Author Topic: Cultural [Ethnic] Superstitions, Wives Tales, Myths & Health Traditions: Fact or Fiction?  (Read 64538 times)

JoyInHim

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Moderator, please move this odd post if I guessed wrong, about where to ask.  ::)

I have an extremely diverse set of neighbors, from every point of the world.  Several health issues have come up, which cause me to wonder a bit, outside of my box, whether they are factual or merely myths.  Could anyone comment - and perhaps there are other oddities to ask about on this thread that come to mind. 

1)  Staying warm during menses:
My Chinese neighbor tells me she never swims on her menses, because it is bad to allow your body to get cold at all during that 5 days or so.  I laughed because I swim right after my babies are born (careful about infection prevention, of course) as well as all during the month.  I had never heard this before. 
However: it may make some sense to me, considering the menses is related to blood flow (of course) and cold (or a cold dip) definitely can effect this.  She couldn't tell me 'why' it might be bad to 'get cold' during menses, only that she never does because it is unhealthy.  Anyone?

2)  Would this be considered 'Organic' or not?
Another neighbor gave me some gorgeous vegetables, a full month before the rest of us had anything but blossoms.  I asked her secret for such early zucchinis.  She quietly whispered that she has her 5 year old urinate into a bucket of water, and uses this for fertilizer!  (Her American hubby didn't care for this technique, so she was being discreet!)  After sitting on my counter a week.....I tossed them out at my dh's suggestion.  I honestly didn't know if it was safe to eat or not - but how much of our produce gets 'fertilized' this way by migrant workers, one must wonder!  (And, its organic, right?)  Is there any reason not to have eaten these veggies?

3)  Dressing a baby warmly, in warm weather:
My neighbor from Germany (similar climate here in MI) routinely dresses her baby (11 mos now) head to toes in long sleeves, pants and a hat - even when it is 95 out.  She explained babies need to be fully covered and the cotton keeps him somewhat cool.  He seems comfy enough.  (Funny to see him this way while his 8 year old cousin runs around in just undies!)  Is it 'better' to dress a baby so warmly the first year?  It is always in 100% cotton, I notice.  And once he began crawling, he could crawl on the grass somewhat and not bother his baby skin.

4) 'Jump starting' brain function in children:
I've observed several Indian (from India) neighbors, now, teach their very little toddlers to read, write and compute.  They've explained that they believe the brain must learn by age 3 (to read and write) to perform correctly in the older (child) years.  They are bright, I must give them that!  But, my neighbor is in a panic right now because her almost-5 yo can 'only' read 3 and 4 letter words, and can not yet add 2-digit numbers.  I've explained that our PS kindergarten is social based and reading and math begin in first grade (age 6 or 7) in our district...but she didn't seem to understand that he is more than prepared for his first day of K.  Is there something to the idea that stimulating a 3 year old's brain to read, write and compute is needed to have mandatory results in the elementary years?  I've heard this from several Indian families, now.  School in India begins at age 3, I am told, with 1st grade materials.  I am now somewhat convinced that Indians (in general) have a different pattern of development from generations of early reading/writing/computations.






Offline africamissy

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Moderator, please move this odd post if I guessed wrong, about where to ask.  ::)



2)  Would this be considered 'Organic' or not?
Another neighbor gave me some gorgeous vegetables, a full month before the rest of us had anything but blossoms.  I asked her secret for such early zucchinis.  She quietly whispered that she has her 5 year old urinate into a bucket of water, and uses this for fertilizer!  (Her American hubby didn't care for this technique, so she was being discreet!)  After sitting on my counter a week.....I tossed them out at my dh's suggestion.  I honestly didn't know if it was safe to eat or not - but how much of our produce gets 'fertilized' this way by migrant workers, one must wonder!  (And, its organic, right?)  Is there any reason not to have eaten these veggies?



lol  ;D ;D ;D ;D

Seriously now, when we were in Tanzania and wanted to eat anything fresh we would wash put it in the sink with a gallon of water & around a teaspoon or so of bleach (bleach because it was cheap and readily available).  I've heard of other missionaries using iodine.  We might try GSE this next time we go out.  We did this because you couldn't be certain that people didn't poo in their gardens.

