Author Topic: Full-term newborn has signs/symptoms of a premie  (Read 10423 times)

Offline khix

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Full-term newborn has signs/symptoms of a premie
« on: February 01, 2010, 02:19:10 AM »
Not sure where to post this....but my sis just had a baby girl, they had to induce labor due to toxemia.  It was agreed that my sis was about 38-39 weeks along, according to last period calculations & measurements & ultrasounds.  They ended up doing a c-section b/c sis wasn't dilating past 6 cm.  Anyway, staff at hospital thinks that baby girl is around 36 weeks, not full-term, because baby is suckling/latching on/rooting (doesn't have that reflex like full-term babies do) and because baby lacks the muscle tone that full term babies have.  They have put baby in NICU & have a feeding tube in her.  First of all, please pray for the baby (& for my sis to recover quickly, and for my sis' fears & worries).  Second, anyone have any experience with this?  Any help, tips, wisdom, advice to share?  What could cause something like this?  Is baby really a premie, or is something wrong with this full-term baby?  Some medical history includes:

- Standard American Diet for mom
- mom around secondhand smoke
- mom's first baby
- mom had toxemia (high blood pressure)
- mom did get flu shot & I think she got H1N1 shot also
- mom also had several ultrasounds with this pregnancy

Could the mercury in the shots or anything else listed above be a factor?
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Offline mykidsmom

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Re: Full-term newborn has signs/symptoms of a premie
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2010, 05:28:54 AM »
The smoke and the shots could very well have caused this in a full term baby and the SAD would have contributed by her body not being healthy enough to filter stuff for baby.  For sure, I've seen secondhand smoke do this.  Praying for both!

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Offline born-an-okie

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Re: Full-term newborn has signs/symptoms of a premie
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2010, 10:32:49 AM »
I have read a personal account from a mother whose last baby (the seventh?) had this problem of not being able to suck.  The baby was actually overdue, but the mom had been on a vegan diet for a few years prior to this.  She attributed the sucking problem to her own malnutrition due to the vegan diet.  She used a gravity type supplementation system while she nursed the baby (and pumped to keep up her milk supply) and after three months the baby was able to nurse just fine.  I would think the toxemia would indicate there is a problem with liver function and poor nutrition.  After this problem the mother found out about Weston Price's research and stopped her vegan diet.  She used the principles of good nutrition to help her children make up for some of the damage caused by her malnutrition during pregnancy.

Offline simplynatural1

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Re: Full-term newborn has signs/symptoms of a premie
« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2010, 11:30:12 AM »
My seventh child (no, I am not the person mentioned in the other response) had the same issues;  I was not induced and my baby was born on her due date.  The only medical thing that happened to her during birth was that she was stuck; however, there was no pulling on her, no vacuum extractor or forceps - we had an awesome dr.  They did the "hands and knees" trick and it worked to spiral her out.

My dd was born with no palmar grasp, no reflexes in her feet, and no suck reflex.  The dr.s didn't catch it at birth and I kept telling the nurses that something was wrong with her suck.  They didn't find anything, but at almost 2 months of age she started losing weight and I lost my milk supply.  I took her to the ped and they sent her for a developmental assessment.  4 developmental specialists told us that her core was 6 months, but her extremeties were newborn and she would be over a year before she could sit up, grasp objects and do many things that "normal" babies could do.  At 6 months she was actually beyond what they told us and at 9 months she started walking. 

As for the suck reflex...I immediately started her with an SNS with my milk and formula, then eventually my milk supply increased with the help of a hospital grade breast pump.  The speech therapist told me to do some special exercises on her mouth and jaws, and she would eventually be able to suck from a bottle, but she would never nurse.  I continued the exercises 6 times a day and by 6 1/2 months she was nursing and is still nursing at 15 months. 

As soon as we found out their prognosis for her, we started taking her to a chiropractor.  She was way out of alignment.  Within a week we were seeing so much progress that even the chiropractor was amazed.  I kept taking her every week and he kept working with her.  That is the only "special" thing that we did for her.  He adjusted her jaws with the "activator" and her neck manually. 

Hope this helps,
Theresa

Offline simplynatural1

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Re: Full-term newborn has signs/symptoms of a premie
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2010, 02:01:44 PM »
I have been asked to share the exercises that we did for my daughter.  Here they are...

