Author Topic: Pectus excavatum  (Read 8178 times)

Offline hudymom4

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Pectus excavatum
« on: October 10, 2007, 02:54:25 PM »
My son was born with a slight indention in his chest.  As he has gone through puberty it has gotten worse.  Surgery has been recomended and I would like to know if maybe my son has some nutritional deficiency that is causing his bones to not grow right.  Any ideas? Thanks

Offline BJ_BOBBI_JO

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Re: Pectus excavatum
« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2007, 04:00:54 PM »
I am certainly no expert on this at all. Is Pectus excavatum the same thing as an inverted sternum ( breast bone) ?

If it is I was born with that. My parents said  if an adult male could press on something with his thumb and make a dent with it that was the size of the indentation on my chest.

It nearly killed me when I was 3 months old because it pressed in on my lungs/hart ( that is a long story that ended with a miracle from God)  After God healed me I no longer had breathing issues from the indentation. The indent stayed but kept slowly dissapearing over the years until when I was a teen I no longer noticed it. Now it is gone as if it never exsisted.  I see that some ppl have it all their lives.

Does your son ever have breathing issues from it?

How deep is his indent?

I have no idea if it is a nutritional thing or not. I was raised poor so we did not have good nutrition at all but still some how it got better for me so I don't think nutrition is the cause other wise I would still have it. It seems like it is just something that happens while the baby is forming and cant be helped but Im no expert on it.

Offline 6pacmom

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Re: Pectus excavatum
« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2007, 09:54:47 AM »
My son also has this. He is 13 and has chest pains a lot. I have had him checked out and went through an echo. I have been told, Oh we have seen worse. Doesn't help much does it? The last thing they said was we could elect to have it repaired but insurance might not cover it. They consider it to be more cosmetic than anything. No one can say why he is short of breath and has chest pain. If you can have the surgery, I would have it done.

Offline lovey1029

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Re: Pectus excavatum
« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2007, 03:25:39 PM »
I believe glyconutrients would boost his immune system to an all-time peak. We educate people full-time about this technology to the cells backed by the science of Glycobiology that is changing the world.  What we have seen in 5 years with all types of health challenges has been phenomenal when people give their bodies what is missing and what is required for proper cell to cell communication. Good nutrition improves health.  Healthy cells mean healthy bodies.  We are here to help!

Doug and Amy Stroup, thankful parents of 7
McDonough, GA
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www.livingsugars.com

Offline smithzonian

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Re: Pectus excavatum
« Reply #4 on: October 16, 2007, 08:11:05 PM »
My son was born with a slight indention in his chest.  As he has gone through puberty it has gotten worse.  Surgery has been recomended and I would like to know if maybe my son has some nutritional deficiency that is causing his bones to not grow right.  Any ideas? Thanks

Have they checked your son for an underlying anomaly? 

My 3 month old has a congenital lung disorder called CCAM.  They said that pectus is commonly associated with CCAM as the tumor is so large in utero it can cause the sternum to develop in a shifted manner.  However, many children's tumors have shrunk by the time they're born but still have the pectus remaining.

Did your son have difficulty with respiratory infections growing up?

If so, he may have had an asymptomatic CCAM or some similar underlying congenital problem as well.

I must say, I was shocked to see this on here because I just learned of it myself with my wee one.

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Offline GarlicMom

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Re: Pectus excavatum
« Reply #5 on: March 11, 2013, 02:10:01 AM »
My daughter has this and I think I have it as well, along with scoliosis. I am going to start working with her more by doing some exercises that may help her that I found on the internet. She hasn't been to a doctor about it yet but I may end us taking her. She is complaining more these days and has a cough. She is six. Has anyone done exercises for this condition and it helped? What were they?
And be not weary in well doing for in due season ye shall reap if you faint not. Gal.6:9

Offline Precious

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Re: Pectus excavatum
« Reply #6 on: March 11, 2013, 07:28:09 AM »
Pectus excavatum runs in my family.  We think our son has a mild case, so I have done a ton of research (in the past) on natural ways to improve it.  Here is a journal article about yoga for p.e. and here is a message board which has a link to a pdf article about exercises for p.e.  We had him do several of the exercises and stretches for a couple of months, though I must say we were rather inconsistent.  We think we've seen a slight improvement.

The most helpful website I have ever seen for posture is Aligned and Well.  I am a physical therapist and the information on the Aligned and Well site is top notch.  I have been using the Aligned and Well techniques with a friend who has chronic back and neck pain, and she has seen remarkable improvements.  These are the first improvements she's seen after years of visits to a chiropractor, 3 physical therapists, and a cranial sacral therapist!  Specifically, this video would really help with chest issues.  The shoulders get all out of whack when your chest is tight (which is always the case with pectus excavatum).