Author Topic: Insulin Pump: Tell Us Your Experience  (Read 36435 times)

Offline Good day family

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Insulin Pump: Tell Us Your Experience
« on: March 04, 2009, 06:07:22 AM »
Hello (again)! I haven't been on here for a while, and we've just been going along with life.  But I'm trying to get myself motivated to start watching my son's diet again ~ it's just so expensive!  :-\  Anyway, I'm reading through the recipe ideas again and all that, but I was wondering if any of you have an opinion on the pump? Most people I talk to really like it better, but we still don't have it. What about if you're doing an eating plan like Dr. B? Would the pump still be first choice with that kind of low carb diet? When my son was on the extremely low carb diet, he didn't need as many shots and he went low a lot... Any thoughts on if the pump would be worth it?
http://aholeleis.blogspot.com/
From the burden I carried, now I am set free!  For JESUS has lifted my load!  Oh, the love and the grace I received in it's place~ when HE put my sins under the blood!

Offline lovingmomof2

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Insulin Pump: Tell Us Your Experience
« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2009, 06:17:01 AM »
Hello (again)! I haven't been on here for a while, and we've just been going along with life.  But I'm trying to get myself motivated to start watching my son's diet again ~ it's just so expensive!  :-\  Anyway, I'm reading through the recipe ideas again and all that, but I was wondering if any of you have an opinion on the pump? Most people I talk to really like it better, but we still don't have it. What about if you're doing an eating plan like Dr. B? Would the pump still be first choice with that kind of low carb diet? When my son was on the extremely low carb diet, he didn't need as many shots and he went low a lot... Any thoughts on if the pump would be worth it?

I love my pump.  I have had it for 9 yrs and gone through 2 pregnancies with it.  In my opinion it makes life a whole lot easier no matter what diet plan you are using.  I am not a fan of Dr. B.  I think he limits a lot of good for you foods.  I do watch my carb intake though.  I have found that whole wheat dark chocolate chip cookies made using honey and coconut oil do not affect my blood sugar when I only eat one or two.  Every diabetic is different so finding out how different foods work with YOUR body the main thing that helps.  If your son went low a lot using the shots when on a low carb diet you may be able to due only a basal and not have to bolus for eating.  The pump would allow for more flexibility with your son's diet. 

I am writing this real quick before leaving if something didn't make sense just ask and I will try and clarify. :)
Proverbs 31:26
"She openeth her mouth with wisdom; and in her tongue is the law of kindness."

Offline Good day family

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Insulin Pump: Tell Us Your Experience
« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2009, 06:45:04 AM »
Thank you! Yes, we don't do a "complete" Dr. B diet; I still let him eat my whole wheat bread that I make and stuff like that. But it did help me to see that my son does a whole lot better with at least a pretty-low-carb plan (whole grains in moderation -even a little sweets occasionally). It's just that our doctor said to just "let him eat whatever but give him more insulin", and we went with that for a while ~ but it didn't work good for us.  I know they don't want their newly-diagnosed patients to feel overwhelmed, but I'd rather have the entire straight truth and just deal with it.:)
So when you are doing "semi" low-carb with the pump, do you end up crashing with that continuous insulin? --oh, no-no-no! I get it! It's cause the continuous insulin covers the glucose produced by the liver, right? Then you just don't program as much in for each meal?  Idk... I'm just not familiar with the pump yet.  :-\ 
http://aholeleis.blogspot.com/
From the burden I carried, now I am set free!  For JESUS has lifted my load!  Oh, the love and the grace I received in it's place~ when HE put my sins under the blood!

Offline Gigi

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Insulin Pump: Tell Us Your Experience
« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2009, 01:20:10 PM »
I'd love to hear more about folks using pumps, too!! 

I've never used a pump (going on 10 years) but the doctors are constantly asking me if I'm "ready to be on one" when I go in. 

I've asked them, what, in particular, a pump DOES that provides better care for my diabetes than what I can do with shots and I do NOT get an answer.

They do say that those who go on a pump have better sugars, but when I asked if the better sugars are long-term, they say that it just depends on the person.  What that means (seems to me) is that the whole "learning-how-to-use-the-new-gadget" time forces you to closely manage your sugars, resulting in better sugars!  (Therefore, the better sugars are not a result of the pump, but the better management, maybe?)

It has always seemed to me that it is just a nice gadget that will be a new tool in your diabetic tool-belt (all the while supporting the pharm companies pushing them . . . but I digress), but it won't do anything that you can't do already with shots.  I think that docs don't have anything "new" that really helps diabetics so they just try to get everyone using a pump so that you feel like there's something  better 'round the corner . . .

That sounds really negative, doesn't it?!   ;D

All that to say, I'd love to hear some opinions on pumps so that I can revise all my ignorant blather with some informed facts from folks who use them!!

So BUMP to this one!







Offline BJ_BOBBI_JO

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« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2009, 02:11:45 PM »
I've asked them, what, in particular, a pump DOES that provides better care for my diabetes than what I can do with shots and I do NOT get an answer.

