Author Topic: Postpartum Recovery  (Read 17663 times)

Offline Julia

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Postpartum Recovery
« on: January 02, 2009, 01:51:14 PM »
I didn't see a thread specifically on this subject and thought it might be good to have one.

What have you all found to be important in recovering physically from pregnancy? I was determined not to hit the slump I usually hit after pregnancy in terms of low energy, but I feel it coming. I felt pretty good once the afterpains were gone, for about a week, but then overdid it and came down with a fever for a day and have felt lethargic, weak, hungry, and sore since then (that's just been about 5 days).

I was taking so many vitamins and supplements and drinking so much pregnancy tea and I haven't gotten back into that routine since the baby's been born - it was kind of demanding and I figured I was done being pregnant and don't need it. I'm realizing I do need all those vitamins and fatty acids still, I guess I should know that!

And what have you all found to eat while nursing full time that actually fills you up? I'm resorting to the Christmas cookies far too often just because I'm hungry and have snacked on about everything else. I know I always gain weight instead of losing at this time just because I have such a huge appetite. I've spent about 5 years nursing so far, so you'd think I'd know, but I think it's these early months where my appetite is just out of control! I'm trying to think of the most nutrient-dense, filling foods I can so I will be satisfied and not spend all day snacking in the kitchen.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2009, 05:25:25 AM by JuliaofSunnyside »

Offline MrsBaumgart

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Re: Postpartum Recovery
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2009, 07:38:58 AM »
The only thing that satisfies me is LOTS of protein. Otherwise, I find I just want to graze on sweets and other things that end up making me feel bad. If I have protein ready to go before I get too hungry, I'm not tempted by things I shouldn't eat. Keeping the engine fueled before you run out of steam is key, I think.
Wife to a wonderful man, blessed mom of Seth-14, Micah-12, Titus-10, Eliana-8, Josiah-6, Hosannah-3, and Aria Joy born 2/9/09 on her due date!

Offline amandas5boys

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Re: Postpartum Recovery
« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2009, 08:26:00 PM »
Okay please tell me if I am crazy or not. We have young ladies having babies all around and they are not giving themselves time to recover at all.  One had a baby yesterday and is singing at a wedding today. She was told by the midwife that that would be fine. I am thinking that this is very weird. I know I like to stay at home and get to know my babies and rest after delivery. But other than that I am thinking that it is dangerous for mother to be out and about as well as not safe for baby's health either. I have heard of and know women that have hemorrhaged or got blood clots after baby and almost died.

So I want to know from you more experienced women so that I can give sound advice to these younger ladies. Is it safe to be out and about so soon after delivery?

Offline cjanderin

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Re: Postpartum Recovery
« Reply #3 on: August 28, 2009, 09:20:58 PM »
I don't think there is a problem with the mother going to sing at a wedding the next day.  She will have to be careful - ie. not rushing around etc before or after and really taking it easy.  But for something like a wedding - if she thinks she can do it then that's great.  It's not so much that it is dangerous for her rather it's just unusual - many mothers are still in bed wanting to rest.    But everyone is different too.  I feel great once I've had my babies.  In fact, after #4 I was certain I could have run up and down the hall had I so wished!  I didn't feel sore at all except when feeding (with afterpains).  What a difference to my first baby where I was shuffling along with the pain down there for the first two days.
I would feel more concerned with having a newborn out and about at a wedding in it's first day of life.  But you didn't say that she had the baby with her? 
Time to recover is necessary if you feel you have something that needs recovering from ... ie. traumatic birth, lack of sleep, stitches etc.
Time to rest and build up a milk supply is a different matter.  Resting, eating and drinking well is very important.  And for some people - time away from people is important while for other personalities it's more important to be with people.
Erin :)  Wifey to Chris and mummy to Marcail (10), Alex (8), Joel (6), Timothy (4), Zipporah (3) and Jeremiah (8months).

Offline floydian

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Re: Postpartum Recovery
« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2009, 04:15:23 AM »
The day I had my 4th, I was out in the yard talking with the neighbors.  I felt amazing.  Not quite the same for #5.  And #6 was somewhere in the middle.

So,  if someone had asked me to sing the day after I gave birth to #4, I'd have done it, but after #5, it would have been tough, but I'd have done it because I loved my friend.

