WellTellMe

Natural Health => Nutrition & Food => Recipes, Menus & Diet Plans => : healthybratt May 17, 2006, 10:43:34 AM

: Nourishing Traditions
: healthybratt May 17, 2006, 10:43:34 AM
I have not read this book yet, but it's been mentioned many times in other posts.  I would ask that those of you who have read this book post your thoughts, remarks and recommendations in this thread for easy access. 

Thanks

hb  ;D
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: dara May 17, 2006, 10:57:12 AM
I like it. Good recipes, though we don't eat nearly the amount of fat the book recomends- I don't put 4 T. of butter on any one serving of food! I would gain weight like there was no tomorrow! I like the pure food thrust, though, and need to read more about soaking grains...
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: blessedby5 May 17, 2006, 11:13:31 AM
I really like this book.  More for the info than the recipes.  Lots of good reading.  I read parts to my mom about how eating fat doesn't make you fat and she's not convinced, yet.  I put lots of butter on everything and use whole milk and eat homemade ice cream sweetened with maple syrup and whole milk yogurt, etc :.  I don't think it's the natural fats that put the weight on us but all the other junk we eat.  I suppose it's hard to believe something when you've heard the exact opposite for so long. :)
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: FaithAcre May 17, 2006, 05:51:29 PM
One of my most favorite books in the kitchen!  I have to agree with blessedby5, it's not the healthy (read natural) fats that make you fat.  I read another book by Sally Fallon called Eat Fat, Lose Fat.  Eye opening!   We are just so very decieved by our FDA's recommendations, that its hard for any of us to have our minds changed.  I urge you to go to weston price foundation's website and do a bit of research there. 

Oh, back to the book...I have only owned mine for a few short months and of those few months, I was reading the plethora of information in it!  Just recently have I started utilizing the recipes and am loving it! 

The recipes require planning time.  This isn't a problem for me, because my menu is usually planned out and I look at it in the evening to see what needs to be done for tomorrow.  Some might have difficulties with this, but I think it's a good habit to form!

Hope this was helpful somewhat!

: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: organimommi May 17, 2006, 06:48:12 PM
I also just started reading this book a few months ago.  Love it!  Lots of great info. We were already eating lots of organic foods exspecially diary, but i have really learned so much from this book in respect to meats and fermented foods.  No more Low Fat Yogurt for me!  I recommend this book to everyone.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: lotsaboys May 18, 2006, 06:38:21 AM
Thanks, healthybratt, for starting this subject! I was planning to, just had not got around to it yet. Oh, where do I start?!  :) At the time a friend told us about Nourishing Traditions, it was just what we were needing and ready for! We have loved the changes it brought to our eating and we always say it has done for our health what the Bible teachings from Michael Pearl did for our souls!  :)

When I first read it, I wanted to dive in and cook up a storm, but soon found out it is best to take it slowly at first. It requires alot of planning ahead because of the soaking, fermenting and simmering, but well worth it. Our family has made gradual changes starting with basics like sweeteners, salt, and raw milk and yogurt, and now we've done the Kombucha tea, beet kvass, sourdough starter from rye, cream cheese and whey, sour cream, ginger beer and small beer, beef and chicken stock, homemade ice cream, eggyolks for my baby, and much more!

My boys tease me about my tattered book and all the bookmarks and scribbles. It has been such a learning process for me, but so well worth it! My dear hubby loves doing all the fermenting and culturing, so he is a big reason for our success.

Its amazing how deceived we've been by most nutritional experts out there, esp. the ones promoting low fat. Its been refreshing to get back to traditions that are nourishing! :D

We still have some areas that we are trying to learn more about and decide what is the best route to take, like cheese for instance. Our family eats alot of cheese and Sally doesn't recommend it except for raw cheese which gets very pricey for a family of ten. I've welcome any help on that. (the cheese, not the 10 problem  ::)!!!, we ARE trying to slow down !!! :-[)

Oh, and I also found the "Limited-time, limited-budget guidelines" section in the back very helpful. Also the may Sources she lists. Well, I don't want this to get too long and boring, so I'll quit, but am looking forward to hearing from others! ~B

: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Chickory Chick July 11, 2006, 09:06:21 PM
How did I miss this post! Thanks for the cross reference HB.  I love this book.  I keep it with my health reference books instead of my cookbooks (because I kept taking it to bed or wherever to read), thankfully that bookshelf is right next to my kitchen entry way, so I can grab it when I want to try a recipe.

 I first discovered this book when I read "The Maker's Diet" and Dr. Mercola's book.  I noticed both had recipes from Nourishing Traditions, so I decided to go straight for the source.   Amazon had it for $17 (which was the cheapest I found it, but at the time thought it was pricey) and if I ordered $8 more (easily done) shipping is FREE!  I was not expecting such a huge book, (the size of a large town phone book) nor the reference part of it.  Definitely worth the money.   It has so much information and recipes. Beside the meaty introductions to each chapter, the margins are full of quotes, research and a "guess what store bought food has these ingredients" challenges.  IT has a great resource section in the back and a comprehensive index.  I showed it to my mom and sis in KY and they each ordered a copy.   Definitely a great resource and its nice because you can just pick it up and start reading a little bit here and a little bit there.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Hope64 July 14, 2006, 05:01:40 PM
Check www.overstock.com   I found it cheaper there.  I "think" it was about $14.00 with actual book rate shipping.  It's been a few weeks since I checked the price though.

Hope64

Nope.  I don't own it yet.  It's at the top of my "I'd like to buy it" list.  I have Maker's Diet book though. 
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Elizab04 July 14, 2006, 05:40:40 PM
I really found this book eye opening.  She explains everything very well.  I had to wait for 4 other people before I could get it at the library.  When I finally got it and wanted to renew it, I couldn't, because 4 more people were waiting for it!  I'm just going to buy it.  It's worth it.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: felmleyfam July 14, 2006, 06:33:15 PM
It is good for even the mostly vegetarian eaters. The grains section is small but the info on soaking grains has been helpful for me (the banana bread is good).
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Julie G July 15, 2006, 03:39:54 AM
I also checked it out from the library, would love to own it.  There is so much information and it is very simply put, so you can actually understand it without needing a brain transplant ;).  When I was reading it, I was so excited I kept telling my husband..."Listen to this.....Can you believe that?"  He was pretty amused by the whole thing.  Some great information, wish I would have tried the recipes....I had to return the book as well so I didn't get that far.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: DawnsEarlyBirds July 15, 2006, 09:37:57 AM
My son and new daughter-in-law spent their first 8 months of marriage in the Dominican Republic.  Some folks were going down for a short term mission trip and I sent down the Nourishing Traditions recipe for soaking beans and a few bottles of organic lemon juice for them.  My D-I-L said that she was now soaking the many many beans they were eating and that it made a huge difference in how my son's digestive system was handling the beans, and then she said, "And I am THANKFUL!"   ;D ;D ;D ;D

I love the book, followed a lot of it this past year, and we had a much much healthier winter.  We are just doing the fermented vegetables, soaking beans and grains, drying nuts, so far.  Haven't quite been able to think about the raw meats and organs yet .........
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: ARmom July 15, 2006, 02:09:27 PM
I didn't read this thread very throughly, and may have missed it, but I didn't catch the author's name. Could someone give me that info please?  Thanks so much.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Chickory Chick July 15, 2006, 04:54:47 PM
I didn't read this thread very throughly, and may have missed it, but I didn't catch the author's name. Could someone give me that info please?  Thanks so much.

Sally Fallon
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio July 21, 2006, 12:41:49 PM
I just got my copy of this book in the mail, yesterday.  I already have around 600+ pages read.    I really really love it and would recommend it to anyone who is interested in good traditional cooking.  I have already been able to answer a lot of my dumb lacto-fermented questions.  Like you don't necessarliy get whey out of a newly opened yogurt container.  You actually strain it and the stuff that drips is whey and the rest I guess is cheese.  Duh!  Hey, I am learning!
You can make pickled cucumbers so much easier than using vinegar, salt, and canning.  And it is really healthy and supports your intestinal bacteria. 
I am enjoying all the history on foods.  I just love to study different cultures.  I found the section on baby food very interesting.  Feeding egg yolk and raw liver to a four month old :o  I would have never thought that one on my own!  I would highly recommend this book for those who have a lot of time for some of the rigorous preparation of soakings and fermentings. 
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio July 21, 2006, 03:57:00 PM
Just made my second lacto-fermented veggie and my first sauerkraut.  I pounded for 10 min. and again, I did not have the juice above my veggies.  Do I have non-juicy veggies, or am I just a wimpy lady? ;)
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio July 22, 2006, 08:11:48 AM
BUMP!! please. :)
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Chickory Chick July 22, 2006, 10:48:11 AM
Just made my second lacto-fermented veggie and my first sauerkraut.  I pounded for 10 min. and again, I did not have the juice above my veggies.  Do I have non-juicy veggies, or am I just a wimpy lady? ;)

The first time I tried to make it (both times I didnt have way so used salt), the juice didnt come up over, the 2nd time it did.  I am not sure if it was the head of cabbage or what!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio July 22, 2006, 11:03:09 AM
Kay,

Since the juice didn't come over it, can I still eat it?  Is it safe?  Or was my work in vain? ???
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: mishy July 22, 2006, 11:06:30 AM
I use a tall jar and then a wooden spoon.  I whack the wooden spoon down in the jar until I get juice.  I didn't have any problem with cabbage.  Hm.  I would think it is OK to eat if it smells fermented.  It says in NT that there is no way you would be able to eat the stuff if it were bad because it stinks so bad.  But fermented stuff does stink.  So?? 
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio July 22, 2006, 11:08:15 AM
Thanks,

I will eat it.  But if I don't post anything here in the next few weeks, you will know why. ;)
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: mishy July 22, 2006, 11:11:28 AM
LOL   :D
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Nickole July 23, 2006, 10:16:43 AM
This book takes a LONG time to get through but is worth every minute.  It is a health book/cook book in one.  Totally changed our perspective on eating, and now we cook almost everything we eat from this book, soaking, making whey, raw milk, yes lots of butter  ;D .  We were already cooking everything from scratch so it wasn't much of a transition, and you will find that pancakes and waffles taste SOOO much better when the flour is soaked in kefir, and oatmeal soaked in whey.  Oh, my, the food is SO much tastier.   :P  Also you have never had good almonds/cashews/pecans until you have had soaked and dehydrated ones.  Intensifies the flavor.   :P I am constantly soaking something, or making a stock, or dehydtrating, or whatever, but it is all worth it and just knowing we are healthier for it.  Plus lots more healthy kid labor!   ;D  The kids love the porridge also - we hardly ever buy dry cereal anymore. 

