Author Topic: Achillea millefolium [Yarrow]: ID'g, Properties, & Uses  (Read 23704 times)

Offline BJ_BOBBI_JO

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Re: Achillea millefolium [Yarrow]: ID'g, Properties, & Uses
« Reply #30 on: July 22, 2008, 03:21:50 PM »
I just tried merging it and it wont merge since yours is on another board.

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Achillea millefolium [Yarrow]: ID'g, Properties, & Uses
« Reply #31 on: July 28, 2008, 06:31:30 AM »
I just tried merging it and it wont merge since yours is on another board.
Done.  ;D
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Offline ah_young

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Re: Achillea millefolium [Yarrow]: ID'g, Properties, & Uses
« Reply #32 on: January 20, 2009, 10:53:48 AM »
Is Yarrow ok to take during pregnancy?  I can't seem to find a definitive answer....any help?

Thanks!

Offline Mrs. B

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Re: Achillea millefolium [Yarrow]: ID'g, Properties, & Uses
« Reply #33 on: January 20, 2009, 11:23:24 AM »
Is Yarrow ok to take during pregnancy?  I can't seem to find a definitive answer....any help?

Thanks!
Yarrow is considered an emmenagogue, or it promotes menstruation.
Depending upon where you are at in your pregnancy, the route (topical or oral) you are planning on taking yarrow, and the quantity you would be using, I would probably opt on the safer side and not use it.

Offline ah_young

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Re: Achillea millefolium [Yarrow]: ID'g, Properties, & Uses
« Reply #34 on: January 20, 2009, 12:23:58 PM »
Is Yarrow ok to take during pregnancy?  I can't seem to find a definitive answer....any help?

Thanks!
Yarrow is considered an emmenagogue, or it promotes menstruation.
Depending upon where you are at in your pregnancy, the route (topical or oral) you are planning on taking yarrow, and the quantity you would be using, I would probably opt on the safer side and not use it.

Thanks!  I'm not pregnant right now (although trying) so I won't take it internally. I have been rinsing my mouth with it today to try to heal a painful canker sore.

YoopreMama

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Re: Achillea millefolium [Yarrow]: ID'g, Properties, & Uses
« Reply #35 on: April 28, 2009, 08:46:41 AM »
http://www.learningherbs.com/news_issue_32.html
Yarrow for insect repellent and other interesting tidbits about its use to staunch bleeding.

Offline SarahK

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Re: Achillea millefolium [Yarrow]: ID'g, Properties, & Uses
« Reply #36 on: June 06, 2009, 03:44:01 PM »
Does anyone have any info about yarrow used with bleeding immediately after birth?  Or how about for post-partum bleeding?


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YoopreMama

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Re: Achillea millefolium [Yarrow]: ID'g, Properties, & Uses
« Reply #37 on: June 06, 2009, 04:19:12 PM »
Not really, SarahK.  I used Cayenne and Shepherd's Purse (tinctured).

http://creativecounterpart.wordpress.com/2008/02/08/the-best-herbs-for-pregnancy-birth-postpartum/ doesn't address your ? specifically, but may give other ideas. 

If I find anything, I'll holler.  I think I've read you can make a tea/tincture it (bitter, though) for the bleeding.  It's great externally.

YoopreMama

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Re: Achillea millefolium [Yarrow]: ID'g, Properties, & Uses
« Reply #38 on: June 06, 2009, 04:29:32 PM »
From PH's chapter on Yarrow:

"[quoting someone else] It will be found to be one of our best agents for the relief of menorrhagia (excessive menstrual bleeding)."

INTERNAL CONDITIONS
For Hemorrhage:  Infusion, Tincture, Decoction.  Combines well w/ Plantain, Capsicum (Cayenne) and Red Raspberry

For Menorrhagia:  Same preparation.  Combines well w/ Red Raspberry, Blue Cohosh and Capsicum

EXTERNAL CONDITIONS
Bleeding, Hemorrhage:  Tincture, Fresh Herb.  Combines well w/ Nettles, Alum root, Cranesbill (Wild Geranium), and Capsicum


Offline Pastorswife2B

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Re: Achillea millefolium [Yarrow]: ID'g, Properties, & Uses
« Reply #40 on: June 07, 2009, 05:10:21 AM »
Does anyone have any info about yarrow used with bleeding immediately after birth?  Or how about for post-partum bleeding?




