Author Topic: Homemade Bread Recipes  (Read 8651 times)

Offline 4myhoonie

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Homemade Bread Recipes
« on: April 28, 2006, 11:22:03 AM »
i would be interested to see other people's bread recipes from milled flour.  do any of you use soy flour?  my friend who taught me how to make it is really into soy and i would like to get away from it, but unsure how to change her recipes.  thanks!   :)
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Offline 4myhoonie

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Re: Homemade Bread Recipes
« Reply #1 on: May 26, 2006, 05:59:19 PM »
hope it's ok, i copied this here so people would find it!  i made this the other day and it's wonderful!  tastes as good or better than my usual and the wheat is soaked in yogurt!   ;D  will be making this often!  thanks!  (by the way i made it with yogurt instead of kefir and it worked)

Here is my recipe which includes "soaking" in an acidic medium to neutralize phytates.  I am copying it from my website.  I have a Magic Mill (Electrolux) Assistent 2000 DLX, which is basically a big stand mixer.  I have never made this by hand or in a bread machine, but it comes out wonderfully fluffy and light w/ my mixer.  It makes 2 large (8.5" x 4.5") loaves.  I have found the egg to be crucial; otherwise it falls half the time!  I used to add gluten and lecithin but then I left them out one time and couldn't tell a difference so I don't use them anymore.  That and I avoid soy now (lecithin).

Ingredients
5-6 cups freshly milled flour (hard red or hard white) (see Notes below)
1/3 cup olive oil
1 egg
1/3 cup honey
1 cup water
1 cup kefir (yogurt might work; never tried it)
1 scant tablespoon instant yeast
2 1/2 teaspoons sea salt

Instructions
In the DLX mixer, combine the water, kefir, olive oil, egg, honey, salt, and enough flour so the dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl (everything EXCEPT the yeast).
Mix well, cover, and allow to sit in a warm place for at least 7 hours.
Add the yeast and let the mixer knead the dough for 10-12 minutes.
Divide dough in half. On a lightly oiled surface, roll each half into a rectangle and then roll up, pinwheel style, along the shorter edge. Pinch along the seam to seal.
Place each loaf seam-side down in a large (1.5-2 lb.) loaf pan that has been greased with butter or olive oil on the bottom and sides. Or you can skip the oil and just line the loaf pan with sheets of parchment paper.
Let loaves rise in a warm place until the tops are 1-2 inches above the pan, about an hour or longer.
Bake in a preheated oven at 350 degrees for 28-30 minutes. Be careful not to bang the pans while putting them in the oven or the loaves may fall.  Or, 25 minutes @ 325 degrees in a convection oven.
When they are done, take them out of the pans immediately to avoid soggy sides. You can use a spatula to loosen each side of the loaf from the pan, and they usually slide right out. If you use the parchment paper it comes out very easily.
Place on a cooling rack and cover with a dish towel while they cool. The towel helps keep the crust from getting too hard/thick.
When slightly cooled (about 20 minutes), place each loaf in a plastic bag. This helps retain softness and moisture.
If you wish to freeze the loaves, put them in the freezer immediately after placing them in the bags. When ready to use them, allow to thaw on the counter, not the microwave. This will only take a couple of hours, and they will still be moist and light.

Notes
You may have to use a little more than 5 cups of flour. You don't want wet dough, but you don't want it dry as a bone, either.
To make the honey slide out of the measuring cup easily, measure the oil first and then the honey (using the same measuring cup).
You want to let the dough sit for at least 7 hours but not much more than 12 hours else the end result will be sour. If you like sourdough bread, let it go longer.
If you add the yeast with the other ingredients, the bread will taste yeasty and nasty!
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Offline mishy

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Re: Homemade Bread Recipes
« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2006, 09:07:12 PM »
Don't every be afraid to experiment.  I am always changing things out for things I have in the house.  So just use the type of flour you have instead of the soy.  YOU run the recipe, not the other way around.  :) 

Offline Hope64

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Re: Homemade Bread Recipes
« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2006, 10:03:55 AM »
Here's our "tried and true" recipe.  Honey-Oat Whole Wheat

1 1/4 cups warm water (1 cup if flour is freshly milled)
2 tsp. yeast
2 Tblsp. honey

Add to bowl to proof.

Then add:

1 Tblsp. melted butter
1/2 cup oats
1 tsp. salt
1/2 cup brown sugar ( I just add more honey - about 1/2 a cup honey for a triple batch)
3 cups whole wheat flour

I add 1/4 cup of gluten to a triple batch to encourage it to rise faster and higher. 

I make a triple batch in my kitchenaid mixer
I use 3 cups hard red/ 3 cups hard white / 3 cups spelt flour.  You can use whatever combination works for you.  As long as your total flour is at 9 cups for a triple batch. 

