Author Topic: Slippery Elm [Ulmus ruba]  (Read 15633 times)

YoopreMama

  • Guest
Slippery Elm [Ulmus ruba]
« on: July 22, 2008, 02:51:15 AM »
How are you all using slippery elm (bark or powder)?  It's noted for being extremely mucilaginous (the thick tea looks like loose gelatin), making it very soothing and healing to the intestinal tract.  It's considered quite safe.

I keep slippery elm on hand for sore throats, and we enjoy Slippery Elm lozenges from our co-op.  I like the taste; children like it better w/ a little maple syrup.   :)  I'm currently cooling a thick batch of it to mix goldenseal powder in for thrush on baby's bottom).  I spooned it into my children's mouth's yesterday (slippery elm alone, slightly sweetened) for their sore throats and coughs.  I like chewing the bark in the gruel.   ::)

I've been learning more about it, though, after seeing Dr. Schulze recommend it as one of the top digestive herbs in his Top 10 Herbs videos.  Then, Rosemary Gladstar (Family Herbal--very useful book) mentions some interesting uses for it:

--as a gruel (thick tea) for children..."very nourishing, soothing and healing..."
--in a diarrhea remedy tea
--for burns on the mouth of your mouth
--for heartburn
--for throat coat (candy) balls
--for cough/sore throat teas
--colic
--constipation
--as an ingredient in homemade baby powder
--for use in a poultice
--as a powder in a recipe for an inflamed or infected p*nis
--as an ingredient in a paste to lubricate an inflamed, dry va*ina, or an an effective lubricant.

http://www.herbs2000.com/herbs/herbs_slippery_elm.htm
(Lots of great stuff on this page--a picture of the bark, too)
Quote
Indigenous to North America, slippery elm trees normally breed in damp, but not drenched forests in the United States as well as in eastern parts of neighboring Canada. Migrating planters from England have been familiar with various other varieties of elm tree barks and used them to cure coughs and sore throats back home in Europe. The barks of these slippery elm trees were also used a balm to heal fractured bone or cuts. Later, they used slippery elm as a remedy for urinary tract infections. Even the indigenous inhabitants of America effectively used the barks of slippery elm for treating cold sores as well as boils. Obviously, barks of slippery elm trees were common for healing battered eyes and also to cure gun-shot injuries during the American Revolution. Basically, the inner bark of slippery elm trees, the part next to the timber, has medicinal properties and is collected during spring.

Talking about the combination of this tree, the bark of slippery elm has mucilage, while the other constituents of the timber comprise beta-sitosterol as well as campestrol. It also contains some proportion of calcium oxalate, while the interior of the bark has tannin in small quantities. As it has been mentioned earlier, the bark of slippery elm tree has been traditionally used as a balm to heal external cuts and bruises as well as joint pains resulting from gout or other problems. Currently, the bark of slippery elm is primarily used to cure soar throats as is widely used as an element tablets available to cure throat inflammation. As aching throats and cough often accompany each other, the bark of slippery elm tree is also commonly used as a medicine to heal coughs. It may be noted here that the slippery elm bark can be blended with the bark of wild cherry, leaves of sweet gum, mullein, and also sweetening to prepare cough syrups at home. Those who can avail the bark of slippery elm directly may chew it. It is reported to have a tasty flavor and provide the same relief in the above mentioned ailments.

USES
When the bark of slippery elm is consumed on a regular basis, it is not only nourishing, but has a comforting effect too. Basically, the bark of slippery elm is a tremendous food when a patient is recuperating or is in an incapacitated condition. It helps enormously if a person’s digestive system is feeble or extra responsive. Most importantly, slippery elm bark is a great and useful diet for infants. As mentioned earlier, slippery elm has a comforting effect and when applied the herb easily brings instantaneous respite to patients suffering from tartness, diarrhea and gastroenteritis. Slippery elm bark also has the properties to assist in assuaging people suffering from colic (stomach pain), burning sensation in the gut, constipation, hemorrhoids, diverticulitis as well as tetchy or irritable bowel diseases.

While slippery elm helps to ease pain and irritation in the stomach, intestines, kidneys and the urinary tract, it is also useful in treating problems related to the reproductive as well as the respiratory system. If one uses the powder of slippery elm’s inner bark, it can produce a superb comforting effect on the mucous membranes covering all over the body. In addition, the inner bark of slippery elm is of high medicinal value to treat gastritis, sourness, peptic ulcers, colitis as well as enteritis. The herb also has properties of alleviating cystitis, inflammatory bladder, nasal and bronchial catarrh as well as providing relief from an irksome cough.

