Author Topic: Hospital Stays for Young Children: Do's & Don'ts  (Read 5944 times)

Offline SarahK

  • Master
  • Posts: 1820
Hospital Stays for Young Children: Do's & Don'ts
« on: August 10, 2007, 04:18:46 PM »
For anyone with hospitalization of a child in their future, I would recommend these things after prayer (QueenTea jump in as you see fit):

(1) Have someone you trust completely stay with your child at all times.  (The only exceptions for us have been after sedation when going in for a general anesthetic procedure.)  Be there in the room at their side for every exam, test, procedure and discussion.  Protect your child from mistakes because, if mom can make a mistake, any one else can too.

(2) Use phrases like "I want to be sure I understand this so I can explain it to my child if there are questions.  What you just said to me means..."  or  "I will need to explain this to my spouse/insurance provider/employeer when I request time off - so can I re-state what you told me and then you can correct me when I've misunderstood?"  No one gets defensive.  You get a straight answer in clear language.  Repeat as often as necessary.  I have even gone as far as putting on the ditsy look and saying "I'm sorry I'm so slow at this - but I know you have done this so many times that you will be able to teach even me.  So tell me again why..."  Everyone smiles (usually) and I get my questions answered.

(3) More aggressive options are out there, but save those for your last battles.  You have rights, but if you constantly 'flex' them in a threatening manner - it can get unnecessarily difficult.  The docs think of our son, by name, " with those parents with tough questions" instead of "That room with the nagging mother".

Moderator - move this as needed (as if you need my permission)...  
I have learned enough to know I still have lots to learn.  Teach me.
My WTM Intro updated 9/2010

Offline queentea

  • Adept
  • Posts: 484
Re: Hospital Stays for Young Children: Do's & Don'ts
« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2007, 01:52:39 AM »
For anyone with hospitalization of a child in their future, I would recommend these things after prayer (QueenTea jump in as you see fit):

(1) Have someone you trust completely stay with your child at all times.  (The only exceptions for us have been after sedation when going in for a general anesthetic procedure.)  Be there in the room at their side for every exam, test, procedure and discussion.  Protect your child from mistakes because, if mom can make a mistake, any one else can too.

(2) Use phrases like "I want to be sure I understand this so I can explain it to my child if there are questions.  What you just said to me means..."  or  "I will need to explain this to my spouse/insurance provider/employeer when I request time off - so can I re-state what you told me and then you can correct me when I've misunderstood?"  No one gets defensive.  You get a straight answer in clear language.  Repeat as often as necessary.  I have even gone as far as putting on the ditsy look and saying "I'm sorry I'm so slow at this - but I know you have done this so many times that you will be able to teach even me.  So tell me again why..."  Everyone smiles (usually) and I get my questions answered.

(3) More aggressive options are out there, but save those for your last battles.  You have rights, but if you constantly 'flex' them in a threatening manner - it can get unnecessarily difficult.  The docs think of our son, by name, " with those parents with tough questions" instead of "That room with the nagging mother".

Moderator - move this as needed (as if you need my permission)...  

I second everything that SarahK said here....especially the leaving your child part.  I didn't eat, shower, or have other bodily functions unless there was someone to stay with Gracie. I showered and used the bathroom in her room (wasn't supposed to, was supposed to go to another floor where the family lounge was) We had people (nurses, techs) come in and call her by the wrong name, so who knows what could happen if you are not there to catch it.

   I certainly could have been better at asking questions, so I appreciate that advice.  It doesn't help that they do rounds so early and I didn't get much sleep, and was sleeping when they usually came in. 

Only thing I would add is to somehow get on WTM and post your specific prayer request.  I know that it was a key instrument that the Lord used to bring me peace and comfort in my time of need.  Gracie even thought it was pretty cool that people all over the country (world maybe) were praying for her and they didn't even know us!

