Author Topic: Making Butter  (Read 92342 times)

Offline gloryacres

  • Adept
  • Posts: 81
Re: Making Butter
« Reply #180 on: March 05, 2009, 03:46:26 PM »
I always make my own butter and I salt it as that helps get out all the whey. I put the salt into it while I am rinsing and kneading it.  Then I will add just a bit more after I finish.   I leave my butter out always.  Very rarely do I have it spoil.  I will say a couple of times in the very hot summer it might start to turn into what the oldtimers call "real" butter.  What most of us use today is called "sweet" butter.
I have a butter dish that you put the butter into and turn it upside down into another container with water.  It really keeps the butter fresh and it is softer.
Hope this helps.
Gail

Offline Mrs. B

  • Master
  • Posts: 1317
Re: Making Butter
« Reply #181 on: March 06, 2009, 03:21:17 AM »
I have a 'butter boat' thing like gloryacres mentioned also, but I still tend to refrigerate my butter.
Maybe it's because it's unsalted (?), but even in the butter boat my butter always molds when left out on the counter for more than 2 or 3 days.
I also have to refrigerate bread for the same reasons/time.
I've always figured it was because I'm in a very hot/muggy area, but maybe it's the salt.

Offline corriebeth

  • Adept
  • Posts: 115
Re: Making Butter
« Reply #182 on: June 02, 2009, 04:26:06 PM »
So, I've been heating my cream to about 140 degrees (then cooling it) before making my butter to help decrease the very cow-ish taste of my cream.

I accidentally heated it to over 200 degrees last time - just totally forgot I had it on the stove. Ooops. Would you toss it, or is it just more "ultra-pasteurized?"

Thanks!
Corrie
We'd been learning about Daniel at youth group (DH is a youth pastor) and recently my 3 yo DS said, "Mommy, I had a worse dream and it troubled me... "

Nebuchadnezzar, anyone?

Offline hi_itsgwen

  • Master
  • Posts: 1428
    • Gwen's Nest
Re: Making Butter
« Reply #183 on: June 02, 2009, 06:43:41 PM »
Personally, I would use it.  You could always save it to use for baking/cooking, and use your healthier 'raw' butter for unheated uses.  ;)
Come see me at www.gwens-nest.com
♥ Check out our family favorite recipes, funny kid stories, natural remedies and other creative and fun stuff.

Offline Mrs.Visser

  • The Mrs. Visser!!
  • Adept
  • Posts: 228
  • Learn & Live Well!!
    • Growing Up Herbal
Re: Making Butter
« Reply #184 on: June 03, 2009, 03:21:26 AM »
I'm thinking of getting some raw cows milk from a farmer I know. I'll probably only be able to get a gallon a week, and I want to be able to make butter. So......how long can I save cream (how long will it stay good) until I have enough to make butter??

Offline lotsaboys

  • Master
  • Posts: 1796
Re: Making Butter
« Reply #185 on: June 03, 2009, 06:15:18 AM »
I think it depends on how clean your container was/is and such, but a week is about max for me.

Offline lotsagirls

  • Adept
  • Posts: 728
Re: Making Butter
« Reply #186 on: June 03, 2009, 09:00:00 AM »
I keep my cream about a week before making butter.  But the lady I used to get milk from keeps hers for 3 weeks.  I'd guess hers would be more of a sour cream butter.
Lo, children are an heritage of the Lord: and the fruit of the womb is his reward.  Psalm 127:3

Offline tonysgirl

  • Adept
  • Posts: 78
Re: Making Butter
« Reply #187 on: June 03, 2009, 02:52:51 PM »
I just keep my cream in the freezer and keep adding to it, then when I have a bunch I let it thaw out and make a bunch of butter.

Offline Mrs.Visser

  • The Mrs. Visser!!
  • Adept
  • Posts: 228
  • Learn & Live Well!!
    • Growing Up Herbal
Re: Making Butter
« Reply #188 on: June 03, 2009, 04:50:13 PM »
I just keep my cream in the freezer and keep adding to it, then when I have a bunch I let it thaw out and make a bunch of butter.

Does it taste like it would if you were making it fresh??

Offline corriebeth

  • Adept
  • Posts: 115
Re: Making Butter
« Reply #189 on: June 03, 2009, 05:39:29 PM »
Personally, I would use it.  You could always save it to use for baking/cooking, and use your healthier 'raw' butter for unheated uses.  ;)

Thanks Gwen!
We'd been learning about Daniel at youth group (DH is a youth pastor) and recently my 3 yo DS said, "Mommy, I had a worse dream and it troubled me... "

Nebuchadnezzar, anyone?