Nickole
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: mexmarr July 23, 2006, 11:40:28 AM
Yeah!  I just ordered Nourishing Traditions from Amazon!!!  I can't wait to get it!!!

It is marked down to $15.70 right now, and count's towards free shipping (if you spend $25).

Considing that it has 600 pages, I think that is a very good deal.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Amey July 23, 2006, 05:37:25 PM
I can vouch for what NT says about sauerkraut - if it goes bad, you will know it when you take a whiff. I had one jar go bad. It was one that only filled up about half of a jar (the last of the batch). It smelled awful. There's no mistaking when a jar goes bad.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: joyful_mommy_03 July 23, 2006, 05:57:45 PM
Just looked up this book on the public library website.  There are 6 copies of the book and 27 hold requests!!!  Yipes!  Must be an awesome book!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: ScottsHelper July 25, 2006, 04:23:36 PM
I've enjoyed NT as well.  I have a question, though...I am nursing, and my baby is EXTREMELY sentitive to any dairy I eat, so I've had to leave out the whey when making the recipes.  I would really like to make a good sandwich bread with soaked flour, but the recipe in the book for sandwich bread does not give the option of leaving out the buttermilk and using vinegar or lemon juice.  Does anyone have a good "compromise" bread recipe for sandwiches that does not use dairy?  I've tried the sourdough recipe...it was WAY too sour and hard for my family's tastes right now!   I can't do too much experimenting resulting in failures, as much as I like to experiment...it's gettting too expensive!  :)

Heather
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthybratt July 25, 2006, 05:12:11 PM
I'm thinking about getting this book, but wanted to ask those of you who have read it a question.

I know the basic idea is to cook from scratch, grind and soak your own flour and make everything yourself, BUT does the author offer anything in the way of healthy and practical substitutions?  For instance, does her book tell you whether purchasing skim milk is a practical substitution for buying raw milk when it's not available or is she hard pressed on raw milk or goat milk only?  Does she offer tips on buying ground flours and how to use them or does she only tell you how to grind them yourself? 
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Amey July 25, 2006, 05:42:41 PM
Does anyone have a good "compromise" bread recipe for sandwiches that does not use dairy?
Heather

Sue Gregg's Whole Grain Bread recipe uses apple cider vinegar to soak the flour in. I think you could probably substitute vinegar or lemon juice for whey/buttermilk/kefir in any recipe, though. I have the recipe, but I don't know if it is ok to post it here since it is copyrighted from her cookbook. Anyone know? Urban Homemaker also has a recipe http://www.urbanhomemaker.com/articles/index.php?page=index_v2&id=318&c=18 (ftp://http://www.urbanhomemaker.com/articles/index.php?page=index_v2&id=318&c=18) where you can substitute. I use the Sue Gregg recipe and I like it better than the NT "compromise" yeast bread recipe and the Urban Homemaker recipe (I've tried both). A friend of mine likes the Urban Homemaker recipe best.

About dairy in Nourishing Traditions: they are very adamant about raw milk. If I remember right, you won't find much advice about choosing non-raw milk, but she does say that pasteurized but non-homogenized milk can be used for cultured milk products. Here's a quote I found (page 35):
If you cannot find good quality raw milk, you should limit your consumption of milk products to cultured milk, cultured buttermilk, whole milk yoghurt, butter, cream and raw cheeses.

She doesn't talk much about buying flour that I can see. She just mentions that if you do a lot of baking, "a home grain grinder is a must," but says unbleached white flour is good for dusting pans, rolling out doughs and kneading. Also for pie crusts.

Hope that helps!  ;D
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: ScottsHelper July 25, 2006, 05:52:01 PM
Thanks, Amey!  I have tried the Urban Homemaker's recipe, however, we didn't care for it as well...it may be because I did not use the dough conditioner (not sure if that's what it is called or not!).  Will have to find Sue Gregg's recipe to try.  My family loved NT's compromise bread with the buttermilk, but, like I said, I can't eat it now.  Maybe I'll do one more experiment and try to make it with the cider vinegar instead!

Heather
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthybratt July 25, 2006, 08:36:11 PM
Hope that helps!  ;D

Yup, thanks.  It would probably be a waste of my money right now.  Don't have any way to get raw milk and my yogurt doesn't do as well as raw milk without adding gelatin, so I'll just have to figure something else out.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: natural August 17, 2006, 03:52:05 AM
I saw this book for sale this morning for $17.00 postage paid. I did notice she will not take checks, you can email her to find out what you can organize with her. I have bought books from her and she is really a great seller. She offers a wide variety of homeschool books too. You could email her for her list. This was listed on the homeschl used books (yahoo group).

bibliolater23@yahoo.com

Please let us know if you are the one to purchase it so we don't over-load this woman with inquiries

SAndra
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: amazonmama2five August 17, 2006, 04:25:41 AM
I CAN'T BELIEVE I MISSED THIS POST!!!  This is one of my absolute most FAVORITE books!  HB, the information alone is worth the $$$, even if you never use a recipe.  I have a difficult time getting raw milk, it is here just not easy to come by.  I use pasteurized milk that I have cultured with kefir grains in all the recipes.  I have had this book for almost a year and there is just so much information!  I get it down and read it at night like KayinPa, and also during the afternoon when everyone is busy doing something else.  It feels so awesome to go to bed with oatmeal soaking, kefir culturing, beans cooking in the crockpot that have soaked all day, kombucha fermenting, punch in the fridge, and rootbeer brewing!!!

This book has also helped me to see the importance of eating the different foods how God intended.  I used sunflower oil for years thinking I was doing my family a favor only to find out I was contributing to the problems! 

When I first got the book in the mail from half.com (http://half.com), I WAS OVERWHELMED with all the changes I needed to make.  We live in Brasil as most of you know, and eat beans every day.  We were cooking them in the pressure cooker, straight from the bag with only a rinse!  Now we buy the fresh beans from the Farmer's market, soak them all day or night, and then do them in the crockpot overnight two pounds at a time and freeze four family sized containers to season for later meals.  My kids really like two bean chili, which is just pinto and black beans in the same pot. 

And that was just ONE thing I was doing wrong!  If you can check it out at the library, do so.  But like I told my SIL, there is just so much information you really need to buy it!  And it is SO interesting to read all the facts and cultural tidbits (to me it was anyway!)

I need to go and READ some more!
Lisa
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: ALittleMore August 17, 2006, 05:03:20 AM
Oh I LOVE this book, it's sooo interesting. Totally different perspective on so many things I never thought of before. Makes me happy, I don't have to eat alfalfa sprouts and tofu and no meat and skim milk to be healthy. Haha. And her recipes for chicken and beef stock are so yummy, I cook with them ALL the time, they're my secret ingredient.  :D My cousins actually got to hear Sally Fallon speak at a convention, I'd love to hear her speak. Her book has been an awesome blessing, just the wisdom and the mindset -very refreshing!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthybratt August 17, 2006, 07:45:18 AM
HB, the information alone is worth the $$$, even if you never use a recipe. 
Just when I had talked myself into buying it, my budget was cut drastically.  I'll have to wait a bit longer, it seems. :-\
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: natural August 24, 2006, 10:10:50 AM
I saw this book for sale this morning for $17.00 postage paid. I did notice she will not take checks, you can email her to find out what you can organize with her. I have bought books from her and she is really a great seller. She offers a wide variety of homeschool books too. You could email her for her list. This was listed on the homeschl used books (yahoo group).

bibliolater23@yahoo.com

Please let us know if you are the one to purchase it so we don't over-load this woman with inquiries

SAndra


I just saw her update her for sale post today....now it is 15.00  postage included.

bibliolater23@yahoo.com
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio August 24, 2006, 03:12:33 PM
Would all the NT fans like to list the dishes that they made from the book that DIDN'T turn out.  I have made quite a few that I like, but some did not turn out well at all, and I wasted a lot of money and energy.  Anyone have some pics that didn't turn out right?
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Nickole August 24, 2006, 04:05:21 PM
My mouth waters as I look through my book at highlighted resipes I have tried b/c most have surprisingly turned out to now be my favorites.  In an earlier thread I wrote about the GINGER CARROTS though:

Yes, we made the gingered/pickled carrots which the book says is a good introduction food to lacto-fermented vegetables.  We all like just about anything, eat all kinds of weird foods but this was so gross even I who hate to waste things, had to throw it away.  After all that work.     The texture reminded me of what grass half-chewed by a cow would feel like in the mouth.  Very slimy, just seemed like a bunch of spit with veggies mixed in.  It truly made us all gag.  I could not believe how gross it was.  If anyone had a better experience I would like to know.  I can't imagine what I may have done wrong.  Needless to say, I haven't tried pickling anything else yet (except saurkraut which is great).

The only other thing after looking through this immense book just now is the KISHK - it was great but NOT dried.  I didn't have enough room to dry all of it in our oven so I dried half and then tried to use it as cereal - in a bowl with milk poured over but it was HARD.  You can't eat it like that!  SO I got the other bowl of not-yet-dried kishk in the fridge (it was just soaked) and put that in a bowl and poured milk over it and MMMMMMMMM GOOOOOOD!  We loved it.  I have no idea why it even says to dry it, at least for cereal.  So I would personally ammend that recipe if you want to eat it as cereal.  The dried KISHK we used to make the KISHK soup which was fine b/c it softens again. 

No highlighting (yet?) in the organ meats chapter  :P
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Amey August 24, 2006, 04:18:39 PM
My mouth waters as I look through my book at highlighted resipes I have tried b/c most have surprisingly turned out to now be my favorites.  In an earlier thread I wrote about the GINGER CARROTS though:

Yes, we made the gingered/pickled carrots which the book says is a good introduction food to lacto-fermented vegetables.  We all like just about anything, eat all kinds of weird foods but this was so gross even I who hate to waste things, had to throw it away.  After all that work.     The texture reminded me of what grass half-chewed by a cow would feel like in the mouth.  Very slimy, just seemed like a bunch of spit with veggies mixed in.  It truly made us all gag.  I could not believe how gross it was.  If anyone had a better experience I would like to know.  I can't imagine what I may have done wrong. 

I made the ginger carrots last fall and they turned out great! I'm not sure what happened with yours. Mine weren't slimy at all, and if you like ginger, these were very good. If you don't like ginger, then these would be too strong in flavor. After reading more this summer on the benefits of ginger, I will probably make some more soon.