Offline healthybratt

  • administrator
  • Administrator
  • Guru
  • Posts: 11503
  • administrator
    • wouldn't you like to know?
Re: Hospital Stays for Young Children: Do's & Don'ts
« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2007, 08:13:47 AM »
Good advice.  Thank you.
  My favorite herb book!!

Offline milmuth

  • Adept
  • Posts: 503
Re: Hospital Stays for Young Children: Do's & Don'ts
« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2007, 08:39:57 AM »
Great advice, thanks!  Hoping not to need it soon....

One thing I might add from my own experience (as adult) is to ask extra questions of a nurse that you trust if you don't understand or can't get straight answers.  And special prayer for the right nurses to care for your child is important too- for me, having the right nurse has made the total difference on how my care was. 

Offline queentea

  • Adept
  • Posts: 484
Re: Hospital Stays for Young Children: Do's & Don'ts
« Reply #4 on: August 11, 2007, 09:05:07 AM »
Great advice, thanks!  Hoping not to need it soon....

One thing I might add from my own experience (as adult) is to ask extra questions of a nurse that you trust if you don't understand or can't get straight answers.  And special prayer for the right nurses to care for your child is important too- for me, having the right nurse has made the total difference on how my care was. 

This is so true.  Our nursing care was SO MUCH BETTER than our Dr. care. I was sure to let the lady know when she called to see how our "stay" was.  I gave names of those who were good and who weren't.  She was nice and said they need to know those things so they can be better.  This is from the Cleveland Clinic, one of the best hospitals in the nation.  Even the President goes there. With the exception of one nurse, they were all wonderful.  In fact the BEST was only a nursing assistant, but she was totally awsome and would do anything for us. She wasn't afraid to approach the other nurses to find out where pain meds were or whatever. The right nurses can make or break a stay in the hospital!

Offline daisey

  • Master
  • Posts: 1087
  • Be Still my soul, the Lord is on Thy Side
Re: Hospital Stays for Young Children: Do's & Don'ts
« Reply #5 on: August 11, 2007, 04:46:23 PM »
This is actually good advise for anyone who is in the hospital.   When a person isn't feeling well they really need someone else to look out for their well being.    I did this for both of my parents in their last years of life.
Be Still my soul, the Lord is on Thy Side

Offline lotsaboys

  • Master
  • Posts: 1796
Re: Hospital Stays for Young Children: Do's & Don'ts
« Reply #6 on: August 11, 2007, 05:51:34 PM »
Excellent stuff, ladies.

I really second the thing of not coming across in a contentious or defensive way. After we had been in with our son for 2-3 weeks and they saw that they could trust us and in fact respect us, we had a very workable relationship with the staff. So for the last couple weeks I did so much of the actual care that the Drs. and nurses would ask us what we thought about adjusting meds or trying this or that instead of simply ordering it done. Basically the nurses would hand the meds and supplies to me and leave the room and I'd do the rest. They always joked about hiring me. :-\

Once we were home and went back a million times for follow up, we'd often have funny colored concoctions on under the bandages and we'd tell them we used a homemade salve, with an intelligent sounding explanation of what its good for, ;) and they never gave us a hard time, just told us we were doing a great job!

There were also times where they wanted to come in to do a certain test, procedure, or therapy when we had to firmly, but kindly say now is not a good time. Just because it was convenient to their schedule, we knew it was not gonna work well because of Caleb's pain level, mood, or needing to rest at the time. We were as vigilant as we could be in trying to keep his schedule regulated and yet at the same time helping him to be cooperative when he needed to be, even when it was tough for him (and us).

I don't know how much sense I make, but it is really weird stuff to understand unless you go through it yourself. :-\ :)

Offline mamma5rlm

  • Wide Eyed
  • Posts: 1
Re: Hospital Stays for Young Children: Do's & Don'ts
« Reply #7 on: January 25, 2010, 10:34:16 PM »
I definitely agree!  It is because of MY experiences that I have been determined that my girls will never be left alone as children or adults.