Author Topic: Good Fats, Bad Fats: Healthy Oils for Cooking  (Read 68439 times)

Offline momto4girls

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Good Fats, Bad Fats: Healthy Oils for Cooking
« on: January 24, 2008, 01:42:52 PM »
Ok, so everyone is against the conola oil, except one person.  But what about the corn oil?  Or the peanut oil?  Or just regular vegetable oil?  Are all of those just as bad as the conola oil?

I'm just now running out of the conola oil.  Looking for something healthier to buy instead.  The coconut oil will not work for us.  The olive oil burns.  I need something that works like the conola oil.  But is not bad for you. 

Anyone have any more ideas?

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Good Fats, Bad Fats: Healthy Oils for Cooking
« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2008, 05:17:05 AM »
I'm not positive but I think the main concern with Corn Oil is GMO corn being thrown into the mix.

Peanut Oil
seems to work very well in the fryer, has a high smoke point, tastes good (IMO) and so long as it's in it's pure form, I think this one is okay.  I personally like the flavor, but so far have only used it in Asian recipes and in my fryer.  Some say it has a stronger flavor and adds too much to the food.

Many have suggested Palm Oil (haven't used it myself) as a healthy choice.

Virgin coconut oil is very healthy and easy to digest, but has a lower smoke point, and tastes like coconut.  Having this on hand can be a good thing.  It's antifungal and you can use it for more than just cooking.  It's a  great moisturizer.  Some say it works as sunscreen.  It's also a nice oil for the body in general.  Also one of the 3 ingredients in GOOT.  I don't personally cook with it because of the flavor, but I always have some in my house.  ;D

Lard is a nice choice for things to be crispy like fries and pie crusts, but it's harder to find in unhydrogenated forms and there is always the fact that it comes from swine which many do not eat.  Even the lard I purchase has an additive called a defoamer.  You can get it organic, but it's expensive.  It also does not hold up well in the fryer.  It will work once or twice and then breaks down horribly--gets gritty and dirty.  I use it more for baking and pan frying.  It adds virtually no flavor to cooked items.

Bacon grease is a personal favorite for certain things.  If I happen to have bacon on hand, then I save the grease to cook other things.  I think it can give a nice flavor to eggs, pancakes, biscuits, etc and it's a great base for gravies.  If your bacon is from a good source, then your grease can't be any worse than your bacon.  ;D

Real butter is always a good choice for certain things.  You can bake with it, fry with it and spread it on your toast.  It costs a little more than some of the others listed and has a lower smoke point like coconut oil, but tastes great and it's much easier to find than some of the others.

I know at least one member uses grape seed oil in their cooking, but I personally cannot offer much information on this topic.
« Last Edit: January 25, 2008, 05:23:31 AM by healthybratt »
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Offline 4myhoonie

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Re: Good Fats, Bad Fats: Healthy Oils for Cooking
« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2008, 07:14:15 PM »
i use a lot of organic expeller pressed safflower oil that i get through a co-op.  it has something in it that we need (not sure what it was--i read about it in What Your Dr. May NOT Tell You About Pre-Menopause).  it doesn't have a lot of flavor, so i use it in salad dressings, and to cook things in my iron skillets.  usually we fry eggs in butter and i use olive oil if i want that flavor, and the safflower for everything else.  HTH.
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Offline pupu4four

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Re: Good Fats, Bad Fats: Healthy Oils for Cooking
« Reply #3 on: January 28, 2008, 11:26:34 AM »
healthybratt,

How long can you keep your bacon grease before it goes bad?  Do you have to use it right away?

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Good Fats, Bad Fats: Healthy Oils for Cooking
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2008, 11:32:12 AM »
healthybratt,

How long can you keep your bacon grease before it goes bad?  Do you have to use it right away?

A fairly long time, as far as I know.  I've had some on the back of the stove in a jar for months and I just used some yesterday.  Seemed fine to me.

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Offline 4myhoonie

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Re: Good Fats, Bad Fats: Healthy Oils for Cooking
« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2008, 11:46:42 AM »
healthybratt,

How long can you keep your bacon grease before it goes bad?  Do you have to use it right away?

A fairly long time, as far as I know.  I've had some on the back of the stove in a jar for months and I just used some yesterday.  Seemed fine to me.

~hb

eeewwww!!!!!  you don't even refrigerate it?  ???  yikes!   :o 
« Last Edit: March 01, 2008, 11:01:29 AM by 4myhoonie »
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Offline Mama Sita

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Re: Good Fats, Bad Fats: Healthy Oils for Cooking
« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2008, 01:03:42 PM »
I like to use sunflower oil, extra-virgin olive oil and unrefined coconut oil. I also love to use butter, which gives great flavor.