I don't believe that urine is particularly toxic (that is has many diseases in it).  It contains a form of ammonia which is good for plants.  But I've heard of using cow urine to spray organic coffee plants.  Doesn't sound very good does it?

JoyInHim

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The results were pretty amazing, I do admit.  I was using fertilizer, but didn't even have flowers yet!

Offline BJ_BOBBI_JO

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4) 'Jump starting' brain function in children:
I've observed several Indian (from India) neighbors, now, teach their very little toddlers to read, write and compute.  They've explained that they believe the brain must learn by age 3 (to read and write) to perform correctly in the older (child) years.  They are bright, I must give them that!  But, my neighbor is in a panic right now because her almost-5 yo can 'only' read 3 and 4 letter words, and can not yet add 2-digit numbers.  I've explained that our PS kindergarten is social based and reading and math begin in first grade (age 6 or 7) in our district...but she didn't seem to understand that he is more than prepared for his first day of K.  Is there something to the idea that stimulating a 3 year old's brain to read, write and compute is needed to have mandatory results in the elementary years?  I've heard this from several Indian families, now.  School in India begins at age 3, I am told, with 1st grade materials.  I am now somewhat convinced that Indians (in general) have a different pattern of development from generations of early reading/writing/computations.

I have heard many times that the 1st 3 years of a child's life is when their brains absorb in the most stuff at a fast rate and they learn an incredible amount of data in those 3 years which starts slowing down after age 3.

Our great friend from India  would get confused when my oldest was just about 2 years old and he wondered why she could not read simple words yet. He was almost perplexed that she was not doing math yet. In India he was raised learning both his India language and English from the start. He  and his sister also had to learn reading and writing in both languages from the time they were very small children. He says at least in his state of India this is normal and considered to be of help to the Indian child after they grow up because if they do not know English  and other skills well then they wont be able to have a successful high paid job.

 If anyone has ever gotten online late at night ( when it is day time for India) there will be tons of ppl from India at cyber cafes online on the instant messages things. They are an itelligent group of people with lots of culture to learn about. I have greatly enjoyed talking to them and I allow them to ask me tons of questions about why we do the things we do just as they allow me to ask them the same types of stuff.

He is also perplexed that I ,as a female, drive a car, he thinks it is so cool and neat that we have a car. He is in his 30s and has never drove a car. And the fact that a female can drive herself to the store is neat to him.

Offline sweetestday

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Hmmm, your comments remind me of an Asian friend of my mother. She said it is bad to go outside after dark, because the trees give off toxic air. I can't remember all the other strange things she believed, but that one has stuck with me, and I still wonder if there's something to it. I certainly don't avoid going out at night, but it makes me wonder if plants change from their normal - in with the carbon dioxide, out with the oxygen- and do something else?
Also, when my older sis went to Romania, they never drank anything cold, but even warmed up their Pepsi before they drank it. Same thing there, too, with dressing babies up in warm clothes and hats year round. Oh, and they didn't drive with their windows down, because "drafts make you sick."

Offline CrimsonRose

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Also, when my older sis went to Romania, they never drank anything cold, but even warmed up their Pepsi before they drank it.

