Author Topic: Cooking with Cast Iron  (Read 56594 times)

Offline healthybratt

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Cooking with Cast Iron
« on: April 18, 2006, 08:01:02 PM »
Use cast iron skillets.  This adds iron to your foods and from personal experience, I can tell you that my family suffers none of the usual side effects of taking iron supplements and not a one of us has iron poor blood.  ::)

I was raised using teflon, except when my dad used his iron skillet in the oven to make corn-bread -mmmmm.  I remembered this and stumbled across an iron skillet and took it home and tried some bacon in it.  Incredible difference in taste.  YUMMY.  The whole family thought so.  So then I tried hamburgers - same reaction.  I had to re-learn some of the basics of cooking to be able to incorporate using these skillets more frequently, but it was well worth it.  I'm still working on scrambled eggs and pancakes - hee hee.  It was hard enough for me to master pancakes on teflon - it may take awhile in iron.  ;D

I love my iron skillets.  My dad recently gave me his old pan (older than me) to add to my collection.  I got 3 more (different sizes) from a garage sale for 25 cents each.  They were all rusty and dust covered.  I took them home and scrubbed them with steel wool and re-seasoned them and I use them every day.  Next I want to find a griddle.  They make food taste better (no kidding) and as I said before, they add iron to your food every time you cook.

Here are a couple of threads on using and caring for your iron skillets.

Cooking with Iron
Eating Healthy

NOTE:  I've also read somewhere that teflon causes your food to absorb alluminum which is not healthy.  If you can learn to cook without it, you'll be much better off!
« Last Edit: April 18, 2006, 08:06:08 PM by healthybratt »
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Offline lovey1029

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Re: Cooking with Cast Iron
« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2006, 12:13:16 PM »
Check out www.mercola.com for great articles against the use of
teflon pans.  They really opened my eyes!

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Cooking with Cast Iron
« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2006, 05:53:43 PM »
I tried to reseason my old skillets and they came out gummy, so I did some more research and I found a site on how to re-do it.  I chose the self-cleaning oven method and boy does my house reek  :-X  I've only used the self cleaning oven once before, but I had forgotten how bad it can smell - YUCK!

Anyway, my iron pans are cooking as we speak to burn away all the old cruddy seasoning and food so I can start from scratch.

Here is the sight where I got my information.  They have lots of tips on seasoning new and restoring old pans.

http://whatscookingamerica.net/Information/CastIronPans.htm

If you're interested in the self-cleaning oven method, it's listed as a link to the left side of the page.
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Offline lotsaboys

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Re: Cooking with Cast Iron
« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2006, 05:00:29 AM »
Thanks so much for the info, hb! We are looking out for cast iron skillets and griddles as it has made us nervous for a while to use our Teflon/aluminum skillets. My only concern is finding ones big enough. The one we use now is a big commercial one from Sam's Club. I cook a LOT of food and when our 7 sons are teenagers, (that's right around the corner) I can only imagine the size skillets I'll need then.  :P  I rarely have time to get to garage sales (I've told my mom to watch for some when she goes), so if you know of any resources, used or new, I'd be interested. Remember, BIG is the issue.  :)   ~B

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Cooking with Cast Iron
« Reply #4 on: May 12, 2006, 11:23:33 AM »
Thanks so much for the info, hb! We are looking out for cast iron skillets and griddles as it has made us nervous for a while to use our Teflon/aluminum skillets. My only concern is finding ones big enough. The one we use now is a big commercial one from Sam's Club. I cook a LOT of food and when our 7 sons are teenagers, (that's right around the corner) I can only imagine the size skillets I'll need then.  :P  I rarely have time to get to garage sales (I've told my mom to watch for some when she goes), so if you know of any resources, used or new, I'd be interested. Remember, BIG is the issue.  :)   ~B

I got two as hand-me-downs from dad and mother-in-law and the other 2 I picked up at garage sales (all rusty) for 25cents.  I just finished baking them in self-clean last night and I scoured them a little while ago.  I regreased and they are baking to season as we speak.  They are steel grey instead of cruddy black.  They look almost brand new!  8)

Walmart sells them new fairly cheap (cheaper than Teflon anyway).
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Cooking with Cast Iron
« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2006, 02:56:52 PM »
Finished my skillets.  They look great.  Some of the oil pooled on my pans because I did not turn them upside down, but I took a dry wash cloth and some salt and polished the pooled grease off.  I used one, and washed it with nothing but hot water and a cloth.  It's beeyoutiful  ;D  They look just like the pans on the webiste.