I let the mixer knead it for 7 minutes or so.  Just watch it until your gluten has begun to develop.  Then I take it out and knead it for 2 or 3 minutes by hand.  The kiddos all get to help in the process and get their own little mound to knead.  Let it rise in a bowl until doubled (roll it in a bit of olive oil so the top doesn't dry out).  When it is doubled in size shape into loaves.  When they rise again to about an inch above the top of the loaf pans, put into cold oven set to 375 degrees.  Bake for 38 minutes.  Cool on cooling rack.  Slices nicely for sandwiches!

Hope64

Offline Hope64

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Re: Homemade Bread Recipes
« Reply #4 on: May 27, 2006, 10:05:17 AM »
Oh, I forgot.  Either spray the bread pans with PAM or rub them with real butter before you put in the bread and bake.

Hope64

Offline Chickory Chick

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Re: Homemade Bread Recipes
« Reply #5 on: June 25, 2006, 02:37:40 PM »
i would be interested to see other people's bread recipes from milled flour.  do any of you use soy flour?  my friend who taught me how to make it is really into soy and i would like to get away from it, but unsure how to change her recipes.  thanks!   :)

I love this recipe it makes the lightest bread that I have ever made.  I use Prairie Gold wheat berries, which I grind in my grinder.

Mix together your sponge:
3 cups warm water
2 TBSP of Active Dry Yeast
2 cups of whole wheat flour
1 tsp of honey or sugar (I usually use Sucanat)

Let this mixture sponge for about 15 minutes.  After it has sat for 15 minutes stir in:

1/2 c. honey or Molasses (I usually use Sucanat sugar)
1/4 c. oil or melted butter
1 tsp salt
2 TBSP Vital Gluten (optional)...(I have always used this)
6 c. whole wheat flour, add one cup at a time

Once a soft dough forms, turn the dough out onto a floured work surface and knead the dough.  Again add only enough flour to keept it from sticking to the work area.  Knead the dough for at least 10 minutes to ensure good gluten formation..  This is essential for heavy bread.  Once you have kneaded the dough into a soft and elastic dough, place it into a lightly oiled bowl, turn over at let rise for about an hour.  Punch the dough down after it has risen and form into 2-3 loaves.  Place the loaves into lightly greased loaf pans and let them rise in a warm spot for about an hour or until doubled.  Preheat the oven to 375 degrees and bake your loaves for about 35-40 minutes.
Chickory Chick fka Kayinpa http://kayinpa.blogspot.com/

Offline shawnaincov

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Re: Homemade Bread Recipes
« Reply #6 on: July 16, 2006, 09:03:06 AM »
OK You said you want to start making your own bread but you are so not there yet??? ???
To me that is one of the easiest things to do.  I agree that you need to try to find a food coop.  I buy my 100% whole wheat flour from one.  I have a bread machine and use it but you don't have to.  I made it without it before.  If you would like the recipe just say so. ;D
I make it all the time and my family loves it.  I have even had women at my church (much older than me) asking how I made it and getting the recipe from me.

Shawna

Offline KatieMac

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Re: Homemade Bread Recipes
« Reply #7 on: July 16, 2006, 10:06:55 AM »
My step-grandma tried teach me to bake bread and I found it very intimidating...her hands seemed to dance as she kneaded the bread. I guess I am worried about wasting alot of ingredients while I make hockey pucks. And of course there is that stupid all or nothing mentality...my brain jumps ahead to sprouted grains and getting my own mill  and all that stuff. But yeah, give me your tips and recipes! I've been changing so much lately a little bread-making won't be hard to work into the mix! Does anyone use the dough hook on their stand mixer? I have one but I have never used it.

Offline diaperswyper

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Re: Homemade Bread Recipes
« Reply #8 on: July 16, 2006, 10:29:06 AM »
I don't know what kind of mixer you have, but i use the dough hook on mine. I have a kitchen-aid, and can easily make 4 loaves at a time.

Offline KatieMac

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Re: Homemade Bread Recipes
« Reply #9 on: July 16, 2006, 10:33:37 AM »
I have a kitchen-aid. I don't know how to use the dough hook...how do I know when to quit mixing?

Offline WithLoveAndJoy

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Re: Homemade Bread Recipes
« Reply #10 on: July 16, 2006, 10:43:11 AM »
I know of one site which has a good recipe for homemade bread using a mixer with a bread hook.  You can find it at:

http://www.urbanhomemaker.com/articles/index.php?page=index_v2&id=83&c=6

Just use the mixer recipe and it should work well.  I have only personally used the by hand recipe, but I find that the results are fantastic!  (and you don't need to use freshly milled flour....I usually buy mine from King Arthur mills and I find it at Walmart)
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Offline diaperswyper

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Re: Homemade Bread Recipes
« Reply #11 on: July 16, 2006, 10:44:53 AM »
 I don't know the exact amount of time, i add my flour slowly, so as to make sure that i don't get too  much flour in the dough. When the dough pulls away from the sides you know you have about enough flour. After that i let it knead for several minutes until the dough feels soft. I'm sorry i can't give you more exact directions, i just kind of wing it.... ??? If you still have your owner's manual, it should have some directions in there. I have the bigger size kitchenaid, the smaller one makes 2 loaves, i think.

