Author Topic: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]  (Read 58997 times)

Offline abbilynn

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Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
« Reply #60 on: April 20, 2007, 05:58:23 AM »
Thanks abbilynn for the quotes   :)

I am hopeful that it would just be the mold, but I was talking w/ my mom about my reactions to oranges in childhood and my great grandma who had sensitivities to potatoes/eczema, too...

I'm on Day 2 of the elimination diet, and the itchiness has greatly decreased.  The rash is slowly improving, too, on my legs.  Arms are still bad.   :( I'm SO HUNGRY!   >:(  I can't have tea, PB, coconut oil, oatmeal, butter and nothing's keeping me full.   :(

Will research more...but we have a BEAUTIFUL WEEKEND finally predicted (60s-70), so I will NOT be here at WTM (much).  ;D

If you've had reactions to citrus fruits before, I would guess it to be the citric acid I suppose.  :-\  But I'm hoping for the best for you!  I know how frustrating it can be to try and figure these things out - I have two boys I'm still struggling with, each with different issues.  :-\ :o  Sometimes you open one door just to find a thousand more to explore.  But I know the Lord will give you wisdom and bless your efforts.  ;D  Glad the elimination diet is helping.  You should definitely check out an intolerance to gluten.  Let us know how this all goes, and enjoy this awesome weather!!  ;D

abbilynn
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Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
« Reply #61 on: April 21, 2007, 01:51:20 PM »
Glad the elimination diet is helping.  You should definitely check out an intolerance to gluten.  Let us know how this all goes, and enjoy this awesome weather!!  ;D abbilynn

This particular ED is gluten free, I believe, b/c I'm taking the recommendation to omit oats. The weather is beautiful; the results are less than expected so far (but it's only Day 3).  I sure hope it's "only"a mold allergy.  :-\

I think my foundation has citric acid in it (or some variation thereof).  ::) Found some good Burt's Bees Shampoo, and ridded myself of products w/acids. Skin is still poor.   >:( :'( :( How's yours doing?

Quote
I will pray for you. Withdrawal of allergens can be tough. Your body will be screaming for them.
Thanks again!  My body IS screaming!   :(

I think I may start an elimination diet thread--there seems to be many variations.   ???

Offline mercy

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Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
« Reply #62 on: April 21, 2007, 02:24:41 PM »
Quote
I think I may start an elimination diet thread--there seems to be many variations.   

Please do!
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YoopreMama

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Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
« Reply #63 on: April 24, 2007, 07:48:06 AM »
Well, I'm on Day 6 of the ED and I'm learning lots.  :) Accidently took a supplement w/ citric acid last night and this morning...I'm itchier now... :-\ Not conclusive, by any means, but I will continue w/ this ED and learn more...and avoid citric acid as much as I can.  It really is in a lot of stuff.

Took a sauna today--hopefully that got rid of some stuff :D.  The weight loss is a nice fringe benefit    ;D

Taking zinc to help heal skin is something I'm trying to do--w/o the added fillers that are a no-no on the ED!   :(

YoopreMama

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Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
« Reply #64 on: April 24, 2007, 10:47:50 AM »
http://www.juicingbook.com/fruits/

Quote
Citric acid is found in citrus fruits such as lemons, limes, grapefruit and oranges. In addition, citric acid is found in cranberries, strawberries, pineapples, peaches and even tomatoes!

Citric acid, when taken in excess, is said to make the blood too acidic. As such, it is said that the body tries to alkalize the blood by leaching alkalizing nutrients from the body such as calcium and magnesium.

As a result, you want to make sure you are not having too much citric acid in your diet.

Age, metabolic rate and how much exercise are 3 factors which can determine how much citric acid your body can handle without causing problems. Your health care professional can best determine how much is a safe amount for you.

What's a safe or appropriate amount of citric acid for you is only a question that your medical doctor or naturopathic doctor can answer for you. The answer to this question will vary from person to person.

The keyword here is "excess". Just as you normally will eat oranges, pineapples and other fruits which contain citric acid in your daily life, so can you drink the juice of fruits containing citric acid. You simply want to avoid excess citric acid.

Use common sense and if you have any concerns about citric acid, then consult your health care professional. The older you are, the more serious this problem can be as with age, we all begin to loose calcium in our bones.

I think I'll link this to the Master Cleanse site... :)

Here is a link and some of the foods w/ citric acid:
http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~vclarke/citric_foods.html#natural

Quote
List of Foods That Contain Citric Acid In Their Natural State
This list is growing all the time as I do more research!

