WellTellMe

Remedies & Therapies => Cleansing & the GI Tract => : ForeverGirl June 16, 2006, 10:33:24 AM

: Digesting Proteins
: ForeverGirl June 16, 2006, 10:33:24 AM
Hello all - I recieved this question via email and wanted to put it out here in case any of you has experienced this and has first hand advice? 

I was wondering if you have any advice on getting your body to digest protein properly.  I have been having hair loss for the last year and my chiropractor says I am having problems breaking down the proteins.  He gave me something called protefood, but it hasn't seemed to help at all.  I also have tested for being slightly anemic at a physical I took about 8 months ago.  I took plently of herbal iron, including SuperMom and also additional spirulina, but my blood count dropped even slightly lower when I had my bloods rechecked after 6 months.  I'm really stumped by these problems???
: Re: Digesting Proteins
: ForeverGirl June 16, 2006, 10:35:54 AM
I think it would help us to know more about this person's condition, if she would care to post?

What other symptoms are you experiencing? What other illnesses have you had? Are you on any prescription drugs? Recent pregnancy? Diet?

: Re: Digesting Proteins
: healthybratt June 16, 2006, 11:11:10 AM
HEALTH JOURNAL  (http://www.bodyandfitness.com/Information/Health/digestion.htm)

Digestion Health


We often take digestion for granted. Who thinks much about what happens to food after we eat it? And anyway, aren't some of those digestive processes a bit-well-inappropriate as topics for polite conversation?     

But good health depends on adequate digestion. Without sufficient physical and chemical breakdown of foods, the nutrients every human cell needs to function would not be available. Poorly digested food is toxic; when it sits too long, it can be absorbed and recalculated through the body, stressing the liver and the immune system and eventually causing disease. And if the body works too hard to digest food, vital energy is diverted. Digestion starts in the mouth, where salivary enzymes begin the chemical processing of food and the teeth break it down physically. (Garry D'Brant, a chiropractor and clinical nutritionist who treats digestive disorders in Greenvale, New York, recommends chewing each bite twenty to thirty times.) From the mouth, food slides down the esophagus to the stomach, where high concentrations of hydrochloric acid dissolve it further. Material then passes to the small intestine, large intestine and to the colon before being eliminated. Along the way, material is moved through dozens of feet of gastrointestinal tract by peristalsis, waves of contractions that propel food through the hollow digestive canal. As food makes its way down the canal, nutrients are extracted and absorbed by the body.

Though not technically part of the canal itself, the liver, gall bladder and pancreas are crucial to digestion. The liver produces bile, which emulsifies fats and aids peristalsis. Bile is stored in the gall bladder, which contracts and secretes the bile into the small intestine. The pancreas produces three important digestive enzymes: amylase, which helps digests starch; lipase, which takes part in the absorption of fat; and protease, which breaks down protein. Digestion disturbances can be painfully obvious. Some ills, thankfully, disappear quickly, like the discomfort from overindulgence in food or alcohol. Others persist chronically, and can, potentially, cause a health emergency.

These conditions include:

  • Gastroesophageal reflux, a failure of the valve between the stomach and lower esophagus, allows stomach acid to back up and makes us reach for antacids to quell the subsequent heartburn.
  • Gastritis, an inflammation of the stomach's mucous lining, can come and go (with the arrival and departure of irritants like spicy foods or aspirin) or turn into a long-lasting condition
  • Ulcers linked to infection with the Helicobacter pylori bacteria; use of NSAIDS (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) or other diseases can eat away the lining of the gastrointestinal tract.
  • Gastroenteritis, distress caused by a flu infection or food poisoning.
  • Ulcerative colitis inflammation of the colon.
  • Irritable bowel syndrome (commonly called "spastic colon"), marked by alternating episodes of constipation and diarrhea.
  • Crohn's disease, a complex chronic inflammation that affects the intestinal wall.
   