Yes, it is possible to do too much, and any lady just having had a baby does need to be careful, the capilaries in the womb can pop back open with too much stress.  This will vary from woman to woman.
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Offline mommyjen

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Re: Postpartum Recovery
« Reply #5 on: August 29, 2009, 07:09:55 AM »
"Clinical and research evidence would indicate that childbirth is “wearing” on a woman’s body, often resulting in prolapsed uteri, cystioceles, rectoceles, hemorrhoids, varicose veins, etc. Now that part that gets interesting is in whether this occurs in all pregnant women who have several (or more) pregnancies or whether the weakened pelvic floor muscles and weakened venous walls are a pr0duct of “childbirth lifestyle“.

After interviewing a number of midwives caring for women, many of whom are grand multips (I just love that we‘re considered “Grand“ after giving birth 5 or more times), the recurring voiced concern is “These mother don‘t realize they‘re going to pay later for what they‘re doing to themselves today.”…   
   
She (a post-partum mama) has forced discipline to sit down and rest. During the first two weeks, she’s lying down or reclining al the time she is not going to the bathroom. In fact, she doesn’t lift anything heavier than her baby (and, if baby is a big 10 pound chunk of love, she’s better off lying with her in bed or on the sofa during this time” or drive anywhere or un the vacuum, sweep, mop, stand to do dishes, stand to cook, wag the laundry around, scrub the tub…do I need to go on?
   
The first six weeks following birth is a time of healing. A gift, mamas, God gives us to get to know our baby in a way that is achingly dear…This allows her pelvic floor to heal from the tissue trauma of birth (yes, birth is good, but we have to be honest and say it is traumatic to our body tissue). The uterus is still the size of a cantaloupe at this point. That’s a heavy weight to be pressing down on those already stretched and traumatized pelvic floor muscles. When she does begin to add back in home activities, she does so slowly.”  Shonda Parker, Mommy Diagnostics

In many, many other cultures (and in our country's recent past), moms are required to rest after birth.  With my last baby, I knew all this.  I had 6 weeks of meals in the freezer, paper plates, forks, etc, and help from a girl in our church.  I STILL over did it just cause I was feeling SO great!  I went for a walk and had baby in the ergo, and felt something happen in my rectum while walking.  That something took months to feel better and I know it was the weaking of all that structure down there.  Dumb, dumb, dumb. 
« Last Edit: August 29, 2009, 07:29:59 AM by mommyjen »
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Offline Jemima

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Re: Postpartum Recovery
« Reply #6 on: August 29, 2009, 09:30:43 AM »
I can definitely see the value in resting extensively while healing after birth.

I had a hard time balancing rest and being "up and around" after #2, and it was frustrating. I had was pretty much just resting for about a week, then felt like I should try to start doing a few more things, and got knocked back in bed with a breast infection. (My mom was with me for 2 weeks, and doing everything at home, but I felt like I wanted to be doing most of my normal stuff by the time she left - not smart).
I had 2 breast infections in 2 weeks, and felt like I just couldn't get back on my feet no matter how hard I tried to rest up. ::) I know, it sounds dumb but that's how I felt.

I guess my problem has been that I don't want to be thought of as a lazy, taking-advantange mom, by saying I need to rest longer. Because that means someone else is doing my work.
Any thoughts on how to make sure you get the rest you need in a way that doesn't seem like you're lazy? I guess I just think that not everyone might realize how important it is for healing.

Offline mommyjen

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Re: Postpartum Recovery
« Reply #7 on: August 29, 2009, 11:47:01 AM »
I can definitely see the value in resting extensively while healing after birth.

I had a hard time balancing rest and being "up and around" after #2, and it was frustrating. I had was pretty much just resting for about a week, then felt like I should try to start doing a few more things, and got knocked back in bed with a breast infection. (My mom was with me for 2 weeks, and doing everything at home, but I felt like I wanted to be doing most of my normal stuff by the time she left - not smart).
I had 2 breast infections in 2 weeks, and felt like I just couldn't get back on my feet no matter how hard I tried to rest up. ::) I know, it sounds dumb but that's how I felt.

I guess my problem has been that I don't want to be thought of as a lazy, taking-advantange mom, by saying I need to rest longer. Because that means someone else is doing my work.
Any thoughts on how to make sure you get the rest you need in a way that doesn't seem like you're lazy? I guess I just think that not everyone might realize how important it is for healing.