Citrus fruits: all of 'em. It's strongest in lemons and limes, which are up to 8% citric acid by weight and can even be used to extract the chemical from; sour oranges can also be used, so we assume that the more sour the fruit the higher the citric acid content.

Berries and soft fruit: Almost all berries with the possible exception of blueberries. Certainly found in: strawberry, raspberry, gooseberry, cranberry, red currant, blackcurrant. Red currants are one of the worst offenders - red currant juice can be used to replace lemon juice in jam recipes!

Exotic fruits: Pineapple, tamarind

Stone fruits: Cherries (apparently only a small amount)

Vegetables: Tomatoes, cayenne peppers (not the same as sweet peppers), Jerusalem artichoke, lettuce (!)

Wine - as a by-product of fermentation, and to improve clarity

Cheese - Citric acid is used in the manufacturing process to help clot the milk faster. It may be an integral part of making certain cheeses, especially mass-produced mozzarella, but appears to be a by-product of industrialisation for most British cheeses: the traditional method of adding bacterial culture to the milk and allowing it to act slowly does not use added citric acid as far as I know. I don't, however, know whether citric acid also appears naturally in cheese as a by-product of the bacterial reactions. Conclusion: traditional (read: expensive) cheeses are likely to be safer, but the jury's out overall.

Sourdough breads eg. rye bread - as a by-product of fermentation.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Foods which often contain added citric acid
Stock cubes and concentrates, especially chicken. Check carefully as some brands are fine and others aren't.

Soft drinks - almost all of them, especially any fruit-flavoured ones. The only citric-free canned soft drinks I've discovered are Rubicon brand, which come in flavours like mango and guava.

Jams and fruit preserves - including fruit yoghurts and desserts. Chutneys and pickles are much less likely to contain it as they use vinegar (acetic acid) to preserve and acidify intead.

Canned tomatoes (NB tomatoes also contain a small amount of citric acid naturally). If you want to use canned tomatoes try organic varieties, which may be citric-free.

Canned fruit

Fruit flavour sweets - especially fizzy or sour ones. Citric acid is a major
ingredient in sherbet!

Some ice creams - Only some brands contain it, and they're often the cheaper ones which use vegetable fats. Citric acid in ice cream acts as an emulsifier to keep the globules of fat separate - this isn't necessary with "real" ice cream since the milk and cream are emulsified in and of themselves. As a rule, the more expensive the ice cream the less likely it is to contain citric acid; it's such a terrible hardship to only be able to eat very nice expensive ice cream ;-)

Convenience foods: especially tomato-based sauces.

Crisps: Only certain flavours, but often the more "complex" ones such as prawn cocktail and cheese and onion. Check the packet as brands vary.

Mayonnaise - Can be made with vinegar alone, but is most often made with lemon juice.


And this doesn't cover things like shampoo...toothpaste, etc.
« Last Edit: April 24, 2007, 11:00:42 AM by YooperMama »

Offline cjanderin

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Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
« Reply #65 on: April 24, 2007, 12:37:24 PM »
What about it being a salicylate intolerance rather than citric acid?  My dd (3yrs) has had major constipation up until two weeks ago but ever since getting completely cleared out she is suddenly reacting to berries, plums and last night to tomatoes.  My friend developed an intolerance to salicylitate a few years ago and it took months to discover what it was and then it was a really long time on a limited diet before she was better again.  Now and again it crops back up if she eats too much of the 'wrong' foods combined with being stressed or sick and she has to really watch what she eats for a week or so before she is ok again.
I'm now starting to research it for my dd and will go and get a test done at the doctor to see if that is the problem.  The trigger to whatever she is intolerant to seems to be having her digestive system all cleaned out.  Strange...

Here's some info about it :

Salicylate sensitivity is the body’s inability to handle more than a certain amount of salicylates at any one time. A salicylate sensitive person may have difficulty tolerating certain fruits, vegetables, or any products that contain aspirin.

What are salicylates?

Salicylate is a natural chemical made by many plants. It is chemically related to aspirin, which is a derivative of salicylic acid. It is believed the plant uses it as protection from insects, and they are everywhere around us.

Although natural salicylates are found in wholesome foods, some individuals have difficulty tolerating even small amounts of them. The reaction to a natural salicylate can be as severe as that to a synthetic additive if the person is highly sensitive. Some people are troubled by only a very few, but some are troubled by all of them.

