Author Topic: Bursitis & Tendinitis [Tendonitis]: Treatments for Inflammation & Pain  (Read 18567 times)

Offline jenny4wen

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 :-[  I have developed tendinitis in my right shoulder, (having a lot of fun playing catch with my sweet hubbie).  Unfortunately, I'm right handed and can't let it rest really.  Do you wonderful people have any helpful suggestions to decrease the pain?  I hope I didn't miss a thread already dedicated to this subject, I looked.  Any help would be wonderful :) Thanks! :D
I'm smiling! :D

Offline healthybratt

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You might try some trap stretching excercises.  I haven't been able to find any diagrams online, but I'll try to describe a couple that I know.

1)  Sit in a chair with your feet comfortably flat on the floor.  Spine straight and arched.  Arms hanging down to sides.  Bring chin down to chest as tight as you can (make a double chin) and hold for count of 5.  If you do this stretch correctly, you should be able to feel it pull from the middle of your next down to your bra strap.  Do this for several reps each day (about 10 to start and maybe work your way up to 30).

2)  Sit in a chair with your feet comfortably flat on the floor.  Spine straight and arched.  This should be a chair without arms like a plain kitchen chair and your hands should dangle at just about the seat comfortably while sitting.  Grab the chair with one hand and pull your head and neck slowly to the opposite direction until you feel it pull in the side of your neck and your upper shoulder.  Hold for a 3-5 count and switch sides.

3)  Lie on your back.  Legs, arms and spine straight.  Tuck your chin as close to your chest as possible without raising your head completely from the floor.  Shoulders should remain touching the floor and be square.  Hold for 5 count and repeat.  This should pull in the same places as #1.

4)  Lie on your front on a table or with your face dangling over a pillow so that you can lie face down comfortably.  Lift your arms up behind you as if they were wings.  If done properly your shoulder blades will crunch together.  Hold for 2-5 count and repeat.

5)  This stretch requires an exercise band.  I don't know where to get them.  Mine came from a physical therapist when I was being treated for whip lash.  Tie the band to a door knob.  Turn your side to the door.  Place the elbow of the arm furthest from the door tightly against your ribs.  With this same hand grab the band and rotate your upper arm out to stretch against the band.  If there is no tension, move further away from the door.  During this excercise you should not lift your arm or elbow.  Turn it as if the elbow was actually attached to your rib cage and on a swivel.  Switch sides and repeat.

6)  Use the band in much the same manner in #5 except this time grab the band with the hand closest to the door.  Swivel away from the door across your upper body and towards your other arm.  Switch and repeat.

7)  Stand facing the door and grab the band with either hand while hanging your hand to your side.  Then pull your arm straight back until you feel your shoulder blades scrunch together.  If the tension is not strong enough, back away from the door until it it.  Switch hands and repeat.

These are all great excercises for the neck, shoulder and upper back.  They strengthen the trap muscle which controls the tightness or strength in these areas and also controls posture.  They worked wonders for my whip lash and when I get tight, I revert back to these excercises to loosen back up.  Also sometimes when this muscle gets tight, it will pinch nerves and cause numbness in hands and fingers.  These exercises will cure this as well.

Hope it helps.

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Offline 1happygal

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My dad has had reoccurring problems with bursitis. He currently is battling it in his elbow. In the past he has had his knee drained because of the pain.  :( He basically takes ibuprofen for the pain and "waits it out."

Is there any natural alternative to reduce the inflammation of the bursa sac (everyone has about 150 of them anywhere there is a joint in the body). I know he would probably need to examine his diet firsthand, but would appreciate any info. and/or testimonies of people who have suffered from this problem and found natural solutions.

Thanks in advance for the help!  ;D

Offline healthybratt

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Is there any natural alternative to reduce the inflammation of the bursa sac (everyone has about 150 of them anywhere there is a joint in the body). I know he would probably need to examine his diet firsthand, but would appreciate any info. and/or testimonies of people who have suffered from this problem and found natural solutions.