I've made several other recipes from the book, and the only one that I didn't like was the mayonnaise. But it was probably just me. I changed a few things around in the recipe, and I think that's why it didn't turn out quite right.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio August 25, 2006, 01:43:52 AM
Thanks, ladies.  I will keep those two in mind. 
I have pickled the carrots and ginger, just carrots, cucumbers, and sauerkraut.  Only the first one turned out okay.  It was made with just salt.  Was yours salt or with the whey?  Anything that I made with the whey turned out horrible.  But I also made it during our heat spell and it got up to 90 degrees in my house, so I am thinking maybe the heat had something to do with it. 
I made the baked beans(soaked them for a long time with whey) and I couldn't believe how HORRIBLE they turned out.  I thought it wouldn't work out, because it said to cook them for like 6 hours!!  My cast iron dutch oven started to burn from what little sauce it had  after two hours.  I will never make them again.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: WithLoveAndJoy August 25, 2006, 02:14:12 AM
Oh no, I have the carrots in my fridge and now I am afraid to try them!  I made them with the salt not the whey, because at the time my whey was not ready yet.

I soaked split peas in whey and water successfully last time and found that they were very tasty when I made them into a soup.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Eileen September 04, 2006, 11:00:55 AM
This is the first time I've been on Well Tell Me.  I read about it in No Greater Joy magazine.  So haven't figured out how to use it yet and hoping this works.  I was looking for the link to keifer that was refereed to in the magazine.   www.users.sa.chariot.net.au/-dna/Makekefir.html .  I didn't have any luck finding it.  I though some of you might know the site. 

When I read about Sally Fallon's book, which I had on my 'want' list a year or so ago but never got around to buying.  I was excited.  I didn't catch where it was that I could order it from.  Can you help me out?

Eileen
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: jessyru September 04, 2006, 12:11:40 PM
Hi Eileen  :)

I think for the link, you used a - instead of a ~ before dna... try this--it's a great site!

http://users.sa.chariot.net.au/~dna/Makekefir.html

Also this forum has a lot of good stuff about kefir. Try these two and use the search option to find more.

http://welltellme.com/discuss/index.php/topic,1665.0.html
http://welltellme.com/discuss/index.php/topic,1786.0.html

You can search through the previous posts in this post Nourshing Traditions to find where to buy the book. I know that it is available on amazon.com. You might also look on ebay.com and half.com.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: ALittleMore September 04, 2006, 04:05:26 PM
This is the first time I've been on Well Tell Me.  I read about it in No Greater Joy magazine.  So haven't figured out how to use it yet and hoping this works.  I was looking for the link to keifer that was refereed to in the magazine.   www.users.sa.chariot.net.au/-dna/Makekefir.html .  I didn't have any luck finding it.  I though some of you might know the site. 

When I read about Sally Fallon's book, which I had on my 'want' list a year or so ago but never got around to buying.  I was excited.  I didn't catch where it was that I could order it from.  Can you help me out?

Eileen

And, in case you don't know where the "~" is on the keyboard (I remember not knowing where it was once, when I'd never used it before) it's usually located on the far left of the keyboard, over the tab key, and you press shift first before pressing the button. Hope that's helpful if you've never used it before.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Nickole September 06, 2006, 09:47:09 AM
Thanks, ladies.  I will keep those two in mind. 
I have pickled the carrots and ginger, just carrots, cucumbers, and sauerkraut.  Only the first one turned out okay.  It was made with just salt.  Was yours salt or with the whey?  Anything that I made with the whey turned out horrible.  But I also made it during our heat spell and it got up to 90 degrees in my house, so I am thinking maybe the heat had something to do with it. 

Oooooo - I just saw this.  I made it with the whey, but I see you can sustitute more salt instead so I will try that next time.  I just hate to waste food and have it not turn out again!  I do love ginger, but it was the slime that was gagging.  Like it was full of spit.   :P
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Eileen September 12, 2006, 02:36:39 PM
Hi Eileen  :)

I think for the link, you used a - instead of a ~ before dna... try this--it's a great site!

http://users.sa.chariot.net.au/~dna/Makekefir.html

You are right, I used the wrong symbol for ~. With this correct I found the link.  What a wealth of info.  I have never used kefir grains before.  I use a smooth powder from Body Ecology so I have lots of reading to do. 

Thanks,
Eileen
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: natural September 12, 2006, 02:54:27 PM
I saw this book for sale this morning for $17.00 postage paid. I did notice she will not take checks, you can email her to find out what you can organize with her. I have bought books from her and she is really a great seller. She offers a wide variety of homeschool books too. You could email her for her list. This was listed on the homeschl used books (yahoo group).

bibliolater23@yahoo.com

Please let us know if you are the one to purchase it so we don't over-load this woman with inquiries

SAndra


I just saw her update her for sale post today....now it is 15.00  postage included.

bibliolater23@yahoo.com


You might check here she could still have it ??
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: jessyru September 12, 2006, 08:55:33 PM
Quote from: jessyru on September 04, 2006, 05:11:40 PM
Hi Eileen 

I think for the link, you used a - instead of a ~ before dna... try this--it's a great site!

http://users.sa.chariot.net.au/~dna/Makekefir.html

You are right, I used the wrong symbol for ~. With this correct I found the link.  What a wealth of info.  I have never used kefir grains before.  I use a smooth powder from Body Ecology so I have lots of reading to do. 

Thanks,
Eileen


Kefir took a bit of time for me to perfect. The first batch of grains I got was ruined in shipping, but I just got a new batch and it's so fun!  Dom's site (as well as this one) played a big role in helping me figure out what was going wrong. Happy Kefiring!!  ;D


: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Amey September 13, 2006, 03:53:27 AM
Thanks, ladies. I will keep those two in mind.
I have pickled the carrots and ginger, just carrots, cucumbers, and sauerkraut. Only the first one turned out okay. It was made with just salt. Was yours salt or with the whey? Anything that I made with the whey turned out horrible. But I also made it during our heat spell and it got up to 90 degrees in my house, so I am thinking maybe the heat had something to do with it.
I made the baked beans(soaked them for a long time with whey) and I couldn't believe how HORRIBLE they turned out. I thought it wouldn't work out, because it said to cook them for like 6 hours!! My cast iron dutch oven started to burn from what little sauce it had after two hours. I will never make them again.

Sorry, Healthy, I only just now read this since it has been "bumped" the last couple of days. I used all whey with mine, and I made them in November, so maybe temperature was a factor, I'm not sure. I used whey left over from making cheese. It seems there are a number of ways to get whey. I don't know if that makes a difference or not. I have had sauerkraut go bad before - just one jar - the rest of the batch was fine! I think it had to do with how much "headroom" I had left at the top of the kraut under the lid.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio September 13, 2006, 09:23:44 AM
That's okay.  I put off making the carrots for awhile until it has cooled down.  I am going to make them tonight, but am still debating whether to use the whey or the salt.  I use whey that I let drip from yogurt.  The first time was from goat's whey, but this time from cow's whey, so I don't know if the kind of whey makes a consistency difference or not. 
I will see how they turn out this time.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Amey September 16, 2006, 12:56:29 PM
Just made another batch of ginger carrots this afternoon. I have two quart jars sitting on my counter, ready to ferment away!  ;D I hope they turn out good! I'll let you all know. I used whey from some homemade cream cheese (recipe from NT). One thing about these ginger carrots - they look great sitting on the counter top! You could just make them and leave them there for decorative effect if they go bad! haha. Just kidding.  :P
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Nickole September 17, 2006, 12:07:44 PM
Just made another batch of ginger carrots this afternoon. I have two quart jars sitting on my counter, ready to ferment away!  ;D I hope they turn out good! I'll let you all know. I used whey from some homemade cream cheese (recipe from NT). One thing about these ginger carrots - they look great sitting on the counter top! You could just make them and leave them there for decorative effect if they go bad! haha. Just kidding.  :P

Maybe I'll try making them again then - at least they won't go to TOTAL waste if they're bad... ;D  Thanks for the idea  ;)
 
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio September 17, 2006, 03:08:54 PM
I made my batch of carrots(without ginger and with the salt) three days ago, and ate them today.  They were perfect.  So, it was either the whey or the high heat that messed them up the last time.  I am figuring the heat was it.  I should make another batch with the whey just to confirm, though.  I made them without the ginger for it was too spicy for my four year old, but he loves things that taste like a salt lick, too. ;)
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Elbereth September 17, 2006, 06:38:47 PM
Could someone post the recipe for small beer?  Hubby wants it and my copy of Nourishing Traditions is an hour away...I loaned it out and I am missing it!  I would really appreciate it.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: WithLoveAndJoy September 18, 2006, 02:56:55 AM
Yeah, my carrots were really tasty, EXCEPT for the fact that they were WAY too salty ( I didn't use whey)  I will have to try the whey recipe this next time.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Mom in Mo September 18, 2006, 09:42:55 AM
I've tried the sourdough recipe...it was WAY too sour and hard for my family's tastes right now!   I can't do too much experimenting resulting in failures, as much as I like to experiment...it's gettting too expensive!  :)

Heather

Does your sourdough recipe use baking soda in it?  Baking soda "sweetens"  the sourdough.  You add the baking soda to water and then to the dough after it has risen the first time.  My sister doesn't use soda and her bread is more sour and we use the same starter.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Nickole September 18, 2006, 10:17:26 AM
I've tried the sourdough recipe...it was WAY too sour and hard for my family's tastes right now!   
Heather

I have been making this bread like crazy since I began grinding my own wheat - I have heard that the more time you let it rise, the more sour it gets, so maybe you can try not letting it rise as long...?  It is sour, but we love it.  :)
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Clementine September 18, 2006, 04:49:30 PM
I just got my copy in the mail today.  I was worried after reading this thread about all the pickling and raw milk and all.  What a pleasant surprise!  :) I haven't gotten very far reading, just a long skim so far.  But it really is a blessing and I recommend it to anyone because it is full of valuable info. I will probably start with making some of the stocks, but also want to try the cream cheese, and many others.  I can't see myself or my family eating any raw meat or fish though.   :o
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: dara September 19, 2006, 04:43:16 AM
I can't see eating raw meat either. It grosses me out when my husband eats organ meats cooked! Guess I'm just a city slicker after all.   ;)
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthybratt September 19, 2006, 05:56:16 AM
I can't see eating raw meat either. It grosses me out when my husband eats organ meats cooked! Guess I'm just a city slicker after all.   ;)

Yuck.  My MIL butchers her own cows and she never wastes anything.  Anyone for boiled lungs?  :P
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Clementine September 19, 2006, 06:21:53 AM
Boiled lungs?! Yuk! :P

Ok, I put out some yogurt last night to drain.  The leftover cream cheese tastes good, but the kitchen towel soaked up most of the whey.  There are still several tablespoons, but nowhere near what it should be.  What do you all use to strain your yogurt?  Would a coffee filter work, or maybe a smaller cloth? 

: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: mexmarr September 19, 2006, 06:45:35 AM
Boiled lungs?! Yuk! :P

Ok, I put out some yogurt last night to drain.  The leftover cream cheese tastes good, but the kitchen towel soaked up most of the whey.  There are still several tablespoons, but nowhere near what it should be.  What do you all use to strain your yogurt?  Would a coffee filter work, or maybe a smaller cloth? 