Drugs that contain salicylates include aspirin, analgesics (painkillers), and muscle relaxants, cough mixtures, antacids, cold and flu medication and acne lotions.

What is salicylate sensitivity?

Some adults and children have a low level of tolerance to salicylates and may get symptoms that are dose-related. The tolerated amount varies from one person to another. This is an example of food intolerance.

What are some of the symptoms of Salicylate Intolerance?

• Chronic Urticaria & Angioedema

• Trigger for Eczema

• Asthma

• Nasal Polyps

• Sinusitis

• Rhino conjunctivitis

• Stomach aches and upsets

Foods containing Salicylates

Salicylates occur naturally in many fruits, and vegetables as a preservative, to prevent rotting and protect against harmful bacteria and fungi. They are stored in the bark, leaves, roots, and seeds of plants. Salicylates are found naturally in many foods and its compounds are used in many products.

• The salicylate level in food can vary, with raw foods, dried foods and juices containing higher levels than the same cooked foods.

• Salicylates are used in many flavoured products — sweets, toothpaste, chewing gum

• Some artificial food colourings and flavourings such as peppermint and strawberry

All fresh meat, fish, shellfish, poultry, eggs, dairy products, cereals, bread are low in salicylates

Foods with very high Salicylate content

Fruits:

Apricots
Blackberry
Blackcurrant
Blueberry
Boysenberry
Cherry
Cranberry
Currants
Dates
Grapes
Guava
Loganberry
Oranges
Pineapple
Plum
Prunes
Raisins
Raspberry
Redcurrant
Rockmelon
Strawberry
Tangelo
Tangerines
Youngberry

Vegetables:

Capsicum
Champignon
Chicory
Courgette
Endive
Gherkins
Hot Peppers
Olives
Radish
Tomato
Tomato based foods
 
Nuts, sweets, and snacks to avoid:

All jams, except pear
All jellies
All marmalade
Almond
Chewing gum
Fruit flavours
Honey and honey flavours
Liquorice
Mint flavoured sweets
Muesli bars
Peppermints
Savoury flavoured items
Water chestnuts

Herbs, spices, and condiments

Aniseed
Cayenne
Commercial gravies
Commercial sauces
Curry
Dill
Thyme
Fish paste
Meat paste
Tomato paste
White vinegar
Worcester sauce
 
« Last Edit: April 24, 2007, 12:39:10 PM by cjanderin »
Erin :)  Wifey to Chris and mummy to Marcail (10), Alex (8), Joel (6), Timothy (4), Zipporah (3) and Jeremiah (8months).

YoopreMama

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Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
« Reply #66 on: April 24, 2007, 01:01:52 PM »
Erin-
Thanks for the information.  :) I look forward to hearing what you come up with. These unusual allergies are beginning to frustrate me--feels like a wild goose chase!  >:(

I don't have any of the symptoms listed but the eczema.  :-\ I will keep this in mind should my theory on citric acid fail.   ;D

That is strange that the trigger is being all cleaned out... ??? I would think the opposite...What do I know?   :D

Offline mercy

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Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
« Reply #67 on: April 24, 2007, 04:01:00 PM »
I am allergic to milk.  I suffered with an itchy, scaly rash on my hands and sinusitis for over 20 years before I found out I was allergic to milk.  Within three days of getting off all milk, I was rash free for the first time.  Within two weeks, my sinusitis was gone.  After about 6 months, I wondered if I would be able to have milk in small doses.  My first try was with half a teaspoon of ice cream (hey, if you're going to take a risk, make it taste good!); no go--I not only  got the rash on my hands much worse than I would have expected, I got a sinus infection to boot.  It took the rash at least a week to go away.

I am so sensitive to it now, that I know within thirty minutes if I have inadvertantly eaten some because certain spots on my hands start itching.  By the next day, I will have a rash and a stuffy nose.  These symptoms will last for a week or more.  I don't understand it either; seems backwards, I know, but that's the way it is.
Psalm 73:25 Whom have I in heaven but thee? and there is none upon earth that I desire beside thee.

YoopreMama

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Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
« Reply #68 on: April 25, 2007, 02:24:38 AM »
Mercy-
Thank you for sharing your experience w/ milk.  Did I see another post by you w/ numbers by symptoms of milk allergies?  THAT was helpful for my ds...the bright red ears...other things...he maybe joining me on the ED! Today is better, skin-wise. Still some residual itching, but the skin is clearing. I think that EVOO is really helping.