I'm very impressed with the results.  I would recommend rubber gloves while scouring or you're bound to chew your fingernails and fingertips off, but scrub them good, coat them lightly(I used lard as the website I mentioned earlier said that oils didn't work as well as animal fats and shortening and I don't keep shortening in the house) and evenly (inside and out) and if you have a way to catch the drippings, season them upside down. 
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Offline HerbMe

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Re: Cooking with Cast Iron
« Reply #6 on: May 12, 2006, 07:57:53 PM »
For the large cast iron cookware try www.Lehmans.com they have a 15.25" skillet and a 17" skillet also griddles and dutch ovens. They have great service and a catalog you can look at all week.

Offline Helen

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Re: Cooking with Cast Iron
« Reply #7 on: May 13, 2006, 05:32:43 PM »
another way to supplement iron is by taking a tablespoon of black strap molasses every morning.

Offline jenny4wen

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Re: Cooking with Cast Iron
« Reply #8 on: June 19, 2006, 09:59:37 AM »
Check out www.mercola.com for great articles against the use of
teflon pans.  They really opened my eyes!

I called DuPont, makers of Teflon, and they said their's is not toxic, and is completely safe to use.  It's the cheaper Teflon wannabes that cut on doing things the right way that release the toxic chemicals when cooked with.  The name "teflon" is incorrectly being used for all nonstick coating, but is really the trade name from DuPont's own. 
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Cooking with Cast Iron
« Reply #9 on: June 19, 2006, 10:38:41 AM »
Check out www.mercola.com for great articles against the use of
teflon pans.  They really opened my eyes!

I called DuPont, makers of Teflon, and they said their's is not toxic, and is completely safe to use.  It's the cheaper Teflon wannabes that cut on doing things the right way that release the toxic chemicals when cooked with.  The name "teflon" is incorrectly being used for all nonstick coating, but is really the trade name from DuPont's own. 

Most teflon coated pans are made from aluminum.  The teflon on most pans wears off and then you're cooking with aluminum.  Any thoughts on this?  I just bought all new stainless steels pans and I love them.  I've used some really cheap thin ones before and was not impressed, but these have the triple thick bottoms that help prevent scorching.  They are so easy to cook with and clean, it's a wonder I didn't discover these sooner.

So between my baking stone, glass pans, corning wear, iron skillets and griddle and all my new steel pots and pans, I'm almost aluminum free. 
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Offline jenny4wen

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Re: Cooking with Cast Iron
« Reply #10 on: June 19, 2006, 11:06:23 AM »
Hmm.. .  well, I called DuPont because my husband is a Pampered Chef consulatant, and the "Teflon" question always came up.  Now about the aluminum. . . I'm not sure!  I know if you use the *plastic* utensils   :-\ they don't start flaking, but PC also sells silicon spatulas, and those aren't so bad.  I personally have never liked the coating, so I have plain pans (not PC, wedding gift). and a cast iron skillet.  The newest Pampered Chef pots and pans use hard-anodized aluminum reinforced with a titanium alloy, and DuPont Autograph 2 nonstick coating.  I'll have to check on the aluminum thing.  That stuff is too scary.  :o
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Offline blsd2bhome

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Re: Cooking with Cast Iron
« Reply #11 on: December 04, 2006, 06:32:06 AM »
 I just bought all new stainless steels pans and I love them.  I've used some really cheap thin ones before and was not impressed, but these have the triple thick bottoms that help prevent scorching.  They are so easy to cook with and clean, it's a wonder I didn't discover these sooner.

Quote


I know this is an old thread, but I have a question for you HB!

  What brand pans did you buy?  And do you still like them?  DH has asked me about Christmas gifts, and I was considering a new pan set.  I have a mix of old teflon, new teflon, and some cast iron.  I have been to Bed, Bath & Beyond to look at cookware and it was really confusing!  All had aluminum, but some was just in the core, with stainless steel on the cooking surface.  Would this be an option?

I am also looking for ceramic/porcelin cookware, anyone know a good resource for those?  Or would you all reccommend (from your experience) that the $$ is not worth it? That cast iron and stainless steel are good enough?
I have some stainless cookware right now and it burns terribly---some I cannot even get clean any more.

Thank you for any experience that you -or anyone- can share on this!