I have a hard time keeping the 'good' oils on hand, mostly due to their higher cost. However, I keep thinking we're going to pay it somewhere, someday, either now in smaller amounts to stay healthy, or LARGER amounts down the road because now we're NOT healthy. ( I am thinking heartwise, here.) :)
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Good Fats, Bad Fats: Healthy Oils for Cooking
« Reply #7 on: February 01, 2008, 02:13:34 PM »
healthybratt,

How long can you keep your bacon grease before it goes bad?  Do you have to use it right away?

A fairly long time, as far as I know.  I've had some on the back of the stove in a jar for months and I just used some yesterday.  Seemed fine to me.

~hb

eeewwww!!!!!  you don't even refridgerate it?????  yikes!   :o 
why?   ???   it's just fat.  do you keep shortening, coconut oil or olive oil in the fridge?

My grandma always did it this way.  Seems fine to me.   ;D
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Offline twitterpated4hubby

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Re: Good Fats, Bad Fats: Healthy Oils for Cooking
« Reply #8 on: February 10, 2008, 11:21:22 AM »
Is sunflower oil good or bad?
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Offline CountyCork

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Re: Good Fats, Bad Fats: Healthy Oils for Cooking
« Reply #9 on: February 10, 2008, 01:20:06 PM »
I got a handout from a nutritionist/naturopath person about oils.
Summation:
LCFA - long chain fatty acids.  Difficult for body to break down, must have other things with to aid in digestion.  Stress on pancreas, liver, digestive system.  Predominately stored in body as fat.  Also can deposit in arteries in lipid forms such as cholesterol.
MCFA - medium chain fatty acids.  Smaller, permeate cell membranes easily.  Do not require special proteins or enzymes for body to digest.  Do not slow down metabolism.  Go directly to liver, immediately converted into energy rather than storing as fat.  Stimulates metabolism to burn fat.  These are Fats that burn fats!

LCFAs include: most vegetable and seed oils.
MCFAs are found in coconut oil.

I thought for sure I had a list of the LCFA oils by name, the ones that were not good, but if I remember right it included canola, vegetable, soy, corn, and some others.

I think that the best are coconut oil, butter, extra virgin olive oil, and some nut oils.  The problem with the nut oils can be cost, but like someone said pay now or pay later!

If I come across a list, I'll include it.  I am currently looking for an oil to replace canola for us,  something light and tasteless.  I think a lighter olive oil might be the answer, but I have to find out more info.

HTH

Offline CountyCork

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Re: Good Fats, Bad Fats: Healthy Oils for Cooking
« Reply #10 on: February 10, 2008, 01:21:50 PM »
And now I just looked at another thread about just canola oil!  So go there and read that info.  And of course now I remember that the list of good oils is found in Nourishing Traditions.

There!

Offline Jemima

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Re: Good Fats, Bad Fats: Healthy Oils for Cooking
« Reply #11 on: February 10, 2008, 01:51:31 PM »
I have a question, too.  Is Crisco/shortening really bad for you?  I have always assumed it was, but don't really know if it's that terrible or not.  I have a recipe for buns that uses Crisco (shortening) and used butter instead last time, but they did not turn out the same.  Passable, but not the same.  I always avoid buying the tub of white stuff, but I'm wondering if anyone can shed more light on why it's not good for you.

Offline stebs7

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Re: Good Fats, Bad Fats: Healthy Oils for Cooking
« Reply #12 on: February 10, 2008, 02:48:58 PM »
Lard (pork or beef tallow) is actually quite easy to make yourself - we make it and pour it into litre (quart) jars after it has cooled off a bit - then keep it in the refrigerator with a cover on.  (Lard can turn rancid if kept too long in warm).  This way you do not have to buy the hygrogenated type.

Using that in pie crusts makes them very flaky and tasty.  We fry french fires in it - and fry eggs in them if we are out of bacon grease (which I keep in little bowls in the fridge - in the old days people had quite cold pantries and it was normal to keep things like that there)

Going to Wikipedia actually tells you alot about Lard - how to render it by boiling in water or just in a skillet without water.  For instance if you boil a fatty piece of pork for soup, you can cool the pot and skim off the cooled fat that has hardened and put it in a jar - and use it when you need it.  I even use lard for popping popcorn, I grease the cast iron griddle with it when making pancakes, french toast, etc.  If I have used it for deep frying, I will pour it thru a fine strainer when it is just warm back into the jar and use it several times - straining the lard though before restoring is the important part.

We render both pork and beef fat. 