I have been on the pump since 2004. The pump acts like an IV. Ya know the IV that goes in ones hand while at the hospital but instead it goes into the abdomen or leg or wherever the person chooses for it to go. But with an IV the needle stays in where as with the pump the needle comes out but leaves a tiny tube in its place where the insulin goes into my flesh 24/7. Just like an IV does the pump is giving me tiny amounts of insulin 24/7 which eliminates the need for having to use several different kinds of insulin a day, meaning that I no longer need a slow acting insulin in addition to the fast acting insulin. The doctor will figure out  how much insulin the pump should give a person 24/7 as well as how much insulin the pump should give a person according to how much carb grams they eat.

A fast acting insulin is what goes in the pump. The pump is basically acting like the pancreas should act by giving the body tiny amounts of insulin all the time.

Before I was on the pump I was on a fast and a slow acting insulin taking about 4 shots a day of the fast and 2 of the slow acting a day. And in addition to that I was taking correction shots to fix the high sugars making it to a total of about 7-10 shots a day plus a diabetic pill.

Taking all that insulin caused a lot of major sugar swings with sever lows and crazy highs from the fast and slow acting insulins and there was no way to correct that by changing the math formulas around because that is just how insulin acts. And by taking the shots it just kind of gives the person a big giant dose of insulin suddenly and then leaves the body without insulin a few hours later.  And that makes for a sudden low sugar once the large dose of insulin kicks in and later on a high sugar once the big dose wears off. Where as with the pump even after a large dose  of insulin the pump still is giving small doses to help keep the blood sugars down.

A non diabetics pancreas does this but a diabetics (mainly a type 1's) does not. So the pump is my battery powered pancreas in a way.

Yes I still have sugar swings but not near as bad. Yes I still have high and low sugars but not near as bad. The serious awful sugar swings I had before the pump were stealing my life. I was extremely weak which lead to frustration, intolerance, mood swings and so on.

The pump is about the size of a pager and has a see threw tube coming from it to my body where I insert it into my flesh. They now have pumps with no tubes where the pump is attached to the body. On the average a person refills the pump with more insulin every 2-3 days and that is when they also insert the pump tubing into their flesh on a new site of their body that way the skin and muscles don't break down and go away like we see with older diabetics who gave themselves insulin shots in the same location over and over for years.

When I was on the shots I was much weaker due to all the terrible sugar swings and highs and lows. I feel better now. Sure I'm still weak and a diabetic but at least it is not as bad as before I had the pump.

Pumps are very expensive like $6000 give or take depending on the type. And the pumps tubing and other supplies are also very expensive. Thankfully at the time we had a good insurance that paid for most of the pump and a large portion of the supplies. To get pump supplies a person has to call the pump company or order the supplies from their site. Maybe there are other ways, I dunno.

If I had the money I would like to get a tubeless pump because I am so sick of zipping my tubing up in my pants when I am getting dressed and sick of the tubing getting pulled on by the kids/pets and caught on door knobs. Sometimes if my tubing is sticking out from under my clothing people stare at it as if I am wired to a bomb or something or like I am wired to a device that records what they are saying and doing. LOL.

One time when my pump broke the pump company rushed me a free one that got to me the next day but during the day that I did not have the pump my husband saw how badly not having it affected me. 

A person on the pump can unhook from their pump for an hour if they need to and to take showers and swim. I was told that the new tubeless pumps are 100% water proof and can still be wore while swimming and showering.

I have to admit that being on the pump makes it easier to food cheat because I don't have to draw up a needle. I can just push buttons to tell my pump about how many carb grams I am eating and it calculates how big of a dose of insulin I need to eat it and then I tell it to give me that bolus dose and away I go on the eating. So food moderation with the pump is still very important like it is with the shots. Also with the pump I can tell it how high my sugar is and it will calculate how much insulin I should give myself to fix the problem and then I push another button to tell it to give me the insulin amount it just calculated.

Hope all that helps. Maybe we need a thread just for insulin pumps. :)

Offline Good day family

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« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2009, 05:08:25 PM »
Gigi~ thanks for that. I was worried too about it being just a new "fad" for doctors to push and make money off of...
But wow! Bj! Thank you so much for your thoughts and experience with the pump! One of the thoughts I have is that it seems more convenient to always have the insulin with you. Like for us, in the heat of the Southern summers (even Spring and Fall), we have to pack a cooler every time we go somewhere, just to keep his insulin cool. How does the insulin in the pump stay cool enough to still be effective?
Also, ours would be for my son. Do you think the pump stays secure enough on your body for a 12 year old boys roughness?
And finally: what about those "tubeless pumps"? I've never heard of such a thing...
Thanks for you time that you've already put into this!
http://aholeleis.blogspot.com/
From the burden I carried, now I am set free!  For JESUS has lifted my load!  Oh, the love and the grace I received in it's place~ when HE put my sins under the blood!

Offline BJ_BOBBI_JO

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« Reply #6 on: March 04, 2009, 05:41:17 PM »
One of the thoughts I have is that it seems more convenient to always have the insulin with you. Like for us, in the heat of the Southern summers (even Spring and Fall), we have to pack a cooler every time we go somewhere, just to keep his insulin cool. How does the insulin in the pump stay cool enough to still be effective?
Also, ours would be for my son. Do you think the pump stays secure enough on your body for a 12 year old boys roughness?