Jemima, I totally struggled with this too.  In fact, I have some moms in my church who think "I" should just get back in the saddle.  These also happen to be the moms that have a break down with each baby pp, and complain about how hard it is to have a newborn, and who are really ready to be DONE with the baby years.  I really don't look up to or admire these moms.  I've learned to just tune them out and just please my hubby and do what I believe is best for my household.  My husband does NOT want a wife whose vagina is hanging out of her because she didn't manage her childbearing years wisely.  We also ENJOY having a newborn!!  Sure it's a little hectic, but I'm not burnt out.  This is a special phase of my life!  Wow, what a concept.  The Lord gently lead those that are with young.  Anyways, I worked hard before birth, so that I could rest after.  I formulated an after birth plan, cooked up and shopped up a storm, got help, instructed help, figured out and prepared things to do with the kids, borrowed/bought movies etc., etc.  I also took that after birth down time to write baby's birth story for baby and send pics and birth announcements.  These are special things, that especially my children and unbelieving family can tangibly see how excited about and special each baby is that the Lord gives us.  Just some thoughts and what works for us!!   

Oh, Here's our Family's After Birth Plan:

~Taking Care of Mom and Baby Postpartum~

First Week
     *Mom just takes care of baby.
     *Daddy's home!!!  No housework, No cooking, and No dishes, but a much deserved special
           time with boys, baby, and mommy!
     *Emma Time (10 am to 2 pm)  (Hubby really appreciates this. Time for rest and with me, and
       didn't get that burned out from being Mr. Mom ALL day long.)
            ~throw in a load of laundry
           ~housework
           ~put laundry in dryer
          ~11:30 prepare lunch
          ~clear table and throw away dishes while boys read books on the couch.
          ~Read boys a story and put them down for their nap
           ~fold laundry.
     *Meals
          B-  Cold cereal, Instant Oatmeal, Freezer Breakfasts.
          L-  Leftovers or Sandwiches
          D-  Freezer Meals
     *Paper plates, bowls, cups, plastic utensils, and napkins.
     *Mom's water pitcher kept full by John.
     *Sitz Baths:  8" very warm water and 5-7 drops lavender oil for 20 minutes for 7-10 days.
     *Mommy is resting if door is shut.  It will be open for snuggling otherwise!

Second Week
     *No housework
     *No standing to cook.  Sit at table to prepare meals.
            B-  Cold cereal, Instant Oatmeal, Freezer Breakfasts.
            L-  Leftovers or Sandwiches
            D-  Freezer Meals
     *No standing to do dishes.
            ~paper plates, cups, bowls, napkins, and plastic utensils.
     *Just take care of baby and boys (read books, outside, blanket time and toys, videos, snuggle
             in bed, pool and popsicles after naps, school, art and crafts, playdough, games).
     *Emma Time (10 am to 2 pm)
            ~throw in a load of laundry
           ~housework
           ~put laundry in dryer
          ~11:30 prepare lunch
          ~clear table and throw away dishes while boys read books on the couch.
          ~Read boys a story and put them down for their nap
           ~fold laundry.
       *Daddy takes over care of boys when he gets home.
       *Daddy and boys do dinner meal cleanup.  Thank you and this should be easy!

Third-Sixth Week
       *Ease back into our routine.
       *Emma Time!  (9-11 am, once a week)
               ~first hour:  mop, clean bathroom, and vacuum
               ~second hour: miscellaneous tasks or play with boys!
      *Freezer or simple meals  (sit down while prepping, etc. as much as possible)
      *Paper plates, cups, bowls, napkins and plastic utensils until sick of them.
      *Family cleanup after dinner.

**********No carrying baby in carrier till at least 6 weeks pp*********************************

   
« Last Edit: August 29, 2009, 08:33:50 PM by mommyjen »
Billy's wife and mom to John, Charles, Gilbert, and Lewis.