I think that the reason behind the "warmed up" drinks is that the cold can affect your digestive system negatively. Dr. Jordan Rubin talks about it in The Maker's Diet. It's been too long since I read it, though, for me to remember clearly. Guess I need to brush up on my digestive health info again.  :-[


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Offline likemanywaters

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This is a fun thread! Sigh. It makes me wish I tried harder with teaching my boy to read before he was three...  When I first saw the title I thought it was about "genetic" differences. Like why certain cultures get more of certain diseases than others.  My friend has mexican inlaws. She says in their culture a new mom is supposed to stay at home & rest w/ new baby for at least a month before going anywhere. I can't help but think this would be a good idea. Most mom's around here can be seen in Walmart with their new babies like, 2 days after delivery. Not to mention the ridiculous idea of taking 2 day olds to a pediatricians office.  ::)  She says they also dress their babies very warmly even in summer.  My friends Mom-in-law also came over & made her an oatmeal drink to help her milk come in. I couldn't help but think of those tonics in Nourishing Traditions that were just like that for nursing moms. :D Pretty cool!
« Last Edit: August 19, 2007, 12:01:02 AM by likemanywaters »
And, behold, the glory of the God of Israel came from the way of the east: and his voice was like a noise of many waters: and the earth shined with his glory.

-Ezekiel 43:2

JoyInHim

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Hey BJ - Yeah, this is pretty much our experience with Indian friends as well.  But, the ladies definitely drive.  They are very traditional (arranged marriage very subserviant to hubby's etc) and push academics 24/7 with the kids.  You cannot find nicer neighbors, that is for sure.
4) 'Jump starting' brain function in children:
I've observed several Indian (from India) neighbors, now, teach their very little toddlers to read, write and compute.  They've explained that they believe the brain must learn by age 3 (to read and write) to perform correctly in the older (child) years.  They are bright, I must give them that!  But, my neighbor is in a panic right now because her almost-5 yo can 'only' read 3 and 4 letter words, and can not yet add 2-digit numbers.  I've explained that our PS kindergarten is social based and reading and math begin in first grade (age 6 or 7) in our district...but she didn't seem to understand that he is more than prepared for his first day of K.  Is there something to the idea that stimulating a 3 year old's brain to read, write and compute is needed to have mandatory results in the elementary years?  I've heard this from several Indian families, now.  School in India begins at age 3, I am told, with 1st grade materials.  I am now somewhat convinced that Indians (in general) have a different pattern of development from generations of early reading/writing/computations.

I have heard many times that the 1st 3 years of a child's life is when their brains absorb in the most stuff at a fast rate and they learn an incredible amount of data in those 3 years which starts slowing down after age 3.

Our great friend from India  would get confused when my oldest was just about 2 years old and he wondered why she could not read simple words yet. He was almost perplexed that she was not doing math yet. In India he was raised learning both his India language and English from the start. He  and his sister also had to learn reading and writing in both languages from the time they were very small children. He says at least in his state of India this is normal and considered to be of help to the Indian child after they grow up because if they do not know English  and other skills well then they wont be able to have a successful high paid job.

 If anyone has ever gotten online late at night ( when it is day time for India) there will be tons of ppl from India at cyber cafes online on the instant messages things. They are an itelligent group of people with lots of culture to learn about. I have greatly enjoyed talking to them and I allow them to ask me tons of questions about why we do the things we do just as they allow me to ask them the same types of stuff.

He is also perplexed that I ,as a female, drive a car, he thinks it is so cool and neat that we have a car. He is in his 30s and has never drove a car. And the fact that a female can drive herself to the store is neat to him.


JoyInHim

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Oh, I  will have to ask my good friend and neighbors who are from Romania, those!  They do have many herbal 'concoctions' - that honest, I should LEARN.  The hubby especially makes odd little tinctures and will make special trips to the store for a dozen avacodos, etc.

My walking partner, Sundary, is Indian and we have some really fun conversations as we walk and she enlightens me more and more about Indian customs, which vary according to north or south or mid India.  We walk at dusk typically, and she never mentioned tree poison!  But she said all indian families -hate- dogs and usually cats, as well, and said she stifles a scream when she sees a person kiss an animal.  (Tend to agree, here.) 

The Indian families we know well (4 or 5 for 5 years or so) tend to dispise most animals.  Mice, birds, snakes especially.  They call my daughters (animal lovers) to come catch snakes, and we cannot convince them that garter snakes are not poisonous.

