. 
Or you can use a food-grade 5-gallon bucket plastic one that has a tight fitting lid.

Store bulk wheat at 45-65 degrees for a constant temperature and in a moist free environment.  Avoid storing wheat in direct light.

This would be excellent if you are choosing on buying a large, bulk amount that will keep almost forever!!

Offline Simply Kristen

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Re: Storing wheat, etc...
« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2006, 03:35:16 PM »
Hi all...

I have very, very new to the whole world of 'healthy' eating.  I just got our first order from azurestandard...mostly organic things, and what not.  At any rate, I bought wheat to be ground for bread, as well as corn meal, kamut, rolled oats, and several other things.  I thought the wheat would come in buckets...and to be quite honest, I didn't think about the other stuff. 

At any rate...how in the world do should I store this stuff?  I was thinking big and small buckets for most of it, but can't seem to find a place that sells ones made for food. 

Any ideas??

Thanks - Camille



LOL!
I'm glad you asked that question.
that  is something I would have done.  Ordered it then been like.... hmmm....  Now what?

hehe.

Now I know what to prepare for!

Offline SarahK

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Re: Storing wheat, etc...
« Reply #3 on: October 06, 2006, 01:22:56 AM »

I just read in a book this week that wheat can be stored indefinitely.  You should store wheat in round cans, preferably.  But should you choose a "square" can then leave several inches open space on all sides of the can to allow the air to circulate.

......

Or you can use a food-grade 5-gallon bucket plastic one that has a tight fitting lid.

Store bulk wheat at 45-65 degrees for a constant temperature and in a moist free environment.  Avoid storing wheat in direct light.

This would be excellent if you are choosing on buying a large, bulk amount that will keep almost forever!!

We do this!  But I don't but the buckets - I call the deli at the local grocery & say "can you save a few lidded buckets for me?  When should I pick them up?"  and pay Zero.  You can also get nifty screw off lids for the 5-gallon round pail sizes on-line or in farm supply/home repair type store (Menards & Fleet Farm where I am).  The one we got were named Gamma Seal.  Easier to get off if you are in & out of them often.

I also put a few bay leaves in the top of each bucket.  I was told the keep bugs out and it seems to work -though I don't know why.  The ones w/o leaves had bug problems... after a few years.  I 'lost' a few buckets in the back of a storage area.

Air circulating didn't seem to matter IF you were storing in a really air/water tight containers. 

My experience-
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Offline Mama Sita

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Re: Storing wheat, etc...
« Reply #4 on: October 06, 2006, 01:36:06 AM »
Hello KeepItSimple,
Can I tell you that we are using wheat that we have kept fresh since 1999? We bought waaayy too much wheat that year, and we were stumped as to how to store it. After doing a little reading, we decided that we would buy gallon ziploc storage bags and fill them with the wheat. We then 'vacuum-packed' them: put a straw in the bag and suck out as much air as humanly possible. Now you have to be careful with this because one little grain of wheat traveling up that straw can deliver quite a blow to your tonsils.... :D

Anyway, after we had packed all the wheat into the bags, we carefully laid them into Rubbermaid garbage cans with a heavy plastic lining inside (these were given to us by someone). We had 3 different cans, one for red, soft and hard wheat. We have never had a bug problem and the wheat is still fresh to this day.

I have heard of storing grains with food grade DE (diatamacous earth-sp) and yes, bay leaves would be excellent, too. I hot glue those to the inside cover of my flour bucket. Just didn't have any on hand at the time....

This is what has worked for us! Hope it helps a little....

~MS

Oh! And we keep the wheat in a cool, dry place--usually a basement.
« Last Edit: October 06, 2006, 01:37:56 AM by Mama Sita »
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Offline scarlet_prairie

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Re: Storing wheat, etc...
« Reply #5 on: October 06, 2006, 03:01:08 AM »
If you have the freezer space, keep it in the freezer. Put it in ziploc bags ( I use 2 gal, a 50 lb bag will fill  ~3 1/2 of them. I've had questionable experience with DE, most organic farmers add it for bin storage before cleaning for consumption. Freezing kills the bugs and bug eggs. My parents, who have been farming all their life and eating whole grains, freeze 5 gal buckets worth (I don't believe they use food grade buckets except in the house) for several months. Then they said after that they don't worry about it, everything is dead, they'll leave it out nothing else added to it. I don't know how "fresh" it stays but I remember very yummy whole wheat bread growing up :) A deep freeze is the best place to do this. Since it takes me about 3/4 of a year to use 50 lbs of wheat (at this point anyway) I just pull out a ziploc bag as I need more. Works good :)