When the slippery elm inner bark is combined with tepid water or milk to make a nutritious mixture, it provides great comfort in indigestion and heartburn. The mixture also provides for an effective diet for recuperating children and adults or people who are incapacitated. If the mixture of slippery elm and warm water or milk is difficult to consume, one may add powdered cinnamon or ginger, honey or any sweetener to add flavor to the potion. For healing external wounds, cuts or injuries, slippery elm bark may be blended with glycerin and applied as a cream over the affected area for quick healing. The paste is also useful for healing burns, scalds, ulcers as well as inflammatory skin problems. It may be noted that slippery elm is also useful in healing boils and swellings.

In addition, the herb has also been used as a remedy for all conditions of the chest and has a comforting effect on any problem related to the upper body – bronchitis to pleurisy as well as tuberculosis. If the powder or paste of slippery elm bark is applied externally on the epidermis, it proves to be an effective remedy to safeguard the skin and keep it soft and natural. In addition, slippery elm also has a beneficial action on boils and cracks on the skin.

Offline lotsagirls

  • Adept
  • Posts: 728
Re: Slippery Elm [Ulmus ruba]
« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2008, 04:04:47 AM »
I would not be without slippery elm.  We use it for sore throats...we mix equal parts honey and lemon juice (1 or 2 Tbsp) and add 1 tsp slippery elm...warm and sip.  (I sleep like a rock after drinking this)

I have also given it to baby for diarrhea.  I mixed a little in water and gave with a dropper.

And I used it for heartburn when pg.

I was very interested reading the other uses.  I'll have to do some more research on this.

Thanks!
Lo, children are an heritage of the Lord: and the fruit of the womb is his reward.  Psalm 127:3

Offline LoveSunflowers

  • Master
  • Posts: 778
Re: Slippery Elm [Ulmus ruba]
« Reply #2 on: July 22, 2008, 04:36:06 AM »
I have used it in a lot sorts of poultices. It keeps them together as well as, I believe, soothing the area.

I've mixed it with honey and onion juice for colds.

When my little guy was underweight, I put it in his mashed bananas to give him added nutrition. It works great in oatmeal too.

I've given it for constipation or loose stools. I don't remember what my little guy was having a problem with that I was using slippery elm but the added bonus was his poos slide right out of the diaper. I didn't even have to rinse them!

That's how we use it thus far, but I'm also experimenting on the "ill"!  ;)

Yooper, my little guy is having a yeasty diaper rash problem at the moment. Would just sprinkling slipper elm on his bottom help? I don't have goldenseal powder.

YoopreMama

  • Guest
Re: Slippery Elm [Ulmus ruba]
« Reply #3 on: July 22, 2008, 05:14:27 AM »
Thanks, NDMom (recipe and use w/ baby) and Sunshine (poultice/feeding it to your little guy--I knew you used it!)!  :)

As far as diaper rash...she makes diaper powder using it...for daily use.  It's supposed to be good for skin/cracks.  Advises against cornstarch--may encourage the growth of certain bacteria.  Uses arrowroot powder, or clay...comfrey powder or marsh mallow powder, too.  Maybe some tea tree or lavender EO in the powder?

Offline LoveSunflowers

  • Master
  • Posts: 778
Re: Slippery Elm [Ulmus ruba]
« Reply #4 on: July 22, 2008, 05:49:17 AM »
Thanks Yooper. I have all of those things. I just can't seem to get rid of it but that is a whole 'nother thread.  :-*

Offline ~esposita~

  • Master
  • Posts: 937
    • Family Fotos
Re: Slippery Elm [Ulmus ruba]
« Reply #5 on: July 22, 2008, 08:06:18 AM »
I've made Slippery Elm "pudding" for diarrhea:

Some SE powder
Bit of molasses for flavor
Water til desired consistency.

It worked after just 2 - 3 Tbsp, for my 2 1/2 yo!
My attempt at blogging:  The Carpenter's Wife

Offline GarlicMomma

  • Adept
  • Posts: 259
  • My dd took this one in late summer in TN.
Re: Slippery Elm [Ulmus ruba]
« Reply #6 on: September 08, 2008, 02:04:08 PM »
Does Slippery elm come in capsule form? If so, would a local WalMart carry it? And would the capsule form be as efficient as the powdered form?

