Author Topic: different medical fields  (Read 7367 times)

Offline chrysalyde

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different medical fields
« on: June 23, 2008, 10:34:20 AM »
What is the difference between a chiropractor, an osteopath and a physiotherapist ? As I live in France, I'm not sure what is the equivalent to a chiropractor. For a long time I thought it was what we call a "kinésithérapeute" but I just found out that's a physiotherapist... So I thought maybe a chiropractor is more like an osteopath... can someone shed light on this question ? Thanks !

PS : I don't know if this is the right place to post this question, so feel free to move it.

Offline maceoghain

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Re: different medical fields
« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2008, 11:08:10 AM »
I can't answer knowledgeably for the other two, but from my experience, a chiropractor is one who specializes in the skeleton, nervous system and joints of the body.

For example, I was thrown and dragged by a horse, so I went to see my chiropractor. He felt the bone placement in my back, ribs, hips and limbs and determined that the cause of my pain was several bones having been forced "out of joint" (or basically not in the place they ought to be). He applied gentle pressure and contortion in specific places to return my bones to their proper location This immediately relieved the pain.

A few pointers...

1. Make sure you go to reputable chiropractor. Look for his school diplomas in the office. Chiropractors have gotten a bad name from some who are not certified or well trained. If the one you visit is rough, hurried or in any way not meticulous and gentle, go find another one. A good doctor will take time to educate you on your health and answer your questions and concerns before he proceeds with treatment.

2. Much of the problems that chiropractors fix (such as chronic back pain) can be eliminated with muscle-specific exercises. An honest chiropractor will educate you on which exercises you should do to proactively avoid further pain or injury. When the muscles surrounding your bones and joints are strong, they keep everything in place. It is weak muscles or an outside force that cause things to move around.

3. During a visit, be relaxed. It will make it much easier and more comfortable. You may hear some noises as your joints move, but they are normal. If you have been in pain for a while before the visit, you may wish to take a mild pain reliever as your muscles will protest being moved from the current (wrong) location they've been in for some time.

Hope this helps! (And no, I'm not a chiropractor...but I love the one I go to!)

kate  ;D
« Last Edit: June 23, 2008, 01:47:13 PM by maceoghain »
All the way my Savior leads me...

Offline CountyCork

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Re: different medical fields
« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2008, 12:03:47 PM »
Here's some chiro clarification:

What are the typical prerequisites for chiropractic schools?
It is recommended that students have earned a baccalaureate degree in the arts or sciences from an accredited college or university, completed with minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.50 on a 4.00 scale. Most schools require applicants to have at least 60 semester hours in English, the social sciences or humanities, organic and inorganic chemistry, biology, physics, and psychology as part of their undergraduate studies. Check with the Chiropractor school to make sure that you have enough hours in each discipline. Several American chiropractic colleges now offer a BS degree for students interested in career in chiropractic medicine.

What states require a bachelor's degree as well as a DC degree to practice Chiropractic medicine?
Florida, Kansas, Montana, Rhode Island, Wisconsin and the US Virgin Islands all require DCs to have a bachelor's degree as well as the chiropractic degree. Most chiropractic colleges now recommend getting a bachelor's degree either before or concurrently with the DC degree.

How long does it take to graduate?
Most programs are structured around a typical four-year academic schedule. During the first two years, most chiropractic programs emphasize classroom and laboratory work in basic science subjects such as anatomy, physiology, public health, microbiology, pathology and biochemistry. The last two years stress courses in manipulation and spinal adjustments, and provide clinical experience in physical and laboratory diagnosis, neurology, orthopedics, geriatrics, physiotherapy and nutrition. Some colleges offer an accelerated program that allows students to earn their degrees in three years.



So to sum up:  5 states require a bachelor's degree BEFORE chiro school.  Then chiro school is usually an additional 4 years of just chiro.  So there are 45 states that have lesser requirements to enter chiro school.  There is NO requirement to go to medical school, or even do undergraduate pre-med school.

Hope that clarifies.  I have two BIL's that are chiros - one in MN and one in WI.

Chiros cannot do "medical" things like prescribe typical pharmeceutical meds or perform surgery.  Many can and do recommend natural medicines such as herbs and essential oils, as well as vitamin supplements.  Many can and do perform x-rays to aid in diagnosing problems.

Offline maceoghain

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Re: different medical fields
« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2008, 01:45:45 PM »
Hm...I stand (well, sit actually!) corrected!

Perhaps the chiropractor I frequent changed his mind about what profession he wanted to undertake? I am fairly certain he is a board certified medical doctor and can write prescriptions... I'll have to ask him.

In the meantime, I will remove that statement from my post so as not to misinform anyone.

Thanks for the clarification, CountyCork!

kate  :)
All the way my Savior leads me...

Offline Mrs. B

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Re: different medical fields
« Reply #4 on: June 23, 2008, 02:28:46 PM »
Chiropractors go to chiropractor college to obain their doctorates; they use bone/spinal manipulation to allow the body to heal.  Essentially this has been said above.

Osteopaths go to osteopathic schools and are DO (doctor of osteopath); they use a combination of  both manipulation and drugs to heal.  Osteopaths may function in hospital settings depending upon the laws and regulations of the area.  I have seen them as OB/Gyn, general practitioners and even cardiologists.  These guys don't often use alot of natural techniques at this level, IMO, but I've been to a few that are interested in natural treatments.... kind of a mid-point between the MD and Chiropractor...

I'm not really sure what a physiotherapist is or how this would translate over? 

Offline CountyCork

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Re: different medical fields
« Reply #5 on: June 23, 2008, 02:47:20 PM »
Just to be clear, I pulled my chiro info off a Chiro Association web site.  My not-so-vast-databank-brain is on summer haitus!   ;D

Offline maceoghain

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Re: different medical fields
« Reply #6 on: June 23, 2008, 02:50:22 PM »
My dad is from Ireland, and he has mentioned a "physio" before, referring to a physical therapist, such as one who helps someone learn to walk again after surgery or an accident. Perhaps they are one in the same?

As far as the chiro information...I did go to the Palmer website (that's where our chiro-friend went) and you are right. There is no requirement of medical school. I have no idea where I got that idea. Perhaps God is trying to teach me to stop repeating things without verifying them first!  ::)
All the way my Savior leads me...

Offline CountyCork

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Re: different medical fields
« Reply #7 on: June 24, 2008, 03:46:38 AM »
I heard a rumor about that one time.  From somewhere.  I'm just sure someone told me . . .  ;) ;D