Author Topic: Making Butter  (Read 89503 times)

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Making Butter
« Reply #30 on: July 28, 2006, 05:01:47 PM »
we are not willing to try it at the risk of wasting our precious cream & butter - or make our families sick accidentally :o!        ~L

A friend of mine suggested making butter (shaking & rolling) in a baby food jar.  This would be a good way to test it out on a small amount - maybe ???
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Re: Making Butter
« Reply #31 on: August 02, 2006, 02:52:10 AM »


we warm milk before we use it and collect all the cream. i leave the cream in the fridge and collect enough so i can get a bar of butter. it has to stay refridgerated.

you can use a blender to make butter. i will tell you how.

when you are ready to make butter put all the cream in the blender jar and add ice cold water to it. for 2 cups of cream add about 4 cups of ice cold water in the jar. run the blender on "whip" for a minute stop and look in the jar. if it needs more water add more ice cold. keep whipping stopping after every minute until the cream turns color to yellow butter. it is very easy. takes less than 5 minutes. when butter collects on the top discard all the water and add more ice cold water to clean off all the milk in there. you have to kind of rinse all the milk out and keep the butter clean so it won't spoil. also filter all the water and make it into a ball. leave outside for an hour to get all the water out. shape it and refridgerate. can add honey to it to make honey butter or any herbs to make herb butter. yum!

Offline murfette

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Re: Making Butter
« Reply #32 on: August 02, 2006, 04:29:31 AM »
Does anyone know where I can get a cream separating ladle?  It's a special ladle with very tiny holes in it.  When skimming the cream off the top the milk goes through the holes but the cream does not.  I've been looking around the internet but can't find any.

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Making Butter
« Reply #33 on: August 02, 2006, 07:51:50 AM »
Lydia,

this sounds easy, but aren't you wasting your buttermilk?
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Re: Making Butter
« Reply #34 on: August 02, 2006, 09:15:34 AM »
we use only cultured buttermilk.
 if... you make yogurt and then collect all the cream from the top or whirl the yogurt to get the butter then i don't waste the buttermilk. that is buttermilk and we eat only like that.

if... i took cream that tops the milk while cooling then I only have (old)milk along with the cream which gets diluted when i add ice cold water. do you know what i mean? i don't consider that buttermilk or use it. i am not sure if it tastes good.

when we want (cultured) buttermilk then i make yogurt(i have posted how to make yogurt easily too) and then whirl it the same way, get the butter out and use the buttermilk. hope i am making it clear.
note: if you use the homogenized store milk to make butter you won't get butter(i feel) bcoz the fat is broken down and wonder if it can even separate an float on the top.
i hope this info helps.

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Making Butter
« Reply #35 on: August 02, 2006, 02:11:57 PM »
There are two types of buttermilk.  Old fashioned, which is the milk/cream that comes from making butter after the cream is skimmed from the milk

and Cultured buttermilk which comes from the milk not the cream. 

They are not the same thing, but from what I understand, they are both useful products and according to some of the other ladies in here, you can also culture your cream BEFORE you make butter and then your butter and your buttermilk (old fashioned) would be cultured as well.

Here's the thread on it.  Buttermilk and Cultured Buttermilk
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Offline murfette

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Re: Making Butter
« Reply #36 on: August 03, 2006, 04:23:19 AM »
I definately save the buttermilk after I have made butter from the old cream.  The buttermilk stays good for one more week.  I use it in breads, pancakes, biscuits, etc. and it tastes great!  It's a way that we get the most out of our milk.  :) You will know if the buttermilk has gone bad just by smelling it.

Offline mexmarr

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Re: Making Butter
« Reply #37 on: October 04, 2006, 12:28:08 PM »
I just made butter in my blender and it turned our great!  Yea!  I had been using my KitchenAid, and it always took at least 45 min, often longer, but it worked.  When I did it in the blender, it took 3 minutes to get butter!  I didn't add any water to it as mentioned in the previous post.  I just put the cream into the blender and blended it.  \

There did seem to be more buttermilk mixed in than butter made in the kitchen.  I find working out the butter milk to be a messy job, and I get butter all over my hands.  Does anybody have a method that isn't messy and doesn't waste butter? 

Oh., the yield was also greater than when I make it in the KitchenAid.

Offline mommyoftwins

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Re: Making Butter
« Reply #38 on: November 18, 2006, 10:08:17 AM »
Has anyone read in The Maker's Diet that raw butter is not to be used for cooking? It was in the list of fats to use. Does anyone know why he might have said this?