Offline Whiterock

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Re: Cooking with Cast Iron
« Reply #12 on: December 04, 2006, 07:01:54 AM »
I called DuPont, makers of Teflon, and they said their's is not toxic, and is completely safe to use.  It's the cheaper Teflon wannabes that cut on doing things the right way that release the toxic chemicals when cooked with.  The name "teflon" is incorrectly being used for all nonstick coating, but is really the trade name from DuPont's own. 

I got this article from MedicalNewsToday

Can Teflon make you sick?
Main Category: Public Health News
Article Date: 21 Nov 2003 - 0:00am (PST)

For Bucky Bailey's parents, the 22-year-old's wedding day in August of this year was one they feared might never come, given how their son started life. Bucky was born in January of 1981 with only one nostril and a deformed right eye.

'The doctors told us not to get attached to him because he probably wouldn't make it through the night,' Sue Bailey, Bucky's mother, told 20/20. 'They didn't know what to say. I mean, they had never seen a baby like this before. I cried so many tears I couldn't cry another tear.'

Today, two decades later, scarred from more than 30 surgeries, Bucky is coming forward and telling 20/20 he wants to know who or what is responsible for a life that has not been easy.

'I've never, ever felt normal. You can't feel normal when you walk outside and every single person looks at you. And it's not that look of 'he's famous' or 'he's rich,' ' Bucky said. 'It's that look of 'he's different.' You can see it in their eyes.'

Chemicals Widely Detected in Blood

The Bailey family and others lay the blame at the place where Sue worked when she became pregnant with Bucky - the huge DuPont plant in Parkersburg, W.Va., where workers mix the chemicals for Teflon, the famed non-stick substance used on pots and pans.

Teflon, a product advertised as making life easy, is also used in a different form to keep stains off carpets and clothing. DuPont calls these products the housewives' best friend.

Teflon and the chemicals used in its production have grown into a $2 billion-a-year industry. This includes ammonium perfluorooctanoate, known as C-8, which has been linked to cancer, organ damage and other health effects in tests on laboratory animals.

The same chemical, C-8, was found not only in the blood of Sue Bailey when she became pregnant but, it turns out, is in the blood of virtually every American, in much smaller but still detectable levels. This discovery make this a story that reaches far beyond what happened in one small town in West Virginia.

'In retrospect, this may seem like one of the biggest, if not the biggest, mistakes the chemical industry has ever made,' said Jane Houlihan, vice president for research at the Environmental Working Group, an activist organization.

'And how could they not be in our blood?' Houlihan said. 'They're in such a huge range of consumer products. We're talking about Teflon, Stainmaster, Gore-tex, Silverstone. So if you buy clothing that's coated with Teflon or something else that protects it from dirt and stains, those chemicals can absorb directly through the skin.'

Houlihan and her colleague, Kris Thayer, senior scientist at EWG, have been poring over 20 years of confidential DuPont papers and other industry documents on Teflon.

Highest C-8 Levels Found in Children

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, some of the highest C-8 levels were found in some of the children tested. Even DuPont says that it cannot rule out that Teflon-connected products, such as Stainmaster carpet treatment, give off the chemical, although at blood levels the company says are far too small to be a problem.

'We are confident when we say that the facts, the scientific facts, demonstrate that the material is perfectly safe to use,' Uma Chowdhry, Dupont's vice president of research and development, told 20/20. Chowdhry is the DuPont executive chosen to defend Teflon, and she claims that the substance is completely safe, despite the fact that the key chemical, C-8, is in everyone's blood.

'We do not believe there are any adverse health effects,' she said. 'There are lots of chemicals that are present in our blood.'

Now the unexpected discovery of the almost universal contamination of Americans' blood from C-8, combined with worrisome laboratory studies, has led to a high priority investigation by the EPA of the chemical's risks.

'It's a potential threat,' said Houlihan. 'And the EPA's moving fast in studying this. Human blood levels are too close to the levels that harm lab animals. That's why they're moving too fast.'

The ‘Teflon Flu'

There is another more immediate health problem from Teflon, according to the Environmental Working Group. Cooking with Teflon can make a person sick with a temporary flu if a non-stick pan gets overheated.

'It feels like the flu,' said Houlihan, 'headaches, chills, backache, temperature between 100 and 104 degrees.'

DuPont says that fumes are released from the pan when it is overheated, which they say occurs at temperatures that are not reached during normal cooking.