I use a tea towel.  A good alternative would be an old tee-shirt.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Pink Lady October 13, 2006, 08:08:33 AM
As for making bread without buttermilk, before raw milk was available in our area, I learned from an older lady at the hfs that you can substitute a teaspoon of lemon juice in a cup of water for a cup of milk. I always thought that milk was needed for its richness, but it's the lactic acid, so the juice pinch-hits for that just fine. I made many a batch of pancakes for my daughter and bread in the bread machine with that substitution.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Clementine October 17, 2006, 06:29:45 PM
I made the cream cheese breakfast pastries today from this book and they turned out really well.  They were a big hit with my husband, probably because they have pecans in them.  As with most recipes in this book, it takes some prep time, but they're easy to roll out and bake.  It was nice to know that I was using homemade cream cheese, and pure ingredients.  I did use a substitute for the rapadura because I just can't afford that right now.  :)
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Nickole October 18, 2006, 02:00:25 AM
I made the cream cheese breakfast pastries today from this book and they turned out really well.  They were a big hit with my husband, probably because they have pecans in them.  As with most recipes in this book, it takes some prep time, but they're easy to roll out and bake.  It was nice to know that I was using homemade cream cheese, and pure ingredients.  I did use a substitute for the rapadura because I just can't afford that right now.  :)

I love these pastries! You can substitute Sucanat for Rapadura.  When this book was published, Sally Fallon did not recommend Sucanat anymore b/c the processing had changed for the worse.  Now, the makers of Sucanat have improved how they process it (I think it was way overprocessed before) and she recommends it again.  That's nice to know, since rapadura is extremely expensive.  I buy my Sucanat at Whole Foods in bulk. 
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: musicmommy October 18, 2006, 05:11:59 AM
Hi ladies,

I've had trouble getting the muffin and some of the bread recipies to turn out.  They tend to be tough and flat.  I just made gingerbread this morning...and it's not how I thought it should be.  Hmm.  Anyone else w/ a similiar experience?  I feel like I wasted my time since it took over 24 hrs to make.  Is it because I soaked the grain?

(Most of the other recipies I've tried have turned out.)

Also, if I substitute honey for rapadura, does that alter the texture?  Just curious.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: MarkTracy October 19, 2006, 02:27:04 AM
Thanks,

I will eat it.  But if I don't post anything here in the next few weeks, you will know why. ;)

How hilarious!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio October 22, 2006, 02:18:07 PM
I made and ate the NT cream cheese pastries this morning and they weren't as tasty as I hoped they would be.  I used regular organic wg pastry flour.  I don't have a grain grinder, even though I have a bag of whole wheat .  I wonder if I will be able to use it somehow?  Anyways, I could not get my dough to roll out very thin and it stuck like crazy to everything.  Overall, the pastries were very hard.  Like little sweet rocks!! Anyone have this problem?
I seem to be having a problem with A LOT of recipes out of this book.  My oatmeal is good and I think the beverages and soups are okay, but the breads and beans are so nasty.   :P
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio October 22, 2006, 03:29:04 PM
Just tried a sip of the Ginger ale.  Can you say..Blech?!!! :P
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Nickole October 22, 2006, 03:47:46 PM
I made and ate the NT cream cheese pastries this morning and they weren't as tasty as I hoped they would be.  I used regular organic wg pastry flour.  I don't have a grain grinder, even though I have a bag of whole wheat .  I wonder if I will be able to use it somehow?  Anyways, I could not get my dough to roll out very thin and it stuck like crazy to everything.  Overall, the pastries were very hard.  Like little sweet rocks!! Anyone have this problem?
I seem to be having a problem with A LOT of recipes out of this book.  My oatmeal is good and I think the beverages and soups are okay, but the breads and beans are so nasty.   :P

Hey, girl, I've made these several times, and one thing with the stickiness, I had to use TONS of unbleached flour to roll it out.  So that's normal.  Did you soak your flour?  That makes the dough nice and airy.  Maybe next time soak it for 24 hours instead of 12?  Or maybe you cooked them too long??  B/c ours were never hard. I do use freshly ground flour - maybe that does make a difference, but I think I made them before I ground my own flour. 
I just read the recipe and one thing I do different that may help.  I do not roll then cut, roll then cut, roll then cut.  I don't make three rolls of dough and then slice into pastries.  I just roll the whole thing up and then slice into pastries.  This makes bigger ones, about the size of a half dollar or slightly bigger, so maybe that helps.  Too small, and I can see how they could get hard in the oven.  SO maybe that one thing makes a difference?  And then use lots of flour to roll up.  Hope this helps!  If not, I'll trade some for some fermented gingered carrots that don't taste like cow spit!  ;D     
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: boysmama October 22, 2006, 04:08:18 PM
I am very new to NT but it seems like the baking times are seriously overestimated. It only takes about 1/2 the time in the things I've tried. Either less time or I end up anding more liquids...

And the fermented drinks ::) do they improve with aging like a good wine? BTW we all ready did kefir and like it just fine.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: mxmom October 22, 2006, 04:36:37 PM
I made and ate the NT cream cheese pastries this morning and they weren't as tasty as I hoped they would be.  I used regular organic wg pastry flour.  I don't have a grain grinder, even though I have a bag of whole wheat .  I wonder if I will be able to use it somehow?  Anyways, I could not get my dough to roll out very thin and it stuck like crazy to everything.  Overall, the pastries were very hard.  Like little sweet rocks!! Anyone have this problem?
I seem to be having a problem with A LOT of recipes out of this book.  My oatmeal is good and I think the beverages and soups are okay, but the breads and beans are so nasty.   :P

You know, I just posted under the Carbonated Water thread about this very thing.  Some of the recipes are just not palatable to our particular tastes and then some I have just ruined all by myself  ;)!!!  My daughter has had some of the sweet recipes turn out really well.  But, it seems to me, that if I was a cook who read recipes and adapt them to my family's tastes, this book might serve me better.  I am, however, one of the culinary challenged people of this world, and have to precisely follow a recipe or yuck!  ;)  ::)   :D
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: mishy October 22, 2006, 04:52:17 PM
Just tried a sip of the Ginger ale.  Can you say..Blech?!!! :P

I was so excited about the Ginger ale, but YES!! Ewwwwww.  I ended up tossing it.  I am willing to try it again, just with 100% different expectations.  Ginger is SO strong.  I made a batch of kombucha with it and phew!  strong stuff.  Either way it still releases its fiz up into my nasal cavity which always amuses my boys. 
Are our tastebuds so far gone that we can't get used to this stuff, or are we just making it wrong?  :D
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Nickole October 22, 2006, 04:55:10 PM
Just tried a sip of the Ginger ale.  Can you say..Blech?!!! :P

I was so excited about the Ginger ale, but YES!! Ewwwwww.  I ended up tossing it.  I am willing to try it again, just with 100% different expectations.  Ginger is SO strong.  I made a batch of kombucha with it and phew!  strong stuff.  Either way it still releases its fiz up into my nasal cavity which always amuses my boys. 
Are our tastebuds so far gone that we can't get used to this stuff, or are we just making it wrong?  :D

Maybe it's just an acquired taste - I liked it but can't remember if anyone else in the family did.  It's been a while.  My kids LOVED the punch!  Punch has shown up so much in Dickens novels, I just had to try it!  Has anyone tried the small beer? 
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: mishy October 22, 2006, 04:56:56 PM

Maybe it's just an acquired taste - I liked it but can't remember if anyone else in the family did.  It's been a while.  My kids LOVED the punch!  Punch has shown up so much in Dickens novels, I just had to try it!  Has anyone tried the small beer? 


Hmm.  I'll have to go try the punch.  No beer here yet!  Have to get some hops first. :)
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthybratt October 22, 2006, 07:46:18 PM
You guys are really making me want to run right out and buy a copy....yum yum.  Rocks with cow spit, my favorite  :-X

Ginger is very strong and definately an acquired taste.  I drink it straight in tea, but it took some getting used to.  I make the ginger kombucha too, but I don't use very much - maybe about 2 T sliced per gallon.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Lovin'myHoneyinVT October 23, 2006, 01:24:29 AM
What do you all use to strain your yogurt?  Would a coffee filter work, or maybe a smaller cloth? 
I use cheesecloth that I got at the local store.  It is thin but works very well.  Melissa ;)
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: WithLoveAndJoy October 23, 2006, 02:12:37 AM
I have successfully used a coffee filter inside of a strainer.  The coffee filter might rip if it doesn't have the structure of a strainer.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: linemansgirl October 23, 2006, 02:42:18 AM
What good experiences has anyone had with the NT fermented veggies?  I made the ginger carrots first, as they suggest, several months ago.  YUCK!!!!!!   :o :P  I don't know if I did something wrong or what, but I have not been brave enough to try anymore.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: mishy October 23, 2006, 03:22:23 AM
What good experiences has anyone had with the NT fermented veggies?  I made the ginger carrots first, as they suggest, several months ago.  YUCK!!!!!!   :o :P  I don't know if I did something wrong or what, but I have not been brave enough to try anymore.

I make the sauerkraut, kimchee ones all the time.  Love 'em. :) 
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: linemansgirl October 23, 2006, 03:28:59 AM
Thanks, I'll give the sauerkraut a try and see how that goes.  It definitely couldn't be any worse. 
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio October 23, 2006, 04:02:31 AM


Hey, girl, I've made these several times, and one thing with the stickiness, I had to use TONS of unbleached flour to roll it out.  So that's normal.  Did you soak your flour?  That makes the dough nice and airy.  Maybe next time soak it for 24 hours instead of 12?  Or maybe you cooked them too long??   

Yes, I soaked it and it was soaking for 24 hours, too.  I think I cooked them too long, perhaps, but I am just following her times.  She said to cook them for 45 min., now, just reading that made me go...uh, I don't think so, Miss Fallon.  But I trusted her cooking expertise and set the timer.  Well, at 34 min. I could smell them so much that I checked them and they were hard.  It wasn't time to take them out, yet, but I thought that if they got any harder my children could use them in their sling shots.   ;)

I make my fermented veggies without whey.  I use the extra salt.  You have to able to stomach the saltiness, otherwise you are eating something slimy. 

I really didn't think the ginger ale was too strong of a taste, just slimy and not sweet.  Maybe my mouth is just expecting a "soda" like taste.  I think since I made it I will drink it.  But for each cup I will add a little carbonated water and another teaspoon or so of sugar.  I know, I am really bad.

The baking times are really off in this book.  I think we ought to contact Miss Fallon and set up a forum just for the cookbook!!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: chopchop October 23, 2006, 07:36:00 AM
You know what............ I love reading this cookbook!

