Author Topic: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks  (Read 53326 times)

Offline Helen

  • Adept
  • Posts: 412
    • personal blog
Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« on: May 03, 2006, 01:58:45 AM »
Does anybody make cheese? I need a good easy recipe, I dont have any cheese making equipment, but do i really need all that? I have 3 gallons of fresh, raw, milked by hand, jersay milk, and i want to use it!

Elbereth

  • Guest
Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2006, 02:41:24 PM »
The only "cheese" recipe that I know that is easy is for cream cheese.  It's really easy and very good.  You can make yogurt with your milk and when it is set you can set a strainer, lined with cheesecloth over a bowl and let it drain out for 12 hours on the counter, covered with a layer of cheesecloth.  If it is not firm enough, you can tie the cloth and CAREFULLY hang it over the bowl with a long wooden spoon till it's perfect.  Bottle and refrigerate and use the whey for "tummyaches" and indigestion.  Hope you can use this.


Offline healthybratt

  • administrator
  • Administrator
  • Guru
  • Posts: 11503
  • administrator
    • wouldn't you like to know?
Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2006, 02:47:39 PM »
Bottle and refrigerate and use the whey for "tummyaches" and indigestion.

What is whey and how does it help tummy aches.  How long does it keep?

One more dumb question:  Isn't cream cheese made from cream?
  My favorite herb book!!

Elbereth

  • Guest
Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2006, 03:01:20 PM »
Not really sure exactly what whey is, I just know the name of it.   :-\  I do know that if it is made with cultured milk, like yogurt or pima or fil mjolk (cultures you can buy from a company called GEM cultures)  it has enzymes and minerals and other healthy things in it.  I guess I'll have to research it more for more answers than that, but I know that if I have indigestion, I just take a couple of tablespoons and it goes away.  Also works for my kids to take in a small cup of milk or water.  Ummm, it keeps for about a month if kept in the back of your refrigerator tightly capped.

I'm not sure what "Philly" cream cheese is made from, but ours is made from Yogurt.  ;) I think I've heard that commercial cream cheese is made in a bad way, with too much pressure or something, causes it to have negative properties.  Not sure on that one though.

Offline healthybratt

  • administrator
  • Administrator
  • Guru
  • Posts: 11503
  • administrator
    • wouldn't you like to know?
Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2006, 03:51:44 PM »
Thanks, but I just wanted to know what the whey is.  I mean is it the stuff left in the cheesecloth or what?
  My favorite herb book!!

Offline Helen

  • Adept
  • Posts: 412
    • personal blog
Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #5 on: May 03, 2006, 04:11:21 PM »
how about this I answer my own question, hee, whey is what drips out of your cloth, what stays in the cloth is the curds.  I actually talked to my motherinlaw and she said oh yea she knows how to make cheese, so now i have at least 6 fantastic very old and oldfashioned recipes. so now on with the cheese makeing!  yogurt and butter are easy, but cheese, hmmmmm

Offline ForeverGirl

  • Global Moderator
  • Master
  • Posts: 1418
  • BoogBug
    • WellTellMe
Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #6 on: May 03, 2006, 05:25:56 PM »
Ahem...

So please share 'em!  ;)

If they're tried and proven recipes, I'm sure several of us would love to try them too!

Thanks,

Rebekah
Honey Sunny in complete exasperation:
"JOE!!! You DOUGHNUT COCONUT COCONUT COCONUT!!!"