Offline Kati*did

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Re: Making Butter
« Reply #39 on: November 18, 2006, 10:30:07 AM »
I think the reason he said that is because he feels that the fats that best respond to high temperatures without getting denatured are coconut oil and olive oil.  Butter is good, but not in high heat (I think...but don't know...that that might cause something similar to pasteurization since it is fat from dairy).
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Offline Whiterock

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Re: Making Butter
« Reply #40 on: November 18, 2006, 01:02:25 PM »
I got this a while back from a friend named Jerry and thought I'd post it here for you ladies. This is very much like my Granny did it (except her power source was named Wayne, not Jerry  :) )

`````````````````````````
Back in the bad-old-days when I was much younger, my family had a cow and both my mother and father grew up on a farm so we used the old ways of doing lots of things including making butter and buttermilk.  My mother said that over-whipping cream to make butter created what she called sweet creme butter and none of us liked it very much as it lacked some of the flavor of her " Regular Butter"

To make regular butter (and buttermilk as a side benefit)  she used the following equipment:

1 - A 4-5 gallon earthenware crock that was taller than it was wide This was called a churn or butter churn.

2 - A wooden lid to fit the crock with a hole in it about the size of a broomstick.

3 - A chunk of broomstick with the paint removed that would stick out of the top of the churn about 18 inches. To the lower end of the broomstick was fastened a wooden cross with holes in it. This assembly was called the dasher.

4 - One young lad for power (me).

Look here for picture of the all the parts except me. http://www.civilization.ca/vmnf/collect/Gabriel/baratt_e.html

The procedure was a follows:

Since our cow gave more milk than we could drink, the milk built up in the refrigerator and when we had an extra 2-3 gallons she would pour it,  creme and all into the churn.  She then covered the churn with several layers of cheesecloth and secured it with a string around the lip at the top of the churn.  The churn, thus prepared, was placed in a relatively warm place (In the winter it was near the fire place and in the summer on the back porch.) where it would clabber.

Mother checked on it every day and when it came to a hard clabber (which I think meant there were somewhat solid clumps of curds in the whey.) she would call the power unit (Me). After the requisite amount of complaining and whining I would bring the churn into the dining room, remove the cheese cloth and insert the dasher into the churn with the cross part down. Next I would place the hole in the lid over the dasher handle and slide the lid down to the top of the churn and begin the infinitely long task of moving the dasher up and down through the clabbered milk.  I was very careful to hold the lid in place with one hand while I worked the dasher with the other. Experience had taught me that if I got sloppy and splashed the milk out onto the floor I had to mop as well as churn.

Looking back it probably only took about 10 -15 minutes before the butter formed. Once the torture --err churning was over, mother would reach into the churn with her hands and collect the butter and pack it into a butter mold, pressing out as much of the whey as possible. [Also, my Granny always washed her butter while working it (see other posts in this thread) so it would keep longer]

Finally she put 2-3 layers of cheesecloth over a jar and I would pour the buttermilk through the cheesecloth while mother collected the rest of the butter and again pressed out the buttermilk.

As the butter mold filled I would press the butter press firmly against the waxed paper covered cutting board then lift off the mould thus creating a pound block of butter and ready the mould for the next batch,  Inevitably there would be a small amount left over that mother would roll into a ball then mash flat to create block which she used for cooking while the decorated pound block was used on the table when the preacher came for Sunday dinner or sold to the neighbors.

On occasion she added salt to the butter. To accomplish this task she places all the butter on a sheet of waxed paper and  sprinkled it with salt( She just poured some in her hand then sprinkled it over the butter - no idea of how much) She would then kneed it to mash out the butter milk and incorporate the salt.  Finally she would pack it into the mould as before.

I hope I have included enough information for others to follow the process, and as always you should know that my memory may be faulty so your results may vary.


Happy churning -

- jerry
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« Last Edit: March 26, 2010, 04:40:26 AM by Whiterock »
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Offline ShabbyChic

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Re: Making Butter
« Reply #41 on: November 18, 2006, 02:46:33 PM »
We went on a field trip in 4th grade and made butter.  This was exactly how we did it Jerry.  And the thought of having 2-3 gallons of extra milk or a cow who made more milk than we could drink made me chartreuse with envy. 
That's Shabby SHEIK not Shabby CHICK.  Hee-hee.

Nickole

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Re: Making Butter
« Reply #42 on: November 18, 2006, 06:15:16 PM »
I just sit the milk out in a bowl on the counter for about 7 hours to culture, then take the cream and put it in my food processor and whirl for a minute then scrape it out into a mason jar and physically shake the jar (with lid on mind you) about a minute and it has separated into butter and buttermilk.  Doesn't take long at all!  If you have some energetic boys they will love to just shake that thing up and down like crazy! 