I used a tincture containing yarrow right after birth this last time (#4).  The tincture also contained cramp bark, black haw bk, and St. John's wart.  The purpose of the tincture was to help keep the uterus clamped down, ease after birth pains and reduce post partum bleeding. 

I do not normally have an issue with bleeding but I did know going into this labor that this had been my most unhealthy pregnancy (pertussis for 2nd and 3rd trimester and tested GBS+).  In spite of all this I bled VERY little and I am the first person my midwife has ever seen who's hemaglobin levels went up between the first test (on admission) and the 2nd (24 ish hrs later).  I continued the tincture for about a week.  My bleeding stopped the first time at about 2 weeks; I find it hard to rest enough so it came back off and on for the next week but by the 3rd week it had stayed gone (yesterday being exactly 4 weeks).  The only change from my normal bleeding patterns was I did notice more clots than I had had in the past, but I don't know if that's just more babies or had something to do with the tincture.

My main reason in taking the tincture was to eliminate the need for painkillers when dealing with after birth pains and it did pretty well. I still had to take an Ibeprofun for overnights the first two days since the tincture's effects just didn't last long enough, but they made it so I could get through a feeding without writhing. 

Offline mykidsmom

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Re: Achillea millefolium [Yarrow]: ID'g, Properties, & Uses
« Reply #41 on: January 13, 2010, 05:14:50 PM »
Okay, read through this thread with some interest.  I made an infusion of yarrow last night to use today.  This is the first time I've used it.  I made it because I had been reading that yarrow is good for the urinary system.  I am trying to heal a bladder related autoimmune disease.  My bladder is spasming tonight!   :o  :o ???  This happens in two situations.  The first is something I'm allergic to is running through my system.  The second is too strong of a tonic/cleanser.  I understood yarrow to be more gentle as a cleanser.  Is this not correct? 

Answer please, before I inflict anymore pain..........

thanks,

patti
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Offline hi_itsgwen

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Re: Achillea millefolium [Yarrow]: ID'g, Properties, & Uses
« Reply #42 on: January 14, 2010, 10:46:42 AM »
Patti, It's my understanding that Yarrow is a gentle cleanser.  It's one of the ingredients in Chidren's Composition in fact.

http://www.mountainroseherbs.com/learn/yarrow.php  Here is what Mountain Rose Herbs says about Yarrow.  It's in the ragweed and sunflower family, so if you have allergies to those, then that may be your issue.

(Side note: I found this part of the description interresting based on the enzyme/Gaps thread conversations:
[Yarrow] "stimulate(s) the release of stomach acid to digest proteins and fats."
« Last Edit: January 15, 2010, 07:46:39 AM by hi_itsgwen »
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Offline mykidsmom

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Re: Achillea millefolium [Yarrow]: ID'g, Properties, & Uses
« Reply #43 on: January 14, 2010, 01:17:56 PM »
Hmmmm.  Thanks, Gwen.  I'll try again.  If it happens again I'll assume I've just made it too strong (didn't think I had - only used 1tbls).

Interesting about the digestion aid!  We got allergy tests back.  I'll have to post over there when I get a chance.  Hint:  I'm free to eat gluten now!  ;D :)
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Offline mommyjen

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Re: Achillea millefolium [Yarrow]: ID'g, Properties, & Uses
« Reply #44 on: January 15, 2010, 03:22:13 AM »
We got allergy tests back.  I'll have to post over there when I get a chance.  Hint:  I'm free to eat gluten now!  ;D :)

Um, YEAH!!  Don't keep me in suspense any longer!  :D  So glad to hear you're healing, Patti.
Billy's wife and mom to John, Charles, Gilbert, and Lewis.


YoopreMama

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Re: Achillea millefolium [Yarrow]: ID'g, Properties, & Uses
« Reply #45 on: November 01, 2010, 06:18:11 AM »
LOVE having Yarrow powder on hand for external bleeding (leaves and flowers in my Vita-Mix--small amount, so as to not go bad). 