I've been loving my mint tea! And made some FABULOUS leek soup...turkey broth and other veggies.  WOW! My fist time using leeks...

I also saw that berries were full of citric acid (sans blueberries, possibly).  Bummer for now.  :(

Offline mercy

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Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
« Reply #69 on: April 25, 2007, 08:22:59 AM »
Quote
Did I see another post by you w/ numbers by symptoms of milk allergies?  THAT was helpful for my ds

Yep, you did.  The numbers were how many in my immediate family have suffered that particular symptom.  Glad it was helpful to you.

Quote
I also saw that berries were full of citric acid (sans blueberries, possibly).  Bummer for now. 

Yeah, I was bummed out to see that too. :-\
Psalm 73:25 Whom have I in heaven but thee? and there is none upon earth that I desire beside thee.

Offline likemanywaters

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Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
« Reply #70 on: May 03, 2007, 07:06:10 AM »
Saw citric acid on the list of ingredients for my son's Miracle Bubbles. Heads up for all trying to avoid it. It may be in other bubbles as well, but that one happened to have an ingredient list. Also it is mainly "detergent (a surfactant blend)", probably SLS and other petroleum based products we are trying to avoid as well...  Sooo anyone have any ideas about homemade bubble stuff? (not using liquid dish soap either).
And, behold, the glory of the God of Israel came from the way of the east: and his voice was like a noise of many waters: and the earth shined with his glory.

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Offline likemanywaters

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Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
« Reply #71 on: May 05, 2007, 07:34:34 AM »
My son LOVES lemons. He loves eating them plain right out of his water, just like orange slices.
Any clue why??  I know there has been much research by YooperMama on citric acid and eczema and all that. So I don't know whether him wanting them is a good or bad thing. I was thinking of keeping him off acidy fruits like lemons, citrus, tomatoes, but suppose he's craving them b/c his body needs them. I know a squirt of lemon juice in your water is supposed to help out your liver. Why? If lemons stimulate the body to release toxins, then maybe I should be giving him more? But I've read several places that acidy foods can agrivate eczema. Here's a thought. If lemons (or citrus) stimulate the body to release toxins and help the liver perhaps what some people would think is an allergic reaction, like an increase in rashes, is really an increase of the rate the body is releasing toxins... ??? Any thoughts anyone??

The lemons stimulate the body to release toxins
And, behold, the glory of the God of Israel came from the way of the east: and his voice was like a noise of many waters: and the earth shined with his glory.

-Ezekiel 43:2

Offline likemanywaters

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Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
« Reply #72 on: May 05, 2007, 11:13:41 AM »
I really suppose I ought to get him an allergy test done, but I dread having to deal with doctors again.  :(  Casein would be a bummer though, b/c he loves his raw milk, butter, & cheese. Besides that, I've been not feeding him complex carbs b/c of the gluten thing, so if I took out dairy too, I feel like I'd have nothing to feed him. Thanks for the thoughts.
And, behold, the glory of the God of Israel came from the way of the east: and his voice was like a noise of many waters: and the earth shined with his glory.

-Ezekiel 43:2

YoopreMama

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Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
« Reply #73 on: May 14, 2007, 04:40:08 PM »
Ummm...just wanted to share something  ::)  :-[ ...

For those allergic to citric acid, there is a pop w/o it...A & W Root Beer is citric acid-free.   ;D

When I want a pop, it's nice to know I can have one!   ;D

Offline likemanywaters

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Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
« Reply #74 on: May 15, 2007, 09:27:02 AM »
YooperMama,