Food Allergies

Sometimes food sensitivities are due to enzyme deficiencies that prevent certain people from digesting particular nutrients. Many people are plagued by excess gas, for instance. In general, if swallowed air and gall bladder problems can be ruled out as causes, fermentation and decomposition are the likely culprits. Some foods, including beans, radishes, cabbage, broccoli, and other foods of the cabbage family, tend to produce gas. Beans produce gas because the body lacks an enzyme to split their sugar, which is a disaccharide, or double sugar. Because this sugar is not fully digested, it travels through the digestive system to the bowel, fermenting, and gas is the byproduct of this process. cooking beans longer, until they are a sludgy porridge, as the Mexicans do, breaks the sugar bond and reduces the production of gas. In the process, however, they lose a lot of the food value that probably led you to choose beans as a food in the first place. Multi vitamins and minerals should be increase. Milk also may cause gas, and again it is due to incomplete digestion because of the lack of an enzyme. Lactase is necessary to split the lactose, or milk sugar, which is another disaccharide or two carbon sugar. Unless it is broken down into monisaccharides, it can ferment, producing gas, increasing mucus, and causing other problems. With the increase of protein powders, many may see a increase of excess gas, since most protein powders on the market today comes from milk or dairy ingredients. When these protein powders are mix with milk, this can cause a double amount of gas. Taking an antacid to counteract gas generally aggravates the condition because it further depletes the acids that are already lacking to complete the digestive operations and causing gas. The problem can, however, be resolved by adding betaine hydrochloric acid, and digestive enzymes to the diet to assist digestion. With protein powders, which to mixing them with water or juice or used a Soy base instead of whey base.

Digestion Maintenance
   
Although digestive problems sound grim, they can usually be treated-and healthy digestion maintained-with natural medicine from a variety of healing traditions. Acupuncturist Nigel Dawes, a faculty member at the New Center College for Wholistic Health, Education and Research, Syosset, New York, uses acupuncture and herbs to alleviate gastrointestinal disorders. The acupuncture corrects energy (qi) imbalances that disturb digestion and is particularly effective in treating anxiety-related disturbances like "nervous stomach." And it works quickly, says Dawes. "We see symptom changes in one week or two." Since herbs are taken orally and work directly on the digestive system, "they are often the treatment of choice for GI (gastrointestinal) problems," he continues. "Herbs can really help change the environment in the gut." Herbs are especially effective when digestive tissue breaks down (as in destruction of intestinal villi, which leads to poor absorption), obstructions, yeast (Candida albicans) overgrowth or chronic debilitation with weight loss (such as the wasting AIDS patients experience). Dawes has used astragalus root as a tonic to strengthen muscle tone of intestines and intestinal peristalsis. Ginger, (research) raw or dried, improves gastrointestinal secretions. "And licorice root is in almost every digestive formula, (research)" he says. "It's an antispasmodic, increases secretions and calms nervous disorders of the stomach." He uses cinnamon bark as a circulatory tonic, to improve the blood supply to the intestines, and uses atractylodes to help move fluids through the digestive canal.

Cleansing the Tract

Organic, whole foods are a boon to digestion; processed foods and foods full of antibiotics, hormones and pesticides may tax the liver and make the body work harder to extract nutrients. Systems that have been stressed by bad eating and poor digestion can be cleansed, however, and refreshed with a number of substances. For instance, milk thistle extract has been shown to improve digestion and help the liver clean out the digestive system. Grape seed bud is an antioxidant that treats dyspepsia and gas while uva ursa leaf acts as a diuretic that can prevent amoebic diarrhea. In addition, several substances, by speeding elimination, can rid the digestive tract of toxins. Psyllium fiber cuts gastrointestinal transit time (speeding food along its way) and can reduce LDL cholesterol levels. (LDL cholesterol is the blood cholesterol linked to heart disease.) Other fibers like oat bran, rice fiber and prune fiber also produce similar digestive effects. Steven Nenninger, N.D., sometimes recommends supplements, specifically vitamin C and quercetin (antihistamines that can control gastrointestinal inflammation), and soluble, gluten-free fiber. If your digestion is slow-and you've no history of inflammation, ulcers, colitis or Crohn's-he recommends one to two capsules of digestive enzymes (lipase, protease, and amylase), with meals.