Offline Helen

  • Adept
  • Posts: 412
    • personal blog
Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #7 on: May 05, 2006, 04:26:54 AM »
Ok this recipe comes out of an old cook book called AMISH COOKING. it has old fashioned ways of doing things. the General Directions fro cheesemakeing, this is the way women have done it for years, very tried andproven.
#1 let milk set in cool place overnight to ripen, a commercial starter may be added to hasten ripening, add about 1 cup to 1 gallon of milk,  ( ripen means to thicken and sour abit)
#2 next morning warm themilk slowly to 86 degrees
#3 dissolve cheese color tablet in 1/4 cup water ad add to milk, use 3/4 tablet for 10 gallons milk, never mix the cheese color tablet with the rennet tablet solutin
#4 dissolve the cheese rennet tablet; in 1/4 cup cold water. Mis with the milk at 86 degrees. Ice cream Junket tablets may also be used instead of the rennet.
#5 remove the milk from the stove, stir gentlybut thoroughly with wooden spoon for 2 minutes.
#6 cover container and let stand by a warm stove for 1 hour or untill thick enough. to test put finger into the milk and bring up like a hook, if the curd breaks clean across finger like jelly it is thick enough.
#7 cut curd into cubes using a long blade knife that extends to the bottom  of the kettle, cut 1/2 inch squares then cut diagonally, cutting chould give a clear whey. a milky whey signifies loss of cassein and fat
#8 let stand 5 minutes. return curd to stove then stir slowely and gently to keep pieces from sticking together while the temperature is slowely raised to 100-102 degrees, and kept there, then stir only occasionally so piesces wondt stich together, instead of returning the curds to the stove, some of the whey may be taken from the top, strained into a dipper, then brought to a boil, slowely pour the hot whey back into the curds, stirring the curds all teh time, continue this process untill the temperature has risen to 100-102 degrees.
The curds are ready when a handul sqeezed firmly does not squritout between the fingers, but almost falls apart when hand is opened, takes about 1 hour.
#9 pour heated curds intoa colander which has been lined with cheesecloth organdy, or gauze diaper cloth. catch whey it is a helathy drink, or may be used in recipes calling for water, and is also a good tonic for flowers.
#10 gently work salt into the curds, about 1 tablespoon to 2 gallons of milk, or according to tate
#11 leave curds in cloth, having only 1 thickness over the top, and place in the prepared press , do not use an aluminam container, place the lid on top of the cheese, weih down with 2 bricks or the equivalwnt in weight, in the evening turn the cheesead double the weight, , next mornign remove the cheese fromthe press, keep it in a warm room for 36 to 48 hours. by layng it in the sun by a windo for half a day will hasten the ageing process.
#12 seal the the cheese by brushing it with smokinghot paraffin, take heed for hot parafiin catches fire like oil. if cheese is not solid do not seal, instead of paraffin  vegetable or mineral oil may be rubbe nto the cheeseto keep from moiking, another method to prevent molding is to mix only half of the salt  into the cheese then rub salt over it every few days, if mold appears wash the cheese in warm salt water and salt again, turn every few days.
#13 place cheese in room (celler) with temperature about 60 degrees and turn everyother day for 3 to 6 weeks, if kept longer, turn twice a week, cheesemay be kept several months, the longer it is cured the sharper it becomes,
*one gallon of curds produces app. one lb of cheese
*to make hard dry cheese press with 25-30 l weights
*if mold forms on cheesethats beingused, trim it off and use,

       wheeeee that was long!  there are also specific recipes, Iwill try to post some later.               
now my motherinlaw has a diffrent way, she simply sets her milk out for a coupleof days till it is clabbered, sets it onthe stove and heats it till you cant stick you r finger in the middle anymore, :) then she cuts it with a knife, drains the whey and adds butter or salt and pepper , depends what kind of cheese you make.  and that is how i am going to do, this is the way her mom did and her mom taught her and so on. :)
« Last Edit: May 05, 2006, 07:15:09 AM by Helen »

Offline healthybratt

  • administrator
  • Administrator
  • Guru
  • Posts: 11503
  • administrator
    • wouldn't you like to know?
Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #8 on: May 05, 2006, 05:19:32 AM »
DUMB question.  ;D

If the key ingredient in cheese is "spoiled" milk, then why aren't you supposed to drink "spoiled" milk? 

  My favorite herb book!!

Offline sven

  • Learning
  • Posts: 47
    • Solar Family Farm
Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #9 on: June 04, 2006, 01:50:52 AM »
DUMB question.  ;D

If the key ingredient in cheese is "spoiled" milk, then why aren't you supposed to drink "spoiled" milk? 



This is NOT a dumb question!  It is a modern question. 

Milk is designed, as it comes from the animals (i.e. raw), to protect itself.  Aside from the enzymes, it has lactobaccilli (good bacteria) in it.  Over time, these lactobaccilli multiply and outcompete the bad bacteria.  In addition, as the lactobaccilli multiply and consume the lactose (milk sugar) the milk becomes more acid, also discouraging the growth of bad bacteria and other pathogens. When is "spoils" it is really just souring or curing, just like yogurt.  It is not harmful, and in fact, becomes more healthful, although we may not be used to the sour taste with our modern diets.  Curds and whey was a traditional and very healthful food year ago, just like the Miss Muffet rhyme goes!