Her dd was invited to go to the pool with us a few weeks ago, and her mom said, 'No, the chlorine will make your skin darker.' We just -bawled- laughing (teens and I) over that deduction!  We -think- the mom meant the sun would.  But they do not do mixed swimming, so it was most likely a 'polite excuse' and the dd thought she'd give it a try (her parents have been allowing her to do some things more adventuresome lately).  The teen has such a lovely and submissive attitude over her parents odd and many rules.  They are far more conservative than anyone else we know.  : )

Hmmm, your comments remind me of an Asian friend of my mother. She said it is bad to go outside after dark, because the trees give off toxic air. I can't remember all the other strange things she believed, but that one has stuck with me, and I still wonder if there's something to it. I certainly don't avoid going out at night, but it makes me wonder if plants change from their normal - in with the carbon dioxide, out with the oxygen- and do something else?
Also, when my older sis went to Romania, they never drank anything cold, but even warmed up their Pepsi before they drank it. Same thing there, too, with dressing babies up in warm clothes and hats year round. Oh, and they didn't drive with their windows down, because "drafts make you sick."

JoyInHim

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OK, that does make sense.  I've heard the same about hot drinks - and all drinks should be just warm or room temp.  But I love cold, and hot.
Also, when my older sis went to Romania, they never drank anything cold, but even warmed up their Pepsi before they drank it.

I think that the reason behind the "warmed up" drinks is that the cold can affect your digestive system negatively. Dr. Jordan Rubin talks about it in The Maker's Diet. It's been too long since I read it, though, for me to remember clearly. Guess I need to brush up on my digestive health info again.  :-[

JoyInHim

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Cute photo! 
This is a fun thread! Sigh. It makes me wish I tried harder with teaching my boy to read before he was three... 
I wouldn't worry about it.  Experts actually advice little ones do not focus their eyes too much on books (up close) the first several (7?) years.  It is much easier to teach them at that age (to read) also!  Why stress it?  Just my view.  My 4.5 yo has picked up markers, just this month, for the first time!  He'll be in the same place at age 6 as all the early-birds, too, I know from my other dc.


When I first saw the title I thought it was about "genetic" differences. Like why certain cultures get more of certain diseases than others.  My friend has mexican inlaws. She says in their culture a new mom is supposed to stay at home & rest w/ new baby for at least a month before going anywhere. I can't help but think this would be a good idea.
My grandma did the month at home (in bed supposedly) thing, too!  And my mom got SEVEN days in hospital to 'recover' from her births.  My midwife did TRY to get me to stay off my feet as much as humanly possible for a whole week.  She'd even pop in to spy on me!  She said it was the key to avoiding postpartum depression, exhaustion, and a quick recovery.  I did fairly well with it - and I think she is right.

Offline SC

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My friends from India tell me that standard medical practice in that country is for a masseuse to come each day for (I think) a month and give the new mama a massage. Also, they wrap the mama's mid-section firmly with a wide cloth immediately after birth to help the organs and muscles go back into place. When the masseuse comes, mama is unwrapped, given a massage, and firmly re-wrapped. I also think that for the duration of this time, the mother and infant remain at home. All of this is done without charge to the patient. Now THAT's post-partum care!
« Last Edit: August 19, 2007, 11:39:38 AM by SC »
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JoyInHim

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You reminded me that my midwife (again, TRYs) requests that new mom's spend the first 24 hours (as much as possible) lying on their back, to allow organs to sink back in.  She shows us how to massage them back in, too.  Must work - the times I went for a 1 week exam, the OB would say, you look like you are 6 weeks postpartum.

BCBS completely covers chiropractic (a HUGE blessing!) so we get that for 'free' (dh pays a bit).