You really should re-read the "Unraveling the Mystery of Autism" book. I just ordered it and did for the first time and couldn't put it down. DH forced me to sleep for a few hours, but I got it last night and finished it by noon today. Its all in there!!! The connection to eczema. She actually lists that as one of her son's symptoms. Casein, gluten, fruits containing phenolics (apples, bananas), salycites (citrus), potatoes, rice, digestive issues my son has had, constipation, diahrrea, sinus infections, vomiting, constant "snack" cravings for the very food he is addicted to...  I'm beginning to put even more stuff together I had not already.  PS - I've tried, per suggestion in the book an epsom salt bath with him and I can tell those definitely have a different effect on him than the Dead Sea Salt ones. He prefers them! and I can see a different sort of activity & itchiness going on at his rashes that doesn't happen during a DSS one. It's something to do with the body not producing Phenol sulphur transferase (PST) and I guess epsom salts (magnesium sulfate) somehow stimulates. Anyway, it's all in there!! The pancreas and enzyme deficiency. And something I want to research further. Something about this "Secretin" given to them to stimulate pancreatic enzyme release to test their stools for it. Given this, alot of kids really improved directly as a result of the massive release of pancreatic enzymes. I KNOW something has been going on with DS's pancreas and common bile duct opening! Things she describes in the book, like swelling of the ileum, perhaps the duodenum too? Seems to be bacterial in nature. After EVERY TIME my son has had one of his digestive "episodes" with throwing up, then diahrrea, even fever, his skin improved as soon as the common bile duct opened back up (swelling went down? got unconstricted?) and bile was flowing again, his skin cleared up immediately. Anyway, I'm starting him on the diet like she says, with the addition of he reacts to ANYTHING sweet, fruits, honey, and potatoes and rice.... more later I could go on and on.

Blessings,
April

PS - How are you doing??
« Last Edit: May 15, 2007, 09:31:05 AM by likemanywaters »
And, behold, the glory of the God of Israel came from the way of the east: and his voice was like a noise of many waters: and the earth shined with his glory.

-Ezekiel 43:2

YoopreMama

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Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
« Reply #75 on: May 15, 2007, 11:21:25 AM »
I DID read the book a few years ago. :)  It IS fabulous.  Sounds like I could read it again w/ a different perspective and goal!   ;D

Offline likemanywaters

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Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
« Reply #76 on: May 15, 2007, 03:42:05 PM »
Found this and thought all the good tips on citric acid fit here too:

My son developed eczema at age 2 months (our story was exactly like 'alittlemore' described in her post).  We discovered quite by accident that one thing he was very sensitive to was polyester and acrylic fabrics.  Cotton, rayon and nylon did not bother him so we switched  clothes and bedding to cotton.  Made a big difference! 

Two other things to menion:  He and I both have food sensitivies and we have found that taking pancreatic enzymes with meals have helped a lot.  I think they help break down the food more quickly so it doesn't escape out the leaky gut as easily.  We are also taking probiotics and flax seed (an ER doctor recommended the flax seed for asthma/breathing issues - it helped his son and I've seen excellent results with my son as well).

The other thing is we are sensitive to peanuts and corn, specifically the mold on them.  So we don't eat anything with corn or peanuts (no Chic-Fil-A for us) -- including corn syrup and  CITRIC ACID, which is commercially produced from corn mold and is in SO many food and beauty products.  READ LABELS - citric acid is in shampoo, lotions, liquid soaps, beverages, prepared foods, even "health" foods.  The only liquid soaps I have found I can use are some of the Suave bath gels and Dawn Plus (Complete) dish soap.

And get this: pet food is made primarily from corn, and citric acid is in the fat that is sprayed on the outside of dog food chunks (I know - I work as a shipping clerk in a pet food factory!) - if a dog licks my son, or he touches a dog or cat's fur, or if he puts his hand in the dog's water bowl, he IMMEDIATELY breaks out in itchy rash.  My sister in law has a dog that is allergic to almost everything, so she makes homemade food for her consisting of rice, chicken, and vegetables.  My son played with her dog and he never once broke out! So that seems to confirm my suspicion that corn is the main culprit for him.

I have found that prayer for wisdom and discernmnet has helped us find solutions to my son's problem and I know it will help your husband as well!
And, behold, the glory of the God of Israel came from the way of the east: and his voice was like a noise of many waters: and the earth shined with his glory.

-Ezekiel 43:2

YoopreMama

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Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
« Reply #77 on: May 15, 2007, 04:37:27 PM »
YooperMama,
PS - I've tried, per suggestion in the book an Epsom salt bath with him and I can tell those definitely have a different effect on him than the Dead Sea Salt ones. He prefers them! and I can see a different sort of activity & itchiness going on at his rashes that doesn't happen during a DSS one. It's something to do with the body not producing Phenol sulphur transferase (PST) and I guess Epsom salts (magnesium sulfate) somehow stimulates.
Blessings,
April 
PS - How are you doing??
Oh, April, thanks for thinking of me and for checking in w/ such interesting information!  I was reading that book at a time when I didn't know 1/2 of what I know now, so I was missing a lot, I'm sure.  ::) Sounds like some summer reading for me!   :D

The Epsom Salts info is particularly interesting b/c after I bought a big shipment of DSS earlier this winter, I slacked on Eppies and I can't recall the last time I had them.  I was alternating, but now I'm out of both.  Time to pick up some more I think!