Pinapple (fresh) contains bromelain which is reputed to be good for pain and inflamation.  Cod Liver and other Fish oils are also supposed to be antiinflammatory and help to heal bones, ligaments, and joints.
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Offline lovey1029

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1happygal,

Has your dad ever heard about glyconutrients?  I would be glad to send him some literature through the mail or email about these carbohydrates that have been proven to be the missing link in cell to cell communication.  These sugars work with the normal function of the body and support a function that is already taking place within the body - cell to cell communication.  When the cells communicate properly, the body has what it needs to start the healing and repairing process.  What we have seen the body do in severe/mild cases of al kinds of degenerative diseases has been astounding.  My husband is a new man today after battling Interstitial Cystitis after he gave his body the required nutrients at the cell level.  Let us know how we can help!

Doug and Amy Stroup
sugarsthatheal at juno dot com
www.livingsugars.com
www.glycoinformation.com
« Last Edit: June 27, 2006, 01:17:49 PM by healthybratt »

Offline mrstom

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Re: Bursitis & Tendinitis [Tendonitis]: Treatments for Inflammation & Pain
« Reply #5 on: September 04, 2006, 03:49:59 PM »
The Dr. says I have a bad case of bursitis. I would like to treat it naturally- not with harsh drugs. Is there anything for this?

Offline miff aka Missi

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Re: Bursitis & Tendinitis [Tendonitis]: Treatments for Inflammation & Pain
« Reply #6 on: September 04, 2006, 07:48:27 PM »
The Dr. says I have a bad case of bursitis. I would like to treat it naturally- not with harsh drugs. Is there anything for this?

http://welltellme.com/discuss/index.php/topic,994.msg6942.html#msg6942

I tried to post this link for you earlier, but had a little trouble.  Forgive me if it comes through twice.  :)  Anyway, I thought this might be helpful to you. 

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Bursitis & Tendinitis [Tendonitis]: Treatments for Inflammation & Pain
« Reply #7 on: September 05, 2006, 05:26:02 AM »
Quote from:  The Green Pharmacy, by James A. Duke, Ph.D.
Bursitis and Tendinitis

A few years back, the New York Times published a story about my lifelong love affair with medicinal plants. Some time after it ran, I got a call from a Times employee who said that something like 20 percent of the newspaper's employees who banged away daily on computer keyboards were experiencing problems with inflamed joints, including tendinitis in their wrists or shoulders or bursitis of the shoulder.

He said that he was looking into alternative medical treatments, came across my name in the Times archives and called me. I sent him what I had, and my sympathy as well. I've had bursitis myself and can vouch for the pain and disability it causes. Like the man at the Times, I, too, spend hours on end working at a computer. I also enjoy playing the guitar and bass fiddle and do a fair amount of driving and lawn mowing, all of which can aggravate bursitis and tendinitis.

These two disorders are often lumped together, but they're actually two distinct conditions. Bursitis is an inflammation of the bursae, the fluid-filled sacs that help lubricate the joints in places where muscles and tendons meet bone. Tendinitis is an inflammation of the tendons, the tough, elastic, fibrous tissues that connect muscles to bones.

The two terms are often used interchangeably because the bursae are located near tendon-bone connections, and both conditions cause pain in and around the joints. Bursitis and tendinitis also have the same cause--overuse of a particular joint. These kinds of problems show up as a result of sports, as in tennis elbow, and in jobs that require repetitive movement, such as carpentry and butchering. Whatever you call them, though, bursitis and tendinitis really hurt. And interestingly enough, they both respond to the same kinds
of treatments.

Physicians generally treat bursitis, tendinitis and related problems with rest and medications that relieve pain and reduce inflammation--aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids.

Green Pharmacy for Bursitis and Tendinitis

I think resting a joint that has been affected by tendinitis or bursitis is a great idea. Ice packs might also help control the pain and inflammation. But don't count on an ice pack to provide complete relief. And while taking aspirin and related drugs is fine, you should be aware that there are also a number of natural alternatives.

Willow (Salix, various species) and other natural pain relievers. Willow bark is herbal aspirin. So are meadowsweet and wintergreen. They all contain salicylates, natural precursors of aspirin. To make a tea, I suggest using one to two teaspoons of dried herb per cup of water and boiling it for about 20 minutes. Have a cup two or three times a day. Or try a teaspoon of tincture of any of these herbs three times a day. Remember, though, that if you're allergic to aspirin, you probably shouldn't take aspirin-like herbs, either.

Ginger (Zingiber officinale). Ginger has a long folk history in Asia as a bursitis treatment. Since I like ginger, I suggest trying it in combination with pineapple and a little licorice (both discussed below) for recurring bursitis.

