Author Topic: SEEDS: Organic? Heirloom? Treated?  (Read 28010 times)

Offline hi_itsgwen

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Re: SEEDS: Organic? Heirloom? Treated?
« Reply #30 on: May 17, 2009, 02:25:30 PM »
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I am just sooo shocked at this!  Just something else to get people to have to spend more and more money every year to buy seeds.  And to not be self sufficient!  Ok, I guess I'm done venting.  ::)

The way our country has used hybridization of plants is debatably not a great choice IMO.  But God is the one who invented plant reproduction to function this way.  Did you know that peppermint cannot be grown from seed, as the resulting mint will not necessarily be the true 'peppermint' flavor?  So you must grow 'real' peppermint from rooted cuttings.

It is your choice to purchase heirloom (stable) varieties of seed and educate yourself as to how to grow them to keep them from becoming cross-pollinated by the bees...which would result in naturally  'hybrid' seeds for next year.

Granted, it's very resourceful to save seeds.  But I find it distateful to blame 'them' for something that is simply a lack of self-education on your part.  If you're going to be self-sufficient, then you've got to start doing your homework.  ;)  Just sayin'.
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Offline wlwest

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Re: SEEDS: Organic? Heirloom? Treated?
« Reply #31 on: May 17, 2009, 03:15:06 PM »
Sorry, I guess it came across that I was more upset than I really am. ;D  But, I'm still a little confused, so what we planted, for example, the spaghetti squash may turn out to be say, some other squash?  Will it still be ok to eat?  I always thought you plant a seed, the bees pollinate it and then it grows??  I knew there could be cross pollination, and things like that, which is understandable.  Oh, what about those bean plants as kids we would plant in a paper towel at school, ya know those dried kidney beans?  Do they grow into kidney beans?

 Just trying to figure this whole thing out.  :P

wendy


Offline hi_itsgwen

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Re: SEEDS: Organic? Heirloom? Treated?
« Reply #32 on: May 17, 2009, 04:43:16 PM »
I think spaghetti squash is a true form of squash, not a hybrid variety. (based on just a cursory glance at some search results).  However, you should not plant spaghetti squash near the zuccini, as those two can cross pollinate and make your squash a wierd hybrid (more here) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spaghetti_squash

Yes, kidney beans grow into kidney beans.  Unless you plant them next to some other variety that they are able to cross pollinate with, in which case you will get blidney beans, or crowdney beans or other sorts of odd results.  The thing to remember is that the flower must get pollinated to set fruit.  The 'fruit' of a particular plant (bean, corn, whatever) is going to carry traits from both the parent plant and the the pollenating plant as well.  It's all fine and dandy if the parent and pollinating plant are from the same variety.  So your spaghetti squash may grow into gorgeous spaghetti squash vines, loaded with spaghetti squash flowers.  But if a bumble bee wanders too far and gets your zucces' pollen into your spaghetti squash flowers...then you've got issues.   

Not all grocery store veggies and fruit are hybrid varieties.  You'll have to look up each one and see.  A lot of the grocery store varieties are bred for traits deirable to the food production industry (long shelf life, thicker rinds that hold up well in shipping, etc.)

Look back up in this thread at the links for the Southern Exposure Seed Exchange.  Their articles are very helpful...especially the info on seed saving.  The sensativity of a plant to cross pollinization varies from one variety to the next, so it's best to research the exact things that you've got.  Farming is an art form. :) (well...doing it right is).
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Offline wlwest

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Re: SEEDS: Organic? Heirloom? Treated?
« Reply #33 on: May 17, 2009, 05:31:15 PM »
Thanks alot for the info.  I was actually on that Southern Exposure website just a little bit ago. 

I am amazed at how this all works. :o    So this year should really be interesting, I planted cucumbers, acorn squash, spaghetti squash, and zucchini, pumpkins, and watermelons all in a big block type area!  Who knows what I will get.  lol  But most of the stuff is from seeds from the store, which are hybrids, so I'm guessing they might be ok planted close to each other?

Oh well, live and learn I guess! ::)

Offline hi_itsgwen

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Re: SEEDS: Organic? Heirloom? Treated?
« Reply #34 on: May 19, 2009, 08:03:40 AM »
 So this year should really be interesting, I planted cucumbers, acorn squash, spaghetti squash, and zucchini, pumpkins, and watermelons all in a big block type area!  Who knows what I will get.  lol 
Not everything sold at the grocery store is a hybrid...I would look up each kind of seed in a seed catalog or online to check.

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But most of the stuff is from seeds from the store, which are hybrids, so I'm guessing they might be ok planted close to each other?
Seeds taken from a hybrid plant will give you a very random mix of traits in the second generation, even if they are planted alone, with no chance of cross-pollination.  This is because the plants will pull traits randomly from the two original parent plants and mix them. 

Plants (hybrid or not) will cross pollinate with other plants from the same family...spaghetti squash and zuccini are both from the squash family, and are known to cross pollinate.  Hopefully, your crops will be yummy anyway, but you'll want to do more research next year.  Southern Exp. lists how far apart to plant species to control cross-pollination (or unintentionally making hybrid mixes :) )

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Offline babymakers

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Re: SEEDS: Organic? Heirloom? Treated?
« Reply #35 on: February 14, 2010, 12:18:36 PM »
An old friend of mine had an aunt who just threw all her seeds into one plot and left them there till the end of the season. She always got a harvest at the end of the year. I am not brave enough to try it.
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Offline doddsgirl

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Re: SEEDS: Organic? Heirloom? Treated?
« Reply #36 on: March 27, 2010, 11:44:14 AM »
An old friend of mine had an aunt who just threw all her seeds into one plot and left them there till the end of the season. She always got a harvest at the end of the year. I am not brave enough to try it.

well, that would sure make it easier!