But a massage?  Uh...I've only allowed dh to come THAT close to me.  :D

My friends from India tell me that standard medical practice in that country is for a masseuse to come each day for (I think) a month and give the new mama a massage. Also, they wrap the mama's mid-section firmly with a wide cloth immediately after birth to help the organs and muscles go back into place. When the masseuse comes, she is unwrapped, given a massage, and firmly re-wrapped. I also think that for the duration of this time, the mother and infant remain at home. All of this is done without charge to the patient. Now THAT's post-partum care!

Offline africamissy

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Anyone ever watch "Bend it like Beckham"?  It's a movie about Indian people living in England.  It is not perfectly clean, so if you are picky about movies, you might not like it, but you folks with many Indian acquaintances might get a kick out of it.  My dh & I loved it, having known a few Indian folks.

Offline cjanderin

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My Fijian Indian neighbours tell me never to drink cold drinks after birth because only hot drinks will shrink my tummy back to normal.  Also, to wrap my stomach with tight bandages to bring it back to the pre-pregnancy size.

I think a lot of people underestimate what a young child (under 5s) can learn.  I know in the US you start school at the age of 6.  In New Zealand we start school at 5.  So in the US, it's almost accepted that learning to read under the age of 6 is 'advanced' or maybe pushing the child to early but age 6 is the age when they are ready.  In NZ, the same applies if they are under 5, and yet suddenly at the age of 5 they are magically 'ready' to read.  In England they start teaching children to read when they are 4.  Obviously in India it starts even earlier.
I think for most children it comes down to expectation.  You can teach a 2 year old their alphabet.  But most people don't see the point.  They are certainly able to memorise their letters - just like they can memorise nursery rhymes etc.  I have friends who think that their child is too little to learn memory verses and yet don't think it strange that the child already knows jingles from the television or songs off their cds etc!  If they can learn a nursery rhyme or a song then they can certainly learn a memory verse!!

In China and some other parts of Asia they have very strict rules about what a new mother can and cannot eat.  They are also supposed to stay inside the house for the first 6 weeks or so - no going to the park or the supermarket etc!
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Offline joychild24seven

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All of these are so interesting to read... I wonder how much truth is involved in all of our "old wives tales" as you know there had to be some truth in each of them.

When I worked in a group home for delinquent kids the hispanic girls commonly told eachother that eating raw cookie dough will make your "chest" larger. I had to giggle at that one but they swore up and down that it was absolute truth.

Maybe I've been eating too much raw cookie dough...  ;)
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Offline Linguist77

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Oh, and they didn't drive with their windows down, because "drafts make you sick."

Europeans and their fear of "drafts" really crack me up! Not everyone here feels this way, but it's common. My American parents still talk about the time they visited my inlaws in Sweden some 8 years ago. Temps were up in the mid-90s, very unusual for the Stockholm area, and my  inlaws didn't want to put down the car windows (no AC) because of the draft.  ;D

I've read that Mexicans believe the same way about this, but have only spent a week there and didn't experience it personally.
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Offline CrimsonRose

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OK, that does make sense.  I've heard the same about hot drinks - and all drinks should be just warm or room temp.  But I love cold, and hot.

{Sigh} I know. But, how can a girl be expected to give up ice-cold lemonade or not-quite-piping-hot cappuchinos???
« Last Edit: August 19, 2007, 05:03:53 PM by CrimsonRose »


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Offline mexmarr

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LOL, this is too funny!  My first 2 babies were born in Mexico.  I can't tell you how many or those oatmeal drinks that I had...  They are supposed to make the Momma have lots of milk, and every neighbor brought a liter of it.  It is 40 days of post-partum time.  I lived in a little village in the middle of nowhere, where these things were still followed religiously.  (The cities have lightened up a lot.)  The mother's feet AND head had to stay cover and... no shower for 40 days, either... I didn;t follow those, for sure!!!  I did do the band around my stomach.  It was like an ace bandage about a foot wide, and you put it on as tight as you could around your middle, and I loved it for a week to 10 days.

The hot/cold thing was a way of life.  I used to get in trouble all the time for cooking (over an open fire in the kitchen)  and then going outside when there was a breeze.  We met a guy who heated up his icecream on the stove before he ate it, so he wouldn't get sick.