Offline lovetoreadmom

  • Master
  • Posts: 856
  • Music in my kitchen :)
    • The Most Important Job in the World for a Married Woman
Re: Slippery Elm [Ulmus ruba]
« Reply #7 on: September 09, 2008, 05:09:52 AM »
Does Slippery elm come in capsule form? If so, would a local WalMart carry it? And would the capsule form be as efficient as the powdered form?


For what would you be using it?  For instance, I keep it for my DH's hietal hernia, and for that he must take it in tincture form b/c if taken in capsule it would pass right over the herniated area to his stomach and do him virtually no good.

Knowing what you want to use it for may help to answer your question.   :)
Wife to Ron for 8 years (on 7.13.10 :)), and Mama to DS 6yo, DD 3-1/2yo, and DS 19mo! . . . and DD#2 due in August, 2010.


Offline GarlicMomma

  • Adept
  • Posts: 259
  • My dd took this one in late summer in TN.
Re: Slippery Elm [Ulmus ruba]
« Reply #8 on: September 09, 2008, 09:14:38 AM »
To ease some tummy troubles. I thought the capsules would be easier to swallow and keep down  ;D.

Offline lovetoreadmom

  • Master
  • Posts: 856
  • Music in my kitchen :)
    • The Most Important Job in the World for a Married Woman
Re: Slippery Elm [Ulmus ruba]
« Reply #9 on: September 09, 2008, 10:50:33 AM »
To ease some tummy troubles. I thought the capsules would be easier to swallow and keep down  ;D.

This may sound like a funny question, but when you say "tummy troubles," are you referring to your actual stomach or the area that we put our hands or arms on/around when it hurts, which is actually the intestines? 
Wife to Ron for 8 years (on 7.13.10 :)), and Mama to DS 6yo, DD 3-1/2yo, and DS 19mo! . . . and DD#2 due in August, 2010.


Offline GarlicMomma

  • Adept
  • Posts: 259
  • My dd took this one in late summer in TN.
Re: Slippery Elm [Ulmus ruba]
« Reply #10 on: September 09, 2008, 01:26:31 PM »
Both

Offline lovetoreadmom

  • Master
  • Posts: 856
  • Music in my kitchen :)
    • The Most Important Job in the World for a Married Woman
Re: Slippery Elm [Ulmus ruba]
« Reply #11 on: September 09, 2008, 04:36:25 PM »
To ease some tummy troubles. I thought the capsules would be easier to swallow and keep down  ;D.

Have you tried anything else up to this point?  What about yogurt, Tummy Tune-Up (or something similar), etc?  Can you tell what is causing the problems in the first place and eliminate them? 

Slippery Elm is known to coat, so this would be soothing, but I don't think it would have the same "action" if taken in capsule form.  Does this make sense?
Wife to Ron for 8 years (on 7.13.10 :)), and Mama to DS 6yo, DD 3-1/2yo, and DS 19mo! . . . and DD#2 due in August, 2010.


Offline GarlicMomma

  • Adept
  • Posts: 259
  • My dd took this one in late summer in TN.
Re: Slippery Elm [Ulmus ruba]
« Reply #12 on: September 09, 2008, 05:22:36 PM »
I would give my tummy troubles, but it is so vague that I cannot put it into words exactly. I am already trying yogurt and was looking into slippery elm.

But I think I got one of my questions answered already. If it is in capsule form, not all of the digestive tract will be coated.

I am looking into Tummy Tune-Up also. But Tummy Tune-Up would be for reintroducing good probiotics into the digestive system, while something like slippery elm would be for a soothing coating layer and help repel the adhesion of bad bacteria.

But does anyone know if Wal-Mart carries slippery elm in capsule form?

Offline lovetoreadmom

  • Master
  • Posts: 856
  • Music in my kitchen :)
    • The Most Important Job in the World for a Married Woman
Re: Slippery Elm [Ulmus ruba]
« Reply #13 on: September 10, 2008, 02:53:04 AM »
I would give my tummy troubles, but it is so vague that I cannot put it into words exactly. I am already trying yogurt and was looking into slippery elm.

But I think I got one of my questions answered already. If it is in capsule form, not all of the digestive tract will be coated.

I am looking into Tummy Tune-Up also. But Tummy Tune-Up would be for reintroducing good probiotics into the digestive system, while something like slippery elm would be for a soothing coating layer and help repel the adhesion of bad bacteria.