Echinacea (Echinacea, various species).
This herb, also called coneflower, is good for connective tissue injuries such as tennis elbow, skier's knee and jogger's ankle, according to Michael Moore, author of Medicinal Plants of the Desert and Canyon West and one of the nation's leading herbalists. All of these injuries are, in fact, types of tendinitis. He recommends taking up to a half-ounce ofechinacea tincture daily until the swelling and pain are reduced. That's a lot of tincture, but echinacea is not hazardous (although it may cause your tongue to tingle or become numb), so it's probably worth a try.

Horsetail (Equisetum arvense). This herb is one of Nature's richest sources of the element silicon, and some say that it is in a form that is especially easy for your body to use. A number of studies show that silicon plays an important role in the health and resilience of both cartilage and connective tissues such as tendons. (Cartilage forms a significant portion of joints.)

I can't say that I'm entirely sold on high-silicon herbs and foods for treating bursitis and tendinitis, but two scientists I respect, herbal pharmacologist Daniel Mowrey, Ph.D., author of The Scientific Validation of Herbal Medicine and Herbal Tonic Therapies, and Forrest Nielsen, M.D., director of the Grand Forks USDA Human Nutrition Research Center in North Dakota, tout silicon. So I think it's worth trying, although you should not use this herb without the guidance of a holistic practitioner.

If you're advised to take this herb, you can make a tea by putting five teaspoons of dried horsetail, one teaspoon of sugar and one quart of water in a pot. (The sugar will pull more silicon out of the plant.) Bring it to a boil, then reduce the heat and let it simmer for about three hours. Strain the tea and let it cool before drinking it.

Other plants high in silicon include barley, chickweed, cucumbers, parsley, stinging nettle, walnuts, Brazil nuts, cashews, pistachios, string beans and turnips.

Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra). Licorice can be every bit as effective a treatment for bursitis and tendinitis as the commonly prescribed drug hydrocortisone, according to Dr. Mowrey. Plus, the herb has none of the usual side
effects, such as weight gain, indigestion, insomnia and lowered resistance to infection, that are associated with cortisone and hydrocortisone. From what I know of licorice's anti-inflammatory effects, I believe this herb is worth trying. (While licorice and its extracts are safe for normal use in moderate amounts--up to about three cups of tea a day--long-term use or ingestion of larger amounts can produce headache, lethargy, sodium and water retention, excessive loss ofpotassium and high blood pressure.)

Pineapple (Ananas comosus). This tasty fruit contains enzymes that break down protein. One of these enzymes, bromelain, is particularly important because it has anti-inflammatory properties. Pineapple reduces swelling, bruising and pain and speeds the healing of joint and tendon injuries.

Many athletes believe that pineapple helps heal sprains and tendinitis. Some eat lots of pineapple before and after strenuous workouts to help protect their tendons, as tendinitis is a major problem for them. Does it work? I don't have a definite answer for that, but my colleague James Gordon, M.D., president and director of the Center for Mind-Body Medicine in Washington, D.C., told me that he was amazed at how pineapple alleviated his chronic back condition that involved pain and inflammation.

The bromelain content of pineapple is not all that high, but if I had bursitis or tendinitis, I'd try this approach. It probably can't hurt to add fresh pineapple and pineapple juice to your menu while you're getting over an episode of tendinitis or bursitis. Papaya contains enzymes similar to those in pineapple, so you might want to add some of this fresh fruit to your menu as well.

Purslane (Portulaca oleracea) and other foods containing magnesium. Magnesium is an important mineral for muscles, bones and connective tissues. And since leafy green vegetables are a good source of magnesium, I've created a Magnesium Medley Salad. To make it, include any of the following ingredients to which you have access, in whatever amounts are pleasing to you: fresh purslane, green beans, spinach and lettuce. And throw some poppy seeds into the dressing; they also containmagnesium.

Stinging nettle (Urtica dioica). This silicon-rich herb has strong folkloric support as a treatment for gout and rheumatism, which means it's long been used to treat inflammatory conditions that affect the joints. So it seems promising as a treatment for bursitis and tendinitis as well.