When milk is heated to kill the enzymes and bacteria (i.e. pasturized), everything, good and bad, is killed.  The milk can no longer protect itself.  Bad bacteria is no longer inhibited and the just rots.  It is dangerous to drink.
The East Tennessee Ridge Runners

Offline sven

  • Learning
  • Posts: 47
    • Solar Family Farm
Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #10 on: June 04, 2006, 02:14:02 AM »
Does anybody make cheese? I need a good easy recipe, I dont have any cheese making equipment, but do i really need all that? I have 3 gallons of fresh, raw, milked by hand, jersay milk, and i want to use it!

If I had 3 gallons of fresh, raw, Jersey milk, here's what I would do......drink 2 gallons whole!  With the remaining gallon, skim as much of the cream as you can, put it in a wide mouth mason jar (add a tablespoon or 2 of cultured buttermilk if you have it), cap it tightly, and set it on the counter until it thickens (this is called "clabbering" or "ripening" the cream).  You can do a number of things with this.  Eat it as is (it is now soured cream), make butter and save the buttermilk for baking, or make REAL cream cheese by pouring into cheese cloth or a tea towel (not terrycloth!) and hanging over a bowl as described elsewhere in these posts.  Cream cheese is traditionally called that because it was made with all cream.

With the remaining skimmed milk, you could just let is sour (or clabber) and thicken and pour it through cheese cloth to make a soft cheese (which can be used in any recipe calling for commercial cream cheese).  I'll add garlic, salt, and whatever spices we like and use it on bread, crackers, or baked potatoes.

Or you can pour it into a stainless steel or enameled pot, let it clabber, cut the curd (any size you like) and heat it slowly (not too  hot....you should be able to put your finger in it....don't want to kill all those healthy little bacteria) to shrink the curds.  Drain them in cheesecloth and you have real cottage cheese.  This is drier than store bought cottage cheese.  You can add some cream to the curd when you eat it.  And make certain you salt it to taste!

And this is what my mom told me to make years ago when I first had some raw Jersey milk to play with:

Easy White Cheese (a.k.a. Queso Blanco)

1) Scald one gallon of whole milk (that means raise it to 180 degrees or until small bubbles form around the edge of the pan)

2) Slowly add 1/4 cup lemon juice or vinegar (I prefer lemon juice) and stir gently until the curd separates.

3) Pour the curds and whey into a cheesecloth lined colander and then hang per above instructions.

4) After the dripping stops, remove the cheese!  You can now cut it into cubes and use in stir frying or season and just eat.  Or put it in a food processor and season as you like to make a smoother, more spreadable cheese.

This last recipe is not a "ripened" or "live" cheese as you've heated it and used an acid rather than a culture to precipitate the curd.  But it is still good!

I have lots of old cheesemaking books so let me know if you have any questions!  Enjoy!

The East Tennessee Ridge Runners

Offline jaemom

  • Adept
  • Posts: 474
Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #11 on: June 09, 2006, 12:35:40 PM »
Sometimes I feel as though I might as well be reading greek...  :D
Wife to J (10 yrs)
Mom to B (9), G (7), G (2), and B (1)

Offline servantgirl

  • Adept
  • Posts: 219
Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #12 on: June 09, 2006, 07:46:25 PM »
Wow, this is just what I have been wondering about. I love this forum, God is so good to lead me here!

OK Sven,
I want recipes for other types of cheese. I need it to be totally raw. My kids cannot digest milk that is heated at all. I use raw goat milk.

I have 1/2 gallon of milk souring at room temp right now, has been 3 days. Starting to congeal a bit on top. How do I turn it into cottage cheese without heating it?

As for raw hard-type cheeses, how do you make that? Do you always have to use rennet or buy a culture? I really have been longing to do this so I would be very grateful for any help that anyone could give.

I'm so excited!! I'm gonna make cheese for my boys! (They haven't had any in a Looong time.)

Thanks!
Jen
Life is what happens to you while you're busy making other plans.

Offline healthybratt

  • administrator
  • Administrator
  • Guru
  • Posts: 11503
  • administrator
    • wouldn't you like to know?
Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #13 on: June 10, 2006, 05:40:26 AM »
I have 1/2 gallon of milk souring at room temp right now, has been 3 days. Starting to congeal a bit on top. How do I turn it into cottage cheese without heating it?

Being raised a modern city girl sure is a hard handicap to get over.  I read this and immediately went "ewwww GROSS".  LOL   ;)
  My favorite herb book!!

Offline sven

  • Learning
  • Posts: 47
    • Solar Family Farm
Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #14 on: June 12, 2006, 10:18:06 AM »
O.k., HealthyBratt, just remember, God designed milk to protect itself by souring!  Do you want me to write about the pasturized homogenized milk you buy in the grocery store?  That would REALLY gross you out!  And I know a lot of women, countrified or not, that are queazy about the idea of raw meat, raw milk, etc.