FOS Fosters Good Bugs

Fostering the healthy growth of microorganisms called bifidobacteria in our lower intestines can also promote better digestion while possibly dropping our risks of cancer and heart disease. (These little germs may produce anticarcinogenic substances and help eliminate harmful fats before our bodies absorb them.) These helpful bacteria thrive on starches called fructooligosaccharides (FOS). FOS, found in fruits and vegetables, can also be taken as a supplement made from Jerusalem artichokes. Because it feeds these good bugs, FOS has been credited with lowering blood pressure, reducing blood fats and reducing constipation. Many health practitioners, no matter what their specialty, agree on one thing: our stress-filled culture upsets our stomachs. Avoiding arguments at the dinner table, listening to peaceful music and eating slowly (not gulping food in the car, while talking on the cellular phone) can all help digestion. "Minimize stress to the greatest extent you can," advises Steven Nenninger. "If you can't, figure out why not." He recommends counseling for those who need help making lifestyle changes that promote healthy digestion. (If you're the type who feels unworthy of good health, the homeopathic remedy Nenninger recommends is natrum muriaticum.)  And watch your metaphors: if you catch yourself saying "I can't stomach that" or "I'm fed up," your digestive system may be sending you a not too subtle message.
 
Gallstones

I have a customer that suffer from severe gallstone attacks, especially at night. She said sometimes, the pain would persist all day long. I completely overhauled her diet (fresh fruits and vegetables, lean protein, whole grains, nuts and seeds). In addition, I started her on supplements to help to prevent gallstones and enhance liver health. The remedies I use include dandelion, milk thistle, peppermint oil and vitamin C.  The approach has made a dramatic difference in her condition. See Super ThisilyN

Probiotics

    Probiotics refers to a category of dietary supplements consisting of beneficial microorganisms. Probiotics complete with disease causing microorganisms in the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and animals. When helpful bacteria such as acidophilus are reintroduced into the gastrointestinal tract, the result is balance. Probiotics are responsible for several activities in the gut, including manufacturing B vitamins such as biotin, niacin (B 3), folic acid, and pyridoxine (B6); producing lactase; producing antibacterial; killing harmful bacteria by changing the acid/alkaline balance and by depriving the harmful bacteria of the nutrients they need; improving digestive tract function; and combating vaginal yeast infections.

ACIDOPHILUS: Probiotics live in our intestinal tract, mainly in the bowels. Over 400 different species of micro-organisms make their home in the healthy intestine. They can weigh up to 3 pounds, and have so many important functions in our bodies that they can be thought of as an exogenous organ. Throughout the digestive system, their numbers can be as high as 100 trillion. They actually outnumbers the cells of the human body by as much as 100 to one. This mass is formed of both healthful and harmful species. By weigh, there are actually more bad guys. However, among the many functions of the desirable microflora is the job of keeping the undesirables in line. Other functions include assisting in the digestive process, helping to alleviate gastric disorders, eliminating bad breath, preventing yeast infections, lowering blood cholesterol, producing B vitamins and vitamin K, and stimulating the immune system. The bacterial balance of the intestines is the fulcrum of health. Intestinal bacteria are not static. They are highly active and constantly in a state of flux. As beneficial "probiotic" bacteria thrive, they help discourage unwanted bacteria and fungi from proliferating out of control.  the two types of probioric supplement most commonly encountered are Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium. Although both kinds can be found throughout the digestive tract, acidophilus generally thrives in the small intestine and bifdobacteria in the juncture of the intestines and in the large intestine.