As the Environmental Working Group showed 20/20 in a kitchen demonstration, however, a pan can reach that temperature in just a few minutes.

'At 554 degrees Fahrenheit,' said Houlihan, 'studies show ultrafine particles start coming off the pan. These are tiny little particles that can embed deeply into the lungs.'

The hotter the pan gets, the more chemicals are released. 'At 680, toxic gases can begin to come off of heated Teflon,' Houlihan said.

It turns out, DuPont has known about the 'Teflon flu' for years.

'You get some fumes, yes,' said Chowdhry, 'and you get a flu-like symptom, which is reversible.' Chowdhry said the flu is temporary and lasts at most for a couple of days. She also added that a warning about the flu, while not on the pans themselves, is on the DuPont Web site.


In the demonstration for 20/20, a piece of bacon was just getting crisp when the Teflon pan went beyond the initial warning point of 500 degrees.

'I've never cooked bacon,' said Chowdhry. 'I can't comment.'

The Environmental Working Group has tried without success to get the government to order that warning labels be put on non-stick pans.


Bird Owners Beware

One consumer warning DuPont does issue about Teflon fumes involves not humans, but birds. The fumes from overheated Teflon pans can be lethal to them.

Shelby Greenman told 20/20 that her pet cockatoo keeled over in its cage down the hall from the kitchen after all the water boiled out of a Teflon pan.

'I didn't smell anything, I didn't see any smoke,' she said. 'As soon as they inhale it, it's over. There's nothing they can do to help them.'

Bird owner groups say thousands of birds have been killed by Teflon fumes. DuPont says this occurs because birds have small and sensitive lungs.

'People should not have birds in an unventilated kitchen,' said Chowdhry.

Long-Term Effects?

The greatest concern about C-8 is that it may cause possible long-term harm to a generation that has grown up using Teflon products. Scientists say that if there are any long-term effects, the first place they'd look for them would be in the people who have had the greatest exposure to the chemicals - the people who work, live and drink the water near the Teflon plant in West Virginia.

'With neighbors like DuPont, you don't need no enemies,' said Earl Tennant, a local resident.

Now a lawsuit brought by local residents, including the family of Bucky Bailey, accuses DuPont of trying to cover up what the company knew about Teflon's risks.

'We have alleged in the lawsuit that DuPont has been well aware of these problems for many years,' said Cincinnati attorney Robert A. Bilott, who filed the case.

Perhaps most telling is an internal DuPont document, only now made public, that shows the company knew that of eight women working on the Teflon line in 1981, two had children with birth defects - not just Sue Bailey, but a second mother whom 20/20 was able to locate.

The other mother, Karen Robinson, gave birth to a son who also had a defect involving his eye. 'DuPont should be held accountable for their actions in keeping all this secret from the public,' Robinson told 20/20.

Now a grade school principal, Robinson said she only recently found out that she had an extremely high level of the Teflon chemical C-8 in her blood. She fears that her second child, a daughter, has also been affected.

'I gave birth to a daughter. Two years ago we discovered that she has a birth defect that affects her kidneys. One kidney did not grow. One kidney grew to three times its normal size,' she said.

DuPont denies that it was trying to cover up what happened to the children of Karen Robinson and Sue Bailey. It says the reason that the company did not disclose the birth defect study to the government for 22 years was because there was nothing to connect the defects with the chemical C-8. DuPont continues to insist that Teflon and the chemicals used in it are safe for its workers to handle.

Chowdhry said that in the general population incidences of birth defects are 'not uncommon.'

'We have had scientists pore over the data. In the realm of scientific fact, this is not considered a statistically significant sample,' she said. 'All the other children were normal. And since then we have not seen a preponderance of birth defects.'

Chowdhry acknowledged that DuPont has not done a subsequent study to examine birth defects among its workers.

More studies of Teflon chemicals are now happening, but Bucky and others wonder why it has taken so long. What happened to Bucky Bailey has become part of the federal government's high priority review of whether Teflon and its chemicals are safe.

'I have to think about if I want to have children or not. And I cannot put them through what I went through,' Bucky said.

Pending its review, the EPA says it is not now advising consumers to stop using Teflon products. The results of the agency's review of the safety of C-8 and of Teflon-related products that may release it are expected in coming months. [I wonder what happened to that report? -WR]
« Last Edit: December 04, 2006, 08:26:04 AM by Whiterock »
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Cooking with Cast Iron
« Reply #13 on: December 04, 2006, 07:53:19 AM »
I just bought all new stainless steels pans and I love them.  I've used some really cheap thin ones before and was not impressed, but these have the triple thick bottoms that help prevent scorching.  They are so easy to cook with and clean, it's a wonder I didn't discover these sooner.