But does anyone know if Wal-Mart carries slippery elm in capsule form?

I'm sorry.  I don't know if WM carries SE or not.  When I purchased it, I got it from bulkherbstore.  I looked at www.luckyvitamin.com, and the link below is what I was able to find.  I don't know if this is helpful to you or not, but their prices are so reasonable on things.  I would personally recommend the NOW Foods brand, which is $3.97 for 100 capsules, shipping is a flat $5.95, so you're paying about $10 for them.  If you order anything else from them, shipping remains the same or is FREE after $100.

http://www.luckyvitamin.com/searchResult?s=&criteria=&keyword=slippery+elm

HTH   :)
Wife to Ron for 8 years (on 7.13.10 :)), and Mama to DS 6yo, DD 3-1/2yo, and DS 19mo! . . . and DD#2 due in August, 2010.


Offline GarlicMomma

  • Adept
  • Posts: 259
  • My dd took this one in late summer in TN.
Re: Slippery Elm [Ulmus ruba]
« Reply #14 on: September 10, 2008, 05:21:22 AM »
Thanks for the link.

Offline GarlicMomma

  • Adept
  • Posts: 259
  • My dd took this one in late summer in TN.
Re: Slippery Elm [Ulmus ruba]
« Reply #15 on: September 10, 2008, 04:35:39 PM »
I went ahead and bought some slippery elm bark - powdered - organic today while I was in town. I will try it out.

Offline GarlicMomma

  • Adept
  • Posts: 259
  • My dd took this one in late summer in TN.
Re: Slippery Elm [Ulmus ruba]
« Reply #16 on: September 11, 2008, 04:19:06 AM »
While reading more on slippery elm, I came across these directions to make cough lozenges with it. It looked easy and interesting.

Here is the link:
http://eatmoreherbs.com/articles/10_essential_cough_lozenges.html

Here are the directions:

Quote
COUGH LOZENGES

If you were to accidently cook a syrup for too long at too high a heat and cool your "mistake," you would probably end up with a hard herbal candy (lozenge) which would be impossible to remove from the pot!

If you want to make throat (or cough) lozenges on purpose, first cook the honey or molasses to the 'hard-crack" stage on a candy thermometer. Then add your dry herbs for about 10 minutes of simmering or steeping. It won't matter if the honey cools off somewhat when the herbs are added if it was already at the "hard-crack" stage of heat. The reason you add the herbs second is that it takes honey or molasses perhaps half an hour or more to get hot enough, and this might overcook the herbs.

Spread this hot mixture (or place in small blobs) onto a buttered cookie sheet to cool. When the mixture is partially cool it will be easy to score it with lines to facilitate breaking it up later. These tasty, broken bits are your new cough drops!

How to make Slippery Elm cough syrups

From 10 Essential Herbs   Copyright 1992 Lalitha Thomas, Published by Hohm Press, used by permission.

Offline happyhomemaker

  • happyhomemaker
  • Adept
  • Posts: 349
Re: Slippery Elm [Ulmus ruba]
« Reply #17 on: September 11, 2008, 03:35:05 PM »
I've never used this when the kids have "stomach troubles", but it works great for a cold/cough/fever etc.

15 capsuls Slippery Elm (empty into med-small glass)
2 gell-caps odorless garlic
25 (it's been a long time, and I'm not sure about the # of drops)
Honey to taste and make into a thinck syrup.

Stir all of the above together. Give one spoodfull to child as needed (less for smaller kids, more for bigger ones.)

My kids love it, and it really makes them better fast!
Happyhomemaker :)

Offline lovetoreadmom

  • Master
  • Posts: 856
  • Music in my kitchen :)
    • The Most Important Job in the World for a Married Woman
Re: Slippery Elm [Ulmus ruba]
« Reply #18 on: September 11, 2008, 05:00:41 PM »
I've never used this when the kids have "stomach troubles", but it works great for a cold/cough/fever etc.

15 capsuls Slippery Elm (empty into med-small glass)
2 gell-caps odorless garlic
25 (it's been a long time, and I'm not sure about the # of drops)
Honey to taste and make into a thinck syrup.

Stir all of the above together. Give one spoodfull to child as needed (less for smaller kids, more for bigger ones.)

My kids love it, and it really makes them better fast!

Just to clarify, what ingredient is the 25 drops?  Also, I have "loose" Slippery elm, so do you know how much of it is actually in the glass (# of tspoons?)