Offline shawnaincov

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Re: Homemade Bread Recipes
« Reply #12 on: July 16, 2006, 10:52:10 AM »
Cool I've never thought about the mixer. 8)  That would make it easier than nothing at all.  
This is what I use for a smaller loaf.  Most of the time if I am making it for supper I will make rolls.  My family seems to like them better that way.  If I need loaf bread then I make that way.  I use the same amounts either way.

3 cups whole wheat bread flour
1 1/3 cups warm water
2-3 Tbsp butter
Approx. 1 Tbsp. salt
1/4 cup honey (More or less to taste)
3 tsp. yeast

I make min in a bread machine so it mixes it and lets it rise for me.  It takes about an hour for it to rise.  Just knead it in your mixer than set it in a warm place.  I usually turn my oven on warm and set it on top of the stove covered.  after it doubles in size place some flour on your counter, or where ever you are rolling it out, and drop the dough out onto the flour.  You should kind of push the dough down and back then turn it and repeat adding flour until it is no longer sticky.  The gluten needs to be stretched is why I say push down and back.  I use a stoneware pan to bake mine in because it makes the bred have a nice crust.  Place about a Tbsp. of butter in your pan and put it in the oven till it melts.  Still have your oven only warm.  Place your dough in the pan and roll it in the butter.  If you roll it in the butter it keeps it from drying.  Place your pan back on top of the stove till it doubles in size again.  When it is double then turn your oven to 350 and bake till done.  I know this sounds bad but I'm really not sure how long it takes.  I 'm one of those people that doesn't ever remember to set a timer ;D  

I hope this helps you.  It does seem very intimidating.  I remeber when I first started.  
Good luck and Happy baking!!

P.S.  Most people like it a little sweeter, but I have to watch my blood sugar so I try not to have anymore than I must. Also if you do put more honey than you will have to add a little more flour.  (Liquid to Dry ratio)

Bye
Shawna :-*

Offline ARmom

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Re: Homemade Bread Recipes
« Reply #13 on: July 22, 2006, 08:16:20 AM »
Glad I found this!  I love trying new bread recipes.  Just a FYI tidbit to add.  Bread is done when it's internal temp is 190.  180 with good color is usually OK too.  This helped me when I first started making bread the outside looked done but the inside was too doughy.Also, I love my Kitchenaid but it is 13 years old and gets lots of use.  I plan to use it until it dies, but I know I'll have to replace it someday.  What are some of your favorite mixers and why? 
« Last Edit: July 22, 2006, 08:26:05 AM by ARmom »
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Offline SHERRI REEL

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Re: Homemade Bread Recipes
« Reply #14 on: July 27, 2006, 05:12:36 AM »
Can you use a candy thermometer to get that temp reading?
My bread is not turning out it is riseing the first rise but not enough the second rise,I'm tired of wasteing ingrediants.
Any insite would be apreciated.
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Sherri

Offline ARmom

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Re: Homemade Bread Recipes
« Reply #15 on: July 27, 2006, 05:19:48 AM »
You need a probe thermometer. Mine has a small digital head on a long nail like probe with a pointy end.  You stick it into the core of the loaf.  Can't remember how much they cost but you can get them at Wal-Mart. Be careful not to let it over rise on the first rise. Is your bread not rising when you have it in loaf form? 
« Last Edit: July 27, 2006, 05:23:56 AM by ARmom »
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Homemade Bread Recipes
« Reply #16 on: July 27, 2006, 06:40:59 AM »
Can you use a candy thermometer to get that temp reading?
My bread is not turning out it is riseing the first rise but not enough the second rise,I'm tired of wasteing ingrediants.
Any insite would be apreciated.

You might want to check the thread "My Bread Won't Rise".  I started this one.  I have the same problem - in fact - I haven't even tried bread since it got hot.  Not going to waste precious AC and bread ingredients both.  It just wouldn't be prudent.  ;)
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Offline 4myhoonie

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Re: Homemade Bread Recipes
« Reply #17 on: August 02, 2006, 04:28:44 AM »
Glad I found this!  I love trying new bread recipes.  Just a FYI tidbit to add.  Bread is done when it's internal temp is 190.  180 with good color is usually OK too.  This helped me when I first started making bread the outside looked done but the inside was too doughy.Also, I love my Kitchenaid but it is 13 years old and gets lots of use.  I plan to use it until it dies, but I know I'll have to replace it someday.  What are some of your favorite mixers and why? 


i have a bosche universal and love it!  it comes with a real heavy duty (but not real big) blender.  you can also buy a food processor for it too.  the bowl is big and can mix 6 loaves at once.    ;D
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