BIFIDOBACTERIA: (including B. bifidum, B. infantis, and B. longum) are natural inhabitants of the human intestine. They are found in the stools of humans and help prevent colonization of the intestine by unfriendly bacteria, assist in the production of B vitamins, and increase acidity of the intestine, which is inhibitory to less desirable microorganisms. They also help infants retain nitrogen, which encourages weight gain. The Japanese scientific community now believes that bifidobacteria are the most important of all probiotics because they prevent reabsorption of toxins (such as amines) that, when allowed to re-enter the system, place significant strain on the liver. Bifidobacteria also complete against Candida albicans, the bacteria that cause yeast infections. Bifodbacteria are the most common bacteria found in breast-fed human infants. Bottle-fed babies are low in bifidobacteria, however, as are most adults who have taken antibiotics or eaten pesticide-rich foods.

LACTOBACILLUS BULGARICUS is found in yogurt and cheese. When eaten or taken in a supplement form, this good bacteria enhances digestion of the milk sugar lactose by producing the enzyme lactase. As with other lactic acid bacteria, this transient bacteria encourages a more acidic environment, which inhibits less desirable microorganisms. Bulgaricus assists in the breakdown and absorption of proteins. It also boosts the immune system by stimulating the production of macrophages and immunoglobulins, which are essential antibodies.

Enzymes

Enzymes are protein molecules that regulate the metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates (sugar and starch), and fats. They act as catalysts for chemical reactions in the body. Supplemental enzymes are usually taken when the body's natural enzymes have trouble doing their job. Most commonly, they are used to aid in digestion when the enzymes in the mouth, stomach, and small intestine are unable to break down food into components that can pass through the wall of the intestine. Undigested food components that pass through the intestinal wall have been linked to conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis.

...

BROMELAIN : is a naturally occurring enzyme derived from the pineapple plant. As a nutritional supplement, it is widely used to assist in the digestion of protein, to relieve painful menstruation, and to treat arthritis. It has also become a popular sports injury medicine, taken internally to reduce bruising, relieve pain and swelling, and promote wound healing. It can also be used externally, like papain, as a paste applied to stings to deactivate the protein molecules of insect venom. Reports have touted bromelain's immune-boosting properties as well. Typically it is taken with meals as a digestive aid, or thirty minutes before or ninety minutes after a meal to help treat sports injuries.

COENZYME Q10 (CoQ10): is a vitamin like compound, also known as ubiquinone, that occurs naturally in the body and is taken as a supplement to help activate the body's enzymes and thereby generate energy. It may help prevent or treat heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and obesity. CoQ10 is an antioxidant and immunity booster and may strengthen muscles and improve physical performance and endurance. It is taken to allow the body to adjust to higher altitudes and improve physical endurance. It has also demonstrated excellent results in clinical trials on periodontal disease by speeding up healing time, reducing gum pockets, and improving other factors associated with gum disease.

PAPAIN : is a naturally occurring enzyme derived from unripe papayas. It is the ingredient in meat tenderizers that softens meat by breaking down muscle tissue. As a supplement, it is taken internally as a digestive aid. It is also applied topically, after water is added to crushed tablets, to make a paste to relieve bites and stings. It works by breaking down the large protein molecules of insect vernom. The fruit papaya, is an wonderful digestion aid.  Is is also very soothing to the stomach and digestive tract.   [/size]
: Re: Digesting Proteins
: JesusIsKing June 16, 2006, 02:24:13 PM
Hi! I'm the one who sent the question to BeeyoutifulGirl.  My youngest child is four and I started noticing my hair was falling out about a year ago and then when I got a physical I found out about my lower blood counts.  I eat pretty healthy, but not perfect.  I keep moving more and more toward a whole foods diet.  We use raw cows milk, whole wheat (haven't got a grinder yet to have really good quality wheat), use virgin coconut oil to cook with.  I also feel like I'm taking way too many supplements and believe that I must not be digesting them properly or I wouldn't be having these problems.  I already take food enzymes, milk thistle, the SuperMom and Spirulina.  I take a tablespoon of flaxseed oil every day.  I often take psyllium before I go to bed to have extra fiber and I drink lots and lots of reverse osmosis water.  I have no idea if the chiropractor knows what he's talking about in regard to the protein digestion.  I've been praying for wisdom on this.  I can't afford to keep buying so many supplements, especially if I'm not even digesting them enough for them to help.  I just also added whey protein powder to build up my proteins and it is supposed to have the free amino acids that I'm reading help in protein digestion.  I've read to much and my oldest daughter told me that my hair is probably falling out because I'm worried so much about it falling out!  Maybe I'm in a health crisis and need to do the master cleanse or something like that!  I feel so shallow about the hair loss thing.  I feel pretty good if it wasn't for this.
: Re: Digesting Proteins
: healthybratt June 16, 2006, 04:04:57 PM
I've read to much and my oldest daughter told me that my hair is probably falling out because I'm worried so much about it falling out! 