Offline hi_itsgwen

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Re: Postpartum Recovery
« Reply #8 on: August 29, 2009, 02:28:54 PM »
My dear sis sent this to me.  It is from the blog of Gloria LeMay, a very active midwife who trains other midwives and doulas, and is a contributing editor for Midwifery Today magazine. 

http://www.glorialemay.com/blog/?p=34

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Offline mommyjen

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Re: Postpartum Recovery
« Reply #9 on: December 09, 2009, 06:13:18 PM »
I just wanted to add to this important thread that preparing freezer meals for my last babe's birth was a cinch. I asked 3 young adults from my church to come and help me throw together 45 meals and it took us about 2 hours to do it.  I kid you not, we were all shocked!   :o They key was not cooking the dishes beforehand (except for the hamburger) and keeping the dishes mostly one meat source. I know this is not everyone's thing (lack of protein variety) but we all loved the meals after baby.  Most of the recipes were from a once a month cooking book or something that I got from the library and they were sooo yummy. The chili was awesome! We made:

Chili (which I just thawed and put in a crock pot to cook)
enchiladas
lasagna
meatloaf (frozen raw in zip lock bags)
sweet and sour meatballs (wow, these were good too with brown rice. these were frozen raw and sauce, vegetables and meatballs were then cooked in the crockpot when thawed.)
mac and cheese
taco pie (my family LOVED this! We had never tried this before making it...so easy!)
quiche (store bought crusts and you just mix the vegies, cheese, meat, eggs and put them in a ziplock bag then freeze, thaw, and pour into crust and cook)
I stocked up on fryer chickens and beef roasts and froze them to throw in the crock pot in the am.
I also had hamburger frozen in 2 lb portions for spaghetti, burritos, whatever.


There may have been more but this was 2 years ago now.  :P  If our waffle maker hadn't conked out on us we would've done a ton of waffles and for one baby I did mass amounts of breakfast burritos. Hubby and I spent a full Saturday doing this!  He really like having those after baby since he got something besides cereal or oatmeal.  :P  I've also grilled several bags of costco chicken breasts and froze them before a baby so we could just thaw them for a ton of different things. We try to eat organic now so this isn't as economical as organic hamburger or fryers. Anyways, just some ideas..would love to hear yours. ~Jen
« Last Edit: December 10, 2009, 08:09:37 AM by mommyjen »
Billy's wife and mom to John, Charles, Gilbert, and Lewis.


Offline GibsonTown

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Re: Postpartum Recovery
« Reply #10 on: December 26, 2009, 05:27:15 AM »
What a wonderful thread.  MommyJen, I especially like your organized plan.  So many modern moms (and more so, Dads) would say this is excessive pampering!  A shame.  And you are glowing in your photo!  : )

Doesn't nature (nursing every 2-4 hours day/night) seem to encourage new mommies to snuggle and rest several weeks?

A friend with a prolapsed uterus (after her 4th) and I were discussing this.

I found, personally, that rest and PRIVACY the first month or so, were critical for me.  My midwife encouraged the privacy, especially, to avoid post partum depression.

While I did find REST critical (and not standing long periods, especially the first couple weeks), I did exercise.  : )  With my midwife's blessing.  Being accustomed to daily exercise, my body would not have 'handled' a cold turkey approach...and my research seemed to support that it would benefit my recovery.

With several babies, I was back to swimming & bike riding on day 2 (believe it or not) for short periods - or at least walks.  Other than that, I was RESTING and doing herbal baths, eating/drinking intentionally, and not working.  We scraped together $100 to offer a dear friend, for as much house help as she would give the first week of our #3 child - dh had a new job and could only be home her birth day (good thing as he ended up being the emergency midwife on that one!)  My friend came 3x for a couple hours in the a.m., caught up housework, fed and even homeschooled the kids, and put them down for naps.  That got us through that first week just fine.  The rest of the time they were awake and dh was working was snuggle on the floor, couch and TV and book time with mom & baby.  They loved it.  : )

The first week, especially, I did not do any more stair climbing or standing than necessary (but I did indulge in gentle exercise for a half hour as my body craved it.)  I felt *fantastic*.  My midwife, while she okayed the exercise as I checked with her, definitely encouraged 2 full weeks of privacy and sitting/laying/resting other than needing bathroom time and transporting myself from one room to another.  Our church provided 3 meals a week, generous enough that leftovers covered another 2 or 3 dinners - for the first month or so.

