Author Topic: Adenovirus  (Read 17203 times)

Offline dara

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Adenovirus
« on: November 16, 2007, 11:11:24 AM »
My 2 yo little girl was just really sick with diffuculty breathing, and we ended up taking her in for meds so she could breathe, and they diagnosed her with croup. I had previously mistaken croup and whooping cough to be diff. names for the same sickness, but the are not. I just thought I'd share some links with helpful diagnostic info for you other moms who like to file facts before dealing with sicknesses yourselves. It helps ya know what you can do to treat illness. I titled the thread 'Adenovirus' because it can lead to many resp. sicknesses, and who knows, maybe it led to our dd's sickness. I'm just realizing now how much I didn't know about these, even though I had thought we had delt with "them all".  HIH.

Adenovirus:
http://kidshealth.org/parent/infections/lung/adenovirus.html

Croup:
http://kidshealth.org/parent/infections/bacterial_viral/croup.html

Pneumonia:
http://kidshealth.org/parent/infections/bacterial_viral/pneumonia.html

Whooping Cough (pertussis):
http://kidshealth.org/parent/infections/bacterial_viral/whooping_cough.html
« Last Edit: June 12, 2008, 02:05:29 AM by dara »
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Adenovirus
« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2007, 06:38:28 AM »
As a courtesy to the member who started this thread and those participating in the conversation, please attempt to stay on topic as much as possible.

If the conversation triggers a new subject of interest, please search the forum for a more appropriate thread for the discussion.  When one cannot be found, start a new one.

http://www.welltellme.com/discuss/index.php/topic,13559.0.html

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cecac

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Re: Adenovirus
« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2008, 12:30:53 PM »
Well, I am having Adenoviurs in our home, now, and so I'll link the thread I discussed it on with additional links.  Sorry about that, it's just that I didn't know this was Adenovirus when I started poking around.

http://www.welltellme.com/discuss/index.php?topic=15894.msg161599;topicseen#new

Thank you Dara for the link.  It is very helpful.
« Last Edit: March 11, 2008, 12:35:10 PM by cecac »

cecac

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Re: Adenovirus
« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2008, 04:44:50 AM »
My 21 mos old daughter broke her fever yesterday and so I let her get up a bit, as she was of course raring to go.  I even let my older daughter take her in the sun for 15 minutes to aid healing.

Turned out not to be a good thing.  She came in and had another coughing/vomit mucus episode (that was the second one in three days, rather shocking at first).  She also ended up with a fever of above 102 degrees.

I applied Vics Vapo Rub and gave her some tylenol.  She had already spiked to 105 the day before, and I don't care for that due to the possibility of a seizure.  She went immediately to sleep and woke up better.  So I share that to say that we may need to understand that this viral bugger is a longer term one, the article Dara linked says so. 

I recommend keeping your little ones down for 24-48 hours past fevers/possible relapses so that you don't bring a relapse on.

Cara

Offline Simply Kristen

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Re: Adenovirus
« Reply #4 on: May 22, 2008, 04:53:48 AM »
Adenovirus is making it's way around my area. If you have weird symtoms check it out on google......

Just wanted to bump this common sickness.

Offline Simply Kristen

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Re: Adenovirus
« Reply #5 on: June 11, 2008, 05:48:15 PM »
I have found that AV can rear it's ugly head and one can "relapse" several weeks later.
Some experiences are:
Primary Virus experience last a week or so.
Then if you let your immune system/health go (bad nutrition/lack of sleep/etc) then it will happen again, but not as severe.

People I know have gotten pnuemonia, been ill for a month, ear infection, had bad coughs, throwing up, diarrhea, etc.

(not all this happened in my house... just people talking about their illnesses)

I also heard Vit C is supposed to help, but the only helpful thing I've noticed is what my husband did: When symptoms appear, Go OUTSIDE and physically work hard.   :D He only got a sore throat for a day or so......... but they again he hardly ever gets the sickness.  :)

Offline Gabe Rising

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Re: Adenovirus
« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2008, 06:37:12 PM »
Yeah, this is really wild... I have a friend that had the cough / flu symptoms for about 2 1/2 weeks and was feeling worse by the end of that period...