Turmeric (Curcuma longa). Joseph Pizzorno, N.D., president of Bastyr University in Seattle, and naturopath Michael Murray, N.D., co-authors of A Textbook of Natural Medicine, are just two of the herbal scholars who note that curcumin, a compound abundant in turmeric, has proved as effective as
cortisone in the treatment of some kinds of inflammation. They suggest taking both 250 to 500 milligrams of curcumin and 250 milligrams of bromelain three times a day, between meals.

You can purchase these isolated compounds in natural food stores, but I have a suggestion that you might enjoy more. Try preparing ripe pineapple, for bromelain, with turmeric, for a generous amount of curcumin. Come to think of it, a fruit cocktail made of pineapple and papaya spiced with ginger and turmeric would taste pretty darn good.

I always take a whole-foods approach whenever possible. I think that
generally, whole foods have more healing power going for them than any
individual ingredients that have been isolated from them.

The Green Pharmacy info is mostly for pain control.  Listed below is more info on dietary considerations to promote healing.

Quote
Quote
Nutritional Considerations

Calcium and vitamin B12 malabsorption and food allergies should be considered as contributors to inflammatory conditions such as bursitis. Conversely, diet modifications may improve malabsorption problems, arthritic conditions, or gouty conditions that may be nutritionally linked or aggravated.

Identification and avoidance of food allergies are of the utmost importance. Foods from the nightshade family such as tomatoes, potatoes, and eggplant aggravate symptoms in some individuals..

Additionally, eating foods that are high in magnesium can be helpful. Dark, leafy green vegetables and many green and yellow vegetables are good sources of magnesium. Drinking a mixture of filtered water, apple cider vinegar, and honey at intervals throughout the day is also sometimes recommended. Consuming a mixture of equal parts carrot, celery, cucumber, and beet juice is another option. Taking one tablespoon of cod liver oil 1–2 hours before meals primarily during the winter months may also promote healing...from
« Last Edit: September 05, 2006, 05:32:01 AM by healthybratt »
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Offline SONBEAM

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Re: Bursitis & Tendinitis [Tendonitis]: Treatments for Inflammation & Pain
« Reply #8 on: September 28, 2006, 12:39:15 PM »
Hi all!  Quick question.  I've got tendinitis, so says the Dr.  My knees start to hurt while I've been playing softball.  I usually run a lap before games to loosen up.  Is the running helping or hurting me?  Perhaps I should just stretch before the game?  Any ideas?
 
                                                    Thanks,
                                                               ~Dawn~

Offline bighornbound

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Re: Bursitis & Tendinitis [Tendonitis]: Treatments for Inflammation & Pain
« Reply #9 on: October 17, 2006, 07:11:26 PM »
I have horrible bursitis in both shoulders ever since high school- probably from too many sports.  The doctor had told me that i could get shots in each shoulder that would reduce the pain.  This was when i was in high school and went in about the problem.  I did not want to do that. And so i have been studying into it and trying different things when it acts up.  Pineapple does not seem to help me.  keeping my shoulders very warm helps ALOT-it is basically the only thing that helps. I have also found that movement helps.  My bursitis occurs mostly at night.  So, if i move my shoulders and then put a sweatshirt on it helps quite a bit.  I have also been told by my chiro. that exercising them with strength / muscle building, low impact type of stretches (she specifically told me to use rubber bands) would help a lot- I have not tried that very religiously.

Offline TammyLee

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Re: Bursitis & Tendinitis [Tendonitis]: Treatments for Inflammation & Pain
« Reply #10 on: November 19, 2006, 10:28:18 AM »
I've got tendonitis in my wrist.  Anyone know of a poultice or anything that will help?

THanks!

TammyLee

JoyInHim

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Re: Bursitis & Tendinitis [Tendonitis]: Treatments for Inflammation & Pain
« Reply #11 on: December 01, 2006, 11:28:15 AM »
Rest it and gentle stretching.  It will go away if you take care of it - my dr. forgot to tell me that, and I thought it was a life sentence, lol.

Use motrin or similar for inflamation (this is important, even if you don't typically use pain killers, to treat it), and ice 10 on/10min. off when inflammed (if swells.)

Stop whatever provoked it (computer?) as much as you can.  Don't repeat those motions, except to keep it loose.  Balance 'exercise' with treating inflamation - you want to do both, but neither to excess.