I also do seed saving from my garden, all bean and grain seeds have weevil eggs in them, so to save the seeds it states you only need to freeze them for 5 days. I tend to forget about them in the freezer  ::) and they don't get taken out for a couple months.
Test all things; hold fast what is good. 1 Thes 5:21

Offline KeepItSimple

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Re: Storing wheat, etc...
« Reply #6 on: October 06, 2006, 04:14:10 AM »
Thanks for all the great ideas.  Hubby was worried about any kind of plastic because of the gasses they put off...or something along those lines.  I am very new to breadmaking, have only made one batch thus far in my life ... it was edible  ;D  However, had it been a 'daily special' at the store I probably would not have bought it again  :-\

The first wheat I had was given to me by a friend.  It was a 5-lb can of wheat...sort of like what coffee comes in.  That didn't seem to last very long at all, so I thought hmmm...I guess I need to get 50 lbs.  Now I have 50 lbs of 3 diff types of wheat.  I think I may have over-purchased!!  I'd like to keep some inside, so perhaps I could freeze some of it and put the rest inside in a smaller container. 

Thanks again for all the info.  You ladies (and gents) are truly a blessing here at welltellme!!
Wife to a wonderful man who happens to be a Chiropractor (aren't I blessed??) and home schooling mom to four great kids: Victoria ~16, Jacob ~13, Marlee ~8, David ~6

Offline murfette

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Re: Storing wheat, etc...
« Reply #7 on: October 06, 2006, 04:33:20 AM »
Why is it recommended that you store wheat in metal containers instead of plastic?

We store ours in the basement in a rubbermaid container.  I also read that you should mix 1/4c. of diatomaceous earth per 1 gallon of wheat.  It is safe and harmless to humans and pets but it kills any bugs that may be living in the wheat.

Offline mexmarr

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Re: Storing wheat, etc...
« Reply #8 on: October 06, 2006, 05:16:53 AM »
We store our wheat in a big plastic tub we got at target.  We've never had any problems.

Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: Storing wheat, etc...
« Reply #9 on: October 06, 2006, 07:43:33 AM »
I think the gasses in the plastic are a problem if it is being heated, but not stored in. 

Offline scarlet_prairie

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Re: Storing wheat, etc...
« Reply #10 on: October 06, 2006, 09:23:44 AM »
Why is it recommended that you store wheat in metal containers instead of plastic?

We store ours in the basement in a rubbermaid container.  I also read that you should mix 1/4c. of diatomaceous earth per 1 gallon of wheat.  It is safe and harmless to humans and pets but it kills any bugs that may be living in the wheat.

Well, that's not entirely true about DE it can be harmful to humans and pets if too much is inhaled or if it gets rubbed in the eyes. It's actually pretty nasty. You can eat it just fine but you NEED to be careful when handling it. 1/4 c. seems like a lot to a gallon of wheat...  It's very abrasive and VERY hard on flour mills. I'd stick with freezing, bayleaves, or vacuum sealing. My 2 year old rubbed some in his eyes once and they were red and nasty green boogers plugged up his eyes. I thought he had pink eye but then remembered where he had been that day, so we flushed his eyes throughly that night and he was fine by the morning.
Test all things; hold fast what is good. 1 Thes 5:21

Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: Storing wheat, etc...
« Reply #11 on: October 06, 2006, 10:07:09 AM »
You can eat it just fine but you NEED to be careful when handling it. 1/4 c. seems like a lot to a gallon of wheat...

It does seem like an awful lot, but my book says as well to add 1 1/4 cup to each 5-gallon bucket, so it would be the same as saying 1/4 cup to each gallon.  Seems to be the basic regulation.

Offline bizymum

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Re: Storing wheat, etc...
« Reply #12 on: July 10, 2007, 03:59:53 AM »
Help!!  I was just given a large sack of hard red wheat by a farmer friend of ours.  He warned me that its' straight from picking - bugs, pebbles, onion bits and all.  So I was wondering if I should rinse it, dry it and store it.  Or should I just freeze it (in batches, I don't have a deep freezer) then take it out and store it in bins with bay leaves?  Help!  I'm so blessed that he would give us this wheat, but I don't want the bugs (eww!!) and I don't want the pebbles to damage my mill. ???

