Author Topic: Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome  (Read 10385 times)

YoopreMama

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Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome
« on: December 10, 2009, 04:40:42 AM »
Anyone w/ experience w/ this?  Dos, don'ts?  Any natural treatments?  Looks like the thread on tachycardia would be helpful?

http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=4785

What is the heart's normal condition?

In a normal heart, electrical signals use only one path when they move through the heart. This is the atrio-ventricular or A-V node. As the electrical signal moves from the heart's upper chambers (the atria) to the lower chambers (the ventricles), it causes the heart to beat. For the heart to beat properly, the timing of the electrical signal is important.

What is the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome?

If there's an extra conduction pathway, the electrical signal may arrive at the ventricles too soon. This condition is called Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW). It's in a category of electrical abnormalities called "pre-excitation syndromes."

It's recognized by certain changes on the electrocardiogram, which is a graphical record of the heart's electrical activity. The ECG will show that an extra pathway or shortcut exists from the atria to the ventricles.

Many people with this syndrome who have symptoms or episodes of tachycardia (rapid heart rhythm) may have dizziness, chest palpitations, fainting or, rarely, cardiac arrest. Other people with WPW never have tachycardia or other symptoms. About 80 percent of people with symptoms first have them between the ages of 11 and 50.

How is this syndrome treated?


People without symptoms usually don't need treatment. People with episodes of tachycardia can often be treated with medication. But sometimes such treatment doesn't work. Then they'll need to have more tests of their heart's electrical system.

The most common procedure used to interrupt the abnormal pathway is radiofrequency or catheter ablation. In this, a flexible tube called a catheter is guided to the place where the problem exists. Then that tissue is destroyed with radiofrequency energy, stopping the electrical pathway. Successful ablation ends the need for medication. Whether a person will be treated with medication or with an ablation procedure depends on several factors. These include the severity and frequency of symptoms, risk for future arrhythmias and patient preference.

Offline hi_itsgwen

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Re: Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome
« Reply #1 on: December 10, 2009, 04:53:04 PM »
Yooper, this sounds like what my Grandmother has.  She described it as 'a problem with the electrical system of her heart' and did end up having a pacemaker installed in her 60's, as she was having the tachycardia and fainting.

Here is the tachycardia thread.  I did just a bit of research, and there are links to imbalance in calcium/magnesium & potassium.

Interestingly, I've had problems with this in past pregnancies, but this time, I've been taking a cal/mag supplement and haven't had any issues this time around.
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YoopreMama

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Re: Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome
« Reply #2 on: December 10, 2009, 06:25:24 PM »
Thank you, Gwen!   :-*

Our friend's 6 y.o. boy has this, and they're looking at some type of surgery now that he's "old" enough.  I was hoping to find some help for them from another perspective.  ;)  He's on some medication twice a day.  He's also on some acid reflux medication, I believe--any connection?  Oh, and has an inhaler/allergy issues, too.   :-\

Thanks for linking the thread.    ;D

Offline hi_itsgwen

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Re: Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome
« Reply #3 on: December 10, 2009, 07:42:28 PM »
well, my brain is kinda pooped by this time of night, but would the anti-reflux meds reduce his stomach acid?  I think I read that calcium/magnesium need an acidic environment to absorb/digest properly.  So he could be deficient in some of his minerals from that.

I'm always suspicious of frequent meds :D  I suspect that they mess with body chemistry.  I know they are sometimes necessary, but if there is an herbal alternative, I'd MUCH rather see that happen than meds.  Just 'cause the herbs will often times build the body and supply nutrition in addition to the medicinal actions.  (preaching to the chior, huh?) ;D 

If his parents are willing to try some natural stuff, there are lots of alternatives for the inhaler/asthma issues including rabbit tobacco.  The flowers, stitched into a little pouch can be tucked into the pillow for long term treatment of asthma.  There are several accounts of this curing childhood asthma without recurrence over a two year period or so.  My aunt noticed relief from her seasonal allergies just by using the flowers for a week or less...she no longer needed her medications. 
Boysmama is a good one to ask about inhalers and such if I remember correctly. 

#1  If he's got frequent episodes, they could try giving him a cal/mag supplement to bowel tollerance...up them one a day, and then back off one when his bowels get loose.  And also have him eat a banana or some other source of potassium.  They could keep a record of the episodes, and see if it helps.  If his diet is already high in calcium, then maybe just natural calm for kids would be a good alternative to add a balance of magnesium back in. 

#2 I'd do a probiotic and clo...just for good digestion and good measure.  ;) 

I'd recommend making once change at a time, and then wait a week before starting anything new sp they can see any effects the changes are having.   
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Offline boysmama

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Re: Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome
« Reply #4 on: December 11, 2009, 04:18:12 AM »
Yooper,
I have known two different people that had the surgery for WPW. In those cases it was necessary because the tachycardia was leading to cardiac arrest and completely uncontrollable heart rates even on medication.
Although it's tachycardia, it's not nutritional or lifestyle triggered, it's an actual hardwire problem. Both had trouble with asthma, failure to thrive, severe fatigue, etc which went away once the dual pathway issues were resolved with the surgery.
It's a scary surgery, but both came out fine.
One person I only heard the history when I met them later in life, one family I knew as they went through the surgery with their child.

YoopreMama

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Re: Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome
« Reply #5 on: December 11, 2009, 04:46:08 AM »
Yooper,
I have known two different people that had the surgery for WPW. In those cases it was necessary because the tachycardia was leading to cardiac arrest and completely uncontrollable heart rates even on medication.
Although it's tachycardia, it's not nutritional or lifestyle triggered, it's an actual hardwire problem. Both had trouble with asthma, failure to thrive, severe fatigue, etc which went away once the dual pathway issues were resolved with the surgery.
It's a scary surgery, but both came out fine.
One person I only heard the history when I met them later in life, one family I knew as they went through the surgery with their child.
Very helpful, Boysmama.  :)

There has been uncontrolled heart rates, too, w/ medication.  I see failure to thrive, as well.  Would caffeine be a logical thing to stay away from, or is that not relevant?


Offline boysmama

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Re: Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome
« Reply #6 on: December 11, 2009, 04:59:17 AM »
As for caffeine....just thinking out loud....Probably would be good to eliminate the majority. 
Even though nutritional and lifestyle changes aren't going to fix the  main trigger for this kind of tachycardia, it seems logical to not add other avoidable triggers.
Know what I mean? This boy's heart and body is already stressed in ways that probably can't be addressed with any amount of external efforts. Don't stress it even farther in the known weak spot with controllable factors.

YoopreMama

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Re: Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome
« Reply #7 on: December 11, 2009, 05:38:04 AM »
You explained it so well.  :)