I have wondered the same thing. I do know that before I was on the pump I gave myself insulin via the insulin pen (except for the slow acting insulins) and I was told that I did not need to keep the pen in the fridge because insulin would keep outside the fridge for up to 10 days if it was not in sunlight or intense heat. So my insulin pen was always kept in my purse out of direct sun and heat and the insulin still worked. I assume the same must be true for the pump since the insulin is still effective. When I was in Jamaica there was a few terrible hot awful days and the insulin in my pump survived it and was still effective some how but I did keep the extra insulin vials in a fridge just to be safe.  I would think that if a person was going to be in intense awful heat all the time day after day that it probably would not be good for the insulin in their pump.

I'm wondering if a tubeless pump is better for an active boy? I just don't know. I don't know much  about the tubeless pumps yet other then the model of one I was given and the stuff I saw on line about it. A lady I did 2 plays with wore one and she showed it to me while it was on her. It was small and kind of shaped like an egg. The only problem I thought it might have is that once it is attached to the person it cant be moved again until the insulin runs out (about 2-3 days) so if it is in an uncomfortable spot the person would have to live with it unless they could afford to rip it off and replace it for a new one. With the tubeless pumps it is some kind of plastic  temporary pump where the person puts insulin into it and it is only good for the duration of a few days and then the person puts a new one on with fresh insulin every few days. Or something like that.

I don't know how a 12 year old boy would do. That's a good question. I have known of 2 other boys to have the pump and I never heard their mothers say anything about their active lifestyles being an issue. But I could see where the tubing might get snagged and caught on stuff for an active child. When I have done things like mud sliding down a hill I took the pump off but left the insertion site on. The insertion site is the part that gets put on and in the flesh with a needle and the needle gets pulled out leaving the tube in and on the flesh with a sticker like paper that keeps the tubing in and on the skin so it don't just pull out and off easily. But doing that mud sliding made it pull out and off my skin and was costly to keep replacing so I left it off and took my insulin via the old fashion shot way. When going to water parks and sliding down those ruff slides I kept the pump and insertion site off then too because the insertion site would get rubbed on to much and peel/fall off. So if a child is going to be doing stuff like that often then a pump might not work for them. But while doing other types of active stuff the pump and insertion sites have stayed secure and on.

Offline amandas5boys

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Insulin Pump: Tell Us Your Experience
« Reply #7 on: March 05, 2009, 01:44:45 AM »
I haven't read all of this information there is a lot there. I have a boy that is now 13 that has had type 1 for 7 years now. We tried all the herbs and things but got discouraged trying to stuff all that and give shots to a 6 year old. My nephew was dignoised two years ago at age 5 and my sister went through with alot of the herbs but ended up having to stop for it was too expensive. but I want to tell all diabetics about bitter melon tea. He has been drinking it daily for the last couple of months and boy have we seen a difference in the levels of insulin. When he hasn't had it we can tell the next day. He lets it steep for a long time and then puts stevia in it to sweeten it. We were told by a Filipino Nurse to drink it more than water. He still drinks his water too. We get it at a filo shop here in Australia but you may find it in a health food store.


Also the oats help his blood sugars to come down. So does Blueberries. And I was told that green beans have 1 unit of insulin in 1 cup of beans.

I can't wait to read the book so many of you were talking about. Thanks for sharing your tips and information as I am always thankful to have help with research.

And I don't know how it is there but the pump for us is so expensive. It would cost us $8000 out of pocket to get it. :o Plus he is not to interested as he is very active. We sort of like the idea of getting the shot and not having it until the next meal.
Thanks
Amanda

Offline Good day family

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« Reply #8 on: March 05, 2009, 01:57:46 AM »
Thank you Amanda! I've noticed that berries are a fruit that my son can eat pretty well, but he still needs insulin for them (like he eats some when we pick blueberries in the summer, but his sugar will run high). I never knew there was a unit of insulin in a cup of green beans! I'll have to watch for that and see what happens in his meals with green beans.:)
So BJ, when you are doing more activity, and you take off the pump and the insertion thingy, you just give yourself (the equivelent to) Novolog (fast acting) during the daytime? (I'm remembering that when you use the pump there is no slow acting insulin {lantus}; rather, small continuous amounts of fast acting is going in through the pump.)  Does your sugar run high at all because of not having Lantus to cover the glucose produced by the liver?  How do you manage that?
Thanks again!
http://aholeleis.blogspot.com/
From the burden I carried, now I am set free!  For JESUS has lifted my load!  Oh, the love and the grace I received in it's place~ when HE put my sins under the blood!

Offline lovingmomof2

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Insulin Pump: Tell Us Your Experience
« Reply #9 on: March 05, 2009, 03:02:10 AM »
Thank you! Yes, we don't do a "complete" Dr. B diet; I still let him eat my whole wheat bread that I make and stuff like that. But it did help me to see that my son does a whole lot better with at least a pretty-low-carb plan (whole grains in moderation -even a little sweets occasionally). It's just that our doctor said to just "let him eat whatever but give him more insulin", and we went with that for a while ~ but it didn't work good for us.  I know they don't want their newly-diagnosed patients to feel overwhelmed, but I'd rather have the entire straight truth and just deal with it.:)
So when you are doing "semi" low-carb with the pump, do you end up crashing with that continuous insulin? --oh, no-no-no! I get it! It's cause the continuous insulin covers the glucose produced by the liver, right? Then you just don't program as much in for each meal?  Idk... I'm just not familiar with the pump yet.  :-\ 

Doctors have changed in the way they treat diabetes over the years.  When I was first diagnosed over 17 yrs ago my endrocronologist told my parents and me no, no, no to just about everything a kids eats, even hot dogs.  I was so stressed out from that doctors appointment that when I it was over my blood sugar read HI on my meter which was over 500. 