Boy, 6, got to test run it for me.  A very tender wound on the top of his foot had its scab broken, and he was bleeding quite liberally.  We sprinkled it on and it stopped instantly.  He said it helped w/ pain, too.   8)

Achilles was supposed to have used it on his soldiers' battle wounds.  With 3 boys, I expect to use it more.   ::)

Offline Gigi

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Re: Achillea millefolium [Yarrow]: ID'g, Properties, & Uses
« Reply #46 on: November 02, 2010, 04:39:27 AM »
I like to keep yarrow around for making glycerites or alcohol tinctures for fevers.  I add it to lobelia and mullein for any sort of cold/flu problem.  We've found it to be VERY effective.  Sometimes amazingly so.

I've also found it to take the "heat" out of sore places on the skin.  Like if a cut gets slightly infected or sore - a paste of yarrow just calms it right down.  Kind of similar to what Yooper found with her Super-Yooper-Six-Year-Old.  I've found it great for diaper rashes because of this.








YoopreMama

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Re: Achillea millefolium [Yarrow]: ID'g, Properties, & Uses
« Reply #47 on: November 02, 2010, 06:21:16 AM »
YES!  Yarrow is fabulous for fevers.

I like the others topical uses you mentioned, Gigi...will have to keep those in mind when the need arises.  And it will.   ::)

YoopreMama

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Re: Achillea millefolium [Yarrow]: ID'g, Properties, & Uses
« Reply #48 on: November 02, 2010, 06:30:48 AM »
I forgot...I did an exhibit for our County Fair on Yarrow.  Some excerpts from research:

Yarrow is a classic herb for first aid, colds and flus, fever, and skin ailments, with quite an impressive history of use.

This remarkable plant, often abundant in the open meadows favored particularly by the ancient armies in the Mediterranean area, has a stunning ability to stop the flow of blood.  The Latin name, Achillea, comes from the tradition that Achilles used it, as it grew on the battlefield, to staunch the bleeding of his soldiers’ wounds.  3,000 years later, it was reported to be similarly used in the Civil War.   

“Millefolium” translates "thousand leaf", referring to Yarrow’s finely dissected simple leaf that appears almost fernlike.  Yarrow is also know as Soldier’s Woundwort, Bloodwort and Staunchweed.

Indicated Uses

Not only will Yarrow speed blood clotting but it helps relieve pain (analgesic), disinfects wounds (antiseptic), promotes tissue repair, and reduces inflammation. Fresh yarrow leaves are best for wound healing, but you can put dried, powdered leaves right on the cut or make a compress, soaking a cloth in yarrow tea and laying it on the wound.

Lowering fevers (in a tea or bath) and healing skin (infused oil) are two of Yarrow’s other impressive abilities.  Some view Yarrow as being unsurpassed for plague-like flus and fevers, claiming that if used at the onset of a cold, it usually breaks it up within 24 hours.  Yarrow makes a bitter-tasting infusion (tea), so you may want to blend it with tastier herbs (peppermint, cinnamon, orange, or cloves) as a digestive aid and diaphoretic (inducing sweating to reduce fever).

Other traditional uses include digestive problems, liver and gall-bladder conditions, menstrual irregularities, cramps.  Yarrow has been used to treat colitis and viral infections, and it has a healing effect on mucous membranes.  Externally, it is used in the form of sitz bath or as a compress against skin inflammation, slow-healing wounds, bacterial or fungal infections.   

Growing and Harvesting

Yarrow grows abundantly in [our area], along roadsides and in open fields.  Yarrow is drought tolerant, deer resistant, and likes poor soil – you can easily find it in nurseries in a variety of colors.

Some things to remember when harvesting any plant:

   1. Correctly identify plant before picking. Many herbs are similar and it could be dangerous if you pick the wrong herb.
   2. Do not pick herbs that are close to the road or in an area that uses pesticides.
   3. Pick your plant material once dew has evaporated and before the hottest part of the day. Volatile oils will be at their prime.
   4. Only pick in an area of abundance. Do not wipe out a patch of any herb.

The entire plant (above the ground) should be gathered when in full bloom between June and September—early morning is best.  It can be tied in loose bundles and hung to dry in the shade or airy, dark place indoors.  After removing the leaves and flower tops, a Mason jar works well as a storage vessel.