After 6 pregnancies, and at age 48, I am 100% pleased with the results (youngest is now 6)....and dh is also.  : )

Offline mommyjen

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Re: Postpartum Recovery
« Reply #11 on: February 20, 2010, 09:51:49 AM »
Quote
Having a baby can and should be one of the most joyful experiences of a woman's life. While there are hundreds of books that provide information on how to ensure the development of a healthy baby, few of them dedicate more than a few pages to the nourishment of the mother herself during this physically and emotionally demanding time. It is rarely discussed, but women commonly experience a wide variety of ailments during the postpartum period, from depression to anxiety, backache, and loss of libido.

A Natural Guide to Pregnancy and Postpartum Health is the first book by physicians that is devoted entirely to telling women how they can prevent postpartum problems and attain optimum health after the delivery of their babies. Elements of the program, which is meant to be adopted during-or, if possible, before-pregnancy, include diet, nutritional supplementation, exercise, hormone-balancing, the use of medicinal herbs, and conventional medications. Developed by the authors in clinical practice, this program has a proven track record in helping women to avoid and overcome postpartum difficulties.

Dean Raffelock is a doctor of chiropractic, a diplomate in acupuncture and applied kinesiology, and a certified clinical nutritionist. He has a special interest in helping mothers to recover their lost nutritional reserves after giving birth, thus preventing and resolving many postpartum disorders.

Robert Rountree, M.D., is a board-certified practitioner of family medicine who has done extensive postgraduate work in nutritional and herbal pharmacology. His practice incorporates traditional family medicine, nutrition, herbology, and mind-body therapy. Dr. Rountree is also a certified master practitioner of neurolinguistic programming.

A Natural Guide to Pregnancy and Postpartum Health = good book! Not a whole lot out there on this topic!  The baby just uses up so much nutritionally like omega 3 in the last trimester that unless mom is well nourished this leaves her deficient and sets her up for minor and major health concerns. Then, mom conceives again in a deficient state and only becomes further deficient and baby, too. I always thought loss of libido pp was just cause of hormones, but it may be nutritionally or lack there of related. Read the reviews at Amazon...every woman should own this book!! http://www.amazon.com/Natural-Guide-Pregnancy-Postpartum-Health/dp/1583331387

Sorry I haven't been updating much on our health journey...it's looking like I may have the time coming up.  :-*
« Last Edit: February 20, 2010, 12:09:20 PM by mommyjen »
Billy's wife and mom to John, Charles, Gilbert, and Lewis.


Offline hi_itsgwen

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Re: Postpartum Recovery
« Reply #12 on: February 20, 2010, 11:48:51 AM »
I always thought loss of libido pp was just cause of hormones, but it may be nutritionally or lack there of related.

Hormones are oil based compounds...so the body needs enough of the good fats to keep up with Mama's needs, as well as baby's.  Did you know that breastmilk can be up to 50% saturated fat?  That's a LOT of fats that are outgoing, so it's very important to keep your nutrition and especially fat intake up during the last trimester.  I think it's time I make some coconut oil fudge again! ;)
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Offline mommyjen

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Re: Postpartum Recovery
« Reply #13 on: February 20, 2010, 12:30:15 PM »
Gwen, that is so interesting about the saturated fat profile of breast milk and a pp mamas extra need for sat. fats for hormonal health!  I've been reading a lot about how we need fats for hormonal health but I hadn't connected the dots that a pregnant and lactating mama has extra demand and need for fats!

I also wanted to quote Dr. Bob's review of the above book at Amazon.  He is Dr. Sears son and gives a high recommendation of this book.  I encourage you all to read the reviews...I learned some by just reading them.  :)

Quote
This is a must read book for every pregnant mother, every new mother, every mother who developed chronic symptoms after a pregnancy, every spouse of one of these women, and anyone providing healthcare to pregnant or postpartum women. I have not seen any other book that deals so well with the many nutrient depletions and hormonal imbalances that pregnancy may cause in the mother and how to prevent or reverse them. Following the guidelines here for dietary changes, essential fatty acids, vitamin and mineral supplements, hormone balancing, amino acids and exercise could certainly prevent many of the very common problems in the postpartum period, such as depression, mood swings, fatigue, weight gain, and decreased libido. If these symptoms are not treated early, they often become chronic longstanding problems that many of my medical colleagues have then treated with all sorts of medications, especially Prozac. There is an excellent chapter on breastfeeding problems and remedies along with a discussion of what herbs are safe or unsafe during nursing. The many case stories remind me of real-life patients I have treated. I am keenly interested in neurotransmitter and hormone problems and after reading this book I have a greater understanding of the cause of these problems in mothers and will more effectively treat them.