Things I have learned about my diabetes:

Trying to follow some sort of eating schedule is helpful.  I don't stress about this.  I pretty much eat when I am hungry (truly hungry).  I do not graze all day long.  When I eat a little a lot I found that it seemed to overload my system even though I was taking insulin for everything I ate.  It seems like it interferes with how the insulin works, kind of just slows everything down and my blood sugar was harder to control.

Learning to use the different boluses available on my pump is very helpful.  For a while I was just intimidated by the different boluses, but once you understand how your body digest foods it will help you to better choose which bolus to use.  I have 3 boluses available on my pump, the regular bolus (everything at one time), the square wave bolus (give you the insulin over a specific amount of time that you choose) and the dual-wave bolus (gives some immediately and some over an amount of time that you choose).  I most often use the regular and dual-wave boluses.  If I am having a meal that is higher in fat like pizza then I will use the dual-wave bolus.  I will either split the bolus in 1/2 and take 1/2 now and 1/2 over the next hour or I if needed I take whatever to cover my count plus 1 unit and the rest over the next hour. 

You really have to listen to your own body.   I only take what the doctors say as a starting point and then I find what works for my body.


The basal rate works continually.  You can set your own basal rates and they can change often.  I went in for a routine diabetic checkup where the nurse was asking me for my basal rate.  I started giving her the list and how often it changed and she was shocked at how much my basal rate varied.  She said that they doctor doesn't normally like you to have so many different basal rates.  I am thinking isn't that the whole point of having a pump is so I can customize it for me.  Then she said "Keep it up, because it seems to be working for you."  Your basal can change over the day due to different things happening or just how your body responds.  My highest basal is in the early morning hours and my lowest basal is in the late evening.  You can even set temporary basal rates.  This comes in really handy.  If I know I am going to be working my garden plot most of the day, picking strawberries, going on a long bike ride then I will use a temporary basal rate that is lower to keep me from going low.  Sometimes I will just suspend my pump and have no insulin depending on what my count is and how long the activity is going to be.  If I am going to be travelling and in the car a lot then I can do a higher temporary basal to keep me from going high.  And yes, you are right the basal rate helps with the glucose produced form the liver. 

You can learn more about the pumps on line.  I use a pump by minimed.  Here is a link where you can find out more information.  http://www.minimed.com/index.html

Proverbs 31:26
"She openeth her mouth with wisdom; and in her tongue is the law of kindness."

Offline lovingmomof2

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Insulin Pump: Tell Us Your Experience
« Reply #10 on: March 05, 2009, 03:42:27 AM »
Gigi~ thanks for that. I was worried too about it being just a new "fad" for doctors to push and make money off of...
But wow! Bj! Thank you so much for your thoughts and experience with the pump! One of the thoughts I have is that it seems more convenient to always have the insulin with you. Like for us, in the heat of the Southern summers (even Spring and Fall), we have to pack a cooler every time we go somewhere, just to keep his insulin cool. How does the insulin in the pump stay cool enough to still be effective?
Also, ours would be for my son. Do you think the pump stays secure enough on your body for a 12 year old boys roughness?
And finally: what about those "tubeless pumps"? I've never heard of such a thing...
Thanks for you time that you've already put into this!

The heat shouldn't be a problem.  That is one of the reasons it is still important to check your sugars and keep an eye on things.  If you notice that your blood sugar is running higher and you don't know why, if the whether has been hot it could be the insulin has gone bad.  I live in FL, so  we have nice?, HOT weather and I can't remember having a time where my insulin went bad.  I do keep my extra vials in the refrigerator.

As far as roughness, they sell accessories to help with that.  I think there is a sports thing to hold the pump.  My brother has a pump and he does the typical boy stuff and hasn't had any problems that I know of.  I think once his tubing got pulled by ressling.  I usually where my pump on my waitband, so that most of the tubing is under my clothes.  I haven't had too many problems with the tubing getting pulled or the pump getting bumped, but the few times it has happened it didn't feel to good.

If pumping correctly not having long lasting insulin doesn't affect anything.  When you are going to disconnect your pump for about an hour you usually will take a bolus of the amount of insulin you would miss.  Say your basal is set for 1 unit of insulin for that hour then you would take 1 unit of insulin before disconnecting.  This can be changed up some.  For instance if I am disconnecting to go swimming and I am a good count I will not take any insulin and possibly have a small snack because swimming always makes my blood sugar go low.

Just a side note.  If you are looking into an insulin pump and your insurance doesn't cover enough of it you can look into assistance from the pump company.  I know that minimed has some sort of financial assistance (I can't remember what they call it), you fill out a form and send it in and they will give addition distcount and sometimes they will right the rest off depending on the individual situation. 