Resources

Heirloom Herbs:  Using Old-Fashioned Herbs in Gardens, Recipes and Decorations, Mary Forsell.  1990

Practical Herbalism, Philip Fritchey, MH, ND, CNHP.  2004

Prescription for Nutritional Healing, 2nd edition, A Practical A – Z Reference to Drug-Free Remedies Using Vitamins, Minerals, Herbs & Food Supplements, James F. Balch, M.D. and Phyllis A. Balch, CNC. 1997

Rosemary Gladstar’s Family Herbal. 2001

www.bulkherbsore.com

http://www.ryandrum.com/threeherbs.htm

http://www.mamasherbgarden.com/my-garden/yarrow-to-the-rescue

http://www.ehealthyland.com/health/essential-oil/yarrow-oil-what-are-yarrow-essential-oil-health-benefits-yarrow-essential-oil-medicinal-uses-and-properties-health-benefits-of-yarrow-essential-oil.html

http://www.learningherbs.com/herbs_for_fever.html

Yarrow-infused Oil was easy to prepare.

Dried Yarrow leaves & flowering tops were covered with olive oil and heated in a pot on low to about 160 degrees.  They were then moved to this Mason jar where they will sit in a sunny spot for a few weeks, shaken daily.

The mixture could then be used topically as a general skin healer (bruises, chicken pox, old and new wounds), and to manage varicose veins, and hemorrhoids, bleeding or not.

Yarrow Powder

Dried leaves & flowers were ground in the blender to make this powder, which can applied directly to a wound to stop bleeding (including
nosebleeds), or made into a tea to use as a compress.  Herbal powders do not have as long a shelf life as other forms, so it’s best to only grind ¼ to ½ cup at a time.

Yarrow Salve

Oils can be messy with little ones, & more can be accidentally taken than needed, so to get more out of my herbs, I often make salves.

This one was made with other herbs (Comfrey, Plantain, and Arnica) to complement Yarrow’s skin healing ability.  Like the infused oil, the herbs were covered w/ oil, then simmered until crispy.  The oil was strained through muslin, and shaved beeswax was added to thicken it into a salve.

I added Grapefruit Seed Extract and Tea Tree Oil as preservatives; the Tea Tree Oil also being a wonderful disinfectant.

Actions

Diaphoretic (promotes sweating/fever-reducing)
Anti-inflammatory (soothes inflammation)         
Bitter (digestive aid)
Hypotensive (lowers abnormally high blood pressure)   
Diuretic (increases production/elimination of urine)
Hepatic (aids the liver)
Astringent (drying effect)                     
Anti-microbial   (helps body resist bacteria, fungi, viruses)
Vulnerary (promotes wound healing)
Hemostatic (checks bleeding)
Anti-viral (inhibits growth of virus)
Emmenagogue (stimulates menstrual flow)

CAUTIONS:  Yarrow interferes w/ absorption of iron and other minerals.  It is not to be taken more than a week internally.  Some people are allergic to it (Composite family).

Offline BJ_BOBBI_JO

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Re: Achillea millefolium [Yarrow]: ID'g, Properties, & Uses
« Reply #49 on: October 31, 2011, 04:19:29 PM »
I just wanted to bump this thread up again. Yarrow has been such a blessing to me since I discovered it was indeed yarrow I had growing on my land. It dries easily and works well at stopping colds and other sinus/respitory issues.

It also works has a diuretic so if you drink some yarrow tea be sure you will be able to get to the bathroom in a timely manner!  ;) ::)

Due to yarrow's awful bitter taste you might want to use a lot of peppermint with it when making tea. I like also using elderberries in the yarrow tea not only for added flavor, but because both of those together seem to act like lean mean cold and virial killing machines.


I only have white yarrow growing. But I have saw yellow yarrow as well and Im pretty sure that was a pinkish/puplish yarrow I once saw. Were my eyes deceiving me is there such a thing as pinkish/puplish yarrow?

Offline Lady of the Wood

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Re: Achillea millefolium [Yarrow]: ID'g, Properties, & Uses
« Reply #50 on: August 06, 2013, 06:57:21 AM »
Yes! There is such a thing as purple/pink yarrow.  :D :D :D The white kind is the wild species, and the colored ones, (I'm pretty sure), are hybrid ones that people use in their flower beds. The funny thing is  that people that plant yarrow in their flower beds usually have no idea about the medicinal properties of yarrow. ::) ::) ::)   I've read somewhere that the colored ones are supposed to be not as potent as the white kind.  :o :o :o Hope that helped you!!! Have a great day :D :D :D :D

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