another review by Dr. David M. Brady (the University of Bridgeport College of Naturopathic Medicine (CT)

Quote
Drs. Dean Raffelock and Robert Rountree have truly produced a book that should be read by not only every expecting mother, but also by their doctors! If this were the case I firmly feel that the current horrific national epidemic of severe postpartum depression and infanticide that is all too commonly detailed on the evening news would be nothing more than a sad footnote in history. The current attempted solution, which is to simply give young mothers anti-depressant drugs, is clearly not working. Drs. Raffelock and Rountree construct this book in a clear and concise format so that the person with no medical or nutrition knowledge, or the highly trained physician, can equally benifit. The most current understanding of alterations in the nutritional, hormonal, and neurotransmitter status of new mothers is easily explained. Novel methods of diagnosing and treating these problems in the most non-invasive and supportive ways possible are clearly detailed in order for the woman to acheive a lasting and true recovery from the physiological stressors of pregnancy. It is obvious from reading this book that these two enlightened doctors are not only on the cutting-edge of knowledge in the fields of functional medicine and clinical nutrition, but they are also gifted clinicians who have compassion for their patients and have a passion for this grave public health issue. It is often said that medicine is not only a science, but an art. These doctors have produced a masterpiece. If it could only be read by every obstetrician in the country and if only there were more doctors who thought like them. Bravo!

http://www.amazon.com/Natural-Guide-Pregnancy-Postpartum-Health/product-reviews/1583331387/ref=dp_top_cm_cr_acr_txt?ie=UTF8&showViewpoints=1

Some other things that we think are just normal during pregnancy and pp may not be or should not be like forgetfullness aka baby brain!
« Last Edit: February 20, 2010, 12:46:31 PM by mommyjen »
Billy's wife and mom to John, Charles, Gilbert, and Lewis.


Offline hi_itsgwen

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Re: Postpartum Recovery
« Reply #14 on: February 20, 2010, 04:00:38 PM »
Babies really need the fat, and not just for chubbiness.  The 'white matter' of the brain, or coating on the nerve cells that insulates them and facilitates fine motor coordination and better neural communication is called myelin...it's 80% lipid (fat).  From Wikipedia

Quote
The white matter is the tissue through which messages pass between different areas of gray matter within the nervous system. Using a computer network as an analogy, the gray matter can be thought of as the actual computers themselves, whereas the white matter represents the network cables connecting the computers together. The white matter is white because of the fatty substance (myelin) that surrounds the nerve fibers (axons). This myelin is found in almost all long nerve fibers, and acts as an electrical insulation. This is important because it allows the messages to pass quickly from place to place.
[/size]

So add to that the hormones that Mama needs, and you've got a lot of good fat needed for a healthy Mom and baby!
My babies have never been pudgy, but my milk is very fatty, and I eat like a cow after I have a baby.  I get REALLY ravenously hungry after I have a baby and during nursing...and food tastes GREAT.  I can't wait!  ;D  (I'm 38 weeks, 4 days...but whose counting, right?)
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Offline kamom

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Re: Postpartum Recovery
« Reply #15 on: February 21, 2010, 12:00:42 PM »

So add to that the hormones that Mama needs, and you've got a lot of good fat needed for a healthy Mom and baby!
My babies have never been pudgy, but my milk is very fatty, and I eat like a cow after I have a baby.  I get REALLY ravenously hungry after I have a baby and during nursing...and food tastes GREAT.  I can't wait!  ;D  (I'm 38 weeks, 4 days...but whose counting, right?)

  :D :D I'm counting! 11 days to go for me! :D :D

Offline herbs girl

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Re: Postpartum Recovery
« Reply #16 on: February 22, 2010, 04:12:15 AM »
I took large amoutns of fish oil during pregnancy, and as a result had a very bright, smart and alert little girl.  My postpartum experience was the worst Ive ever had,  for  a little bit  I almost considered  going to a mental hospital.   For some woman they find that fish oil can treat/prevent PPdepression.  However,   I was able to get off my medication when my baby was 5 months old and then I transferred to to  2500 mg EPA and 375 mg DHA (5 capsules of Omega 3 Mood)   So  Good fats are still important!