I was very cautious about going to the pump.  I really did not like the idea of having something stuck in me all the time.  My parents actually forced me to do a trial period and if I didn't like it I could go back to shots.  Well, I am still on that trial period.  I LOVE my pump.  It has made my life so much easier.  I can't imagine being a mother and running my house and having to take shots.  The pump is definitely for someone on the go.  I did find that while adjusting to my pump the first couple of days my blood sugar was constantly dropping low.  The basal rate that the doctor recommended was too high for me. For about a month I was adjusting to the pump and blood sugars were a little off, but once I figured out the basals and boluses that worked for me it was a lot better. 
Proverbs 31:26
"She openeth her mouth with wisdom; and in her tongue is the law of kindness."

Offline Gigi

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« Reply #11 on: March 05, 2009, 04:03:26 AM »
Wow, BJ and lovingmomof2, thank you so much for your experiences with this, I appreciate you taking the time to write it all out.

I'd love any other thoughts you or anyone else has.


Offline BJ_BOBBI_JO

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« Reply #12 on: March 05, 2009, 05:44:57 AM »
So BJ, when you are doing more activity, and you take off the pump and the insertion thingy, you just give yourself (the equivalent to) Novolog (fast acting) during the daytime? (I'm remembering that when you use the pump there is no slow acting insulin {lantus}; rather, small continuous amounts of fast acting is going in through the pump.)  Does your sugar run high at all because of not having Lantus to cover the glucose produced by the liver?  How do you manage that?
Thanks again!

My sugars run kind of high when I'm off the pump even with frequent shots of novalog all day. The doc said to give myself a shot about every 1-2 hours of novalog while I'm off the pump for the day since I don't have a slow acting insulin to take care of those in between times. In is how a non-diabetics pancreas acts. A pancreas should be giving a person small amounts of insulin thoughout the day and night but type 1 diabetics pancreas wont do that at all or not very well so the pump does it for the pancreas.
With a pump there is no need for slow acting insulin since it behaves kind of like our pancreas giving us small doses of insulin all the time. Although I did know of 1 diabetic on the pump who still needed slow acting insulin shots but that was because her kidneys and other body parts were dying from having had long term diabetes and her sugars were in bad shape. But I don't think that is the norm thankfully.

The past 2 summers I found that a common herb that grows FREE and wild is QUEEN ANNS LACE also known as the wild carrot. It is those tall white late summer time flowers that have  a dark purple dot in the middle of them. Their roots smell and taste like carrots but as far as I know only the roots and flowers can be eaten safely. They help my blood sugars rather well, I 1st tried them after finding research on line about how they help diabetics. They dry up fast enough too, I wish I had dried more last summer so I had some now. Be careful because they have a poison look a like I'm told but I have never come across the look a like. I always know it is a Queen Anns Lace by the dark dot in the middle and the smell of the carrot smell root. It is like free diabetic natural medicine from God for me. In fact last night I dreamed I found a field of them and they were real big and good for picking. I batter and fry them up, scramble them up in eggs, eat them raw or just chew on the tuff roots.

A warning I wanted to mention is something I have found when using herbs and other natural stuff for diabetes. I find that the herb will work good for a while and then it is like the body gets used to it and suddenly the herb wont work anymore. But I do know of one thing that works good long term which is the mineral we all need called CHROMIUM. I use CHROMIUM GTF which means glucose tolerance factor. I found out that diabetics are lacking in that mineral.

We have not had insurance now since sometime in early 2007. So I have not been to the doctor since 2007 other then to one of those night time clinics about 2 times. I keep using herbs and whatever else I find to help myself and the pharmacy still keeps refilling my insulin and test strips. When I went to a Christian health clinic last week the doctor nearly flipped her lid when she found out I was a double diabetic with extreme insulin resistance and not seeing a doctor. I'm glad I have attempted to educate myself a lot on diabetes and paid attention to what works and don't work for me other wise I would not have been able to tend to my diabetes without medical help these past last 2 years. I strongly believe education on diabetes and our own bodies is one of the keys to slowing down the terrible affects of diabetes.

Offline amandas5boys

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« Reply #13 on: March 05, 2009, 05:55:27 PM »
There is a book that is a MUST read for anyone with diabetes (type 1 or 2).  It's called The Diabetes Solution by Dr. Bernstein.  I think I paid $11 (that included shipping) from Amazon.com. 

Here's his website.  diabetes-normalsugars.com
And Read the Book Online.



I know this post is old but I am wandering how do you get the book. I can't find it when I click on it. Please excuse me, I am no very computer freindly.
Thanks
Amanda

Offline mykidsmom

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« Reply #14 on: March 05, 2009, 06:07:45 PM »

Hi Amanda,

Click on this link:  http://www.amazon.com/Dr-Bernsteins-Diabetes-Solution-Achieving/dp/0316167169/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1236312264&sr=8-1

It will take you right to the page on Amazon where you can order it.  It looks like he's written an updated version since I read it.  This is the updated version.  I found this book very helpful even though I don't follow his diet perfectly.  I am not a diabetic.  I was a gestational diabetic and thus at risk for diabetes.  I wanted to take care of myself in such a way I wouldn't get it as I got older.  Even following half of what this book said has helped me.  So far (at 39) I am not diabetic. 

blessings,

patti



« Last Edit: March 06, 2009, 05:51:26 AM by mykidsmom »
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Offline lovingmomof2

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« Reply #15 on: March 06, 2009, 03:48:00 AM »
There is a book that is a MUST read for anyone with diabetes (type 1 or 2).  It's called The Diabetes Solution by Dr. Bernstein.  I think I paid $11 (that included shipping) from Amazon.com. 

