Author Topic: Is the purity of my drinking water important?  (Read 4362 times)

Offline oliveoil

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Is the purity of my drinking water important?
« on: July 10, 2006, 10:19:21 PM »
I'm not sure how to ask this question...I want to drink more water but is it really necassary to get bottled water, spring water etc? Is water from my tap THAT bad? How can I tell if it is?

Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: Is the purity of my drinking water important?
« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2006, 03:08:30 AM »
Do what your budget can afford!  Bottled water is safe as long as they haven't added any flouride to it.  Flouride is a poison and you can read about it in a book called:  Flouride Deception.
If you can afford a water filter, it would be better.  We personally have a whole house filter that gets rid of all the bacteria and things that the chlorine they add to the water misses.  It removes the Triamethalchlorines(spelling?) which is the chlorine by-product in the water that is very dangerous. It also removes any heavy metals, nitrites and nitrates, too.  It is a reverse osmosis like system that we rent for $48 a month.  It is worth it to me. 
If you want to know exactly what is in your water and how much, call a local water filtration company in your area and they should be able to do a free analysis.  They will be able to show you your ph level, heavy metal levels, whether your city fouridates the water, etc.  Unless, you live in the country and have a well.  Then, the test may be a little different.   Hope this helps a little.  Let us know what is in your water.

Offline jenny4wen

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Re: Is the purity of my drinking water important?
« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2006, 04:13:26 AM »
I don't know how well it is at getting all the bad stuff out, but when I lived in the city, I used a Brita water pitcher, and it made a huge difference in our water.  It's simple to use, and I always had a nice cold drink ready to pour in my fridge.  The best thing, it only costs about $15 (It comes with one filter), and the filters, you can get a three pack for about that price.  The filters lasted us about 3 months, but you can tell when it's not filtering well anymore. If your demand for water is higher or lower, your filter will last accordingly.
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Is the purity of my drinking water important?
« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2006, 05:58:41 AM »
Personally I drink water straight from the tap; however flouride and chlorine in the water are not recommended for good health.  Flouride is poisonous in large quantities as healthyinOhio pointed out and chlorine can contribute to candida and leaky gut because it kills everything just like antibiotics. 

I'd like to get a R/O for our water, but the budget only stretches so far, so I'm working on the kitchen cabinet first.   ;D  I've been told that if you boil your water or let it sit for a few hours on the counter that the chlorine will evaporate out of your tap water.  Haven't tried it, but that's what I heard.   ;)
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Offline mommie

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Re: Is the purity of my drinking water important?
« Reply #4 on: October 19, 2007, 08:03:25 PM »
we currently buy ro water for drinking but my mil  just gave me a brita pitcher...i know nothing about them...what are you laies thoughts on brita filters?

Offline Simply Kristen

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Re: Is the purity of my drinking water important?
« Reply #5 on: October 20, 2007, 02:38:04 AM »
Scroll down to "All About Water"
SC gives a lengthy explanation about purity of water and its whole deal.

http://backtobasicspodcast.com/Welcome/Podcast/Podcast.html

Offline homesteadmommy

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Re: Is the purity of my drinking water important?
« Reply #6 on: October 20, 2007, 02:45:09 AM »
My husband has been researching water systems and will very likely in the future start selling them. Anyway, the water you drink is so important - your body is 70% water!  One our local towns gets their water from the lake.  This summer their was extreme flooding in a local town and the water in the river that runs into the lake was contaminated with sewer, oil etc.  They advised people not to eat the fish out of the lake but that is what they run through a taste and odor filter and people use. Also make sure you buy the right kind of water. Alot of spring water is just water that was run a taste and odor filter at a plant.  I tend to be rather miserly myself and stretch every penny - but I have decided that good health is an investment. Also beware of the brita pitchers - if you would check the water from your tap and the water from the pitcher you would be surprised to find that quite often their is more bacteria in the pitcher. Just my two sense.

Offline christina_k

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Re: Is the purity of my drinking water important?
« Reply #7 on: October 20, 2007, 02:49:35 AM »
we are looking into a ro system. Not sure which one, but leaning towards ecoquest... Yes, I think that water is very important.
Our community has let their drinking water go to unsafe levels in the arsenic area.  The "safe" limit is 10 parts per billion or under... ours is 12 parts per billion. I'm thinking, arsenic is poison, period.  I read up on it, and it does your body no good.
Who knows what else we have floating around in our water.. so, yes, I think it's important, but the "filter" things that people have.. sometimes, just don't cut it, it just makes people feel safer.

Offline cinmama

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Re: Is the purity of my drinking water important?
« Reply #8 on: October 20, 2007, 03:10:58 AM »
I personally think drinking water quality is important.

However, I also feel if tap water is all you can afford, than so be it.  Just be sure to drink enough water for your bodies' needs. It may not be optimal, but being dehydrated is worse, IMO.

We just recently bought a Berkey Filter (like the ones on BHS) and we absolutely love it!  I cannot believe the difference in taste alone.  I have found that if you like the taste of your water you will actually drink it  ;D.  Noticed a big difference with the amount of water our kids are now drinking, too.   It was around $200.  It has filters that need replacing according to your use that run around $65.  I figured for our family of 6 that we should replace them between 6 months to 1 year.  Hope this helps.



Offline prairiechild

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Re: Is the purity of my drinking water important?
« Reply #9 on: October 20, 2007, 09:00:05 AM »
I decided this week I no longer want us to drink fluoridated water. I started buying Culligan  reverse osmosis water at walmart. It is only 33 cents a gallon. Eventually we may buy some kind of system but this works for now.

The stainless steel/glass filtration system I'd like to have costs $479 and that is a great deal since it costs up to $800 some places. However the cost will still be up to 25 cents a gallon due to water and electricity costs.

I am using glass jugs and adding 1/4 tsp sea salt per gallon to remineralize the water.

The brita is nasty because it grows bacteria.

Offline homesteadmommy

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Re: Is the purity of my drinking water important?
« Reply #10 on: October 20, 2007, 12:02:38 PM »
after doing research we have come to the conclusion that one of the best water systems to get is one that softens, filters & purifies.  The benefit with the soft water would be that you would save money by the reduction of soap costs, clothes wouldn't wear out as quickly etc. etc.  I would not want to drink fluoridated water if I could possibly help it at all.  The fluoride in hte water goes into the body and binds up the iodine thus a thyroid problem. No wonder so many people have neurological problems today - depressions, chronic fatigue, fybromyalgia etc. etc.  alot of them stem from the thyroid. And then to not even start into mercury . . .