Cooking with it is a different story!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
I have been cooking for years, much of it very healthy, all of it from scratch.  Most of the recipes I actually haven't tried because they just didn't look good.  And the ones I have made, I have to admit, I have only made them once.  Hmmm!  Does somebody out there actually use this cookbook and enjoy the food?

My boys do eat the soaked oatmeal stuff (almost every morning) and are fine with it.  (I personally am not in love with oatmeal in any cooked variety, Dh hates it with a passion. That is ok since he leaves for work at 7 AM each morning and the boys eat after saying goodbye to him ;))
I do use the big 900 page Rodale's Basic Natural Foods Cookbook quite a bit, adding salt to all recipes since they happen to be salt free. And do a lot of my own concoctions and altering of other recipes.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: linemansgirl October 23, 2006, 07:47:11 AM
So far we have loved the recipes that we have tried from NT.  With the small exception of fermented ginger carrots.  Oh!  There was also the bread from the rye sourdough starter that if I would have decided to throw them at someone I would now be in jail for homicide.  Yeah that hard.  :'(  Everything else has been wonderful, although it does take some getting used to.  I use the book almost daily, always several times a week.  Good luck.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio October 23, 2006, 07:51:54 AM
I like the oatmeal, fermented veggies, and the Korean beef soup.  I am scared to try anything else, because so many things have failed me.   :(
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: SC October 23, 2006, 09:08:26 AM
For me, I often find that my first attempt at a very new recipe (not just Nourishing Traditions) is a disaster. The way I combat this is I never plan to serve that dish for a meal the first time I make it. If it turns out okay, then it's just a bonus. If not, I haven't delayed our entire meal. I make notes in the margin of a recipe when I am making it the first time (or the second time after the failed first attempt). These include questions about techniques as well as details of what I did. This way, if it doesn't turn out well, I can make adjustments the second (and third) time I try the recipe. When it finally works, I know how to duplicate the results and exactly how long it really takes.

I try to have as much patience with myself as I would have with my children's attempts at new things. That seems to help.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: jessyru October 23, 2006, 10:34:20 AM
I haven't had this cookbook for very long but here's what I've made so far:

Pancakes with yogurt and whole wheat flour pg 478--Very good!

Breakfast porridge pg 455-not a big fan of oatmeal, but still tasty and edible

Fried Mush pg 457--pretty good

Mustard & Ketchup pg 104--the mustard is VERY strong--somehow I want to fix it, but I'm not sure how to. The ketchup is different, but I would expect it to be as the ketchup sold nowadays is just high fructose corn syrup.

Sauerkraut pg 92--haven't eaten it yet (we're having it tomorrow on Reuben's) but it smells like sauerkraut

Chicken Stock pg 124--my mom made this and and she just left all the veggies in it and made it chicken soup. It was very good, much better than soup made from boullion.

Cultured Milk Smoothie pg 88--this is SO good. I like it best with Kefir, though I have made it with yogurt

Cottage Potatoes pg 397--these are SO good and SO simple I wouldn't even call them a recipe. I've done potatoes like this before but never thought to put both butter and olive oil on them.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: HeatherRose October 23, 2006, 11:28:22 AM
I just made the grape spritzer and I make the beet kvass quite often.  They are both delicious.  I love to soak my rice with whey until it's a bit sour and the Indian idly recipe is very good.  I also love the raw salmon or tuna salad.  It keeps for at least a week.

I gave the book to my sister hoping she'd take her son off soymilk.  I call her about once a month to look up recipes for me.   :D
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: chopchop October 23, 2006, 12:30:13 PM
okay, now I feel silly.  ::) I got the cookbook out this afternoon (I have owned if for 5 1/2 years) and started looking at all the recipes page by page.
I actually make a lot of them, regularly, just from a different cookbook. :o  I guess while looking through it I would just automatically not try recipes like Tabbouleh, Yogurt, Kefir,  Salad Dressings, Croutons,  Potato dishes, green enchiladas, fajitas, cooked veggies.... when I already made them either identically or with minute variations.  I tried the unique stuff, and well, it was unique.  I still don't particularly like vinegar added to my chicken broth, but I make stock regularly. And I do love the crispy pecans
 I guess I have to work on my sprouted grain thing and just ignore the liver, brains, kidney stuff that I think is GROSS.   ;D  So anyway!  This is to say that there are some great recipes in there and I do make things "from it" (more or less) on a regular basis.  Maybe I will try using it a bit more, and not be a chicken.   ;D
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio October 23, 2006, 03:12:41 PM
I just made the carob fudge tonight.  It wasn't worth it.  The taste was pretty good, but never solidified up like fudge should.  She says to put it in the fridge for several hours.  Okay, to those who have common sense, what would several hours be to you?  I put it in for four hours and it still was soft. Then, I put it in the freezer for an hour.  It is still soft, like frosting.  Tastes okay, but if I wanted frosting I would have made frosting!!!  Getting a little frustrated with these recipes, here.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: kentuckymommy October 23, 2006, 03:26:31 PM
I have had this cookbook for 1 1/2 years and I too love to read all the great info. We are a traveling family and I am just itching to be someplace for a few months to be able to use this resource. ( my hubby's job takes us away from home usually 10 months out of the year- I should be the never-in-Kentucky-mommy!) Are any of these recipes good for someone living in a hotel for the next 3 weeks with no oven? I can dream right? I have had some delicious muffins and biscuits from a friend at home she topped the biscuits with olive oil/butter and cinnamon. They were delicious, I am thinking this could be a good way to get my coconut oil in? My friend has also had heaps of trouble getting the cooking time down. She has gotten pretty frustrated, that has been pretty discouraging to me! But anyways, I would love to try some of these!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: mxmom October 23, 2006, 03:35:25 PM
I( my hubby's job takes us away from home usually 10 months out of the year- I should be the never-in-Kentucky-mommy!)

LOL   My daughter is a much more adventurous cook and has made some of the desserts/sweets that have turned out good, but, she has usually added her own twist.  I have looked through it quite thoroughly and now believe that there is some stuff in there that is really an acquired taste (or you had to be brought up with it).  I will give it to dh and he can choose what he thinks he may want to eat.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio October 26, 2006, 06:13:08 AM
I just made the carob fudge tonight.  It wasn't worth it.  The taste was pretty good, but never solidified up like fudge should.  She says to put it in the fridge for several hours.  Okay, to those who have common sense, what would several hours be to you?  I put it in for four hours and it still was soft. Then, I put it in the freezer for an hour.  It is still soft, like frosting.  Tastes okay, but if I wanted frosting I would have made frosting!!!  Getting a little frustrated with these recipes, here.

Okay, I left the fudge in the freezer for TWO DAYS.  It is still soft.  I give up.   >:(
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: SC October 26, 2006, 06:27:40 AM
IMO a failed carob recipe is no great loss. To me, carob tastes like flavored cardboard. I'd much rather invest in a high quality chocolate.

BUT, having said that, I've found that if I have a flop when I attempt a recipe in NT, it's ususally in my own execution. I wait until the kids are in bed and sit down with the book and look back over the instructions and measurements, making notes in the margin if I need to. Often, I find that I ignored a key step that I thought wasn't important. You just don't want to KNOW how many times I attempted mayonnaise before I realized that there was a REASON the ingredients needed to be at room temperature AND needed to sit for about 7 hours BEFORE going back into the fridge, LOL! And none of you are allowed to ask my DH what I was like before I figured out what was going wrong with my homemade bread!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio October 26, 2006, 06:39:29 AM
I just don't think that a recipe book should be so difficult that you would need to read it over 8-10 times to make something work.  That is inefficient to me in the life of a SAHM!  ;)
I have four other cookbooks and I have yet to try all the recipes, but I will take out a new one and won't have a problem the first try.  But more than half the times I try a NT recipe, it does not work.  To me it is a waste. 
I love the concepts of the NT cookbook.  I love the sounds of the recipes.  But I  can't see how I can give good reviews to a book based on "it had good potential" or "try it and it may work on the 11th time" .  KWIM? 
I just think that it needs to be reviewed and edited.  It has a lot of questionable timings and inconsistencies. 
I am glad that the recipes are working for you, SC, and people like Nickole.  Perhaps, you two can come on over and make this book work for me!!!!  :D
I am NT illiterate.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: SC October 26, 2006, 06:51:53 AM
healthyinohio!

It's not supposed to be used as a weapon! Don't hit yourself over the head with it. LOL!

Seriously, yes, it is different than most conventional recipe books in that the ingredients are very basic. In other words, you can't just dump in a box of a pre-packaged mix and add some other processed stuff, and bake. In NT, you start from scratch. It wasn't such an adjustment for me as I like the OLD Fannie Farmer cook books (before modern food processing), and Mennonite cook books that use similar ingredients. I also use a cookbook that was recommended by overseas missionaries who didn't have access to grocery stores.

So, it takes a little TIME. But the investment is on the front end. Once you get the knack of fermenting foods and such, it isn't that hard.

Pretend you were teaching someone else. How much patience would you have with a little girl wanting to learn these things? You'd start with something simple to encourage her success and work your way up to the more complex. Do that for yourself, too. It's not like we're all going to show up and inspect your pantry tomorrow! That won't be until next week  ;).
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: jessyru October 26, 2006, 07:33:03 AM
I just made the Basic Muffins on pg 482... Recommended cook time is 1 hour--I think I had them for about 15-20 minutes and they were done! They were VERY good. Nice and moist and soft--I used whole wheat flour, buttermilk, and blueberries and made a half recipe--I did bake them in a toaster oven (don't know if that had something to do with time). I soaked the flour for a bit longer than I was supposed to so it was a little touch to stir and there was a bit of dry layer on the top, but I mixed the wet ingredients in and no problems.

We ate the saurkraut on Tuesday--I go the texture a little wrong, but the taste was very good-way better than commercial saurkraut!! It was really easy to make too.

I don't have a family to cook for so I just play around with the recipes... it's kind of fun. I'm the process of making Cream Cheese Breakfast Pastries (pg 488) right now--I'm making crispy almonds instead (picked up the wrong thing on accident)--I hope they taste okay.

I made the mustard but it is VERY hot. Anyone know how to fix it? Just add more honey or something-maybe?

I'm going to make Punch (pg 588) next.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Whiterock October 26, 2006, 07:37:39 AM
While reading this thread, I noticed that someone said they used whey left over from making cheese in one of the recipes and it didn't work. Was that cream cheese or was it a type of cheese with rennet? I have been told that whey from rennet-containing cheese shouldn't be used because the whey will most likely contain rennet too and this will mess up your recipe.