Offline hi_itsgwen

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Re: Postpartum Recovery
« Reply #17 on: February 22, 2010, 10:12:55 AM »
I took large amoutns of fish oil during pregnancy, and as a result had a very bright, smart and alert little girl.  My postpartum experience was the worst Ive ever had,  for  a little bit  I almost considered  going to a mental hospital.   For some woman they find that fish oil can treat/prevent PPdepression.  However,   I was able to get off my medication when my baby was 5 months old and then I transferred to to  2500 mg EPA and 375 mg DHA (5 capsules of Omega 3 Mood)   So  Good fats are still important!

Are you attributing your PP depression to the fish oil? 
Do you think that varying the source of your fats would help...or was it other factors (mineral deficiency, etc.) that could have contributed?  Do you have issues with digesting/absorbing fats? 

Just curious as to your thoughts on the cause of your difficult pp and what you'd do differently next time.
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Offline herbs girl

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Re: Postpartum Recovery
« Reply #18 on: February 22, 2010, 05:02:17 PM »
I took large amoutns of fish oil during pregnancy, and as a result had a very bright, smart and alert little girl.  My postpartum experience was the worst Ive ever had,  for  a little bit  I almost considered  going to a mental hospital.   For some woman they find that fish oil can treat/prevent PPdepression.  However,   I was able to get off my medication when my baby was 5 months old and then I transferred to to  2500 mg EPA and 375 mg DHA (5 capsules of Omega 3 Mood)   So  Good fats are still important!

Are you attributing your PP depression to the fish oil?  
Do you think that varying the source of your fats would help...or was it other factors (mineral deficiency, etc.) that could have contributed?  Do you have issues with digesting/absorbing fats?  

Just curious as to your thoughts on the cause of your difficult pp and what you'd do differently next time.

No the fish oil did not cause my difficut postpartum recovery.  I took large amounts of minerals and vitamins, also.    I believe I was having some post-traumatic stress disorder because before she was born,  she was breech up until 35 weeks or so.   So I started worrying in my pregnancy. This caused me to lose  sleep during the last few months of my pregnancy.  I basicly worried myself  until I was  sick physically almost.  I was petrified I would have to have a C section. (In fact they had  one scheduled at 32 weeks or so...I have had 3 previous vaginal births) She turned around 35 weeks to head down.

My doctor said I should wean from the fish oil so it wouldnt thin my blood before the possible C-section.  I think that made the mental problems worse, because I needed the fish oil worse than ever.  After a very long and difficult labor, she was born. And I hemmorhaged with a extremly rare condition (uterus would not clamp on its own very long), and they took me into surgery, I had a spinal. After surgery, I had to be on Mehergine for about 7-10 days  around the clock.  

Came home, and I was so weak. Baby would not nurse properly, so I started pumping. Then when she was  6 weeks old, I was in the hopsital with Mastitis, after being on oral antibiotics scince her birth almost constantly for breast problems.

I think my mind and body could only handle so much, and I had a  mental breakdown almost.  Do I think more nutrients would have helped? I doubt it. In my case, I  tried to prepare, but sometimes God changes  the circumstances.  I praise HIm  for the safe delivery, even though it was scary)

What I would do different next time?  I might take depression meds as soon as the baby is born!



I would highly recomend fish oil for any pregnant and postpartum mom. I am able to stay off of meds today, and  Thank you Lord for fish  oil! My husband can tell When I am on it!
« Last Edit: February 22, 2010, 05:07:44 PM by herbs girl »



Offline hi_itsgwen

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Re: Postpartum Recovery
« Reply #19 on: February 22, 2010, 05:23:06 PM »
What I would do different next time?  I might take depression meds as soon as the baby is born!

Poor thing!  You really went through it!  Next time: *Do not worry* (quote/sing scripture!) and get your sleep during the pregnancy...and take your RRL tea and have some cayenne on hand to help with bleeding. 
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Offline 4myhoonie

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Re: Postpartum Recovery
« Reply #20 on: March 22, 2010, 02:09:09 PM »
hi all, i'm posting here, cuz i have 2 things that i'm questioning.  hope you wise ladies have some answers.  *************************************************

my lochia stopped before 6 weeks, now at 8 weeks after baby i'm having pink or brown discharge or mucous, what does this mean? i had endometrieitis a week after.