God has healed my skin amazingly...I posted about it in the Elimination Diet and Prayer Request/Praises threads.  I did the diet for 2 weeks and am convinced the allergies (or what degree of intolerance, I'm not sure) are related to citric acid or the mold affiliated w/ it.  I have allergy testing next Wednesday, so I'll be curious to see what happens.  I suspect I have a dairy problem, if it's homogenized/pasteurized, but not if it's untreated.   :-\

I was told silk, b/c it's "natural" is OK to wear, too.  And that powdered laundry detergent is particularly harsh on skin...my homemade soap also has coconut-derived cleansers in it, so I'm on All-Free for now. 

Thanks again!   :-*

Offline boysmama

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Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
« Reply #78 on: July 04, 2007, 06:01:33 AM »
Just reading this thread now. Very interesting about the difference between naturally occurring citric acid and the commercially grown form.
My ds (2 yrs) has an almost instant reaction (red rash around the mouth and flushing) to any item that includes citric acid on the label, but is fine with whole foods that contain it or all natural prepared foods - that have something like real lemon juice added. I knew there had to be a difference between the natural and the additive!!!

Offline Mommyof4

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Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
« Reply #79 on: July 29, 2007, 07:21:18 PM »
OKAY, Tomatoes and coconut have naturally occurring chemical that MANY people have intolerance or allergies to.
If the citric acid isn't from the company NOW then it is probably corn derived, meaning, allergy! MANY people have corn intolerance or allergies.
I have food chemical charts with this info if anyone wants me to share, contact me privately.
Look at this site www.fedupwithfoodadditives.info/
Lindsey
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Offline handsful l--l_

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Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
« Reply #80 on: August 03, 2007, 05:54:44 AM »
I believe I possibly have a dairy allergy.  For the first 14 years of my life we ate healthy and got milk and cheese from a dairy farm. (unpasteurized) Then we move to another state when I was 14.  We got milk from the store.  Suddenly I developed a constant cold.  This went on for 2-3 years.  Finally my mother suggested I might have a dairy allergy.  I didn't think so, but I went off dairy for a while.  When I tried to have milk products I would immediately develop a stuffed up nose and would feel like my tonsils were swelling.

Since reading Unraveling the Mystery of Autism and reading a lot on this site I realized that the brain fogginess and random diarrhea were probably the result of the dairy.  Am I right?  Do I have a dairy allergy or could there be something else going on?  I don't take anything for it - I only remember vitamins when I'm sick. :)  It seems to help after I've had ice cream to drink a lot of water.  Thanks, handsful
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Offline diaperswyper

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Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
« Reply #81 on: August 03, 2007, 06:52:14 AM »
   Whenever my dh drinks pasturized milk his sinus's start clogging up. We went on raw milk and it cleared up.

Offline handsful l--l_

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Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
« Reply #82 on: August 03, 2007, 07:22:24 AM »
Whenever we go back to our previous state we get the milk and cheese. I still have a reaction to it though. >:( It is very frustrating to say the least!
I was signing along to music on my headphones one night and my brother looked over at me and asked, "Are you listening to sign language?"

Offline jennyrose

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Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
« Reply #83 on: August 11, 2007, 04:40:05 AM »
I am getting so much good information here.  But I have a question about Epsom salt baths....Good or bad???  They seem to help my son 3 yr old son w/ eczema and insomnia  but I took him off thinking they were bad.  I was adding 2 parts Epsom salt to 1 part baking soda(to keep toxins from reentering his body).  Could someone help me better understand this? Thanks so much!

YoopreMama

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Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
« Reply #84 on: August 11, 2007, 07:21:38 AM »
I am getting so much good information here.  But I have a question about Epsom salt baths....Good or bad???  They seem to help my son 3 yr old son w/ eczema and insomnia but I took him off thinking they were bad.  I was adding 2 parts Epsom salt to 1 part baking soda(to keep toxins from reentering his body).  Could someone help me better understand this? Thanks so much!
If I remember correctly, the Epsom salts comment was re: a specific situation...I think the DSS were preferred in that situation.  I have never heard of Epsom salt baths being bad, though...there's a thread somewhere that describes what exactly they do...I have NO idea where it is, though...???

