Author Topic: Kefir, Whey, Sauerkraut  (Read 67590 times)

Offline lotsaboys

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Re: Kefir, Whey, Sauerkraut
« Reply #90 on: February 19, 2008, 05:16:46 PM »

Not sure what you mean by "a cultured milk product". :-\
But if you leave your cream at room temp. for 8 hrs to sour and then use that to make butter your buttermilk will be cultured. Sorry if I'm confusing. :P :-[

I think I know what you are saying, and it truly does make sense.  But I still think there is a bit of difference between the "whey" left over from butter and actually buttermilk.  Maybe this is what NLBB is trying to figure out?  I only made the mention of it, because you can buy buttermilk cultures at a co-op or on ebay, and it is a drink.  So, that made me think it was an entirely different thing than the leftover butter stuff. KWIM? ;) :D

Ahh, you make sense too! ;) I did some fast googling and learned something I didn't know before. It makes sense too. :D Lemme know what you think.

From this website: http://homecooking.about.com/od/cookingfaqs/f/faqbuttermilk.htm
Old-fashioned homemade buttermilk is the slightly sour, residual liquid which remains after butter is churned, ie. milk from the butter or buttermilk. It was usually flecked with tiny spots of sweet, creamy butter that didn't quite make it to the top to be skimmed. The flavor of buttermilk is reminiscent of yogurt and most people prefer it well-chilled. You'll find it is slightly thicker in texture than regular milk but not as heavy as cream. It takes one gallon of milk to yield one-half pint of true buttermilk.

Nowadays, most commercial buttermilk is made by adding a lactic acid bacteria culture to pasteurized sweet whole milk or, more commonly skim milk or non-fat milk, and it may or may not have added butter flecks.


From this site: http://www.mrbreakfast.com/ask.asp?askid=18
"In the old days," she said rhythmically pumping her fantasy stick up and down, "buttermilk was a byproduct of making butter. People would churn and churn and churn. The result of churning milk was butter and liquid. This liquid byproduct was buttermilk."

"These days," she said sadly, her lips softly pouting, "the buttermilk we buy at the grocery store is made by adding a lactic acid bacteria culture to skim or non-fat milk. The milk is then fermented to make modern buttermilk."

And then Wikipedia's explanation:
http://en.wiki
pedia.org/wiki/Buttermilk

Offline Aura

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Re: Kefir, Whey, Sauerkraut
« Reply #91 on: December 08, 2008, 09:05:55 AM »
Since Ricotta is made by heating whey to a high temp (180 or more), you cannot use it for fermenting.  The good bacteria is dead.  But that is the price you pay for real ricotta!  Hope you all enjoyed it.

Kristin
Uh oh. I didn't know this! I made some mozzarella cheese and then (attempted) ricotta. I just made a mess with the ricotta, but I had lots of whey so I used that for sauerkraut (NT recipe)...I thought it turned out good. It tasted fine. Nobody got sick.  :-\  I still have leftover whey and I was going to make some more sauerkraut. Maybe I shouldn't use this whey  ???

Would've been nice to have that info in the book.  >:(  Or did I just miss that?

Offline Aura

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Re: Kefir, Whey, Sauerkraut
« Reply #92 on: January 24, 2009, 04:57:35 PM »
OH NO!! Have I ruined my sauerkraut by using iodized salt?!  :-[ Please, someone tell me it's still okay! I JUST made sauerkraut today out of 2 heads green cabbage and 2 heads of red cabbage, but I was out of sea salt and so I just used plain old table salt, except it wasn't PLAIN salt, it was iodized salt. Then, as I was researching info on yogurt, I found this...

Quote
3. Sauerkraut:
...A traditional recipe follows:
Ingredients:
1 Fresh Medium Cabbage (red or green)
2 Tablespoons Pickling Salt (Please no iodine, it will kill the bacteria)
Distilled Water (or filtered and non-chlorinated)
here: http://www.healingcrow.com/ferfun/ferfun.html

Does anyone know anything about this? I SOOO hope I didn't ruin this.  :'(

Offline tynnille

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Re: Kefir, Whey, Sauerkraut
« Reply #93 on: January 24, 2009, 06:04:24 PM »
Well, I guess you could maybe rinse the cabbage and start again adding non-iodized salt and more liquid than usual since some of the juices were washed away as well.  :-\ Do you have any kefir you can make whey from to add into the liquid to help the process?
I do hope you can still use the cabbage...I know the feeling when things haven't gone as planned and time and money were spent getting the 'thing' done.
Tennille

Offline crystal

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Re: Kefir, Whey, Sauerkraut
« Reply #94 on: April 12, 2009, 08:01:48 PM »
About two to three months ago, I made sauerkraut, ala Nourishing Traditions, with red cabbage.  I tasted it today and it has quite a powerful zing to it.  It isn't the typical sour taste, but a bite,twang and pow!  I wonder if it is okay to eat.  It has been refrigerated since the three day mark.  Maybe it is like this because of using red, rather than green cabbage?  I have used the NT recipe for sauerkraut before, only using green cabbage.