Quote


I know this is an old thread, but I have a question for you HB!

  What brand pans did you buy?  And do you still like them?  DH has asked me about Christmas gifts, and I was considering a new pan set.  I have a mix of old teflon, new teflon, and some cast iron.  I have been to Bed, Bath & Beyond to look at cookware and it was really confusing!  All had aluminum, but some was just in the core, with stainless steel on the cooking surface.  Would this be an option?

I am also looking for ceramic/porcelin cookware, anyone know a good resource for those?  Or would you all reccommend (from your experience) that the $$ is not worth it? That cast iron and stainless steel are good enough?
I have some stainless cookware right now and it burns terribly---some I cannot even get clean any more.

Thank you for any experience that you -or anyone- can share on this!

TRAMONTINA from Walmart is my stainless stell stuff.  I got a fryer, 3qt sauce pot, 2 qt sauce and 1 qt sauce and lids for the pots (no lid for the fryer) for around $40 if I remember correctly.

I've had Visions glass cookware (fryer and sauce pans) in the past and I hated them.  Everything stuck to them and I always had trouble cleaning them; HOWEVER, that was back in the days when I tried to cook low fat.  I do not cook low fat anymore.  I throw lard, coconut oil, olive oil or butter in everything anymore.  If I had cooked like this with the glassware, I might have liked it better.  ???  Visions is very heavy and of course breakable.  Either way, I love my steel pans.  My only complaint is not being able to master an omelete or a fried egg without loads of fat.
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Cooking with Cast Iron
« Reply #14 on: December 04, 2006, 07:54:27 AM »
Can Teflon make you sick?
I was more worried about the aluminum pan UNDER the Teflon.
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Offline Whiterock

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Re: Cooking with Cast Iron
« Reply #15 on: December 04, 2006, 08:04:55 AM »
Apparently, there's something to worry about before you get down to the aluminum.

But I really couldn't believe that Dupont would tell lovey1029 that it was perfectly safe when they've known about Teflon Flu for years.

WR
« Last Edit: December 04, 2006, 08:07:54 AM by Whiterock »
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Offline blsd2bhome

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Re: Cooking with Cast Iron
« Reply #16 on: December 04, 2006, 11:20:23 AM »
I called DuPont, makers of Teflon, and they said their's is not toxic, and is completely safe to use.  It's the cheaper Teflon wannabes that cut on doing things the right way that release the toxic chemicals when cooked with.  The name "teflon" is incorrectly being used for all nonstick coating, but is really the trade name from DuPont's own. 

Of course--it is everybody else BUT them!

Chowdhry acknowledged that DuPont has not done a subsequent study to examine birth defects among its workers.
[/color]

I really don't think these guys are stupid, they know what chemicals do, and don't want to do a study because they KNOW what the conclusion will be! :-X
I wonder how many of them use these pans?

I just read an article that a new cholesterol drug being tested (on humans of course) was causing cardiovascular and other major problems, and the company was very dissappointed because they were hoping that this new drug would help their lagging sales. >:(

Their bottom line is $$.  Thankfully my bottom line is the health of me and my family! :)
OK, off my political soapbox...sorry! ::)

TRAMONTINA from Walmart is my stainless stell stuff.  I got a fryer, 3qt sauce pot, 2 qt sauce and 1 qt sauce and lids for the pots (no lid for the fryer) for around $40 if I remember correctly.

Thanks, HB, I will check those out at Wal-Mart.  Are they still working well for you?


Anyone know about porcelin or ceramic pots and pans?  I know some chefs use these, and they look nice!
Thanks!


Offline healthybratt

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Re: Cooking with Cast Iron
« Reply #17 on: December 05, 2006, 06:30:27 AM »
Thanks, HB, I will check those out at Wal-Mart.  Are they still working well for you?
You mean, since yesterday?  ::) ;D

Yes, they work great.
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Offline blsd2bhome

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Re: Cooking with Cast Iron
« Reply #18 on: December 05, 2006, 09:17:26 AM »
Thanks, HB, I will check those out at Wal-Mart.  Are they still working well for you?
You mean, since yesterday?  ::) ;D

Yes, they work great.

 ::) LOL! Ok, you got me!