First of all, your hair is your crown.  God gave it to you to wear for yourself and your husband.  It's not vain for you to want to take care of it and keep it.  It does sound like you're really trying hard on the diet, which would lead me to believe that you might have external problems like shampoo??  It's hard to tell, but you can check the "Hair Loss" (http://welltellme.com/discuss/index.php/topic,274.0.html) thread in "Skin, Hair and Scalp" (http://welltellme.com/discuss/index.php/board,14.0.html) to find out information on how to care for your hair on the outside.

The other thought, is in all of your dietary changes, have you ever treated for Candida?  This can also lead to hair loss espcially if you've developed LGS.  This is reversable and it's not really that hard to do.  You just need to make sure you kill the yeast, replace the good bacteria and make sure you're getting enough of the good fats and protein in your diet.  All that other stuff you're doing is good too, except for maybe the flaxseed oil.  I've read that flaxseed oil may not be as good as they say, but it might be better to eat the whole seed (ground) instead.  This isn't so bad, as it makes a great sprinkle in smoothies, on tacos, on peanut butter sandwiches, salads and lots of other stuff and you can get organic ground flaxseed at Walmart fairly cheap.  It also has as much or more fiber content than psyllium.  If you'd prefer to take the oil, Cod Liver Oil is the most recommended for healing up the GI tract and it's also good for the bones and joints and I'm pretty sure Walmart sells this too.  I 've actually been meaning to get me some for a finger injury from last Christmas but I keep forgeting.   CLICK HERE (http://welltellme.com/discuss/index.php/topic,603.0.html) for more info on LGS and how to reverse it and it's symptoms. 

Don't fret, I felt like you too.  I once had so many problems and I read and read and read trying to find the answer, but when you finally do find it, all the other stuff you read will start to fit together like a puzzle and you'll be all the wiser for it.   ;)
: Re: Digesting Proteins
: JesusIsKing June 16, 2006, 05:29:51 PM
Thanks for the information.  You are so sweet.  I looked at the LGS link and I don't think I have that , but maybe I do and need to read more on it.  I also need to read more on the Candida.  That is something I don't know much about.  I mentioned I'm taking so many herbs and things and I forgot to mention that I am taking 2 Tummy Tune-up a day.  Before I was taking Tummy Tune-up I went through 2 of the biggest size bottles of Garden of Life Primal Defense over a 3 month time.  Maybe I need to take way more of the Tummy Tune-up??  I'm also taking herbal iron on top of all the other stuff!! That is why I can't believe my iron didn't go up at all.  I'll research the conditions you mentioned some more. 
: Re: Digesting Proteins
: joyful_mommy_03 August 10, 2006, 05:48:27 AM
I have many food allergies - primarily to fruits.  A wonderful friend (visionarymom!!) suggested that, as stated in the quote posted by HB, food allergies may be linked to undigested proteins.  She suggested I take papaya tablets to help with this.