Then (at the worst of it) he raced in a 12 hour endurance Mountain Bike race... and that seemed to cure it!

Really wild. It had all the adenovirus symptoms and I am as sure as I can be that that is exactly what he had... and the strenuous exercise cured it exactly as KristenA mentioned.

--gabe

Offline CountyCork

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Re: Adenovirus
« Reply #7 on: June 12, 2008, 04:12:55 AM »
Not specifically related to that virus, but we've found that when our kids are coming down with something, we send them outside.  Not with fever or feeling horrible, but as long as they can cope and be ok, out they go.  Even in cold Minnesota winters.
I have that Scandinavian notion that open windows, time outside, fresh air, lots of sun and physical exercise can cure almost anything.  My mom is always on my case about letting sick kids go out, but I say if they feel up to it, there is no better place for them!

cecac

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Re: Adenovirus
« Reply #8 on: June 12, 2008, 10:22:03 AM »
So, Country Cork--it wasn't a bad thing that my daughter (not quite 2) went outside and then relapsed?  What do ya think?

Don't know that the outdoor thing works for the younger set.  When my daughter first began that illness it was with 105 degree fever.  Not sure I should have let her run around outside, but I'm willing to hear otherwise.

My hubby has licked something similar, though, chopping wood....I'm too much of a wimp for this.  Okay, next time I get a fever, etc, I'll go weed the garden or something. :D

Offline CountyCork

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Re: Adenovirus
« Reply #9 on: June 12, 2008, 11:48:56 AM »
I only let them go out if they want to and seem able to.  I doubt a kiddo with 105 temp would be asking to go out and play  ;)
The low grade fever, or other mild symptoms that make them well enough to play indoors or sit and watch movies and such, I figure if they want to go out they can.
But only you know your kids!

cecac

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Re: Adenovirus
« Reply #10 on: June 12, 2008, 12:33:08 PM »
Well, true about the 105 degree fever episode.  But, what about the relapse she did experience when she wanted to go outside, and I let her?  Was that good or bad?   I've let my kids get up a few times because they wanted to, and then they relapse (had throw ups in the back of the van a couple of times ::)).

I could think that this is just a get-it-out-of-their-systems-completely type deal.  When dd had Adenovirus, she relapsed but then bounced back quickly enough.  She did not get as sick as the onset experience. 

Offline CountyCork

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Re: Adenovirus
« Reply #11 on: June 12, 2008, 03:02:09 PM »
I just read the link above about this virus and am wondering something.  How on earth could you know if your child has this, or a cold, or flu, or GI virus, or any other number of viruses?

I suppose a trip to the doc for a test would say "It's Adenovirus" rather than "you have a cold" or whatever else.

The symptoms are exactly like any number of typical viruses.  Is what makes this different the duration?  But the link said duration is a few days to a week, typically.  That is just like any other thing.

So is there a benefit to knowing the name of this?  And has it been around for a while, and is just now being known?  I can think back to many times when it seems my little people had a typical virus, but then it would hang on a bit longer, or morph into some new symptoms.

Not to pick on the medical community, but it sounds like a new name for a large category of older viruses, that sometimes are more severe than others.

My little tot (17 months) has had the same cold the others have had for the last week or so.  All have had fine energy, appetite, sleeping, etc.  Plenty of play, no fever, no lingering cough.  I thought we were mostly over it.  Plus, tot was getting FOUR MOLARS at the same time, poor kid.  But now today he was very punky, spiked a 102.5 fever and seems sicker.  I am assuming roseola as it is right time, age, season, etc.  Time will tell.

But do I now suspect Adenovirus for any and all viral stuff that is either more severe or lasts longer?

Sorry to be so skeptical, I am just trying to understand the difference.