As for cheese recipes, milk "cooks" at a relatively low temp.  I mean 80-110 degrees.  Heat it above that and it would no longer be "raw".  So to make cottage cheese, let it clabber (it seems you've done this), cut the curd into cubes (they won't be perfect, experiment with the size you like), then put it in a stainless steel pot on the stove on really low heat and stir it gently occasionally.  Watch to make certain you don't over heat....you should be able to put your finger in it without burning.  The curds will slowly shrink.   When they are shrunk to your liking, drain the curds and whey thru some cheese cloth.  I usually rinse the curds after this.  Salt to taste and chill.  This will be dry, not like storebought stuff.  You can add milk or cream to it if you prefer it wetter.

A great website for all cheeses, and especially raw goat cheese is www.fiasofarm.com.  There is also wonderful info on raising goats the "natural" way.

I highly recommend anyone interested in cheesemaking buy a book or two on the subject.  Cheesemaking Made Easy by Rikki Carroll is considered the American classic.  Wild Fermentation also has a chapter on cheesemaking as is much more "casual" about it.  Do a websearch on the subject. 

There are just so many variables in making hard and soft cheese.  Most hard cheese recipes are too complicated to list here.  You can use a purchased culture (buttermilk works for "mesophillic" and plain yogurt for "thermophillic" in recipes) or let your milk culture itself (i.e. sour) but the latter may give you an undesirable taste.  Or it may not!  Rennet is used for most "standard" hard cheeses.  But you could take your curds from the cottage cheese recipe above and press them for a time too.  Then you would have a sort of hard cheese.  You can even age it.  But you may or may not like the outcome!  Experimenting is fun if you have a good, cheap source of milk, lots of adventurous eaters, and someone or something to eat the "failures"!

I can spend WAY too much time here and the kids need a good reading now!  Happy experimenting.

The East Tennessee Ridge Runners

Offline healthybratt

  • administrator
  • Administrator
  • Guru
  • Posts: 11503
  • administrator
    • wouldn't you like to know?
Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #15 on: June 12, 2006, 11:56:52 AM »
O.k., HealthyBratt, just remember, God designed milk to protect itself by souring!  Do you want me to write about the pasturized homogenized milk you buy in the grocery store?  That would REALLY gross you out!  And I know a lot of women, countrified or not, that are queazy about the idea of raw meat, raw milk, etc.

Don't worry about me none.  I've been living in the country for 10 years now.  I've seen bull calves being processed (pigs too).  I've watched and helped butcher a few cows.  I've cleaned a few fish and a few other things that would probably have grossed me out to no end years ago.  Actually, since I lived with only my dad (fishing, and other tomboy stuff) and now that I'm a mom, there is very little left that grosses me out (except the idea of drinking chunky milk  :-X ), but thanks, I'll get there eventually.
  My favorite herb book!!

Offline Elizab04

  • Adept
  • Posts: 103
Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #16 on: July 17, 2006, 03:46:56 AM »
I have recently started making my own cheese at home.  I am wondering if anyone has any suggestions.  I don't know where to age it.  I think the aging temp. is around 56 degrees, so I really don't know where to do that in WI.  It's either colder or hotter by far.  Also, does anyone have any good easy cheese recipes?  Thanks :)

Offline shawnaincov

  • Adept
  • Posts: 74
Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #17 on: July 17, 2006, 07:00:53 AM »
I don't have recipes but am sooo glad you ask because I would like tham too! ;D 
Thanks for asking and I hope someone answers.

Shawna

Offline mexmarr

  • Master
  • Posts: 1555
Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #18 on: August 15, 2006, 10:57:15 AM »
Ok, I have really been thinking about making mozzerella cheese.  I have access to raw milk for $2.50, and we eat a lot of cheese.  I thought that it would be fun to learn, and be tons better for you.  It wouldn't be cheaper while I buy my milk, but we want to get a cow or goats once we get some land.  (My FIL has 360 acres available as soon as we can dig a well, and get a mobile home, hopefully by spring of 2008) Has anybody done it?  I found a kit on the internet that looked fun and helpful.