Has anyone else had success with treating allergies with papaya?  I'm wondering if there is anything else I can do to speed up or help the process.  I am a nursing mother, so some of my options are limited.  I really would like to start eating more healthy, but the allergies to fruits is really discouraging - these allergies didn't start until a few years ago and I'm 30, so built up undigested food makes total sense to me.

I was planning on taking the recommended dosage of papaya tablets three times a day after meals - is that too much?  Will it help digest the foods I've eaten with that meal and also work on the stuff that had built up?

Thanks everyone!
: Re: Digesting Proteins
: joyful_mommy_03 August 12, 2006, 03:12:22 AM
 ;)   ;)   ;)  Bump Bump Bump   8)   8)   8)
: Re: Digesting Proteins
: Pennie August 12, 2006, 03:36:40 AM
i would love to know this too.  My 7 yo suffers with allergies and I would do just about anything for him aside from giving him OTC med all the time. 
: Re: Digesting Proteins
: healthyinOhio August 12, 2006, 07:19:39 AM
I have no idea about Papaya tablets and the digestion of proteins.  But I do know that my daughter has digestion problems with certain meals and she takes the three tablets and it eases her stomach.  She gets too many acids and then belches like a man! ;)  Truly is disgusting.  But it does really work.
: Re: Digesting Proteins
: 4myhoonie August 12, 2006, 11:14:52 AM
i would love to know this too.  My 7 yo suffers with allergies and I would do just about anything for him aside from giving him OTC med all the time. 

i don't know much about papaya tablets, but it seems like a bandaid.  good for the immediate problem, but not getting to the root.  i am taking the primal defense powder and i can tell a major difference in my food allergies.  i used to be paranoid about everything i ate and if it would agree or not with my digestion.  (my symptoms were really poor digestion) i was "allergic" to beef, corn, dairy, eggs, mushrooms and bananas and couldn't tolerate white flour or sugar.  there were other foods i stayed away from because i had bad experiences with them before.  i also had major protein digestion problems.  now i eat pretty much whatever i want and occasionally forget to take the primal defense, without any major effects.  i try not to overdo it, eating too many allergens in a day if i start feeling bad, but it hardly ever happens.  i have used it with my kids without any trouble.  just start slowly.  i plan on working up to a larger dosage when i'm done nursing.  my 7 yo son has eczema on the insides of his arms and gets very itchy in the winter.  i am going to begin him on it daily.  i think his is related to dairy.
: Too much iron supplementation?
: boysmama August 28, 2006, 04:33:53 AM
  I'm also taking herbal iron on top of all the other stuff!! That is why I can't believe my iron didn't go up at all.
I just want to add a note of caution about over supplememting with iron. Almost two years ago I researched this for awhile along with a midwife and there is some evidence that too much iron supplementation can actually drop your iron. Actually there is alot of evidence that the iron pills doctors prescribe usually do more harm than good. Herbal iron should be much better but I kind  of remember that our conclusion was that iron is best taken as a "whole food" supplement. I would suppose that the iron in Supermom would qualify. I would check to see if the herbal iron is a whole herb or just extracted from the herb -if that is possible ???
I am so irked that my box of natural health papers was THE box that got lost when we moved :'( :'( :-\ :P I wish I could get you all the info we collected. It was convincing!!!
I had good success with dried prunes ::) to get my iron up , but I was not severely anemic either.
: Re: Digesting Proteins
: Simply Kristen August 01, 2007, 02:15:44 PM

Enzymes

Enzymes are protein molecules that regulate the metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates (sugar and starch), and fats. They act as catalysts for chemical reactions in the body. Supplemental enzymes are usually taken when the body's natural enzymes have trouble doing their job. Most commonly, they are used to aid in digestion when the enzymes in the mouth, stomach, and small intestine are unable to break down food into components that can pass through the wall of the intestine. Undigested food components that pass through the intestinal wall have been linked to conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis.