Offline tonysgirl

  • Adept
  • Posts: 78
Re: Making Butter
« Reply #190 on: June 05, 2009, 06:55:53 AM »
I don't know what the fresh butter tastes like, but I think mine tastes fresh and awesome!

Offline abbilynn

  • Master
  • Posts: 795
    • Visit my blog!
Re: Making Butter
« Reply #191 on: June 05, 2009, 04:08:22 PM »
Wife for 11 years, Mommy to 3 rambunctious boys!!  :)  Lover of Jesus, my hubby, my kids, and learning!
--------------------------------------------------------------
http://glutenfreegoose.blogspot.com/

Offline Mrs.Visser

  • The Mrs. Visser!!
  • Adept
  • Posts: 228
  • Learn & Live Well!!
    • Growing Up Herbal
Re: Making Butter
« Reply #192 on: March 05, 2010, 04:06:50 AM »
EXPERIENCED BUTTER MAKERS OPINIONS NEEDED!!! 

Okay so I've been getting raw cows milk for some time now, and I reserve the cream to make butter or to use it in cooking. I'm have some butter problems that I'd like to ask all of you experienced buttermakers to help me with.

1) I'm blending my cream with a hand-mixer because that's all I have. I tried using my vita-mix blender, but when the cream gets to the frothy stage it no longer gets sucked down to the blades...it creates an air bubble and I have to end up doing it with the mixer after all. Anyway, it's taking me almost an hour to make my butter (I'm using a lot of cream by the way). I'm doing it with the cream cold. Someone said to let the cream get to room temp then blend it. Any advice. It's really taking too long. I don't have time to do it every week. At least I hate taking the time to do it every week!

2) I strain my finished butter in a cheesecloth to get the buttermilk out, and I wash it and smash it. After a bit, the butter starts to smell sour, and someone said it was because I wasn't getting all the buttermilk out. Any suggestions on how to get it all out?

Thanks!

Offline healthybratt

  • administrator
  • Administrator
  • Guru
  • Posts: 11503
  • administrator
    • wouldn't you like to know?
Re: Making Butter
« Reply #193 on: March 05, 2010, 07:49:09 AM »
EXPERIENCED BUTTER MAKERS OPINIONS NEEDED!!! 

Okay so I've been getting raw cows milk for some time now, and I reserve the cream to make butter or to use it in cooking. I'm have some butter problems that I'd like to ask all of you experienced buttermakers to help me with.

1) I'm blending my cream with a hand-mixer because that's all I have. I tried using my vita-mix blender, but when the cream gets to the frothy stage it no longer gets sucked down to the blades...it creates an air bubble and I have to end up doing it with the mixer after all. Anyway, it's taking me almost an hour to make my butter (I'm using a lot of cream by the way). I'm doing it with the cream cold. Someone said to let the cream get to room temp then blend it. Any advice. It's really taking too long. I don't have time to do it every week. At least I hate taking the time to do it every week!

2) I strain my finished butter in a cheesecloth to get the buttermilk out, and I wash it and smash it. After a bit, the butter starts to smell sour, and someone said it was because I wasn't getting all the buttermilk out. Any suggestions on how to get it all out?

Thanks!
put your cream in a tightly sealed jar and let the kids roll it back and forth.  you'll get butter.



to get the buttermilk out you have to work it with your hands, wooden spoons or paddles.





http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-a-butter-paddle.htm
http://www.homesteadharvest.com/butter-making.html
  My favorite herb book!!

Offline boysmama

  • Global Moderator
  • Guru
  • Posts: 2199
Re: Making Butter
« Reply #194 on: March 05, 2010, 08:38:40 AM »
Try letting your cream set at room temp for a couple hours before making butter and then shake it. A qt 3/4 full of cream should make butter in 15-20 minutes. You might double check to make sure you are skimming only cream. Too much milk in with the cream and the fat particles won't stick together well.

To prevent a souring you probably need to wash it more. You should be able to work it with your hands instead of in a cheesecloth. The water should be clear before you stop washing.
A butter bell might also help to keep it from souring while stored at room temp. Culturing your cream might also help it maintain flavor over a longer period of time.

Offline Mrs.Visser

  • The Mrs. Visser!!
  • Adept
  • Posts: 228
  • Learn & Live Well!!
    • Growing Up Herbal
Re: Making Butter
« Reply #195 on: March 05, 2010, 06:15:26 PM »
Thanks so much HealthyBratt and Boysmama! I think my problem is getting too much milk in with the cream, because I definitly don't see big globs of yellow butter after I'm done churning. It's more like fine white particles floating in the buttermilk. Also, I'm guessing I'm definitly not squeezing all the buttermilk out or washing it enough. I get milk tomorrow. I can't wait to try again. Do you think the hand mixer is okay or should I invest in an actual butter churn and some paddles?