There were a lot of other interesting things they did there.  The men would not cut logs for building cabins unless it was either full moon or no moon, I can't remember which.  They said that the wood would rot unless it was cut at the right time.

Offline Mrs. B

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I guess what I'm finding funny from all of these posts is that my elderly, caucasian, Southern/redneck grandparents have alot of these same beliefs.  I grew up hearing alot of this from them.  Who'd have thought that a bunch of hillbillies would have so much in common with the international community?

Offline Whiterock

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I guess what I'm finding funny from all of these posts is that my elderly, caucasian, Southern/redneck grandparents have alot of these same beliefs.  I grew up hearing alot of this from them.  Who'd have thought that a bunch of hillbillies would have so much in common with the international community?

I've been thinking the same thing!
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Offline likemanywaters

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The main one I remember from my grandparents (southern) is don't get your feet wet, you might catch a cold.

But really, I bet there is a lot of sense in the hot/cold drinks thing. Before the ability to have such treats (before freezers & refridgerators, before heating and air conditioning) all you had was room temp. drinks.  I've also really been wondering lately what a/c does for us. Before you had the advantage of sweating  8) in the hot southern summer to keep cool. I bet people released a lot of toxins that way!!!  Not to mention people were outside a lot more gardening, feeding the chickens, etc. You'ld probably naturally drink more.  ;D Actually, my husband says it's quite a shock to your system during the summer to go from freezing cold buildings to the 100 degree outdoors, then back in a/c vehicles & such.  I was going to go "pioneer" this summer & see what it was like before a/c down here, but this 103 weather lately has me enjoying my a/c  ::)  But I have taken the step of adjusting it up 5 degrees.

What about it missionaries that are out there?? Ever lived without a/c & liked it???  We were actually looking at an old turn of the century farm house that didn't have hvac.

All of these are so interesting to read... I wonder how much truth is involved in all of our "old wives tales" as you know there had to be some truth in each of them.

When I worked in a group home for delinquent kids the hispanic girls commonly told eachother that eating raw cookie dough will make your "chest" larger. I had to giggle at that one but they swore up and down that it was absolute truth.

Maybe I've been eating too much raw cookie dough...  ;)

Maybe it's the raw eggs in the cookie dough???  :D
« Last Edit: August 20, 2007, 06:27:05 AM by likemanywaters »
And, behold, the glory of the God of Israel came from the way of the east: and his voice was like a noise of many waters: and the earth shined with his glory.

-Ezekiel 43:2

Offline kittyninja

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I'm trying to remember some of the things my Chilean grandparents would tell me. Well- my grandma AND GRAMPA all swore that MY milk goes bad after 1yr and so they were shocked to see my daughter still nursing after a year. Course when she did get sick they said it was because of my milk.

Then there's the bowlegs if you stand an infant up on his/her legs. and they did make a fuss if the babies feet leg arms were uncovered even in the summer time.

JoyInHim

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Oh, thanks for the recommendation!  We have, through close friendship with an Indian family next door for many years, learned to really enjoy laughing at our differences (the nutty ones, that is!)

Our 15 yo Indian friend next door always refers to Indian homes as 'brown houses.'  When there is something we raise our eyebrows at (such as not being allowed to go out of the house when her mom or dad are not literally IN the house), she shrugs and says 'it's a brown house thing,' which we find so cute!

I'll look for this video  ;)
Anyone ever watch "Bend it like Beckham"?  It's a movie about Indian people living in England.  It is not perfectly clean, so if you are picky about movies, you might not like it, but you folks with many Indian acquaintances might get a kick out of it.  My dh & I loved it, having known a few Indian folks.

JoyInHim

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But the Swiss (and others, like Jethro Kloss of 'Back to Eden') felt hot to cold to hot was excellent for stimulating the system daily.  In fact, Kloss recommends daily skin rubs (with a brush) and cold water (ICE cold) showers, every morning, first thing.