What do you all think about the safety?  Does it maybe have even more good bugs, indicated by the zing?

Offline crystal

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Re: Kefir, Whey, Sauerkraut
« Reply #95 on: April 15, 2009, 08:14:05 AM »
About two to three months ago, I made sauerkraut, ala Nourishing Traditions, with red cabbage.  I tasted it today and it has quite a powerful zing to it.  It isn't the typical sour taste, but a bite,twang and pow!  I wonder if it is okay to eat.  It has been refrigerated since the three day mark.  Maybe it is like this because of using red, rather than green cabbage?  I have used the NT recipe for sauerkraut before, only using green cabbage.

What do you all think about the safety?  Does it maybe have even more good bugs, indicated by the zing?

BUMP!

Offline DawnsEarlyBirds

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Re: Kefir, Whey, Sauerkraut
« Reply #96 on: April 15, 2009, 06:07:38 PM »
We make the NT recipe with both green and red cabbage - we prefer the red by far.  It does have a lot of zing.  It's bad if it tastes ... bad, or yeasty, or nasty.

I don't know if more zing = better for you.  We will probably only make the red cabbage this summer.  And doesn't it look GORGEOUS on your plate?!

Offline MrsJ

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Re: Kefir, Whey, Sauerkraut
« Reply #97 on: June 24, 2009, 12:33:54 PM »
I am in the process of making sauerkraut a la NT for the first time, and I think I must have filled my jar too full because it seems to be bubbling out a bit (evidenced by a little ring of sauerkraut juice at the base of the jar).  And the lid is bulging a little too.  Does this ruin my batch, or is it still okay?  It's got one more day on the counter before I stick it in the fridge.

Offline aflora

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Re: Kefir, Whey, Sauerkraut
« Reply #98 on: June 24, 2009, 12:56:34 PM »
I haven't had this happen...but I have heard it will crack the glass if there is not enough room to ferment...don't know about ruining the batch though. I have had to reduce the salt NT calls for in that one. It turns out way to salty for us. Good luck!

Offline Jemima

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Re: Kefir, Whey, Sauerkraut
« Reply #99 on: January 29, 2010, 05:10:18 PM »
Just read through this thread and made sauerkraut for the first time... But as I'm reading the last page here (p.4) someone asked about using iodized salt, and if that would ruin it, or it wouldn't turn out. There was one response, but I'm looking for more.

I used iodized sea salt... has anyone had experience with it not turning out? Also, I didn't have whey (dairy allergies) so I used the extra Tab. of salt.

Thanks!

Offline boysmama

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Re: Kefir, Whey, Sauerkraut
« Reply #100 on: January 30, 2010, 04:37:52 AM »
Cabbage is full of lactobacilli on it's own. It's one vegetable that lacto ferments quite nicely without added whey(for the lactobacilli). I suspect this is why your batch did just fine. You can use the kraut "whey" as the starter in other recipes.
Since Ricotta is made by heating whey to a high temp (180 or more), you cannot use it for fermenting.  The good bacteria is dead.  But that is the price you pay for real ricotta!  Hope you all enjoyed it.

Kristin
Uh oh. I didn't know this! I made some mozzarella cheese and then (attempted) ricotta. I just made a mess with the ricotta, but I had lots of whey so I used that for sauerkraut (NT recipe)...I thought it turned out good. It tasted fine. Nobody got sick.  :-\  I still have leftover whey and I was going to make some more sauerkraut. Maybe I shouldn't use this whey  ???

Would've been nice to have that info in the book.  >:(  Or did I just miss that?

Offline boysmama

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Re: Kefir, Whey, Sauerkraut
« Reply #101 on: January 30, 2010, 04:51:17 AM »
Iodized salt will keep the batch from fermenting properly. I think  you can still get an edible product, but the quality and texture and also the probiotic content may be reduced. If it gets slimy I would start over. I've seen some decent kraut made with iodized salt, but it was much less salt than the NT recipe.

As for very "zingy" kraut....traditionally kraut is made in the fall when temps are low. It's kept at room temperature ONLY until wilted and packed down enough to be covered with it's own juices- no added water. Allowing it to ferment slowly over 2-3 weeks between 55* and 65* will give you a more mellow ferment that will store much better.
From what I can learn from my older relatives (German)  it was then usually moved to an even cooler location for storage over winter- a vacant smoke house where it might even partially freeze, buried underground or put deep into a root cellar.

Offline HOMEFree

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Re: Kefir, Whey, Sauerkraut
« Reply #102 on: October 31, 2010, 09:34:30 AM »

After watching "Homestead Blessings: Canning" DVD, I got excited to do my own sauerkraut. The West ladies did a wonderful job of walking you through this project. I had never realized how extremely simple this can be.

Hand shred/grate cabbage, add uniodized salt and work with your hands for a few minutes, put into jar and leave a couple inches space on top, cover loosley but secure and wait a few weeks. They recommend you sit the jar in a pie pan in case of leakage.