HTH,
WR
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Nickole October 26, 2006, 07:54:43 AM
I just don't think that a recipe book should be so difficult that you would need to read it over 8-10 times to make something work.  That is inefficient to me in the life of a SAHM!  ;)
I have four other cookbooks and I have yet to try all the recipes, but I will take out a new one and won't have a problem the first try.  But more than half the times I try a NT recipe, it does not work.  To me it is a waste. 
I love the concepts of the NT cookbook.  I love the sounds of the recipes.  But I  can't see how I can give good reviews to a book based on "it had good potential" or "try it and it may work on the 11th time" .  KWIM? 
I just think that it needs to be reviewed and edited.  It has a lot of questionable timings and inconsistencies. 
I am glad that the recipes are working for you, SC, and people like Nickole.  Perhaps, you two can come on over and make this book work for me!!!!  :D
I am NT illiterate.


I would love to come over!  ;D  But the three states away thing is kinda tricky...
Like SC said, maybe start out with easy stuff, like the soaked and dried nuts maybe.  I think that's what I did.  Oh, and making stocks.  And then with the stocks you can make all these other recipes.  I have had great success with nearly all of them, so I don't know what you can be doing wrong?  It does take a lot of preparation, esp, for some recipes that you have to have soaked and dried nuts for and then also a ready-made stock for.  You can't just open up and make most recipes on a whim.  Maybe if you make some really yummy sweet stuff first it will encourage you to continue.  Like the walnut tart, the Carob Bavarian cream, lemon almond tart, and pancakes and waffles.  Almond fool is SOOO good!  For nonsweet easy things, the roasted carrot puree is a favorite, as well as peppers with almonds and potatoes gratin (I wrote peppers and gratin before.  duh).  Baked eggplant with cilantro marinade is yummy too.  Coconut chicken soup is easy and Maria's Empanadas aren't too involved, and they are also a one-dish meal in itself and it makes a TON!  Hope this helps!   ;D ;D
     
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: jessyru October 26, 2006, 09:32:17 AM
Like SC said, maybe start out with easy stuff, like the soaked and dried nuts maybe.  I think that's what I did.

I have no cooking experience... so this is what I've been doing too. The stuff in the breads section is easy (except that you need to soak the flour--I don't use freshly ground whole wheat--in a dairy product of some sort). I just did the dried nuts and they're really easy (and yummy)--plus (it's cold where I live) you can put the soaking flour on top of the stove while you 'dry' the nuts.

I started with the no cooking, fermenting type stuff first. Now I'm onto the baking stuff and I'm doing okay. Those meat, meal-type recipes look terrifying!! Even the stock looks scary... Eventually I'll get there...

Mmmm... Baked Eggplant sounds like a good idea!! Maybe that'll be my first actual 'dish'.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio October 26, 2006, 03:59:35 PM
Okay, now my pride is hurt thinking you ladies think I don't know how to cook nuttin'  :(
I have had great success with the fermenting of veggies.  I can make my own cheese and such.  I can follow a recipe very well. 
IT'S NOT ME!!!!  I PROMISE!!!!
I just think the recipes could be explained a little more and I just find it odd that they are not working very well.
I made the bean tostados, tonight.  They worked great.  I also made the crab cakes last week and they were really good!!! But as I was saying, a good cook book is not considered good, IMO, because it has 5 recipes that turn out and 20 that are bad. 
I am still going to keep it and still try.  My goodness, there are at least 200 different recipes in there.  I am waiting for probability to kick in here soon.   ;D
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Clementine October 26, 2006, 05:16:18 PM
Healthy in Ohio, don't feel too badly, I agree with you that the cooking times are not really consistent with reality.  As you said the pastries do not need to cook nearly 45 minutes, mine turned out very well, but I didn't believe that it could take 45 minutes, so I cooked them about 30.  I also used a pastry cloth to roll them out with as well as a little sock type of thing on my rolling pin.  They were gifts years ago and I used them for the first time with this recipe.  It really worked to keep the pastry from sticking.  I don't think they were very expensive, but I wouldn't buy them just for one recipe. 

Oh, and I admit that I used unbleached all purpose flour, not wheat.  That might have made a difference too.  I didn't have any wheat on hand. :)  Have you tried the Mexican Rice casserole?  I think that is the name.  My family liked it.

Oh, and the stocks are good and worth the effort.  I found chicken feet at a local store.  They were very cheap, but the look on my husband's face when he saw them floating in a pot was priceless.   :P
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Nickole October 26, 2006, 05:26:42 PM
I found chicken feet at a local store.  They were very cheap, but the look on my husband's face when he saw them floating in a pot was priceless.   :P

Oh, yeah, that does look so tasty doesn't it?  Making the fish stock is even better - a fish head floating on top.  Yum yum!!!

HealthyinOhio, I forgot that I do think I remember now that it was mentioned, that I do not cook them nearly as long either.  The timing was off on that one, I just didn't remember until now.  That would make a big difference!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Nickole October 26, 2006, 05:32:45 PM
I am thoroughly pigging out on the merengues right now I just took out of the oven.  Oh, MY!!!!  Melt in your mouth!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Elizab04 October 27, 2006, 02:40:41 AM


Oh, and the stocks are good and worth the effort.  I found chicken feet at a local store.  They were very cheap, but the look on my husband's face when he saw them floating in a pot was priceless.   :P


I was going to skip the chickens feet, but when we were at the farmers market someone was selling them.  I decided to get two, but he gave me a whole bag for the same price.  I don't think they sell many chicken feet at the farmer's market.  I guess I'll have to make a lot of broth! :P
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Nickole October 27, 2006, 03:55:44 AM


Oh, and the stocks are good and worth the effort.  I found chicken feet at a local store.  They were very cheap, but the look on my husband's face when he saw them floating in a pot was priceless.   :P


I was going to skip the chickens feet, but when we were at the farmers market someone was selling them.  I decided to get two, but he gave me a whole bag for the same price.  I don't think they sell many chicken feet at the farmer's market.  I guess I'll have to make a lot of broth! :P

I got a bag from a farmer too - they told me just use 2-3 for each stock recipe in NT.  They were frozen all stuck together in the bag so they told me just thaw them enough to be able to break off about 3 (I ran it under water) then stick in the freezer again.   The other ones will still be mostly frozen, and any freezerburn will not hurt them anyway.  So just so you know you don't have to use them up all at once!   ;D
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Elizab04 October 27, 2006, 05:00:45 AM


Oh, and the stocks are good and worth the effort.  I found chicken feet at a local store.  They were very cheap, but the look on my husband's face when he saw them floating in a pot was priceless.   :P


I was going to skip the chickens feet, but when we were at the farmers market someone was selling them.  I decided to get two, but he gave me a whole bag for the same price.  I don't think they sell many chicken feet at the farmer's market.  I guess I'll have to make a lot of broth! :P

I got a bag from a farmer too - they told me just use 2-3 for each stock recipe in NT.  They were frozen all stuck together in the bag so they told me just thaw them enough to be able to break off about 3 (I ran it under water) then stick in the freezer again.   The other ones will still be mostly frozen, and any freezerburn will not hurt them anyway.  So just so you know you don't have to use them up all at once!   ;D

Thanks!  Right now I just have one massive chicken foot ball!  :D
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Nickole October 27, 2006, 05:03:30 AM

Thanks!  Right now I just have one massive chicken foot ball!  :D

Yeah, me too.  Wanna play?  OUCH!  Forgot, it's frozen!   :o
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: MQM November 06, 2006, 04:48:30 AM
I am extremely interested in this book, but before I purchase it, I have to know...

Will this book teach how to soak grains and ferment veggies, etc. (with specific instructions) in layman's terms? If the instructions are vague concerning these particular food-preparation methods and many others with which, unfortunately, I have little experience, then I don't want to spend money on something not very useful to me.

If this is the case, perhaps you ladies could recommend a more basic book with which to start.

Can the average person who was not raised in the kitchen make sense of these things?  What are your opinions?  Looking forward to your input.  Would like to purchase online today.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: linemansgirl November 06, 2006, 06:13:31 AM
I am extremely interested in this book, but before I purchase it, I have to know...

Will this book teach how to soak grains and ferment veggies, etc. (with specific instructions) in layman's terms? If the instructions are vague concerning these particular food-preparation methods and many others with which, unfortunately, I have little experience, then I don't want to spend money on something not very useful to me.

If this is the case, perhaps you ladies could recommend a more basic book with which to start.

Can the average person who was not raised in the kitchen make sense of these things?  What are your opinions?  Looking forward to your input.  Would like to purchase online today.


I have had success using this book in learning how to soak grains, ferment veggies & sprout seeds.  I did grow up cooking a lot, but not these types of food.  I have found the instructions to be easy to follow and thourough.  As you can read further up in this thread, for many of us it has taken a lot of trial and error to find what works best for you.
Besides the recipes the information at the beginning of the book and on the side bars is wonderful.  I have learned SO much from it!  I hope that this helps you at least a little bit.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio November 06, 2006, 07:09:44 AM


Will this book teach how to soak grains and ferment veggies, etc. (with specific instructions) in layman's terms?


Most of the recipes are hard to decipher in certain areas,(IMO)  but I must admit that the most thourough recipes are the grain soaking and fermented veggies.  I have never made cream cheese and whey using yogurt and I did it just fine following the recipes in this book.  You could use your local library's inter-library loan process to take it out and see if you like the book before you make a commitment to buy it.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: MQM November 06, 2006, 10:08:47 AM
Thanks healthyinOhio and linemansgirl. 

Any others have an opinion on this subject?

Will this book teach how to soak grains and ferment veggies, etc. (with specific instructions) in layman's terms? If the instructions are vague concerning these particular food-preparation methods and many others with which, unfortunately, I have little experience, then I don't want to spend money on something not very useful to me.

If this is the case, perhaps you ladies could recommend a more basic book with which to start.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: boysmama November 06, 2006, 10:19:15 AM
I think the instructions for fermenting and sprouting are complete enough for a beginner. Of course the more experience you get the easier and less time consuming it becomes.The thing with fermented stuff is that you have to work out your own preferences... how tart you like things...what  the temperatures are in your house... etc. NT is the best I have seen for having !!everything!! in one book.
Thanks healthyinOhio and linemansgirl. 

Any others have an opinion on this subject?

Will this book teach how to soak grains and ferment veggies, etc. (with specific instructions) in layman's terms? If the instructions are vague concerning these particular food-preparation methods and many others with which, unfortunately, I have little experience, then I don't want to spend money on something not very useful to me.