Offline heatheronthehill

  • Adept
  • Posts: 402
Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #19 on: August 15, 2006, 01:49:20 PM »
I have recently started making my own cheese at home.  I am wondering if anyone has any suggestions.  I don't know where to age it.  I think the aging temp. is around 56 degrees, so I really don't know where to do that in WI.  It's either colder or hotter by far.  Also, does anyone have any good easy cheese recipes?  Thanks :)
[/color]

You need a basement!  If you have a nice unheated basement or root cellar, the temps underground should stay around 50* year round. 

Dairae

  • Guest
Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #20 on: August 15, 2006, 02:09:15 PM »
FAST Mozzarella Cheese
Sprinkle 1 1/2 tsp of citric acid in one gallon of milk and heat to 88 degrees.The milk will curdle right away.

Add 1/4 tsp liquid rennet, reduce heat to very low and let sit for 5 minutes.The whey will really separate from the curd.

Use a long knife and cut the curds into 1 inch squares.

Use a ladle to pick up the curds, draining as much whey as you can. Use your hand to press off as much whey as possible.

Microwave the curds for one minute. Put on some tough kitchen gloves and knead it (or stick it in the KitchenAid mixer) until it is cool.

Toss it back in the microwave for 30 seconds at a time and keep kneading it until it cools. Toss in about a tsp of salt whilst kneading..

When it is shiny and stretches like taffy, it is done. Stick it in cold water to cool it down.

If you don't want to nuke it, heat the whey to 185 and dip the curds in it to heat it up.

I have made Feta from the book Making Great Cheese at Home by Barbara Ciletti. Fabulous and fairly simple. I have a cute book I bought used called Making Homemade Cheeses and Butter by Phyllis Hobson. It is more old fashioned, but simple. I have bought the cheesemaking kits from  www.cheeseemaking.com and been happy with them. Made a decent 30 day cheddar. Wish I had to time to play with it--it is exciting to make your own cheese.
Rena



Offline mexmarr

  • Master
  • Posts: 1555
Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #21 on: September 18, 2006, 10:45:31 AM »
Quote
I have bought the cheesemaking kits from  www.cheeseemaking.com and been happy with them

I did it!  Yea!  Yesterday, I made the 30 minute Mozzeralla recipe using the above mentioned kit, and it really worked!  It was delicious and had a perfect texture, just like "real" cheese, hehe.  I was so proud of myself, and my dh loved it.  We had Quesadilla for supper last night! ;D I highly recommend the kit from Cheesemaking.com  I got the set with book and dvd, and it was really helpful and interesting!!!

Offline lotsaboys

  • Master
  • Posts: 1796
Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #22 on: November 17, 2006, 06:44:56 AM »
We're planning to make some cheese, so have been looking into different recipes, etc. and as it seems the easiest ones use rennet (Junket) tablets, so our question is- does anyone know if there is any reason, nutritionally speaking, NOT to use rennet? Is there anything about it that is not "good for you"?
Thanks.

Offline ShabbyChic

  • Master
  • Posts: 1696
  • Wife, mom, motorcycle enthusiast, and chocoholic.
Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #23 on: January 26, 2007, 11:25:25 AM »
This has got to be the world's fastest, easiest cheese recipe.  I was experimenting (under the guidance of a friend) and we've made some FABULOUS cheese.  Y'all have to try this.

Ingredients:
2 parts (I used 2 cups) raw milk
1 part kefir (I used, um, 1 cup...)

Directions:
In a saucepan heat the milk to 170 degrees, constantly stirring with a wooden spoon.  Add the kefir, and keep stirring.  It will immediately curdle.  I keep my kefir in the fridge, so it also cooled the mix, so I stirred until it got back to 170 degrees. 

Pour all of the contents of the pot through a fine metal seive.  Catch the liquid (whey) and keep it for sprouting grain, pancakes, etc.  The solids are CHEESE! 

Now, squeeze those curds into a ball.  Squeeze all the juice out that you can.

** This step is not necessary, but at this point I dipped it into some icy cold water for one second to help it get firm fast***

Roll the ball in fresh cut oregano and basil.

Wrap it in wax paper and stick it in the fridge for about 15 minutes (just to get a little harder, but not necessary).

VOILA!!

My 2 1/2 year old son pretty much did all of this by himself with our guidance.  It was such a fun and easy project.  And OH MY!!  This is the best cheese I've ever tasted.  Unfortunately, 3 cups of liquid goods only yielded a very, very small ball of cheese.  My Honey kept saying, "YOU MADE THIS?!!?!"
That's Shabby SHEIK not Shabby CHICK.  Hee-hee.

