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Soap Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks

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mamaofangels:

--- Quote from: pljammie on February 19, 2008, 08:26:09 AM ---Have you considered going all the way and making it from scratch???  ;D  

Jammie

--- End quote ---

How Funny since reading this post I have been working on reading the rest of the thread and may try my own from scratch soon.   A friend just taught me to make soap and she showed me the melt and pour method.  So that's what I've been using!  I love it but like everything I want puley from scratch so I'm working my way there.   But sadly no goat milk avalible here.  But thanks for the prices.  That encourages me even more to do it. 
Jenny

pljammie:
<Any suggestions?  What about SLS and propylene glycol?>

I don't know about the sls and propylene glycol in melt and pour bases.  I assume that there would be a sls free soap base available...maybe google it.  or try www.teachsoap.com.  Melt and Pour is very nice to do with small children in the house since there is no danger of lye burn.  It is also fast and the possibilities are endless once you find a good soap base that you like.

Jammie

mhoward1999:
Okay, I've read through the first two pages and half of the third, and I've GOT to stop and do some housework! LOL! Here is what I've done: Well, I used Drano Kitchen Crystals for my lye. I was told by a homeschooling mom that is what her daughter's chemistry book said to use Drano since Red Devil is now unavailable. GRRR! My soap is a light greenish blue. That had me worried. Also, the lye had what looked like three components: shiney silver pieces, white pellets, and greenish crystals. I have never seen lye, so I didn't know if this was what it was supposed to look like, but I know that REAL lye is extracted from the ashes of hardwoods. I KNEW you weren't gonna get any shiney silver pieces from stove ashes! So... after the deed was done,  I decided to see what I can find. (BTW... the can said it contained lye, and that it did not contain any phosphorus. That is ALL.) So anyhow, the only way I've found ingredients is to go to the MSDS sheet. It says the drano crystals contains: aluminum flakes, sodium chloride, sodium nitrate, and sodium hydroxide. Now I know that the silver flecks were aluminum! GRRR! Most of them dissolved when combined with the water. I know why they put it in there, drano is to clean drains, and aluminum has an explosive reaction when mixed with lye!!! I am commited to an aluminum free household! The only aluminum in my house (Not counting construction materials.) is a springform pan that was a gift from my step-mom several years ago, adn I don't want to hurt her feelings. I don't know if this batch will even be safe to use in laundry soap! The sodium chloride is cool, since I was going to add some (table salt), and then forgot to put it in! LOL! Here's what wikki said about sodium nitrate: Sodium nitrate was used extensively as a fertilizer and a raw material for the manufacture of gunpowder in the late nineteenth century. Sodium nitrate has antimicrobial properties when used as a food preservative. It is found naturally in leafy green vegetables. It is mined from Chile, Peru, and Bolivia. I GUESS I'm cool with it being in there.... since they put it in food, it MUST be safe, right?  :-\  I need to think abou this one. I guess the main thing I am worried about is the aluminum. What would you do?

Mrs. B:

--- Quote from: mhoward1999 on March 21, 2008, 09:39:47 AM ---Okay, I've read through the first two pages and half of the third, and I've GOT to stop and do some housework! LOL! Here is what I've done: Well, I used Drano Kitchen Crystals for my lye. I was told by a homeschooling mom that is what her daughter's chemistry book said to use Drano since Red Devil is now unavailable. GRRR! My soap is a light greenish blue. That had me worried. Also, the lye had what looked like three components: shiney silver pieces, white pellets, and greenish crystals. I have never seen lye, so I didn't know if this was what it was supposed to look like, but I know that REAL lye is extracted from the ashes of hardwoods. I KNEW you weren't gonna get any shiney silver pieces from stove ashes! So... after the deed was done,  I decided to see what I can find. (BTW... the can said it contained lye, and that it did not contain any phosphorus. That is ALL.) So anyhow, the only way I've found ingredients is to go to the MSDS sheet. It says the drano crystals contains: aluminum flakes, sodium chloride, sodium nitrate, and sodium hydroxide. Now I know that the silver flecks were aluminum! GRRR! Most of them dissolved when combined with the water. I know why they put it in there, drano is to clean drains, and aluminum has an explosive reaction when mixed with lye!!! I am commited to an aluminum free household! The only aluminum in my house (Not counting construction materials.) is a springform pan that was a gift from my step-mom several years ago, adn I don't want to hurt her feelings. I don't know if this batch will even be safe to use in laundry soap! The sodium chloride is cool, since I was going to add some (table salt), and then forgot to put it in! LOL! Here's what wikki said about sodium nitrate: Sodium nitrate was used extensively as a fertilizer and a raw material for the manufacture of gunpowder in the late nineteenth century. Sodium nitrate has antimicrobial properties when used as a food preservative. It is found naturally in leafy green vegetables. It is mined from Chile, Peru, and Bolivia. I GUESS I'm cool with it being in there.... since they put it in food, it MUST be safe, right?  :-\  I need to think abou this one. I guess the main thing I am worried about is the aluminum. What would you do?

--- End quote ---
Hey, this probably won't be what you want to hear, but I don't think I'd use it....at least not on anything that I came into contact with. 
...and just because they can put it in food... well, that doesn't mean that it is necessarily good, either...
If you're creative, and you sound like you are, I'm sure you can find some use for it.

mhoward1999:
Ms. B, I meant the, "since they put it in food, it MUST be safe, right?" tongue-in-cheek.  I don't know if it's safe or not. I'm hoping some of you might be able to enlighten me.  I guess I could use it for car wash and wear rubber gloves! LOL! :D

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