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Offline stebs7

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Re: Good Fats, Bad Fats: Healthy Oils for Cooking
« Reply #13 on: February 10, 2008, 02:53:49 PM »
By the way, if you dry render it (meaning not cooling it in water), we cut the pork fat up into small cubes and then dump them in our cast iron deep chicken fryer and let them melt down on low/med heat - actually I think they tell you how to do it in NT.  You will have nice cracklings left over.

Offline twitterpated4hubby

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Re: Good Fats, Bad Fats: Healthy Oils for Cooking
« Reply #14 on: February 10, 2008, 05:26:28 PM »
I have the book deceptively delicious and she always calls for trans fat free soft tub margarine. It always bugs me because we use plain butter and it doesn't work the way her does. It makes it harder trying to get it in the recipe just right because hers is chilled and mine is either hard or melted. GRRR!! This margarine is very unhealthy right? What could i use instead? Maybe smart balance butter? wait...is smart balance even butter or is it margarine.  :o
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Offline miff aka Missi

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Re: Good Fats, Bad Fats: Healthy Oils for Cooking
« Reply #15 on: February 10, 2008, 05:47:14 PM »
I have the book deceptively delicious and she always calls for trans fat free soft tub margarine. It always bugs me because we use plain butter and it doesn't work the way her does. It makes it harder trying to get it in the recipe just right because hers is chilled and mine is either hard or melted. GRRR!! This margarine is very unhealthy right? What could i use instead? Maybe smart balance butter? wait...is smart balance even butter or is it margarine.  :o
What about spreadable butter?  Isn't that butter with olive oil?  Anybody know?

Offline naturalgirl

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Re: Good Fats, Bad Fats: Healthy Oils for Cooking
« Reply #16 on: February 10, 2008, 06:10:57 PM »
Um hum. I went to help a family out once and they had spreadable butter...half butter, half olive oil. It tasted wonderful on warm bread. If the butter is salt free I'd think of adding some sea salt, especially if you are trading off from margerine to better-for-you butter/spread.

Offline strawberry

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Re: Good Fats, Bad Fats: Healthy Oils for Cooking
« Reply #17 on: February 10, 2008, 06:31:51 PM »
Is Crisco/shortening really bad for you?  I have always assumed it was, but don't really know if it's that terrible or not.

I picked up "a tub of white stuff" this Christmas from Wild Oats/ Whole Foods.  It's vegetable shortening, by Spectrum.  Maybe it'll work on yer buns!
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Offline blessedmama

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Re: Good Fats, Bad Fats: Healthy Oils for Cooking
« Reply #18 on: February 11, 2008, 05:31:15 AM »
I have a question, too.  Is Crisco/shortening really bad for you? 

Crisco is a vegetable oil, bad for you and is hydrogenated, bad for you!  Can't remember if it is a trans fat or not.  You can buy your own tallow and render it just check out some websites for grass fed beef and most sell it. 

As for getting rid of canola oil, I have replaced mine with a recipe from Eat Fat Loose Fat by Dr. Mary Enig and Sally Fallon.  Here's what she has to say.  "This wonderful blend of three oils can be used in salad dressings or as a cooking oil.  When used for cooking, flavors come through beautifully, and the blend does not burn as easily as pure coconut oil.  In salads, it provides all the benefits of coconut oil and does not have the strong taste of olive oil.  In mayonnaise, it provides firmness when chilled.  Be sure that the sesame oil you purchase is truly expellar expressed or cold pressed, since the very high temperatures used during processing destroy the unique protective antioxidants in sesame oil.  Since we use this blend in many recipes, we suggest you make enough to have on hand whenever you need it. 

1 cup coconut oil gently melted
1 cup expeller-expressed or cold pressed sesame oil
1 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Mix all ingredients together in a glass jar (I used empty olive oil bottle easier to pour from) and store at room temperature.
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Good Fats, Bad Fats: Healthy Oils for Cooking
« Reply #19 on: February 11, 2008, 06:59:21 AM »
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Offline twitterpated4hubby

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Re: Good Fats, Bad Fats: Healthy Oils for Cooking
« Reply #20 on: February 11, 2008, 08:07:46 AM »
The other day dh accidently picked up plain old olive oil instead of EVOO. Is that bad for us or can i still use it atleast on my skin? GRRR!! DH!!! :D
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Offline Pennie

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Re: Good Fats, Bad Fats: Healthy Oils for Cooking
« Reply #21 on: February 13, 2008, 04:20:18 AM »
i use a lot of organic expeller pressed safflower oil that i get through a co-op.  it has something in it that we need (not sure what it was--i read about it in What Your Dr. May NOT Tell You About Pre-Menopause).  it doesn't have a lot of flavor, so i use it in salad dressings, and to cook things in my iron skillets.  usually we fry eggs in butter and i use olive oil if i want that flavor, and the safflower for everything else.  HTH.
I think this post might answer my question but I just want to clarify.  Expeller pressed is okay?  I thought cold pressed was supposed to be good but I saw some safflower oil in the grocery store and it said expeller so I wanted to make sure that was good. 