Here's his website.  diabetes-normalsugars.com
And Read the Book Online.



I know this post is old but I am wandering how do you get the book. I can't find it when I click on it. Please excuse me, I am no very computer freindly.
Thanks
Amanda

I found the book at the library.  If you do a search for the book and the title it will come up.  You might even check ebay.
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Offline amandas5boys

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« Reply #16 on: March 07, 2009, 02:23:46 AM »
okay now I have read through this whole post to make sure no one has asked this and boy did it take a long time. Couple of days to be exact.

My little boys is on lantis and humalog. He sometimes forgets to get his lantis. Not to often like two or three times a year. He takes it at night. The next day he will run very low all day. The last two Christmases we have had to call ambulance for him going into seizures. 

Sometimes we go without it to give his body a break. This is what we have found. The first day he will go low all day so much so that we don't give him humalog. The second day he starts running high again and even if he is not running high he complains with a head ache.Dr. says lantis only stays in system for 25 hours but I don't believe them. Actually I am a lot like the rest of you. When the Dr. says something am thinking your stupid. I don't trust them at all which is hard be cause he does not have good control. His HBA1c has been getting higher and higher. last time it was 9 something.

When I listen to the dr. he has a bad low (seizer). Last time it happened I called her to get help with getting his insulin in order and she jokingly said "at least his HBA1c will be lower". I am thinking I want to slap her. You don't really care about HBA1c's when your little boy is going into seizers and you don't know what to do about it. I literally don't sleep some nights so that I can check his blood sugars every 30 min. or so because it goes wild would be going up and then in the middle of the night start crashing down. :'( :'( I can't stand it. and she wants to laugh about it. She tells me he is going to be going blind him you don't get them down or have all of the other complications.

okay I am sorry I have worked myself up. I will try to get this book you are talking about fast. . We go back wed. to see what his HBa1c is now.


Please pray for my son. Please pray for wisdom for me. And thank for letting me vent for a second. I know that you can understand being diabetics.

Amanda

Now after all that I forgot to ask. Why would he go low when missing a lantis shot?

Offline lovingmomof2

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« Reply #17 on: March 07, 2009, 04:47:57 AM »

When I listen to the dr. he has a bad low (seizer). Last time it happened I called her to get help with getting his insulin in order and she jokingly said "at least his HBA1c will be lower".

Now after all that I forgot to ask. Why would he go low when missing a lantis shot?


I would look into getting another doctor.  Both low and high blood sugars are not good for your body.  She is right about all the complications from running high blood sugars, but her mentality of "at least his HA1C will be lower" is really messed up, because he still doesn't have good control.  The HA1C only give the average blood sugars.  Someone can have a good HA1C and have really bad control with a lot of really high and low blood sugar swings.

Here is how you can help figure out how is body reacts to food and insulin and hopefully better adjust to get better control.  Check blood sugar before each meal.  Try and give insulin for the meal and count 30 minutes before eating.  This allows for the insulin to start working by the time you are eating.  In a non diabetic their insulin starts working pretty much the moment they put food in their mouth.  Check blood sugars again at 2 hours after the meal and then again 4 hours after the meal.  Write down the meals and snacks that he eats along with the amounts and anything that he drinks.  This will help you to see how different foods affect his blood sugar.  All of this will give you more information to work with and make it easier to see where and what you need to adjust.  Also try eating lower carb meals.  I am not saying no carbs, just not a meal full of carbs. Stay away from exercise when his blood sugar is over 200. 

I am sure I am forgetting something or haven't explained myself clear enough.  If you have more questions just ask.

I would seriously look into getting another doctor.  Is she a diabetic endocrinologist or just a regular doctor?

I really am not familiar with lantis and I am at a loss as to why he would be going low without taking it.  Maybe someone else will be able to answer that question for you.
Proverbs 31:26
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Offline amandas5boys

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« Reply #18 on: March 08, 2009, 12:49:27 PM »
Yes, she is a endocinoligist. I want to change Dr.s but we go to the clinic here and she was appointed. I will see if they will let us change.

I wil start checking inbtween meals as well.

Thank you,
Amanda

If anyone knows about the lantis it would be great to know.

Offline amandas5boys

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« Reply #19 on: March 19, 2009, 01:40:32 AM »
I took ds to DR. Last wed and his HBA1c was down to 7 something. For us this is very good considering that the last time he went it was over 9.

But over the last couple of days I have been watching his sugars closely and have noticed that when he goes to bed they are good around 8 (144). I check him in the night and they go up as far as 15(270). Then by the morning they go back down to 8(144). Well, last night and the night before they went low. I set my alarm to wake up a 12:00 to check and at 11:30 pm he woke up low 3.8 (68) gave him something and he was fine till morning. Well tonight same amount of insulin and everything but he is going up. At first he was 4.0(72) at 9:00 pm then I said check to make sure and it had gone up to 10.1(181) a couple minutes later I said you better wash your hand to make sure and it had gone up to 11.2 (201). Now at 10:00 pm they are 15.1(271) so I have given him a shot. I can not tell what is going on with him. Same insulin same time to eat. He is 13 so I am guessing hormones have a lot to do with it. any advice out there?