If this is the case, perhaps you ladies could recommend a more basic book with which to start.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: MQM November 06, 2006, 05:53:21 PM
Thanks, boysmama, for taking the time, as well. I appreciate the info.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: kjmsmum November 07, 2006, 09:22:38 AM
I have a couple NT questions ...
First, she seems to be really insistent on Rapadura. The description sounds the same as sucanat though?? whats the difference? and where do you get it anyway? If I want to use honey instead does anyone know how to adjust the recipes?
Also, when you make fermented veges how hard do you pound them? Into mush ? I tried the corn relish and it tasted really good the first day but afterward the peppers tasted BAD :o I had to do it in 2 x pint jars instead of 1 quart jar - does this make a difference?
And about the sourdough bread - she says not to use honey - but does she mean just in the starter? Is it okay to add it to the dough? (I tried using the rye flour and water just adding it to my established starter but it made it way too sour for me so I went back to my old regime
Seems I had more than a couple questions!! Most of what I've made I've enjoyed - but mostly its the whole idea- and learning how to implement it into my present cooking, not necessarily using her recipes - thats what I like aboutNT :)
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: greenbean November 07, 2006, 11:33:41 AM
I have a couple NT questions ...
First, she seems to be really insistent on Rapadura. The description sounds the same as sucanat though?? whats the difference? and where do you get it anyway? If I want to use honey instead does anyone know how to adjust the recipes?
Also, when you make fermented veges how hard do you pound them? Into mush ? I tried the corn relish and it tasted really good the first day but afterward the peppers tasted BAD :o I had to do it in 2 x pint jars instead of 1 quart jar - does this make a difference?
And about the sourdough bread - she says not to use honey - but does she mean just in the starter? Is it okay to add it to the dough? (I tried using the rye flour and water just adding it to my established starter but it made it way too sour for me so I went back to my old regime
Seems I had more than a couple questions!! Most of what I've made I've enjoyed - but mostly its the whole idea- and learning how to implement it into my present cooking, not necessarily using her recipes - thats what I like aboutNT :)

Rapadura is really hard for me to find, in fact i can't find it in any local stores - only online. I have also only found one brand called Rapunzel http://www.rapunzel.com/products/rapunzel/rapunzel_baking_rapadura.html

The difference between Rapadura and Sucanat is "the way it is processed! Although very similar in appearance and taste, Rapadura is made by just evaporating the water from the organic sugar cane juice. Sucanat is manufactured in a way that the sugar stream and the molasses stream is separated from each other and then carefully re-blended to reach a consistent product." (Rapunzel.com)
Sometimes I use date sugar instead . . . or just break down and use the good 'ol white stuff  ;)

The veggies that I have done . . . I have only done a mango chutney and the pickled cucumbers (I sliced them the short way - they turned out great!). I guess that I didn't pulverize them or anything but I filled the jar really full and then pushed them down so that they were packed in pretty tightly. Just en ought to get some juice out of them.

Regarding honey in your bread I am pretty sure that she just means the starter. In the starter recipe she states" Honey encourages the proliferation of yeast at the expense of lactic-acid-producing bacteria and may give you an alcoholic fermentation" (NT p. 489). Several of her other breads that use sourdough also have honey so I do not see why you couldn't experiment. Plus if it is raw honey that you use then all the better!

Hope all goes well for you! and I hope this helps some!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions - lime water/calcuim hydroxide?
: greenbean November 07, 2006, 11:43:03 AM
Hi -
I'd really like to try some of the recipes that use cornmeal but each recipe says to soak the cornmeal in lime water. I have done a little research to see what lime water is and I know that the lime is calcium hydroxide. In NT it says (p. 545) to place 1 inch pickling lime in a 2 quart jar, fill jar with water and let stand overnight. The powder settles and the result is lime water.

So does anyone know where you can get calcium hydroxide?
: Re: Nourishing Traditions - lime water/calcuim hydroxide?
: Kansas Girl November 07, 2006, 12:30:40 PM
So does anyone know where you can get calcium hydroxide?

I'm pretty sure she mentioned using pickling lime.  You find it with the canning jars/supplies at Walmart or your grocery store.  -KG
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio November 07, 2006, 04:39:22 PM


The difference between Rapadura and Sucanat is "the way it is processed! Although very similar in appearance and taste, Rapadura is made by just evaporating the water from the organic sugar cane juice. Sucanat is manufactured in a way that the sugar stream and the molasses stream is separated from each other and then carefully re-blended to reach a consistent product."

Now, I have found something called muscovado sugar.  Is this the same thing as sucanat or rapadura?  Anyone else hear of this?
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: boysmama November 08, 2006, 11:18:26 AM
You know I really enjoy this book. It is just alot of info in one place. The basic concepts are great... However those recipes... I am having much better success in taking the concepts and applying them to my own from scratch recipes.  ;D The recipes work it is just that some of them can be tastier if you tweak them a little.


The other thing I want to mention is that I got involved in a group oriented around the Weston Price foundation, Sally Fallon, and the NT cookbook. Now this may be just one group... Honestly it is just kind of "cultish" in that you do it this way or else...I do appreciate the group and the communication with others about nutrition, just don't like the pressure to accept their views as the final- and- only- authority that we have felt. I have wondered whether to post this or not. I decided to when I realized how many folks on other forums and maybe here are getting confused and discouraged. If you are feeling overwhelmed or guilty  take a step back. Just want to encourage each one of us to keep our priorities right. I need that reminder ;D
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: diaperswyper November 08, 2006, 12:41:20 PM
   I've been watching this thread and the phytic acid thread with interest, and i have to say, boysmama, that i think you have made some very wise comments. My dh. loves the yeasted buttermilk recipe in the NT, so i'll continue to make it, but like everything else, i believe God wants us to seek Him, and if someone says there's only one way to do something, little red flags go up. Seems to me, there's a ditch on either side. We haven't been freed in Christ to turn to bondage in food. JMHO.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio November 08, 2006, 03:03:53 PM
I just made the carob fudge tonight.  It wasn't worth it.  The taste was pretty good, but never solidified up like fudge should.  She says to put it in the fridge for several hours.  Okay, to those who have common sense, what would several hours be to you?  I put it in for four hours and it still was soft. Then, I put it in the freezer for an hour.  It is still soft, like frosting.  Tastes okay, but if I wanted frosting I would have made frosting!!!  Getting a little frustrated with these recipes, here.

Okay, it has been over a week and my fudge is still soft.  But I figured out why.  I found a book at the library that had a science experiment freezing maple syrup.  Supposedly, the sugar in things like maple syrup or honey does not freeze because of the different molecular structure compared to that in regular sugar.  So, I think what happened is the editors who chose these recipes may have used other recipes and just substituted other ingredients.  I think it should be mandatory that the editors try a recipe to see if it works before putting it in a book!!  ;)  So, make the fudge with regular sugar.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Nickole November 08, 2006, 05:11:38 PM
You know I really enjoy this book. It is just alot of info in one place. The basic concepts are great... However those recipes... I am having much better success in taking the concepts and applying them to my own from scratch recipes.  ;D The recipes work it is just that some of them can be tastier if you tweak them a little.


The other thing I want to mention is that I got involved in a group oriented around the Weston Price foundation, Sally Fallon, and the NT cookbook. Now this may be just one group... Honestly it is just kind of "cultish" in that you do it this way or else...I do appreciate the group and the communication with others about nutrition, just don't like the pressure to accept their views as the final- and- only- authority that we have felt. I have wondered whether to post this or not. I decided to when I realized how many folks on other forums and maybe here are getting confused and discouraged. If you are feeling overwhelmed or guilty  take a step back. Just want to encourage each one of us to keep our priorities right. I need that reminder ;D

It's not just one group.  I also subscribe to a Weston Price group in my area and I get the same feeling.  Major Nourishing Traditions purists.  "Followers" it's more like.  I did find my raw milk providers through them, though.  I love it much better here!   ;D

: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio November 13, 2006, 03:10:53 PM
My family and I really enjoyed consuming the traditional pot roast this evening.  It had to have been the best pot roast I have ever had!!  Yeah!!!  I finally found a good one.  But my time and temp was different.  3lbs, 325 degrees, for 2 1/2 hours.  PERFECT!!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio November 15, 2006, 11:11:08 AM
I have a stock question for those who have made the NT stock.  I have 4 qts water and my chicken parts, but the parts are sticking up a bit above the water.  Either my stock pot is too large, or I need more water.  Should I add more water, or doesn't it make a difference?
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Nickole November 15, 2006, 11:14:03 AM
I have a stock question for those who have made the NT stock.  I have 4 qts water and my chicken parts, but the parts are sticking up a bit above the water.  Either my stock pot is too large, or I need more water.  Should I add more water, or doesn't it make a difference?

I always add more water to get make stock, to stretch it!   :)  Did you get some chicken feet too?  Mmmm, those look no niiiiiiiice in the pot.  Especially when the toes stick up - looks like something that belongs in a cauldron.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio November 15, 2006, 11:25:50 AM


I always add more water to get make stock, to stretch it!   :)  Did you get some chicken feet too?

Okay, I will add more water.  No, I wasn't able to get chicken feet.  I am hoping to get some in my newly found co-op.  Could I substitute them with, I don't know, frog legs?  :D
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Nickole November 15, 2006, 11:28:24 AM


I always add more water to get make stock, to stretch it!   :)  Did you get some chicken feet too?

Okay, I will add more water.  No, I wasn't able to get chicken feet.  I am hoping to get some in my newly found co-op.  Could I substitute them with, I don't know, frog legs?  :D

Uh..you can.....tryyyyyyyyy.
No, they are optional, gives the stock more gelatin, but I made it plenty of times without them.  I only simmer for 7 hours, b/c I want to use the chicken that I pick off the bones for other recipes and I have heard that the nutrients in the chicken are gone if you simmer too long.  The beef stock on the other hand, I simmer for days.  It's quite smelly  :P. 
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: boysmama November 15, 2006, 12:51:59 PM
To minimize that stinky beef smell, cover the bones with water and add a splash of vinegar. Bring to a boil and strain. Add fresh water and it should smell better for the rest of the simmering. ;D
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Nickole November 15, 2006, 01:04:28 PM
To minimize that stinky beef smell, cover the bones with water and add a splash of vinegar. Bring to a boil and strain. Add fresh water and it should smell better for the rest of the simmering. ;D

Hmmm..interesting.  Does it get rid of some nutrients though too?  I don't mind the smell if it will help retain nutrients... :-\
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: lotsaboys November 15, 2006, 02:42:51 PM


I always add more water to get make stock, to stretch it!   :)  Did you get some chicken feet too?

Okay, I will add more water.  No, I wasn't able to get chicken feet.  I am hoping to get some in my newly found co-op.  Could I substitute them with, I don't know, frog legs?  :D

Uh..you can.....tryyyyyyyyy.
No, they are optional, gives the stock more gelatin, but I made it plenty of times without them.  I only simmer for 7 hours, b/c I want to use the chicken that I pick off the bones for other recipes and I have heard that the nutrients in the chicken are gone if you simmer too long.  The beef stock on the other hand, I simmer for days.  It's quite smelly  :P. 