I have a question about the magnet and aluminum.  A magnet will not adhere to aluminum, but it will to stainless steel?  Is this right?  I have some loaf pans that are unmarked, a magnet was not attracted to some, but was to others.  It was also not attracted to my 18/10 stainless steel cookware. :-*

OK, I realize the obvious joke of the attraction comment! ::)

Sounds like a science lesson, anyone have any insight?

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Cooking with Cast Iron
« Reply #19 on: December 05, 2006, 03:07:16 PM »
OK, I realize the obvious joke of the attraction comment! ::)
Sounds like a science lesson, anyone have any insight?
No chemistry ???  LOL oh wait, that would be physics.   ;D
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Cooking with Cast Iron
« Reply #20 on: January 19, 2007, 12:13:31 PM »
I found another article on Dupont and Teflon

DuPont's Teflon Coverup
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Offline herbalmom

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Re: Cooking with Cast Iron
« Reply #21 on: January 19, 2007, 12:44:17 PM »

I have a question about the magnet and aluminum.  A magnet will not adhere to aluminum, but it will to stainless steel?  Is this right?  I have some loaf pans that are unmarked, a magnet was not attracted to some, but was to others.  It was also not attracted to my 18/10 stainless steel cookware. :-*

OK, I realize the obvious joke of the attraction comment! ::)

Sounds like a science lesson, anyone have any insight?

Here's a post I put on another thread about this:

How do you know if they are aluminum? I mean, I know some of them say what they are on the bottom, but is there a certain look or feel that makes it obvious?

I buy most of our household items second hand & it can be hard to tell if something is aluminum or stainless steel. I don't always have a magnet & besides, if the item is thin stainless a magnet may not stick anyway. The easy way to tell them apart is to rub the item firmly with a tissue or your thumb. Aluminum will leave a black smudge, stainless will not. I don't know if this works with the anodized aluminum pans but it works with regular aluminum. Anodized aluminum has a distinctive color that is easy to recognize. HTH

BTW one common source of aluminum that I think a lot of people miss is the splatter screens that you put on top of pans to keep food from spattering all over the stove. I LOVE those things & use them all the time but even if they have a steel frame the mesh is almost always aluminum. The rub test doesn't work on this because the screen will tear up a tissue or your thumb so I do not buy them second hand ever. The only new ones that I have found that say they are all stainless- frame & mesh- on the label is Martha Steward at K Mart. If anyone else knows of somewhere else that carries them I would love to know where else to get them.

Here's the thread it's from:  :http://www.welltellme.com/discuss/index.php/topic,1020.0.html

HTH Blessings ~herbalmom

Offline Mama Sita

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Re: Cooking with Cast Iron
« Reply #22 on: May 11, 2007, 04:35:19 PM »
OK, I would officially like to get this thread back on track. (Sorry, HB  ;) )
We have recently been out garage saling (how do you spell that, anyway??) and have been on the lookout for GOOD cast iron. We especially like to look for Griswold pans. They are extremely high quality.

Anybody else know about Griswolds? What do you use?
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Offline Mama Sita

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Re: Cooking with Cast Iron
« Reply #23 on: May 11, 2007, 04:52:49 PM »
Thanks so much for the info, hb! We are looking out for cast iron skillets and griddles as it has made us nervous for a while to use our Teflon/aluminum skillets. My only concern is finding ones big enough. The one we use now is a big commercial one from Sam's Club. I cook a LOT of food and when our 7 sons are teenagers, (that's right around the corner) I can only imagine the size skillets I'll need then.  :P  I rarely have time to get to garage sales (I've told my mom to watch for some when she goes), so if you know of any resources, used or new, I'd be interested. Remember, BIG is the issue.  :)   ~B

Hey there lotsaboys,
Even though you posted this a year ago, I was wondering if you were still looking for LARGE pans. If you have a Fleet Farm by you (I know you're in Wis), check them out. Or maybe you have a Farm & Fleet. (No joke, Ladies, they really are 2 separate stores!) Anyway, they have some humongous cast iron pans there that I think you could fry an elephant in!! That would probably feed 7 teenage boys pretty well, at least for one or two meals, hey?? LOL!!  :D

Just thought I'd throw that out there for ya.
"No one stands as tall as a Christian on his knees."
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Offline SC