Offline LKS

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Re: Making Butter
« Reply #43 on: November 18, 2006, 06:38:20 PM »
When I made butter it seemed to go rancid really quick, like within a day or two. Has anyone else had this problem? And if so what did you do? I would love to make butter that didn't go yucky.  :-\  LKS

Offline Amey

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Re: Making Butter
« Reply #44 on: November 18, 2006, 07:26:40 PM »
When I made butter it seemed to go rancid really quick, like within a day or two. Has anyone else had this problem? And if so what did you do? I would love to make butter that didn't go yucky.  :-\  LKS

We ate ours so fast, it didn't have time to go bad! I do know that you need to make sure that all the buttermilk is rinsed out of the butter, and it also helps to add some salt. The salt will preserve it for a little longer.

Offline Kansas Girl

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Re: Making Butter
« Reply #45 on: November 19, 2006, 03:34:57 AM »
When I made butter it seemed to go rancid really quick, like within a day or two. Has anyone else had this problem? And if so what did you do? I would love to make butter that didn't go yucky.  :-\  LKS

The lady that I get milk from recommended that you rinse your butter in water until the water is clear to get all of the excess buttermilk out of your butter.  She said that it won't go rancid quickly if you do that.  I haven't had a chance to try that tip yet, but maybe it will help.  -KG
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Offline Whiterock

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Re: Making Butter
« Reply #46 on: November 19, 2006, 09:12:44 AM »
I don't know if Jerry's mom didn't rinse her butter or if Jerry just forgot to mention it, but rinsing the butter is something my Granny did. She used a glass churn (a red top Dazey butterchurn) and it had a screen in the top so when the butter comes, you just pour the buttermilk out thru the screen and added COLD water back into the churn. Then you churn it a few times, pour out the water thru the screen, and repeat until the butter was clean. Then you take out the butter and "work" the remaining moisture out with a couple of spoons on a board (you basically mash and re-form, squash and re-form, squish and re-form, the butter with the back of the spoons and the water will run out). If you want to add salt you do it while you're working the butter. After that make a ball, or pat, or block of butter and there ya' have it.

Here's a picture of the kind of churn my Granny used.
 
She had the 8 quart size (like the larger one in the picture. Oh and the thing in the middle of the picture is the screen. It fits into a slot in the top of the churn). It may have a 2 gallon capacity but to make butter you only fill them half-way so you put one gallon of milk in the two gallon size. And as I said before on another thread, My Granny did not use just cream, she used milk with a little more cream added, just as Jerry described in the email I posted above. It's supposed to give you more butter and thicker, richer, buttermilk that way.
« Last Edit: November 22, 2006, 06:56:55 AM by Whiterock »
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Re: Making Butter
« Reply #47 on: November 19, 2006, 09:24:31 AM »
When I made butter it seemed to go rancid really quick, like within a day or two. Has anyone else had this problem? And if so what did you do? I would love to make butter that didn't go yucky.  :-\  LKS

The lady that I get milk from recommended that you rinse your butter in water until the water is clear to get all of the excess buttermilk out of your butter.  She said that it won't go rancid quickly if you do that.  I haven't had a chance to try that tip yet, but maybe it will help.  -KG

I add salt too, and we eat it fast.  My milk lady also says to add water over and over to rinse.  I disobeyed!  ;D  Seemed not to make a difference to me, but I don't make it on a regular basis.   

Offline LKS

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Re: Making Butter
« Reply #48 on: November 19, 2006, 01:48:22 PM »
I rinsed and rinsed and rinsed. Or so I thought. When the cow comes fresh again(early Feb) I will try again and maybe try using milk not just cream. And rinse and rinse and rinse! Thanks!
LKS

Offline Whiterock

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Re: Making Butter
« Reply #49 on: November 19, 2006, 01:51:33 PM »
Did you work the moisture out after you rinsed?
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Offline LKS

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Re: Making Butter
« Reply #50 on: November 19, 2006, 01:57:03 PM »
I thought I did. I would smash it against the side of the bowl over and over with a wooden spoon until A. the water ran clear and B. there wasn't much coming out anymore. Could it be that I left too much moisture in? It was good right away but like the next day or two it would be yucky. I was trying to make an amount that would last us several days so I was very disappointed that it was yucky.
LKS

Offline Whiterock

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Re: Making Butter
« Reply #51 on: November 19, 2006, 07:53:55 PM »
Maybe. I donno. When I made butter with my mom we worked it until no more water was coming out. Another question, though... was the butter kept in the fridge? I think I read a long while ago that unsalted butter will only keep for about two days if it's left out, and salted butter will last for almost a week. Not sure about that.
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Making Butter
« Reply #52 on: November 19, 2006, 09:21:07 PM »
Maybe. I donno. When I made butter with my mom we worked it until no more water was coming out. Another question, though... was the butter kept in the fridge? I think I read a long while ago that unsalted butter will only keep for about two days if it's left out, and salted butter will last for almost a week. Not sure about that.