Offline amazonmama2five

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Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
« Reply #85 on: August 11, 2007, 07:31:14 AM »
Under the thread Epsom salts there is a reference to a NGJ article.  Maybe this is what you were looking for?
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Offline likemanywaters

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Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
« Reply #86 on: August 11, 2007, 02:31:44 PM »
I've never heard of Epsom salts bath being bad for any reason. I use them for my son's skin. I know they help the body gain extra sulfur & magnesium (which is good) because that's what they are - magnesium sulfate. I know I've read that they really help some kids who have digestive issues and/or autism. I also use Dead Sea Salt too.
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Offline Mommyof4

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Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
« Reply #87 on: August 11, 2007, 04:08:32 PM »
We use epsom salts and baking soda for baths when we are reacting to a food issue, it does help pull the toxins out of our system.
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Offline janns

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Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
« Reply #88 on: February 17, 2010, 08:40:50 AM »
You are definately sure it is hives?  You are probably right, just want to make sure.  Finding the cause for hives is like asking yourself who gave me a cold?  It could be an endless of things.  In my medical book that I read too much,  ;) it states that hives are generally brought on by an allergic reaction for it is the release of histamines in the body that cause it. 
But it does say that certain viruses can cause hives such as hepatitius B and the Epstein Barr Virus.  Is there an outbreak of mono in your neck of the woods? 
It also states that out breaks of Candida Albicans and hives can go hand in hand.  Oh, that's a shock, huh?!
I will list what the book says are some of the most common reasons for hive outbreaks:

Animals, dander and saliva
Aspirin
A gout medication that I don't want to spell out
Antimony, a metallic element present in various metal alloys
Barbituates
BHA and BHT
Bismuth, another metalic element present in metal alloys
Cancer, especially luekemia
Chloral hydrate, a sedative
Chlorpromazine, a tranquilizer
Cologne or perfume
Enviromental factors, heat, cold, water, sunlight
Eucalyptus
Exercise
Flourides
Food allergies
Food collorings and preservatives
Gold
Griseofulvin, and antifungal medication
Hyperthyroidism
Infections, strep, hepatitis, parasites
Insect bites
Insulin
Iodines
Liver Extract
Makeup
Menthol
Meprobamate, a tranquilizer
Mercury
Morphine
Opium
Para-aminosslicylic acid, an anti-inflammatory drug
Penicillin
Phenacetrin, an ingredient in some pain medications
Phenobabital, a sedative
Pilocarpine, a glaucoma medication
Plants
A polio vaccine
Potassium sulfocyanate, a preservative
Preservatives
Novocain, an anesthetic
Quinine
Reserpine, heart medication
Saccharin
Salicylates
Soaps
Shampoo
Sulfites
Tartrazine, a food dye and an ingredient in Alka-Seltzer
Thiamine hydrochloride, and ingredient in some cough medications

Here is some to get you started, HB.  Hope you figure it out!!


I'm new here and hope this is the correct way to get some info. I searched for hives and allergies and found this thread. I have had a cough for about a week and hives for about 3 days. I'm generally healthy. I have an allergy to penicillin products (broke out in hives last time I took them). I believe that I'm allergic to mold as well (got a horrible cough and congestion when my mattress got moldy). These things were years ago. Currently, a few family members have had colds. I got a cough and figured I had the cold too. Then I broke out in hives. I have not eaten differently or done anything else differently either. I am not on any medications (except the Benadryl for the hives). We do have some mold on the windowsills and windows in our house. I was thinking that maybe the cough and the hives were mold related and then I found this list. Mold is not listed as one of the reasons for hives. Maybe the hives are a result of a cold virus...? Does anyone have any ideas or advice? I have no idea what to do and the Benadryl is a pain because it makes me so sleepy.

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
« Reply #89 on: February 17, 2010, 11:27:33 AM »
Does anyone have any ideas or advice? I have no idea what to do and the Benadryl is a pain because it makes me so sleepy.
Read these.

http://bulkherbstore.blogspot.com/2009/11/dermographism-what-on-earth-is-that.html
http://bulkherbstore.blogspot.com/2009/06/lou-gehrigs-disease-and-help-for-other.html

while you're considering all of this, try a couple of charcoal capsules.  i found that a couple of these right after eating an allergen trigger often helped rid my body of the trigger's toxins and the hives would go away.

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