The main one I remember from my grandparents (southern) is don't get your feet wet, you might catch a cold.

But really, I bet there is a lot of sense in the hot/cold drinks thing. Before the ability to have such treats (before freezers & refridgerators, before heating and air conditioning) all you had was room temp. drinks.  I've also really been wondering lately what a/c does for us. Before you had the advantage of sweating  8) in the hot southern summer to keep cool. I bet people released a lot of toxins that way!!!  Not to mention people were outside a lot more gardening, feeding the chickens, etc. You'ld probably naturally drink more.  ;D Actually, my husband says it's quite a shock to your system during the summer to go from freezing cold buildings to the 100 degree outdoors, then back in a/c vehicles & such.  I was going to go "pioneer" this summer & see what it was like before a/c down here, but this 103 weather lately has me enjoying my a/c  ::)  But I have taken the step of adjusting it up 5 degrees.

What about it missionaries that are out there?? Ever lived without a/c & liked it???  We were actually looking at an old turn of the century farm house that didn't have hvac.

All of these are so interesting to read... I wonder how much truth is involved in all of our "old wives tales" as you know there had to be some truth in each of them.

When I worked in a group home for delinquent kids the hispanic girls commonly told eachother that eating raw cookie dough will make your "chest" larger. I had to giggle at that one but they swore up and down that it was absolute truth.

Maybe I've been eating too much raw cookie dough...  ;)

Maybe it's the raw eggs in the cookie dough???  :D

JoyInHim

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My teen son informs me that there are lichens or moss (or something?) that are phospheresent (glow).  Some trees can absorb it through the woods, and give off an eery glow in the forest.

Could that be connected, I wonder?

The night air sure smells clean and wonderful, though.
She said it is bad to go outside after dark, because the trees give off toxic air.

JoyInHim

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Hmmm....have to tell you, I've definitely proved that one FALSE!   :o   :o 

All of these are so interesting to read... I wonder how much truth is involved in all of our "old wives tales" as you know there had to be some truth in each of them.

When I worked in a group home for delinquent kids the hispanic girls commonly told eachother that eating raw cookie dough will make your "chest" larger. I had to giggle at that one but they swore up and down that it was absolute truth.

Maybe I've been eating too much raw cookie dough...  ;)

JoyInHim

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Oh, our chiropractors wife corrected me when held her 6 month old upright, on his legs, once.  She believed it was bad for the spine.  :-\

One German grandma saw (skinny, flat chested) me nursing my big ol' fat baby one time, and spoke some German rapidly to her daughter in law.  My girlfriend (the DIL) laughed and said, 'No, grandma, all women can nurse - you don't need to have a huge chest!"

I'm trying to remember some of the things my Chilean grandparents would tell me. Well- my grandma AND GRAMPA all swore that MY milk goes bad after 1yr and so they were shocked to see my daughter still nursing after a year. Course when she did get sick they said it was because of my milk.

Then there's the bowlegs if you stand an infant up on his/her legs. and they did make a fuss if the babies feet leg arms were uncovered even in the summer time.

JoyInHim

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I asked my Chinese friend, the other day, if she had ever heard of eating fried scorpian, after seeing Chinese people eating it on TV.  She made a grimmace and said, 'Ew! Scorpian?  Yuck!' 

I said, 'I thought Chinese people ate pretty much any living thing that couldn't defend itself, served up on a stick!?'  She laughed.  Then she said, 'well, is dried jellyfish unusual?  I like that.....'

In China and some other parts of Asia they have very strict rules about what a new mother can and cannot eat.  They are also supposed to stay inside the house for the first 6 weeks or so - no going to the park or the supermarket etc!

Offline Whiterock

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Here's one from my family (southern hillbilly)... Don't get your head wet while on your period. Anyone ever heard of that? I've always scoffed at most stuff like that, but still feel daring if I wash my hair during that time of the month.
WR
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