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Re: Cooking with Cast Iron
« Reply #24 on: May 12, 2007, 02:45:48 AM »
How to get cast iron ready for cooking (or restore an old pan):
http://www.welltellme.com/discuss/index.php/topic,2789.0.html
I'm no doctor . . .             I'm not even a Post hole Digger! ;)
See what works for me at LexingtonSlim.com

Offline lotsaboys

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Re: Cooking with Cast Iron
« Reply #25 on: May 12, 2007, 06:41:55 AM »
Thanks so much for the info, hb! We are looking out for cast iron skillets and griddles as it has made us nervous for a while to use our Teflon/aluminum skillets. My only concern is finding ones big enough. The one we use now is a big commercial one from Sam's Club. I cook a LOT of food and when our 7 sons are teenagers, (that's right around the corner) I can only imagine the size skillets I'll need then.  :P  I rarely have time to get to garage sales (I've told my mom to watch for some when she goes), so if you know of any resources, used or new, I'd be interested. Remember, BIG is the issue.  :)   ~B


Hey there lotsaboys,
Even though you posted this a year ago, I was wondering if you were still looking for LARGE pans. If you have a Fleet Farm by you (I know you're in Wis), check them out. Or maybe you have a Farm & Fleet. (No joke, Ladies, they really are 2 separate stores!) Anyway, they have some humongous cast iron pans there that I think you could fry an elephant in!! That would probably feed 7 teenage boys pretty well, at least for one or two meals, hey?? LOL!!  :D

Just thought I'd throw that out there for ya.

Hey, thanks Mama Sita. I did find some on line that we are very happy with. F&F or FF  ;) are good ideas, though. Unfortunately, we don't live very close to either.

Yea, I LOVE my cast iron pans but now my problem is needing a bigger stove.  :P Often I have 2 huge skillets on and cannot get even a small saucepan on besides. So, I'll be delighted once we get a 6 burner stovetop!

Offline Ami H.

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Re: Cooking with Cast Iron
« Reply #26 on: May 12, 2007, 09:43:02 AM »
Yea, I LOVE my cast iron pans but now my problem is needing a bigger stove.  :P Often I have 2 huge skillets on and cannot get even a small saucepan on besides. So, I'll be delighted once we get a 6 burner stovetop!
It's always something, is'nt it?  LOL  So, did anyone ever figure how to cook a simple fried egg on anything but teflon without destroying it?  I have tried both stainless steel and cast iron, but my fried eggs always end up sticking and becoming scambled.  And this is rather important for me to master this since we have something like 50 chickens!  I have tried everything for grease from the Pam like stuff, to coconut oil, to bacon fryings.  I have tried low heat and high heat..........occassionally they turn out.........but they usually end up broken.  I can do it on teflon......so what am I doing wrong otherwise? 
Also, does anyone know anything about the coated cast iron?
...I consider everything a loss compared to the surpassing greatness of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord...Phil 3:7-11

Offline Chickory Chick

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Re: Cooking with Cast Iron
« Reply #27 on: May 12, 2007, 01:25:21 PM »
Do you use a plastic flipper or a metal one?....I find that cooking in my cast iron that the metal flipper (especially the one by Pampered Chef, its actually a serving spatula, but I love it for cooking https://www.pamperedchef.com/ordering/prod_details.tpc?prodId=243&words=spatula) works so much better for flipping my eggs than plastic (I am not sure I even own a plastic one anymore).   My cast iron is well seasoned and I add a little bit of butter to fry them in.
Chickory Chick fka Kayinpa http://kayinpa.blogspot.com/

Offline firecattx

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Re: Cooking with Cast Iron
« Reply #28 on: August 15, 2007, 05:00:19 PM »
Reviving this discussion... is all cast iron cookware "safe and healthy" or are there certain brands that you need to use.  All this cookware stuff is driving me crazy! First we gave up non-stick, now we are wanting to give up stainless steel and I need to know what kind of cast iron is affordable and safe so that I don't wind up having to pitch it and buy something new 6 months from now....

Offline ladyhen

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Re: Cooking with Cast Iron
« Reply #29 on: August 16, 2007, 06:19:19 AM »
I would advise that you buy the very best cast iron cookware that you can afford.  I did and I am still using it after 25 years.  It is in excellent condition. 

I highly recommend 'Lodge' brand cast iron.  It is high quality and made in the USA.  It is carried at many kitchen supply stores, farm-type stores, and Lehman's non-electric.   
Looking for that blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of the great God and our Saviour Jesus Christ;    Titus 2:13