Thanks!
Wife to Ron for 8 years (on 7.13.10 :)), and Mama to DS 6yo, DD 3-1/2yo, and DS 19mo! . . . and DD#2 due in August, 2010.


Offline hi_itsgwen

  • Master
  • Posts: 1428
    • Gwen's Nest
Re: Slippery Elm [Ulmus ruba]
« Reply #19 on: October 02, 2008, 09:55:17 AM »
Posting this for reference from the diagnose me thread.  It's from a link that HB posted in the cough and cold remedy thread, from Susan Weed's site:
http://www.susunweed.com/herbal_ezine/October06/wisewoman.htm

MAKE THROAT-SOOTHING LOZENGES

Put an ounce of marshmallow root powder or slippery elm bark powder in a bowl.
Slowly add honey, stirring constantly, until you have a thick paste
Roll your slippery elm paste into small balls
Roll the balls in more slippery elm powder

Store in a tightly-closed tin. These will keep for up to ten years.


I plan on trying this, as I like the idea of using my honey and slippery elm 'full strength'.  Most of the lozenge recipes that I had seen required long peroids of high heat boiling, which I would think removes a lot of the effectiveness of your ingredients.
Come see me at www.gwens-nest.com
♥ Check out our family favorite recipes, funny kid stories, natural remedies and other creative and fun stuff.

Offline lotsagirls

  • Adept
  • Posts: 728
Re: Slippery Elm [Ulmus ruba]
« Reply #20 on: October 02, 2008, 10:15:31 AM »
Posting this for reference from the diagnose me thread.  It's from a link that HB posted in the cough and cold remedy thread, from Susan Weed's site:
http://www.susunweed.com/herbal_ezine/October06/wisewoman.htm

MAKE THROAT-SOOTHING LOZENGES

Put an ounce of marshmallow root powder or slippery elm bark powder in a bowl.
Slowly add honey, stirring constantly, until you have a thick paste
Roll your slippery elm paste into small balls
Roll the balls in more slippery elm powder

Store in a tightly-closed tin. These will keep for up to ten years.


I plan on trying this, as I like the idea of using my honey and slippery elm 'full strength'.  Most of the lozenge recipes that I had seen required long peroids of high heat boiling, which I would think removes a lot of the effectiveness of your ingredients.


Thank you for sharing this.  I plan on making these as well.

I've had excellent results with 1 Tbsp honey, 1 Tbps lemon juice, 1 tsp slippery elm.  Warm and sip.  Works great for coughs.  I sip it just before bed.  It really seems to help me sleep too.
Lo, children are an heritage of the Lord: and the fruit of the womb is his reward.  Psalm 127:3

Offline SarahK

  • Master
  • Posts: 1820
Re: Slippery Elm [Ulmus ruba]
« Reply #21 on: January 27, 2009, 02:48:07 PM »
Posting this for reference from the diagnose me thread.  It's from a link that HB posted in the cough and cold remedy thread, from Susan Weed's site:
http://www.susunweed.com/herbal_ezine/October06/wisewoman.htm

MAKE THROAT-SOOTHING LOZENGES

Put an ounce of marshmallow root powder or slippery elm bark powder in a bowl.
Slowly add honey, stirring constantly, until you have a thick paste
Roll your slippery elm paste into small balls
Roll the balls in more slippery elm powder

Store in a tightly-closed tin. These will keep for up to ten years.


I plan on trying this, as I like the idea of using my honey and slippery elm 'full strength'.  Most of the lozenge recipes that I had seen required long peroids of high heat boiling, which I would think removes a lot of the effectiveness of your ingredients.


I tried this one and I wouldn't call it a 'lozenge'.  It's more of a 'patty'.  They aren't hard of course and air drying them doesn't seem to change them.  We used a few and the littlest kids couldn't get them figured out and just ate them.  The bigger ones that know how to use cough drops found them to quickly be mush in the cheek and then a goo all over the mouth.  Not anything I would give a child on the way to bed.

So, now that I have these little patties, I'm thinking about boiling them that way.  I won't be able to get them to hard crack stage w/o cooking the elm to nothing.  I'm just gonna boil a bit and give it a whirl.  If I can cook some of the water out and at least make a 'gum' instead of a 'paste' it will be more usable by my crew.

Next time I intend to make a cooked variety.