i'm also running a fever today, just starting this afternoon of 99.5.   had woke up this am with one really sore breast.  i nursed him on this side first this am, then checked it at 10 or so, and it was soft all over, no lumps or hot red spots.  still no lumps now, though my nipple is very tender & slightly redder than normal.  also, when the fever started i felt exhausted & just wanted to go to bed. i had done a lot of work today.  he nurses 6 times daily, every 3 hours or so, and once in the night.  thanks all!

modified to retain proper page format
« Last Edit: March 22, 2010, 03:57:33 PM by boysmama »
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Offline steadygirl

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Re: Postpartum Recovery
« Reply #21 on: March 23, 2010, 04:56:30 AM »
As long as the lochia isn't heavy or doesn't smell bad it is probably just a sign that you aren't all healed and maybe need to take things a little easier. It always takes a while for me to heal up after my babies are born and I am pretty sensitive to overdoing it for a while. If it doesn't smell normal you may have an infection.
Hope you start feeling better soon!  :-*

Offline LoveSunflowers

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Re: Postpartum Recovery
« Reply #22 on: March 23, 2010, 04:59:57 AM »
You probably over did it is my guess. As long as there is no foul odor or any tender spots on your uterus, you most likely need to rest. My midwife says if you have a uterine infection, you will have a tender spot that will hurt to touch somewhere on your uterus b/c that kind of infection is quite localized.

Hope you feel better soon!

Offline 4myhoonie

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Re: Postpartum Recovery
« Reply #23 on: March 24, 2010, 02:30:26 AM »
well, just wanted to let you know, it was definitely mastitis, i've been putting hot washcloths on it before nursing, using a different position that puts more pressure on the blocked part.  it had me fooled cuz there were no hard lumps.  it was red on the top & the plugged part was right where he latched, so that was hard! 

the other stuff went away with me resting all day yesterday.  now i'm off to the "nightsweats during nursing" thread!
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Offline Jemima

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Re: Postpartum Recovery
« Reply #24 on: June 18, 2010, 05:41:32 AM »
Does anyone have any suggestions....

I had a baby 4 wks ago, (and still haven't found the time to write his birth story!) and am having an amazingly hard time getting back to normal, with my health.

I had him at home, and the labor was pretty quick, and went well. I was carefully trying not to "overdo it", especially since with my last baby I had gotten a breast infection twice in the first weeks, and I did NOT want to repeat that experience. Well, play it again, it's been a repeat, and I am now fighting my second br. infection. In between I have felt pretty good, but still weak, and not able to do anything for very long without feeling like it's too much.

I have also had some very good days where I felt just about 100%, but I've been trying to take little baby steps back to my usual days, and work load. (Still doing barely anything other than care for 3 children).

It's going on a month since the birth, and here I am fighting an infection again, and still not feeling totally strong... And I'm getting really frustrated with my lack of recovery, even though I'm doing my best to do all the right things!! Feeling right now like I'll never be strong again. :(

Anyone have any insight or suggestions? I just want to be a healthy mama again, able to care for my family!

Offline steadygirl

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Re: Postpartum Recovery
« Reply #25 on: June 19, 2010, 08:26:27 AM »
Maybe you have already done this, but have you looked into the possibility that it could be your nursing bra? Underwire can plug milk ducts and so can wearing one too tight. Try wearing a loose sleep bra or going bra- less and see if it helps at all. I can't give any other suggestions as I have been lucky enough to have not had any trouble with my last two I have nursed. I always started out with no bra or a loose bra- with the exception of when I go away. ::)

Offline boysmama

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Re: Postpartum Recovery
« Reply #26 on: June 19, 2010, 05:03:34 PM »
Jemima, you might also try nursing in different positions depending on your situation.
I always have so much milk the baby is barely able to empty one side per feeding. I have to use different holds at least every couple times per side in order to get all areas of the breast drained in a 24-48 hr period. If I use the traditional cradle hold the out side never gets completely emptied and that is where most of my infections start.
Changing holds has really helped me eliminate infections.

Offline boysmama

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Re: Postpartum Recovery
« Reply #27 on: June 19, 2010, 05:06:44 PM »
I also second going bra-less at night or on days when you are going to spend alot of time resting in bed. It's a mess  ::), but I just wrap in a bath towel, and change as needed through the night. It definitely helps to leave everything free, although I don't go without support when up and about.  :P