The butter I buy from the store lasts much longer than that out of the fridge.  The ingredients listed are only cream and salt.  Is it because it's raw, that it goes bad, or am I missing something?  I would think if it isn't made until it's cultured, it should last a long time, but I'm completely new at this and only guessing.
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Re: Making Butter
« Reply #53 on: November 20, 2006, 02:51:59 AM »
We make butter with our raw Jersey cream. It seems to churn faster if it's about a week old- or at least a few days. Also bringing it close to room temp helps it turn faster. We have a glass hand-cranked churn that we use. Got it and our seperater from Lehmans. (www.lehmans.com I think) I do not salt or culture my cream (though I would like to play around with it when I get some time!). I leave the butter set on the counter for at least several days and have not ever had a problem with it going bad. I really think rinsing is very important if you want your butter to keep well.

KD

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Re: Making Butter
« Reply #54 on: November 20, 2006, 03:14:00 AM »
Does anyone know where I can get a cream separating ladle?  It's a special ladle with very tiny holes in it.  When skimming the cream off the top the milk goes through the holes but the cream does not.  I've been looking around the internet but can't find any.


I got mine from Hoegger Goat Supply a couple years ago. www.hoeggergoatsupply.com
I buy cheese making supplies from www.glengarrycheesemaking.on.ca and I think they may sell them also, not sure though. They do have great cheese making supplies and IMO her book The Cheesemaker's Manual is the best! I have seen one of her DVDs too, and it was super!

Offline mexmarr

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Re: Making Butter
« Reply #55 on: November 20, 2006, 05:01:40 AM »
To rinse my butter, I gather it in a ball.  Then I turn the cold water on in the sink and knead my butter underneath the flow.  Seems to do a good job of getting all the extra buttermilk out.  Then I knead it a little more out of the water, to remove any extra water.

Also, how long butter lasts out of refrigeration before going rancid is a matter of opinion.  After 24 hours out, my dh thought that my butter was nasty.  I thought that it was delicious.  Since he wouldn't eat anymore of that particular batch, I left it out till I ate it all.  I thought that it was great.  He didn't know how I could stand to eat it!  ;)

So...  You might think your butter is rancid while others don't.  Or maybe you think yours isn't rancid, but others would.

I would have thought, "if it is bad, you will know!" until this experience with my butter.

Aren't we glad that we aren't all alike!  ;D

Offline Whiterock

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Re: Making Butter
« Reply #56 on: November 20, 2006, 05:26:59 AM »
The butter I buy from the store lasts much longer than that out of the fridge.  The ingredients listed are only cream and salt.  Is it because it's raw, that it goes bad, or am I missing something?  I would think if it isn't made until it's cultured, it should last a long time, but I'm completely new at this and only guessing.

Since I don't make butter all the time, I buy cultured, organic, butter that is supposedly from grass-fed cows but the milk is pasteurized before it's cultured. It lasts longer than that too when it's left out. And wherever I read about how long raw butter lasts, they said pasteurized butter would last longer so I think that's the difference.

But you know, my mom said that Granny could put her butter in the fridge and it still stayed soft. I think she whipped it, but she didn't tell me that and I don't know for sure.

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Offline Amey

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Re: Making Butter
« Reply #57 on: November 20, 2006, 05:34:59 AM »
Do you think that part of it could be the kind of cream you use? I know we recently switched from holstein milk to jersey milk, and the difference in the cream is A-MAZING. And I'm not sure how these two raw milks would compare to "town" cream (pasteurized). Maybe it's different? Just wondering...The butter from jersey cream is just wonderful. I would think that the pasteurized butter would go bad faster with all those dead pro-biotic critters in there, but it does seem like store-bought butter lasts longer.

The thing about raw cream butter when it "goes bad" is that I would think you can still use it. If no one likes the taste of it, you could still cook/bake with it. Like with raw milk - when it sours, it is still good. You can use it for other things (cooking, kefir, cream cheese, etc.). Unlike pasteurized milk. When it spoils, I wouldn't want to even touch it. It's gross.

Offline Whiterock

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Re: Making Butter
« Reply #58 on: November 20, 2006, 05:41:55 AM »
I agree that Jersey cream is amazing! I have had one other experience with milk from a different kind of cow (can't remember what kind) and the Jersey milk tastes much creamier and just better. I remember when we first started getting the jersey milk from our farmer and we let it sit in the fridge overnight... the next morning, when the cream had risen, we could see that every gallon was almost HALF CREAM. We were shocked (but very pleased, to say the least)!

WR
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Offline Amey

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Re: Making Butter
« Reply #59 on: November 21, 2006, 04:46:25 AM »
I went to pick up my turkey yesterday at an Amish farm down the road, and the wife there told me about a friend of hers who had a large amount of cream at once, and she actually made butter in her washing machine!!! Can you imagine? She said it worked. Bizarre.  ::)