Thanks Amanda
« Last Edit: March 23, 2009, 01:01:10 PM by amandas5boys »

Offline Good day family

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« Reply #20 on: March 19, 2009, 02:02:15 AM »
Hi Amanda. I'm not sure what you mean by the sugars being at 8 and then at 15?  4.0, 10.1, 15.1? Maybe we do a different system?
But sometimes when my son goes to sleep at night, if his BS is normal, but still lower than 115 or so, I will have him drink some milk, and that seems to keep him at about 115 through the night, and then he will wake up in am with his BS about 80-90.
If he is around 100 or lower before bed time, I have him eat a bite of PB with his milk, and that seems to help as well.
I know that any type of protein or fat helps to maintain a more stable BS through the night. But also, if he is very active during the day, or had a lot of different activity, there is a good chance that the BS will drop during the night anyway. My son is 12 so that has happened to us a lot!:) But really, I found that protein and fats help at the end of a long active day.
But you're right, I have heard that hormones are a big factor in causing BS fluctuations also.
We experience variations as well. Like I will feed him the same food, at the same time, and he will have a completely different result. The only thing I can come up with is just to know that the insulin injections are just NOT going to work as well as a normal pancreas would. We are thankful for the insulin, and just try as best as we can.:)
I'm sorry though, I don't know what would cause his BS to go low when you don't give him Lantus. Do you over-compensate with Novolog? (As in, his BS may be a little high before meals, so you give him extra Novolog?) IDK, it's just a thought...
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Offline Whiterock

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« Reply #21 on: March 19, 2009, 03:34:01 AM »
I thought that blood sugar had to do with what you ate. Am I wrong?

WR
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Offline Kati*did

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« Reply #22 on: March 19, 2009, 03:43:18 AM »
I thought that blood sugar had to do with what you ate. Am I wrong?

WR

What you eat, when you eat, how much you eat, how often you eat, hormones, exercise, infection, emotions... you name it.  Just about everything can effect blood sugar, although some things more obviously than others.
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Offline lovingmomof2

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« Reply #23 on: March 19, 2009, 04:07:00 AM »
I took ds to DR. Last wed and his HBA1c was down to 7 something. For us this is very good considering that the last time he went it was over 9.

But over the last couple of days I have been watching his sugars closely and have noticed that when he goes to bed they are good around 8. I check him in the night and they go up as far as 15. Then by the morningthey go back down to 8. Well, last night and the night before they went low. I set my alarm to wake up a 12:00 to check and at 11:30 pm he woke up low (3.8) gave him something and he was fine till morning. Well tonight same amount of insulin and everything but he is going up. At first he was 4.0 at 9:00 pm then I said check to make sure and it had gone up to 10.1 a couple minutes later I said you better wash your hand to make sure and it had gone up to 11.2. Now at 10:00 pm they are 15.1 so I have given him a shot. I can not tell what is going on with him. Same insulin same time to eat. He is 13 so I am guessing hormones have a lot to do with it. any advice out there?

Thanks Amanda

I am confused with the numbers you give also.  I know I was told that you don't want the blood sugar to go up or down more than 20-30 points while fasting (overnight), but that seems to be for a different system than what you are using to calculate blood sugar.  Are you using a blood meter or urine strips?  I know that the blood sugar reading you get from urine strips is actually a couple of hours old.  There are several things that come into play with blood sugar control in a diabetic, that is what makes it so difficult to control all the time.  The food, emotions, activity, hormones, time of day and I am sure there are a few other big ones that I am missing.  You can eat the same food at the same time of day, have the same before meal blood sugar and take the same insulin, but if your activity level for the day is different or your hormones are out of whack or you are stressed you will not get the same results.  For me if I am happy/excited my blood sugar goes low.  When I first met DH I was low all the time and for the first several months of our marriage.  When I was younger and I got a new game that I liked you can bet that my blood sugar would be low for a while.  As far as the hormones go you kind of just have to go with the flow.  If your doctor can help you come up with a sliding scale for your son's insulin this would be helpful.  It seems to me if I can remember correctly that around 12 or so my insulin requirements started going up and they continued to go up until I was around 15 or 16 then they pretty much stayed the same until I was around 20 and they started coming back down.  I was able to have pretty good control during my teen years.  I didn't stress over having good control, but I did know the consequences of not having good control for now and for the future and that helped me to not feel the stress of not being able to eat this or eat that or not being as free to just go and do.   I did have my days, but overall it wasn't that bad.  If you pay attention to foods, activities, emotions and stuff even with the hormones you can have pretty good control.  I think the key is not stressing (for me stress raises my blood sugar, whenever I find myself in a stressful situation I tell myself do not stress) and knowing your body and how it responds.  Keeping a notebook or log book is really helpful.  Another thing is when you treat for low blood sugar make sure that you are not over treating.  For example if my blood sugar goes low (50) in the middle of the night I know that 15 grams of carbohydrate will raise my blood sugar between 40 and 50 points.  This means that I do not want to eat/drink more than 15 grams of carbohydrate.  4 oz of 100 % juice is usually about 15 grams of carbohydrate.   Most of the time I still feel low after eating/drinking my 15 grams of carbohydrate.  It is important to wait 10- 15 minutes and then recheck to make sure that the blood sugar is coming up, I have had a few times where I caught myself as I was dropping and even after treating with carbohydrate my blood sugar continued to drop.  It is very important for him to learn to listen to his body.  There was one time that my parents treated me for low and I kept saying I feel like I am going low as I slumped over and passed out on the couch.  Icing tubes are really good for a time like this, you just squeeze it in the back of the cheek and it is absorbed quickly through the lining in the mouth.
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Offline lovingmomof2