Mine was caused by excessive shoveling when we landscaped our yard.  It took most of a year, but eventually went away 100%!  Just keep babying it....it is worth the hassle to have it gone  ::)

PS - In the case of my knee (BOY that limits life,) I went to a dr. and got an Rx for phys. therapy.  There was nothing more useful....if it is serious or persists....I'd highly recommend therapy.  You'll build muscles up to support the wrist - and stop the pain.  Pain is a warning that you are wearing the thing out, lol.  So listen to it and try to resolve it - best wishes : )








I've got tendonitis in my wrist.  Anyone know of a poultice or anything that will help?

THanks!

TammyLee

PMESguy

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Re: Bursitis & Tendinitis [Tendonitis]: Treatments for Inflammation & Pain
« Reply #12 on: December 07, 2006, 03:31:34 PM »
www.wobenzym.com

Works wonders.

Offline purewellspring

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Re: Bursitis & Tendinitis [Tendonitis]: Treatments for Inflammation & Pain
« Reply #13 on: October 03, 2007, 02:10:50 PM »
I think I have tendonitis, but I'm not positive. Here's what happened...I started having wrist pain in my right wrist several months ago, pretty sure it came from working on my computer...

Did the Master Cleanse last month, and on day four or so, had HORRIFIC pain the whole day in my wrist, but kept going hoping it was a detox symptom...and it was! The next morning when I woke up, completely gone!

Bad news...just three days or so ago, it came back, worse than ever, and I don't have any real indication of what did it. I just woke up one morning with it hurting terribly. I do know that the week previously we'd eaten terribly (being on the road, we had a LOT of processed wheat products and sugar), but I didn't sleep on it funny and hadn't been working on my computer at ALL.

So, I think it's tendonitis, and I'm wondering what I should do. If it went away when I did the cleanse, should I do it again and watch my diet more closely? Is there anything else I can do? It used to only hurt when I was on the computer, but today I was doing all kinds of cooking in the kitchen and it hurt no matter what I did.

ps. I am taking bentonite internally to continue the cleansing process more gently...could that be contributing anything?

Offline bakermom

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Re: Bursitis & Tendinitis [Tendonitis]: Treatments for Inflammation & Pain
« Reply #14 on: October 04, 2007, 01:25:29 AM »
I had wrist pain a few years back and a brace from the dr did the trick for me.  It held my wrist in place just the right way.

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Bursitis & Tendinitis [Tendonitis]: Treatments for Inflammation & Pain
« Reply #15 on: October 04, 2007, 05:15:48 AM »
I've had carpal tunnel in my wrists since my last pregnancy and I noticed that the things that were most beneficial for healing were reducing water retention (no soda, low salts, lots and lots of water, etc) and wearing a brace (24/7 even to bed) for immediate relief and yeast cleansing and high doses of cod liver oil for long term healing.
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Offline purewellspring

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Re: Bursitis & Tendinitis [Tendonitis]: Treatments for Inflammation & Pain
« Reply #16 on: October 04, 2007, 05:31:43 AM »
yay! That's what I was hoping to hear. I get a lot of the "other side" of medical diagnoses in my house (lifetime diagnosis, nothing you can do, take meds, etc) and was really hoping that there was something else I could try. I did buy a brace yesterday and it helping even just wearing it all evening before bed. I know I need to do a yeast cleanse, have just been waiting until I'd be at home for more than a week and half at a time.

Thanks for the advice!!

Offline bighornbound

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I am having a horrible bursitis outbreak.  It is really bad.  I am not sure what is causing it, other than I have been gardening. 
  The only other thing that I can think of is that my husband gave me a full body massage on Tuesday with some massage oil from Bath and Body works.  The aches started a little that night, in one shoulder and my right big toe joint.  Then they seem to be moving. I still have it in my right shoulder. But I also have it in my left big toe joint now. I can actually tell that it is swollen. My whole body aches, really! 
   Could I have been allergic to something in the massage oil?  I looked at the list of ingredients and the main ones where not too weird but the lower ones were very weird!   :-[
   I am studying into this and doing the above mentioned things.
  Thanks for any feed back!

Offline twitterpated4hubby

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Im so worried about my dh. He has tendinitis in his arm around the elbow area. His job causes him to do the same thing over and over and thats why he has it. He cant quit his job so i have no idea what to do. Does this just get worse and worse until he cant cope? He says right now its so painful that it feels like a lighter is lit under his elbow. He says he could cry sometimes it hurts so bad. His arms go numb when he sleeps and he doesn't get good rest. I am just so upset for my poor hard working man. He works two jobs so i can stay home and he shouldn't have to deal with this.