Offline mom24boys

  • Adept
  • Posts: 340
Re: Making Butter
« Reply #196 on: March 05, 2010, 08:48:11 PM »
When I used to make butter, we used our kitchenaid mixer and whipped it until the whipped cream fluff "broke down" and became watery.

We strained the butterfat from the liquid by pouring it through a wire sieve.

Once strained, we used wet hands to gather the fat up into a glob.  

Then, under cold running water and over the sieve, we would press, fold and squeeze the butter until the water running over it was totally clear.  [the sieve catches any dropped bits so you can add them back in and they won't go down the drain.]

Now we would press and sort of knead out the last of the water and sprinkle a little salt over it, all the while quickly kneading it. {you have to work fast or your hands start to warm the butter}

At this stage, we packed it into containers or shaped into rounds, wrapped and froze or refrigerated.

The washing is very important to keeping your butter fresh longer.  Also, even a very little salt helps it stay fresh longer.

I think once you skim off your cream more carefully, you will see a great improvement in your butter making.

Don't give up!
« Last Edit: March 05, 2010, 08:52:59 PM by mom24boys »

Offline healthybratt

  • administrator
  • Administrator
  • Guru
  • Posts: 11503
  • administrator
    • wouldn't you like to know?
Re: Making Butter
« Reply #197 on: March 06, 2010, 05:20:16 AM »
Thanks so much HealthyBratt and Boysmama! I think my problem is getting too much milk in with the cream, because I definitly don't see big globs of yellow butter after I'm done churning. It's more like fine white particles floating in the buttermilk. Also, I'm guessing I'm definitly not squeezing all the buttermilk out or washing it enough. I get milk tomorrow. I can't wait to try again. Do you think the hand mixer is okay or should I invest in an actual butter churn and some paddles?
we used the jar trick i mentioned above and i've used a blender.  never had a churn.  the paddles can be replace with your hands, wooden spoons, rice paddles or whatever you have handy.
  My favorite herb book!!

Offline Whiterock

  • Jesus Knows Me, This I Love
  • Guru
  • Posts: 3410
  • Eph 6:16
    • Yarb d'Farb Knarb
Re: Making Butter
« Reply #198 on: March 14, 2010, 09:41:35 AM »
Earlier in this thread I posted something an acquaintance wrote, on how his mother used to make butter from clabbered milk and I mentioned that that is how my Granny Trudy used to make it too. (You can read that whole post by clicking on the green link above the exerpt below).....

I got this a while back from a friend named Jerry and thought I'd post it here for you ladies. This is very much like my Granny did it (except her power source was named Wayne, not Jerry  :) )

`````````````````````````
Back in the bad-old-days when I was much younger, my family had a cow and both my mother and father grew up on a farm so we used the old ways of doing lots of things including making butter and buttermilk.  My mother said that over-whipping cream to make butter created what she called sweet creme butter and none of us liked it very much as it lacked some of the flavor of her " Regular Butter"...

I just bought a book called "Smokehouse Ham, Spoon Bread, and Scuppernong Wine" and, in the section on buttermilk, it talks about the same thing, so I thought I’d add it to this thread…

It quotes Ernest Parker (ninety years old at the time the book was written) of Gilmer County, Georgia, as saying this about how his parents made butter and buttermilk, “They’d milk of a morning and again at night, strain the milk into the churn, except what we’d wanted to drink. If it was in the winter time, we’d set the churn up close to the fireplace to keep it warm. That would cause it to clabber. After it began to clabber, you’d turn the churn down sidewise and look down into it. If the gelatinlike clabber had turned loose from the side of the churn, it was ready to churn and make butter.

You put that X-shaped dasher in there and churned the milk up and down until the butter came. If it was warm, it didn’t take long, usually thirty to forty minutes. Then the ‘butter would come,’ as they would say… float to the top. Ma would take a spoon and dip the butter off and put it in a mold. Or sometimes she’d leave it in a cup or dish in the springhouse.”

The book also mentions that “Tommie Bass believe that the weather figured in the speed of butter emergence. Cloudy weather always delayed the butter’s arrival, he felt, and a stormy day meant a half-hour delay compared to a fair day.”

Another account given in the book, is from Mrs. Azzie Walters of Ellijay, Georgia, who used to sell milk and butter. …”Milk has to clabber…” she explained… “…you ‘pour up a churn’, as they called it, and then when it gets clabbered good, why you get your churn dasher out and you sit down and you churn and churn. Afterward you mold up the butter, make it real pretty.”
« Last Edit: March 14, 2010, 09:59:31 AM by Whiterock »
Who Needs God?

My Blog - Yarb d'Farb Knarb Check out the Wellness Wednesday tag for your health-related blog posts!