I am pregnant (about 5 months).
This entire pregnancy I've had stomach issues. I get nauseous then have to go to the bathroom (#2), URGENTLY.
So, I started paying attention to my diet and taking probiotics (but probiotics made no difference).
I've found with this pregnancy I NEED lots of good fats and protein. My brain and emotions don't work well without it.

Whenever I eat a lot of (good or bad) fats I get #2 problems. It seems like the fats are not digesting. They come out as mucous.... and I have to go to the bathroom immediately. I have lots of gas during this point.
I also feel like my intestines are squished. Almost like the baby is resting on them weird and the gas (and other stuff) has to take a turn to expel properly.
Sorry so graphic.

ANYWAYS... I have fixed A LOT of the problem by taking Digestive Enzymes (from Beeyoutiful).
BUT, I'm not sure what this acually is doing. And what the cause of the problem is (feel like I'm only fixing symptoms).

Suggestions? Teaching? Thoughts?
: Re: Digesting Proteins
: likemanywaters August 01, 2007, 02:52:41 PM
If it is a fat digestion problem, I thought maybe you could do things to support your liver, since it is responsible for digesting fats. Dandelion, Milk Thistle, lemon water.  There's a lot about that on here. Pregnancy sure does some crazy things though.  Hopefully someone else will have some ideas too... I know what you mean about finding the cause. I have no ideas in that area.
: Re: Digesting Proteins
: herbalmom August 01, 2007, 11:29:29 PM
Enzymes

Enzymes are protein molecules that regulate the metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates (sugar and starch), and fats. They act as catalysts for chemical reactions in the body. Supplemental enzymes are usually taken when the body's natural enzymes have trouble doing their job. Most commonly, they are used to aid in digestion when the enzymes in the mouth, stomach, and small intestine are unable to break down food into components that can pass through the wall of the intestine. Undigested food components that pass through the intestinal wall have been linked to conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis.
I am pregnant (about 5 months).
This entire pregnancy I've had stomach issues. I get nauseous then have to go to the bathroom (#2), URGENTLY.
So, I started paying attention to my diet and taking probiotics (but probiotics made no difference).
I've found with this pregnancy I NEED lots of good fats and protein. My brain and emotions don't work well without it.

Whenever I eat a lot of (good or bad) fats I get #2 problems. It seems like the fats are not digesting. They come out as mucous.... and I have to go to the bathroom immediately. I have lots of gas during this point.
I also feel like my intestines are squished. Almost like the baby is resting on them weird and the gas (and other stuff) has to take a turn to expel properly.
Sorry so graphic.

ANYWAYS... I have fixed A LOT of the problem by taking Digestive Enzymes (from Beeyoutiful).
BUT, I'm not sure what this acually is doing. And what the cause of the problem is (feel like I'm only fixing symptoms).

Suggestions? Teaching? Thoughts?

This sounds a lot like what I get when my back is out where the nerves to the gall bladder are. (upper back- between the shoulder blades) You may tend to think that this couldn't be what is causing yours because your upper back doesn't hurt but keep in mind that it can be caused by just a slight misalignment that doesn't cause pain like it does when you wrench your back. It can just feel like that area of your back is a little different without being really noticeable. I have gotten to the point after so many years where I can notice it at first twinges in my back IF I am paying attention BUT also sometimes the first thing I notice is a heaviness in my stomach or that I'm nauseous. Here's a post I posted on another thread that explains why your back being out would cause symptoms like that:

Thanks, DHW. I had meant to post on the gall bladder threads but forgot.

Try chiropractic treatment. Nerves to every organ in the body run through the spine. If a vertebra is out it can irritate the nerve that is leading to an organ & cause problems in that organ. Which organ depends on which vertebra is out. The nerve for the gall bladder for instance is in the upper back & the is one for the stomach is lower down.