Im wondering if the immune booster tincture could help. It has ecchinacia and nettle in it. If he took that and ate pineapple im wondering if that could help. Is there anything else he can take that will help or is this hopeless with him working and using the arm so much?
http://keepyourcloveson.blogspot.com/2008_10_01_archive.html

"...I found the one my heart loves. I held him and would not let him go..." -Song of Songs 3:4

Offline healthybratt

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Im so worried about my dh. He has tendinitis in his arm around the elbow area. His job causes him to do the same thing over and over and thats why he has it. He cant quit his job so i have no idea what to do. Does this just get worse and worse until he cant cope? He says right now its so painful that it feels like a lighter is lit under his elbow. He says he could cry sometimes it hurts so bad. His arms go numb when he sleeps and he doesn't get good rest. I am just so upset for my poor hard working man. He works two jobs so i can stay home and he shouldn't have to deal with this.

Im wondering if the immune booster tincture could help. It has ecchinacia and nettle in it. If he took that and ate pineapple im wondering if that could help. Is there anything else he can take that will help or is this hopeless with him working and using the arm so much?
Are you sure it's tendinitis?  If his arms go numb when he sleeps, I would bet money it's a pinched nerve in the rotator cuff area or in the neck.  This can actually cause severe pain in the elbow (been there done that and it IS very painful).  A chiro adjustment, some physical therapy (if you can, have a PT do an evaluation) and a lot of essential fatty acids might just do the trick.

Whiplash, Neck, Back & Shoulder Pain: Posture & Muscle Strengthening

Inflammation & Diet [Recommended Dosages & Diet]
Inflammation & Diet [Diseases Related to Inflammation]
Essential Fatty Acid (EFA) Daily Intake Log: Schedules & Effects
Boosting Your Immune System: Avoiding Illness

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Offline twitterpated4hubby

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Could that hurt him for years because he has been getting worse for years now. He has worked at this factory for about 13 or 14 yrs now. It does seem to be better at times and i think its worse now then its ever been.
http://keepyourcloveson.blogspot.com/2008_10_01_archive.html

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Offline healthybratt

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Could that hurt him for years because he has been getting worse for years now. He has worked at this factory for about 13 or 14 yrs now. It does seem to be better at times and i think its worse now then its ever been.
Absolutely, especially if he has some sort of neck/shoulder trauma/injury in his past.  Doing repetitive work can also cause or exacerbate an already existing injury especially if the posture is poor or compromised.  If his factory work caused him to have his neck/shoulders/arms contorted or held at awkward angles for lengthy periods of time, then injury would most likely would result and it could be the muscles/joints rather than the tendons.

If you can swing it, I would highly recommend a consultation with a good/well reputed Physical Therapist.  They tend to look at things from a whole body perspective in reference to tendons/muscles/bones.  I was very impressed with mine.  He gave me a much better insight to my own injuries than an orthopedist was able to give.  I know it was better because I healed.   ;D  The orthopedist wanted to give me a steroid shot in the neck and call it a day.  The PT worked with me and taught me stretching and posture exercises to actually heal.  That in combination with the extra whopping doses of essential fatty acids (I was previously a trans fat junkie), I healed almost completely.  I still have occasional flareups, but they are slight and easily taken care of with exercise, fatty acids and an occasional trip to the chiro (only once so far this year).
« Last Edit: June 28, 2008, 06:00:23 AM by healthybratt »
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Offline wlwest

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Hi, well, I have tendonitis in my left arm/shoulder area.  well, it's from my shoulder to my elbow.  Anyway, after reading thru the posts, I wondering what I can use that I have.  I've been putting a comfrey poultice on it, and it does feel better when I put heat on it.  Not so good with an ice pack.  will comfrey help with tendons?  Also, I was reading somewhere that tendons have a hard time delivering oxygen to the area, so would some DMSO help?  I have some of that.  I have some other things, the imlife tincture from bulk herb store, made up.  I think that had alot of the herbs in that.  Out of pineapple.   :-[  I'm also taking ibuprofen, can I still add some herbal treatments to go along with that? 

thanks,
Wendy