Offline Simply Kristen

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Re: Adenovirus
« Reply #12 on: June 12, 2008, 03:23:21 PM »
I just read the link above about this virus and am wondering something.  How on earth could you know if your child has this, or a cold, or flu, or GI virus, or any other number of viruses?

Because there are SO many different symptoms options and the families I know that have gotten, ALL get it differently, and it can last a really long time.

Also, from anyone I've talked to the doctor doesn't tell them it's AdenoVirus. I've only heard the word used from people I know from WTM.

Ex:
Child 1: Fever, cough, diarhhea
Child 2: Runny nose, mild fever, cough
Child 3: Pink Eye, blood in urine
Mom: sinus infection
Dad: Pnuemonia

Offline Simply Kristen

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Re: Adenovirus
« Reply #13 on: June 12, 2008, 03:28:14 PM »
So is there a benefit to knowing the name of this? 
Probably not.... but this year's virus appears to be particularly rampant and virulent.
So, it would be nice to know the whole family has _____ . Not all something different.  :)

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Adenovirus
« Reply #14 on: June 12, 2008, 03:36:25 PM »
If I understand all of this correctly, the reason for different symptoms is because they are in fact different viruses.



ADENOVIRUS: Any virus from the family Adenoviridae. More than 40 adenoviruses are known to infect people, causing upper respiratory tract, gastrointestinal, and eye infections.



Adenovirus: A group of viruses responsible for a group of respiratory diseases (common cold, pneumonia, croup, bronchiolitis, and bronchitis), infections of the stomach and intestine (gastroenteritis), eyes (conjunctivitis), bladder (cystitis), and rashes. Patients with compromised immune systems are especially susceptible to severe complications of adenovirus infection.



Quote
Adenoviridae
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Adenovirus)

Virus classification
Group:    Group I (dsDNA)
Family:    Adenoviridae
Genera

Aviadenovirus
Atadenovirus
Mastadenovirus
Siadenovirus

Adenoviruses are medium-sized (90–100 nm), nonenveloped (naked) icosahedral viruses composed of a nucleocapsid and a double-stranded linear DNA genome. There are over 52 different serotypes in humans, which are responsible for 5–10% of upper respiratory infections in children, and many infections in adults as well.

Viruses of the family Adenoviridae infect various species of animals, including humans. Adenoviruses were first isolated in human adenoids (tonsils), from which the name is derived, and are classified as group I under the Baltimore classification scheme. Adenoviruses represent the largest nonenveloped viruses, because they are the maximum size able to be transported through the endosome (i.e. envelope fusion is not necessary). The virion also has a unique "spike" or fiber associated with each penton base of the capsid (see picture below) that aids in attachment to the host cell via the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor on the surface of the host cell. There are 51 immunologically distinct human adenovirus serotypes (6 species: Human adenovirus A through F) that can cause human infections ranging from respiratory disease (mainly species HAdV-B and C), and conjunctivitis (HAdV-B and D), to gastroenteritis (HAdV-F serotypes 40 and 41). Adenoviruses are unusually stable to chemical or physical agents and adverse pH conditions, allowing for prolonged survival outside of the body and water. Adenoviruses are primarily spread via respiratory droplets, however they can also be spread by fecal routes as well.

Most infections with adenovirus result in infections of the upper respiratory tract. Adenovirus infections often show up as conjunctivitis, tonsilitis (which may look exactly like strep throat and cannot be distinguished from strep except by throat culture), an ear infection, or croup. Adenoviruses can also cause gastroenteritis (stomach flu). A combination of conjunctivitis and tonsilitis is particularly common with adenovirus infections. Some children (especially small ones) can develop adenovirus bronchiolitis or pneumonia, both of which can be severe. In babies, adenoviruses can also cause coughing fits that look almost exactly like whooping cough. Adenoviruses can also cause viral meningitis or encephalitis. Rarely, adenovirus can cause cystitis (inflammation of the urinary bladder—a form of urinary tract infection—with blood in the urine).