Offline Pastorswife2B

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Re: Storing wheat, etc...
« Reply #13 on: July 10, 2007, 05:46:53 AM »
Help!!  I was just given a large sack of hard red wheat by a farmer friend of ours.  He warned me that its' straight from picking - bugs, pebbles, onion bits and all.  So I was wondering if I should rinse it, dry it and store it.  Or should I just freeze it (in batches, I don't have a deep freezer) then take it out and store it in bins with bay leaves?  Help!  I'm so blessed that he would give us this wheat, but I don't want the bugs (eww!!) and I don't want the pebbles to damage my mill. ???

I don't have any ideas to help you with cleaning it to run through a mill, but my husband had a teacher he stays in contact with who is an entemologist and he has given us the advice that most bugs AND THEIR EGGS!!! will die if frozen.  so if your concerned about bugs I would go with freezing and storing with a bay leaf and/or diatimatious (sp?) earth.

HTH
-Heather
« Last Edit: July 10, 2007, 06:05:13 AM by Pastorswife2B »

Offline SarahK

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Re: Storing wheat, etc...
« Reply #14 on: July 10, 2007, 05:57:40 AM »
and I don't want the pebbles to damage my mill. ???

I have an idea.  I would put the grain in a flat bin (large surface area) and put the bin on top of the washing machine for a few loads.  Let the jiggling sift the rocks to the bottom.  I'm not sure it would work - but if it was my grain I would sure try it.

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Offline boysmama

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Re: Storing wheat, etc...
« Reply #15 on: July 10, 2007, 06:10:27 AM »
We've cleaned one -  ;) - bushel by hand. Pour it slowly from one container to another in a strong wind or in front of a fan. Adjust how high you hold the original container as needed so that the kernels fall into your bucket below and any chaff gets blown beyond the bucket. Then spread the kernels on the table and sort through to check for any gravel or small stones.
My MIL rinses the berries w/ running water if they are very dusty and then spreads them on a sheet in the sun to dry, but if your berries are reasonably clean you could skip that step. I rinsed a small amount and the water wasn't all that dirty. Better not to wash if you can help it.

Offline bizymum

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Re: Storing wheat, etc...
« Reply #16 on: July 10, 2007, 08:31:56 AM »
Thanks for all the info!!  You guys are great!!  There doesn't seem to be much chaff, just kernals.  I think I'm going to try rinsing a small amount to see how dirty it seems and then go from there.  It does have a slight onion smell to it.  Is my bread going to come out tasting like onions?

Offline milmuth

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Re: Storing wheat, etc...
« Reply #17 on: September 24, 2009, 09:27:38 AM »
moving wheat and other grains from freezer to gamma lid covered containers.

I need the freezer space, so I now need to move all my grain out to buckets.  I have the supplies to do so, just wondering if there is anything else I need to know?  Any concern about the grains being wet? (they were in the original bags they came in, not plastic)?  If so, what do I do?

Also, fyi.  For those that don't have time to get some free-bees like SarahK, Lowe's and other such stores sell empty 5 gal buckets and lids (snap on) rather inexpensiviely in their paint department.  They are not FDA approved, but per my calling the company, they don't have anything in them that will harm food (ie ok type of plastic).   Mine are a #2 However, the lids are not air tight and hard to get on/off.  I'd strongly recommend gamma seal lids.  found some for a good price at freckleface.com 

Thanks for the tip on the bayleaves....they are good to repel roaches too, for those who care :)



Offline seekingtruth

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Re: Storing wheat, etc...
« Reply #18 on: September 24, 2009, 11:08:46 AM »
moving wheat and other grains from freezer to gamma lid covered containers.

I need the freezer space, so I now need to move all my grain out to buckets.  I have the supplies to do so, just wondering if there is anything else I need to know?  Any concern about the grains being wet? (they were in the original bags they came in, not plastic)?  If so, what do I do?

Also, fyi.  For those that don't have time to get some free-bees like SarahK, Lowe's and other such stores sell empty 5 gal buckets and lids (snap on) rather inexpensiviely in their paint department.  They are not FDA approved, but per my calling the company, they don't have anything in them that will harm food (ie ok type of plastic).   Mine are a #2 However, the lids are not air tight and hard to get on/off.  I'd strongly recommend gamma seal lids.  found some for a good price at freckleface.com 

Thanks for the tip on the bayleaves....they are good to repel roaches too, for those who care :)




I would just make sure your grain is really dry before sealing your buckets.  They could absorb moisture when they thaw out.