Sarah K
I have learned enough to know I still have lots to learn.  Teach me.
My WTM Intro updated 9/2010

Offline SarahK

  • Master
  • Posts: 1820
Re: Slippery Elm [Ulmus ruba]
« Reply #22 on: January 28, 2009, 02:43:41 AM »
I put them in a little sauce pan with ~ 1Tb of honey and swirled them around on lo heat til the melted.  Then I had a wad of paste that I kept flipping over & over to keep from burning.  After about 10 min I put the blob on wax paper, folded the paper over to flatten it to about 1/2 - 3/4 in thick and put it in the freezer.

The paper stuck & I can't get it off.  But they are significantly harder.  The older kids said they last much longer than the first try, but still get warm and gummy.  They did say they work much better than my first try.  I'm not coughing and don't have time to be sick, so I'll stick them away for later and see what I think.
I have learned enough to know I still have lots to learn.  Teach me.
My WTM Intro updated 9/2010

Offline miamama

  • Adept
  • Posts: 77
    • Picking Up Socks for Jesus
Re: Slippery Elm [Ulmus ruba]
« Reply #23 on: January 28, 2009, 09:11:47 AM »
I also made the lozenge recipe.  It was definitely softer/gooeyer than I had expected it would be.  I kept adding slippery elm powder to my hands as I formed the little lozenge balls.  They were still soft, but not sticky and gooey when I put them in the tin, so I sprinkled a little extra slippery elm into the tin with them, and gently swirled them around in it.  I pretty much forgot about them for about 2 months, and when I went back, they had hardened significantly  (not like hard candy, but they are not soft anymore either).
Visit my blog   Picking Up Socks for Jesus
http://www.pickingupsocksforjesus.blogspot.com

Offline hi_itsgwen

  • Master
  • Posts: 1428
    • Gwen's Nest
Re: Slippery Elm [Ulmus ruba]
« Reply #24 on: January 29, 2009, 06:57:30 PM »
I did make the losenges, and found them to be very, very nasty.  Just a personal taste and texture issue.  Ick.

I'd much rather do the cocoa powder and honey thing that was suggested elsewhere to stop coughs.

Here is an idea though: get your honey/sugar base to the hard crack stage, and then add the slippery elm mix and whisk in quickly as it cools.  That might give you more life to the latter ingredients, as they've not been boiled as long as the sugar.

Come see me at www.gwens-nest.com
♥ Check out our family favorite recipes, funny kid stories, natural remedies and other creative and fun stuff.

Offline SarahK

  • Master
  • Posts: 1820
Re: Slippery Elm [Ulmus ruba]
« Reply #25 on: January 30, 2009, 04:56:43 AM »
Here's what I did last night that seems to have worked so far:

Grease a cookie sheet/flat pan something that can take the super hot temps w/o cracking.  Set it nearby.  Get a flat bowl with ice water in it.  Drinking glass won't work cuz you have to be able to reach the bottom with your fingers.

scant 1 cup honey in a pot bigger than you think you might need.

Boil over low/medium heat until little drops/threads dribbled into ice water turn hard and will snap in pieces.  Took about 13-15 min for me but your honey may be different because of water content.  It turned darker brown along the line and really wants to burn.  Remove from heat and stir in:

3-4 heaping TB powdered slippery elm bark
1/4 c cherry bark tonic (1/2 vodka tincture & 1/2 honey)
10-15 drops peppermint essential oil

This will spit and sputter all over so move the kids back cuz someone is gonna get tiny sugar burns.  And that peppermint will make your eyes burn a bit, too.  Pour onto cookie sheet in a puddle.  As is cools, fold cooled edges toward the center so the whole wad ends up a bit thicker than it started when you poured it.  When it looks about as thick as you want, get it cooled.  Slow should be fine but I put mine outside in the zero degree air temp.

Once cooled, smack apart with a heavy knife, cutting board and many grand gestures.  This made an easy cup full of hard-candy style drops.  I'm storing air tight so they don't get sticky.

Don't know if they work any better than just plain old lemon drops or other hard candy would.

Don't know why you wouldn't just use a sugar syrup since I cooked the crazy out of the honey and there is nothing 'raw' about it anymore.

You could put whatever you want in them.  I chose these 3 because they appeared to have qualities I want and I had them on hand.  Didn't have horehound, which would be a classic choice.

It is cheaper and more convenient to me cuz I have the ingredients on hand, paid for already.

Sarah K 
I have learned enough to know I still have lots to learn.  Teach me.
My WTM Intro updated 9/2010