Before EVERY feeding - in this order:


1)  3 swipes on both cheeks with palms (firmly brush your palms over the babys' cheeks, pulling forward with each swipe)

2)  Circle lips both directions with deep pressure (use your thumb to circle the lips 3 times...alternate directions each time)

3)  Swipe palate 3 times (use your index finger to gently but firmly stroke the upper palate, almost like massaging)

4)  Tug jaw forward 3 times (use the thumb and index finger to pull the lower gums forward, not much, but enough to get some movement)

5)  Tongue groove (make the tongue “cup”) 3 times (use the index finger to push down on the tongue three times in a row)

6)  Pull finger out to fingertip for preparing suck.  (use the index finger to push down in the middle of the tongue, firmly and gently pull the tongue forward until you are at the tip of the tongue with the fingertip)

Theresa

Offline growinginHim

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Re: Full-term newborn has signs/symptoms of a premie
« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2010, 04:44:13 PM »
Not sure where to post this....but my sis just had a baby girl, they had to induce labor due to toxemia.  It was agreed that my sis was about 38-39 weeks along, according to last period calculations & measurements & ultrasounds.  They ended up doing a c-section b/c sis wasn't dilating past 6 cm.  Anyway, staff at hospital thinks that baby girl is around 36 weeks, not full-term, because baby is suckling/latching on/rooting (doesn't have that reflex like full-term babies do) and because baby lacks the muscle tone that full term babies have.  They have put baby in NICU & have a feeding tube in her.  First of all, please pray for the baby (& for my sis to recover quickly, and for my sis' fears & worries).  Second, anyone have any experience with this?  Any help, tips, wisdom, advice to share?  What could cause something like this?  Is baby really a premie, or is something wrong with this full-term baby?  Some medical history includes:

- Standard American Diet for mom
- mom around secondhand smoke
- mom's first baby
- mom had toxemia (high blood pressure)
- mom did get flu shot & I think she got H1N1 shot also
- mom also had several ultrasounds with this pregnancy

Could the mercury in the shots or anything else listed above be a factor?

Let me preface by saying, don't take my thoughts as medical advice.  Ask the neonatologist/nurses taking care of your niece for their opinion.  They should be able to shed some light on the issue.  I can't see her chart/do an assessment on her, etc. so all I know of your niece is what you have just mentioned, so just take my thoughts as ideas.  These are some of the things I would think about if she were assigned to my care.

You mention that niece was estimated to be 38-39 weeks along by a late prenatal US, did your sis have an ultrasound earlier and when did that place her EDC (due date)?  Many times the earlier US are more accurate when estimating due date.

It was also mentioned that the infant is not rooting, suckling, etc.  I am not a strong proponent of bottles, but it is nice when there is an infant with feeding issues to see how much they are getting.  Have they given your niece a bottle and will she take any of it or is she only getting NG (tube) feedings right now?  If she is getting to try the bottle, is she totally refusing the bottle or does she show a little bit of sucking?  If your sis is breastfeeding, you could ask if they could do before and after weights to see how much she is actually getting (the nurse should be able to calculate this for you).  Also, when was the infant born?  Could she have jaundice (an elevated bilirubin level)?  Does she look yellow?  Many times when babies have jaundice they become very lethargic and it is difficult to feed them for a couple of days.  The neonatologist can run a simple blood test to find her bili level.  Have they done a speech evaluation on your niece?  These can be sooo helpful.  Many times speech will recommend certain ways of holding the infant during feeding, different bottles, etc. that once utilized, prove to be very helpful.

Now for a bit of encouragement, many times we do have kids who come in and are not a ball of fire with feeding, but then a couple of days later something seems to have clicked and they are eating every feeding and take the bottle in about 10 minutes.  Anyway, I will be praying for your sis and her new little one.  Whenever we have get a kiddo in the NICU it is always stressful for the family.  I will be praying for wisdom for your sis's family.

Like I said before, these are just the ideas that came to my mind.  Don't take my thoughts as medical advice.  Communicate with the neonatologist and nurses.  Communication helps so much.  If you are not getting appropriate answers, keep asking until you do. ;)