My other question is.....if partially hydrogenated means bad does totally hydrogenated mean really really bad?  Or is that better? 

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Good Fats, Bad Fats: Healthy Oils for Cooking
« Reply #22 on: February 13, 2008, 07:11:51 AM »
My other question is.....if partially hydrogenated means bad does totally hydrogenated mean really really bad?  Or is that better? 
I don't know if there is a difference, but anything hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated means trans fats.  These cannot be broken down in the body correctly and can interfere with proper fat digestion causing a whole multitude of problems related to inadequate fat consumption.
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Offline Pennie

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Re: Good Fats, Bad Fats: Healthy Oils for Cooking
« Reply #23 on: February 13, 2008, 08:14:40 AM »
My other question is.....if partially hydrogenated means bad does totally hydrogenated mean really really bad?  Or is that better? 
I don't know if there is a difference, but anything hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated means trans fats.  These cannot be broken down in the body correctly and can interfere with proper fat digestion causing a whole multitude of problems related to inadequate fat consumption.
Wonderful, I just bought some Jiffy peanut butter.  The only natural peanut butter was unsalted.  EW.  I haven't bought anything but natural in yrs.. ...... ::) 

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Good Fats, Bad Fats: Healthy Oils for Cooking
« Reply #24 on: February 13, 2008, 08:22:55 AM »
My other question is.....if partially hydrogenated means bad does totally hydrogenated mean really really bad?  Or is that better? 
I don't know if there is a difference, but anything hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated means trans fats.  These cannot be broken down in the body correctly and can interfere with proper fat digestion causing a whole multitude of problems related to inadequate fat consumption.
Wonderful, I just bought some Jiffy peanut butter.  The only natural peanut butter was unsalted.  EW.  I haven't bought anything but natural in yrs.. ...... ::) 
WM and most grocers (not all) carry Smuckers and one of my grocers carries a natural peanut butter spread (I think it's Jiffy).  The only difference is that they add palm oil and sugar to the Jiffy, but I don't think it's hydrogenated.
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Offline CountyCork

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Re: Good Fats, Bad Fats: Healthy Oils for Cooking
« Reply #25 on: February 13, 2008, 08:37:04 AM »
Secret trick - buy some natural, unsalted PB.
Take it home, put in a big bowl, and add a pinch of salt and some honey (or molasses or sucanat or agave, or whatever sweetener) and stir it up well.  Then stuff it back into your jar and you have your own sweet/salty natural PB to your taste liking!


Offline healthybratt

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Re: Good Fats, Bad Fats: Healthy Oils for Cooking
« Reply #26 on: February 19, 2008, 07:17:44 AM »
The Media is beginning to catch up with WTM.   ::)

Saw this on a morning talk show this morning.

http://www.hopeandhealing.com/2008/flat-belly-diet-mufa-foods-trim-waist-without-exercise/
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Offline SarahK

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Re: Good Fats, Bad Fats: Healthy Oils for Cooking
« Reply #27 on: February 19, 2008, 07:21:27 AM »
The Media is beginning to catch up with WTM.   ::)

Great.

There goes the neighborhood.
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Offline CountyCork

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Re: Good Fats, Bad Fats: Healthy Oils for Cooking
« Reply #28 on: February 19, 2008, 09:06:58 AM »
HELP HELP HELP!

I want a clear, tasteless oil for high heat cooking. 
NOT coconut oil (taste), NOT evoo (taste) and NOT butter (burn).
I use all the above for many things, but need an option for other things.

Something to pop popcorn in, or whatever.

Lard and bacon grease are out, we are "no pork" here.

What about "light" olive oil?

Grapeseed is too high in Omega 6 says Sally Fallon.

I WANT AN ANSWER - and I am not mad, just looking for a definitive "yes" or "no".

This thread has many questions, but is there a clear answer?

Offline purewellspring

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Re: Good Fats, Bad Fats: Healthy Oils for Cooking
« Reply #29 on: February 19, 2008, 09:15:34 AM »
We use almond oil for popcorn around here...it's probably not adding a whole lot of health benefits since it's processed for high heat cooking...but it makes great popcorn and from what I've read I don't think it's doing anything all too BAD to us!! :) And it doesn't have any flavor at all that I can tell. Hope that helps!