Most people recover from adenovirus infections by themselves, but people with immunodeficiency sometimes die of adenovirus infections, and—rarely—even previously healthy people can die of these infections.[1]

Adenoviruses are often transmitted by coughed-out droplets, but can also be transmitted by contact with an infected person, or by virus particles left on objects such as towels and faucet handles. Some people with adenovirus gastroenteritis may shed the virus in their stools for months after getting over the symptoms. The virus can be passed from one person to another through some sexual practices, and through water in swimming pools that do not have enough chlorine in them. As with many other illnesses, good handwashing is one way to lessen the spread of adenoviruses from one person to another. Heat and bleach will kill adenoviruses on objects.
from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adenovirus



Quote
What is adenovirus?
Adenovirus is a group of contagious viruses. Symptoms can be similar to a cold or pneumonia. Adenoviruses usually infect the respiratory tract.

Adenoviruses are viruses that usually infect the tissue lining of the respiratory tract. Depending on the type of infection, they can cause other illnesses, like gastroenteritis, conjunctivitis, cystitis, and rashes. Overcrowding and stress during an Adenovirus infection can cause acute respiratory disease.

Symptoms

Symptoms of adenovirus infection can be similar to the common cold or even pneumonia, croup, and bronchitis. The signs and symptoms of adenoviral infections vary:

Febrile respiratory disease, an infection of the respiratory tract that includes a fever, is the most common. Other symptoms include inflammation of the pharynx, or sore throat, inflammation of nasal membranes, or a congested, runny nose, cough, swollen lymph nodes and illness similar to the flu. The infection can also cause bronchitis and in children under 3 years old, adenovirus can affect the lower respiratory tract, causing bronchiolitis, croup, or viral pneumonia.

Conjunctivitis (pinkeye) is an inflammation of the membranes that cover the eye and inner surfaces of the eyelids. Symptoms are red eyes, discharge, tearing, and a feeling that something is in the eye. Keratoconjunctivitis is a more severe infection that involves both the membranes and cornea.

Pharyngoconjunctival fever happens when adenovirus affects the lining of the eye and the respiratory tract. Symptoms are red eyes and a sore throat, sometimes with a fever, rhinitis, and swollen lymph nodes.

Gastroenteritis is inflammation of the stomach and the intestines, large and small. Wet diarrhea, vomiting, headache, fever, and stomach cramps accompany this variety. Adenovirus is sometimes linked to urinary tract infections, which causes urinary frequency, burning pain, or blood in the urine.

All types of adenovirus are transmitted by direct contact, fecal-oral and waterborne transmission. Some types can establish persistent infections in the tonsils, adenoids, and intestines.

Adenoviral infections usually affect infants and young children. Studies show that adenovirus accounts for up to 5% of acute respiratory infections in children and is often a cause of diarrhea. They are more prevalent in the winter, when children are often indoors with other children, as in school etc. Symptoms can develop from 2 days to 2 weeks after a child has been exposed to the virus.

Adenoviral infections typically last from a couple of days to a week. Severe respiratory infections can last longer and cause persistent symptoms, like a cough. Pneumonia can last from 2 to 4 weeks.

Adenovirus is highly contagious and is often caught in day cares, schools, hospitals, and camps. The adenovirus that causes respiratory and intestinal infections spreads through coughs and sneezes, fecal contamination, holding hands or sharing a toy with an infected person. The adenovirus that causes conjunctivitis is transmitted by water, by sharing contaminated objects, or by touch.

Adenoviral infections are difficult to prevent, as vaccines are not available. Parents and caregivers should encourage frequent hand washing, keep countertops and toys clean, and remove children with infections from group settings. Vaccines were developed for some types of adenovirus, but were available only to the military. Adequate chlorination of pools is necessary to prevent outbreaks of adenovirus conjunctivitis.