I have an S curve in my spine & the change over is right at the nerve for the gall bladder. That makes that the weakest spot in my back & it goes out a lot. When it's out it irritates my gall bladder & I either get the runs,   (the gall bladder spasms putting out too much bile which is a laxative) vomit bile,  :P :P or have the symptoms of a gall bladder attack. Resetting my back stops it cold. DH has gotten quite good at setting my neck & back. For years before I found out about this Dr's were telling me that I needed to have my gall bladder removed (which I refused) but they couldn't figure out why I was having problems since I didn't have stones, my ultrasound only showed a little bit of sand & it wasn't big enough to cause problems. I don't have gall bladder problems, I have a bad back. That isn't the case for everybody but it is in my case. I've been using the back resetting for 16 yrs so if it was truly my gal bladder I would know it by now. I have also stopped the runs numerous times in family members by resetting their backs. I have done it for a few non family members as well but I am cautious about who I offer to do it for. I know how to reset backs & necks but I'm leery of doing it on just anybody. Obviously, the runs have many causes but sometimes it is nothing more than the upper back is out. 

Here is a chart showing which vertebrae go with which part of the body. It's at the bottom of the page so just scroll down:

Spine Chart (http://www.burtischiropractic.com/Glossary.htm)

I thought that this would make it easier to understand.

I had also posted this link on other threads & a couple of people said that it's didn't work. I don't know, it works fine for me. Anyway, here is another link for a different chart, hopefully it works.

New Spine Chart (http://home.earthlink.net/imagelib/sitebuilder/misc/show_image.html?linkedwidth=actual&linkpath=http://home.earthlink.net/~pnemanic/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/spine.jpg&target=tlx_new)

HTH Blessings ~herbalmom

When I was pregnant with #2 (which is when I found out about the back affecting the gall bladder) I threw my upper back out A LOT. I was having to see the chiro 2-3 times a week. He ended up showing my DH how to do acupressure (NOT acupuncture) to reset it since my back needed reset so often. Now that I think about it, the chiro may have showed DH how to do it because he was afraid our insurance (we were on state ins) would kick it back. As is, I got a form from the state asking for the details, witnesses, etc of the "accident" I had been in that required so much treatment. DH & I had a good laugh over what I could have written  ;) but in the end I just wrote pregnancy & didn't hear any more about it.   

Another thing that causes me symptoms like that is eating foods I'm allergic to- in my case dairy. If I haven't been eating dairy for a while it doesn't bother me. If I continue to eat dairy, I get symptoms like your describing only after eating dairy. If I CONTINUE to eat dairy then I get to the point where I have symptoms like your describing after EVERYTHING I eat, dairy or not. I also happen to get bad intestinal cramps with all this but not everyone would. The fact that you get mucus is a clue that it may be allergy. 

It is also possible that you have BOTH issues going on at the same time- that's usually how it is with me. I know, I need to quit dairy but I love it so I always go back to it sooner or later. (can you say allergic addiction?  ::)) HTH Blessings ~herbalmom
: Re: Digesting Proteins
: Maria/NHM August 02, 2007, 03:11:25 AM
This is great to learn. I have galbladder attacks every couple weeks. I've done six liver flushes and at least that many coffee enemas. I've yet to pass any stones. I've had back trouble between my shoulder blades for years. I'm going to try chiropractic care as soon as we get the money.
: Re: Digesting Proteins
: Simply Kristen August 02, 2007, 03:42:47 AM
That's cool about the spine. I've been planning to go to a chiro for a while.
Thing is: How could pregnancy (even at 4 wks) cause anything funny about the spine?


: Re: Digesting Proteins
: Pastorswife2B August 02, 2007, 05:09:08 AM
That's cool about the spine. I've been planning to go to a chiro for a while.
Thing is: How could pregnancy (even at 4 wks) cause anything funny about the spine?




My back has an increased tendancy to go out pretty easily when I'm pregnant, personally I blame it on those ligament loosening hormones since it's gotten worse with each one (I'm on #3 right now).  and my Chiro likes to keep all his pregnant patients on a little closer leash because he notices that joints and backs go out much easier and that the symptoms of the joint misalignment are magnified.

-Heather