Offline boysmama

  • Global Moderator
  • Guru
  • Posts: 2199
Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #24 on: January 26, 2007, 11:39:27 AM »
I have recently started making my own cheese at home.  I am wondering if anyone has any suggestions.  I don't know where to age it.  I think the aging temp. is around 56 degrees, so I really don't know where to do that in WI.  It's either colder or hotter by far.  Also, does anyone have any good easy cheese recipes?  Thanks :)
You can use an old fridge that doesn't hold a really cold temp anymore. These are usually free and there is nothing wrong with extending their life for a use like this. Make sure the door seals well... put it in a well  ventilated place like a shed or garage in case it is leaks a little refridgerant (it is not really dangerous ;)) or condensation. Also might want to be sure the fridge doesn't have a problem that causes it to run constantly or your electric bill goes :o

Offline diaperswyper

  • Adept
  • Posts: 656
  • A DOUBLE BLESSING!!
Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #25 on: February 07, 2007, 02:58:31 PM »
   Does anyone know how healthy the cottage cheese is that's made with vinegar? That's how i made it last time and then added salt and cream. My family loved it. I now have a culture but it's definitely more complicated. I'm assuming since it's still raw when you're done it's healthier but enough to go to all the bother?

Offline healthyinOhio

  • Guru
  • Posts: 4024
  • Happily Married for 12 years and proud mama of 2.
Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #26 on: April 26, 2007, 06:45:22 AM »
I found this neat website the other day:
http://www.gourmetsleuth.com/cheeserecipes.htm

I also believe that the easiest of cheese to make is the vinegar cheese.  I will share my recipe, but seems like there are many different variations to it.

GOAT'S MILK FETA

1 GALLON MILK
1/2 CUP VINEGAR

Heat milk to 180 degrees and add vinegar.  Stir to mix well and remove from heat.  Milk will curdle immediately.  Let sit for about 5 min. and strain in cloth to separate the whey from the cheese(you will have around 9-10(or more)  cups of whey and only about a pound of cheese).  After the whey has strained and you can squeeze the excess out, put on a cutting board and  add some salt if you like.  Then, this is what I do to get a more firm and drier cheese:  place your cheese blob on a cutting board and place another cutting board on top and place something underneath the bottom one to make it tilt .  This way the excess whey can run down at an angle.  Keep pressing down to mash the cheese flat.  Put in fridge and either eat right away, or let sit in fridge a few weeks to age.  It really is pretty easy!  ;)

Nickole

  • Guest
Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #27 on: April 26, 2007, 10:24:53 AM »
Healthy, why don't you make the cheese raw and not heat it? 
My recipe is pretty much the same, easy like that, except you add juice from 8 lemons to the milk and let sit 15 minutes to curdle, covered.  Then strain over cheesecloth for a few hours or overnight for a dryer, less lemony flavored cheese.  Should yield 3 pints cheese and 2 q. lemon whey.  I think this recipe came from the Untold Story of Milk book.  I tried it and it works great!   :)   

Offline healthyinOhio

  • Guru
  • Posts: 4024
  • Happily Married for 12 years and proud mama of 2.
Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #28 on: April 26, 2007, 10:36:54 AM »
Healthy, why don't you make the cheese raw and not heat it? 
My recipe is pretty much the same, easy like that, except you add juice from 8 lemons to the milk and let sit 15 minutes to curdle, covered.  Then strain over cheesecloth for a few hours or overnight for a dryer, less lemony flavored cheese.  Should yield 3 pints cheese and 2 q. lemon whey.  I think this recipe came from the Untold Story of Milk book.  I tried it and it works great!   :)   

I didn't have a recipe for not heating it.  I just got this the other day from our "milk lady".  WOULD HAVE BEEN NICE TO HAVE THIS FROM YOU EARLIER!!!  ;D

Nickole

  • Guest
Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #29 on: April 26, 2007, 10:40:05 AM »
Healthy, why don't you make the cheese raw and not heat it? 
My recipe is pretty much the same, easy like that, except you add juice from 8 lemons to the milk and let sit 15 minutes to curdle, covered.  Then strain over cheesecloth for a few hours or overnight for a dryer, less lemony flavored cheese.  Should yield 3 pints cheese and 2 q. lemon whey.  I think this recipe came from the Untold Story of Milk book.  I tried it and it works great!   :)   

I didn't have a recipe for not heating it.  I just got this the other day from our "milk lady".  WOULD HAVE BEEN NICE TO HAVE THIS FROM YOU EARLIER!!!  ;D

You didn't ask  ;).