Most adenoviral conditions are also associated with other causes. Medical advice is needed if any of the following symptoms is present: Fever that continues for more than a few days, symptoms that get worse after a week, breathing problems, a child is under 3 months old, swelling and redness around the eye becoming severe or painful or child seems to be dehydrating.

Adenoviral illnesses may resemble bacterial infections but they are viral and antibiotics don't work against viruses. The doctor may want to test a sample of respiratory secretions, a stool specimen, or a blood or urine sample, depending on what he or she suspects is the cause. Adenoviral infections don't usually result in hospitalization. However, younger children may not drink enough fluids to replace what they lose by the vomiting or diarrhea. They may need to be hospitalized to prevent dehydration. Young infants with pneumonia are usually hospitalized.

Your child's body will fight the virus on its own. Since antibiotics don't help a viral infection, you just need to make him more comfortable. If your child has a respiratory infection or fever, rest and extra fluids are needed. A cool-mist vaporizer will help to loosen any congestion. The humidifier should be thoroughly cleaned every day to prevent mold and bacteria. Don't give any cold medications or cough syrup without first checking with the doctor. Use acetaminophen in case of fever and avoid aspirin due to its link with Reye's syndrome.
from http://www.essortment.com/all/whatisadenovir_obf.htm
« Last Edit: June 12, 2008, 03:39:47 PM by healthybratt »
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Re: Adenovirus
« Reply #15 on: June 12, 2008, 04:21:42 PM »
Ditto Kristen.

My dd got 105 degree fever and mucus enough to almost mimick the whooping cough, but it didn't match those symptoms because I called my friend whose kids have had whooping cough.  And her mucus coughing episodes were only 1-2 in one day, twice.  It was croup.

I and my MIL experienced the diarrhea only.

This also is typically in day cares, etc. where there are many children according to Dara's article.  And so I guess the kids wouldn't necessarily have the same symptoms, but they'd be sharing the same thing amongst them in different ways.

I just liked knowing what we had so I didn't second guess about going to the doctor unless things got worse.  I was dealing with a less than 2 and 81 yo at the same time, so it is good to know and make sure, as the article HB posted, to keep them hydrated, etc.

« Last Edit: June 12, 2008, 04:31:09 PM by cecac »

Offline CountyCork

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Re: Adenovirus
« Reply #16 on: June 13, 2008, 03:31:20 AM »
The "family of viruses" thing makes good sense. 

I'm still curious how long this has been around.

And now I'm wondeirng why MDs don't diagnose it or talk about it.

Oh, well.  Because the symptoms are so similar to other viruses, at least the treatment seems to be the same deal.

My little one does not have a fever today, but has copius green boogs in his nose!

But I think my dog has it, too, because she has diahrrea.   ;)  That's what I was doing at 1:00 am - cleaning doggie runs off the carpet after my son stepped in it because the smell woke him up.  Gross!   :P

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Adenovirus
« Reply #17 on: July 07, 2008, 12:45:55 PM »
  Our 3 yr old son was running very high temps and the doctor said he believes it's viral meningitis. He put him on antibiotics and i'm not sure why if it's viral. Has anyone else dealt with viral meningitis?

As a courtesy to the member who started this thread and those participating in the conversation and to keep subjects more organized and easier to find, please attempt to stay on topic as much as possible.

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« Last Edit: July 25, 2008, 10:03:11 AM by healthybratt »
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Offline kittyninja

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Re: Adenovirus
« Reply #18 on: February 11, 2009, 03:16:05 PM »
Could this also mean differant strains of stomach virus? For instance I just had a houseful of 13 people (4 adults 9 kiddos) my sis in law woke up nauseous one day and it led to vomiting. She also had a headache. Then my niece vomited twice and had diarrhea the next day. It spread from there-everyday someone had something- but never the same. some just had the bad runs. others had nausea and the runs. others had just vomiting (some even just vomited once and were good to go). My daughter had it the worse with nausea, pain, diarrhea and vomiting AND fever. It kept coming back differant ways or for some hasn't left at all. Could this just be that each body reacted to the same virus a differant way?