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« Reply #24 on: March 19, 2009, 04:09:01 AM »
I thought that blood sugar had to do with what you ate. Am I wrong?

WR

For me my first sign of pregnancy was my blood sugars.  Pretty much everything affects them.
Proverbs 31:26
"She openeth her mouth with wisdom; and in her tongue is the law of kindness."

Offline BJ_BOBBI_JO

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« Reply #25 on: March 19, 2009, 04:13:04 AM »
I thought that blood sugar had to do with what you ate. Am I wrong?

WR

For some diabetics dreams, stress, depression, happiness, hormones, exercise, excitement, the sunshine, housework, pregnancy, breastfeeding,bending over to much, other sicknesses, the weather and many other things also can affect the sugars. Food is only 1 of the many things to affect it for brittle diabetics especially. 
 :(

Offline Good day family

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« Reply #26 on: March 19, 2009, 11:09:14 PM »
Lovingmomof2~ Thank you for that! Many of the things you said are things my doctor has told me;  I've liked our doctor pretty well, but you've just helped me to trust him a little bit more.;) 
BTW: I love the  "When I first met DH I was low all the time and for the first several months of our marriage." That's sweet...
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Offline lovingmomof2

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« Reply #27 on: March 21, 2009, 03:52:56 AM »
Lovingmomof2~  
BTW: I love the  "When I first met DH I was low all the time and for the first several months of our marriage." That's sweet...

He still makes my blood sugar go low.  He is constantly doing sweet things for me.

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"She openeth her mouth with wisdom; and in her tongue is the law of kindness."

Offline amandas5boys

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« Reply #28 on: March 22, 2009, 11:39:00 PM »
Hi Amanda. I'm not sure what you mean by the sugars being at 8 and then at 15?  4.0, 10.1, 15.1? Maybe we do a different system?

Quote
I am confused with the numbers you give also.

I am sorry those are the numbers we use here in Australia. I have made the changes on that post. I really do think you are right with the being relaxed and such. He has had terrible lows for the last two Christmases and this week he hasn't been doing much school work and has started going low at night again. so now we are lowering his dose again. Also he didn't have much of his bitter melon tea the week he kept going high through the night and now he has started it back again and his levels are low again through the night and all though the day as well.

I do keep a complete log of everything he eats and sugars. I really find this helpful the getting the regulated.
Thanks for your help.
Amanda

Offline Gigi

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« Reply #29 on: March 23, 2009, 10:29:21 AM »
Hi amandas5boys!

I was totally confused with the numbers also!  Thanks so much for updating your post for us Americans.  Now I can actually follow what you're saying . . . sorry I couldn't help before and had no idea you were writing from Australia.

As I followed what his numbers were in this example you gave, I had a few thoughts/questions.  Some of the readings do not make sense, that is for sure! 

Is your meter fairly new?  What is the brand?

Is he washing his hands - or at least rubbing the soon-to-be-pricked finger really hard against his clothing before checking? 

Is the code correct on the meter so that it matches the strips you are using?  (Or maybe you do not use this type of meter system?)  I am always forgetting this and it can make some differences.

Is it a possibility that he is eating when you are not aware? 

What kinds of insulin is he on?  Is he taking one or two shots of long-acting insulin daily? 

How long has he had diabetes?

Are you calculating carbs for shot dosages or some other method?

Is he eating standard carb-heavy meals?  Like  70-80 carbs for breakfast, 60-70 for lunch, 65-75 for dinner and 15 for a bedtime snack and other carb snacks as needed through the day?

I'm just trying to get a better understanding of his general situation and hopefully ask some helpful questions.




I took ds to DR. Last wed and his HBA1c was down to 7 something. For us this is very good considering that the last time he went it was over 9.

But over the last couple of days I have been watching his sugars closely and have noticed that when he goes to bed they are good around 8 (144). I check him in the night and they go up as far as 15(270). Then by the morning they go back down to 8(144). Well, last night and the night before they went low. I set my alarm to wake up a 12:00 to check and at 11:30 pm he woke up low (3.8)(68.4) gave him something and he was fine till morning. Well tonight same amount of insulin and everything but he is going up. At first he was 4.0(72) at 9:00 pm then I said check to make sure and it had gone up to 10.1(181) a couple minutes later I said you better wash your hand to make sure and it had gone up to 11.2 (201). Now at 10:00 pm they are 15.1(271) so I have given him a shot. I can not tell what is going on with him. Same insulin same time to eat. He is 13 so I am guessing hormones have a lot to do with it. any advice out there?

Thanks Amanda