I've found that the feet do give a lot more gelatin to stock. And another trick I learned is to pick the meat off the bones then put bones back in and simmer several more hours to get more gelatin but save the meat from tasing weird when cooked too long. Hope I made sense...  :-\
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: amazonmama2five November 15, 2006, 03:40:46 PM
I too, really like the stocks out of the NT cookbook.  I get chicken feet for free at a little restaurant down the street!  They give us the heads, feet, liver and gizzards.  We use it to feed our 5  :o dogs.  But I do save a couple to put in with my free range whole chickens I get at the Farmer's Market.  I guess that is one of the perks of living in a foreign country.  ;) 
I totally agree with HealthyinOhio about some of the other recipes though.  We have tried punch and rootbeer.  :-X  I liked the turkey dinner, especially the stuffing that goes with it!  Some of the stuff is far out and some is really great, one just has to try them and see.  If anyone has good success with the rootbeer we would be very grateful for your exact instructions.  We have not bought soda in two years and rootbeer is something they don't have down here.
Have a good night,
Lisa
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: jessyru November 15, 2006, 08:46:46 PM
I know a lot of the recipes call for stocks. I just found a brand that makes what appears to be very good stocks--good for me because I've never made a stock before. It's called Kitchen Basics. They look pretty good!

http://www.kitchenbasics.net/

Kitchen Basics Chicken Stock is slow cooked from or with:
Chicken bones
Carrots, onion,  celery
Natural flavor—protein without artificial additives
Bay leaf, thyme and peppercorn
Honey and salt
Kitchen Basics Beef Flavor Stock is slow cooked from or with:
Beef bones
Carrots, onion, leek, tomato and garlic
Natural flavor—protein without artificial additives
Bay leaf, thyme and peppercorn
Honey and salt
Kitchen Basics Stocks do not contain:
MSG (monosodium glutamate)
HVP (hydrolyzed vegetable protein)
Disodium inosinate or guanylate
Yeast extract
Yeast
Soy
Milk, whey, caseine or caseinates
Wheat, oats, rye, barley
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: boysmama November 16, 2006, 04:42:54 AM
To minimize that stinky beef smell, cover the bones with water and add a splash of vinegar. Bring to a boil and strain. Add fresh water and it should smell better for the rest of the simmering. ;D

Hmmm..interesting.  Does it get rid of some nutrients though too?  I don't mind the smell if it will help retain nutrients... :-\
I have wondered the same myself. All I can say is I first made stock with a national family in another country and this was part of the process. They did not always use vinegar(or wine). They considered the unrinsed stock as unclean and not fit to use. It is interesting that if you do the rinse process very little scum rises to the top of the second broth. BTW I do it with all stocks.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio November 16, 2006, 03:44:11 PM
The chicken stock did taste really good!  But I have two questions.

1.)  Why do you have to skim the fat that congeals on the top?  Is this a different kind of fat that is bad?  She promotes a lot of fat eating, so I was surprised to have to skim it.

2.)  I let my stock simmer over night and when I got up in the morning to check it, the whole stock pot was cold and everything in the pot was cold.  The oven was still on and set for med/low so I am wondering if certain stoves have like auto-matic shut-off's?  Or do I need to get a new stove?  It is rather old.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Nickole November 16, 2006, 03:48:57 PM
The chicken stock did taste really good!  But I have two questions.

1.)  Why do you have to skim the fat that congeals on the top?  Is this a different kind of fat that is bad?  She promotes a lot of fat eating, so I was surprised to have to skim it.

2.)  I let my stock simmer over night and when I got up in the morning to check it, the whole stock pot was cold and everything in the pot was cold.  The oven was still on and set for med/low so I am wondering if certain stoves have like auto-matic shut-off's?  Or do I need to get a new stove?  It is rather old.

I also would like the answer to question number one!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Nickole November 17, 2006, 01:43:35 AM
www.cookingnt.com

There's a really cool website everyone.  Created by the local chapter of the Weston Price group.  OH, MY, it is GREAT!  I'm gonna make the graham crackers today!

All sorts of "NT friendly" additional recipes.  And other useful info.

 
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: savedbygrace November 17, 2006, 04:01:49 AM
Has anyone tried the recipe for Homemade baby formula?
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: linemansgirl November 17, 2006, 05:51:46 AM
www.cookingnt.com

There's a really cool website everyone.  Created by the local chapter of the Weston Price group.  OH, MY, it is GREAT!  I'm gonna make the graham crackers today!

All sorts of "NT friendly" additional recipes.  And other useful info.

 

Thanks so much Nickole!  That looks like a really great site.  I bookmarked it & I am sure that I will be coming back to it often.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio November 17, 2006, 02:59:46 PM
www.cookingnt.com

There's a really cool website everyone.  Created by the local chapter of the Weston Price group.  OH, MY, it is GREAT!  I'm gonna make the graham crackers today!

All sorts of "NT friendly" additional recipes.  And other useful info.

 

Am I dumb or something?  ;D  I can't find any recipes on that site.  Is there a link within a link that takes you to recipes? 
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio November 17, 2006, 03:01:12 PM


1.)  Why do you have to skim the fat that congeals on the top?  Is this a different kind of fat that is bad?  She promotes a lot of fat eating, so I was surprised to have to skim it.




I also would like the answer to question number one!

BUMP for question!!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Nickole November 17, 2006, 03:09:37 PM
www.cookingnt.com

There's a really cool website everyone.  Created by the local chapter of the Weston Price group.  OH, MY, it is GREAT!  I'm gonna make the graham crackers today!

All sorts of "NT friendly" additional recipes.  And other useful info.

 

There's the whole purple column of choices down the side!  "Kids snacks", "Main recipe page", etc.

Am I dumb or something?  ;D  I can't find any recipes on that site.  Is there a link within a link that takes you to recipes? 
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio November 17, 2006, 03:10:51 PM
Yah, I saw that, but they were not recipes, just suggestions.  Are there recipes encrypted in some sort of NT code?  ;)
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: linemansgirl November 17, 2006, 03:14:54 PM
Yah, I saw that, but they were not recipes, just suggestions.  Are there recipes encrypted in some sort of NT code?  ;)

You have to scroll way down, they are at the bottom af the page & they took a while to load on my computer.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio November 17, 2006, 03:18:26 PM


Am I dumb or something?   

Yup!  I am dumb!  :-[
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Nickole November 17, 2006, 03:19:46 PM


Am I dumb or something?   

Yup!  I am dumb!  :-[

So you found them??????  I cannot explain it better - just click to the left and you will find recipes.  I found the graham cracker recipe on the "packaged replacements" link.

: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio November 17, 2006, 03:24:13 PM


So you found them?



Yah, I found them. I am dumb and embarrassed!!  ;)
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Whiterock November 18, 2006, 04:06:41 AM
www.cookingnt.com

There's a really cool website everyone.  Created by the local chapter of the Weston Price group.  OH, MY, it is GREAT!  I'm gonna make the graham crackers today!

All sorts of "NT friendly" additional recipes.  And other useful info.

Yeah, KerryAnn is a very nice person (sweet is a good description) and very helpful. I posted her website earlier in one of the recipe threads. She runs several NT email lists too (I'm a mod on one of them - the slowest one! Thank the Lord  :) ).
There's one for NT Once A Month Cooking  http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/NTOAMC/?yguid=55225036.
One that is basically an online NT recipe exchange so you can share your NT-style recipes, get recipes from other members, ask about converting recipes, etc. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NT-recipes/?yguid=193132484.
And a few more that I can't think of off the top of my head.

She is working thru some problems with Celiac right now and would appreciate all the prayers she can get. It's very hard being sick and trying to learn how to cook glutten-free with two small children to take care of.

WR

: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: makingchanges November 24, 2006, 04:38:51 PM
I had never seen this thread until today. I just bought this book at Whole Foods. They are moving and had all their books on half price. I just had to bring it home. Well, a funny story. On the way home, I spilt a soft drink all over it. I doubt she'd approve, huh? I'm so addicted to the soft drinks. I can't seem to give up the comfort of drinking them. I am ready to read the book now.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: heatheronthehill November 24, 2006, 05:02:30 PM
I know how you feel about not being able to give up soft drinks.   :P  It was sooooo tough!  I relied upon having one every afternoon to unwind, and to not fall asleep on my long drive home from work.  I did finally break the habit by doing a yeast cleanse this past fall.  Going two weeks without any sugar or yeast was one of the hardest things I've ever done, and honestly, once it was over, I desperately wanted a Dr. Pepper, but the funny thing was that when I tried it, it was disgusting to me!  It tasted so syrupy that I didn't want it anymore.  It almost tasted like cough syrup to me!  I've tasted sodas two other times since then and reacted the same way.  If you are really ready, you might give it a try!  Another side benefit was losing 7 pounds and being able to keep it off effortlessly.  I think no longer ingesting the empty soda calories has been a big factor in this. 

Hope you enjoy N.T.!  That book is chock full of information!  I'm still trying to take it all in!   :) 
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: queentea November 24, 2006, 05:19:01 PM
Giving up pop (yes I am from Ohio and it is POP not SODA ;)) is hard.  We are trying to cut back on expenses, so that helps in the decision making!  I do still cheat and have a Dr. Pepper every now and then, but I had one yesterday and it was "syrupy" tasting, so the longer you go, the easier it gets I think.  Also, when I have one, I find that I will crave one sooner, so for me it is best not to indulge, because then I want it more often!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: ShabbyChic November 24, 2006, 05:33:29 PM
Yep.  If you go long enough without something and then try it you will be very disappointed.  I still drink a few swallows of clear caffeine free sodas from time to time, mostly because I crave the scratchy feeling in my throat from the carbonation, but my beloved diet dr pepper (sweet nectar of the gods that got me through college...) tastes awful, as do french fries I'm very sad to say.   :'(
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: makingchanges November 25, 2006, 02:37:05 PM
The problem with me is the comfort of the drink. I want to unwind and just relax. The drink is tied to an emotion. This makes it so much harder. I have stopped drinking them for a month here and there, and yes, it does taste funny when I drink it but I crave the relaxation. God has a big project with me. I'll have to rely on him to give me something else to relax.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: heatheronthehill November 25, 2006, 02:53:35 PM
I've replaced sodas with hot tea and coffee.  The whole tea brewing process is very calming and relaxing for me, so that is what I like to drink in the afternoons.  The little buzz from the caffeine is a nice pick-me-up too. 

Many have said that Kombucha is a nice soft drink replacement.  I'm hoping to taste my first batch in just a couple more days!  :)
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: leslieincali November 25, 2006, 03:02:33 PM
I love Kombucha. I have 2 kids that like it and two that don't and my husband who doesn't even want to be in the same room with it. He was a soda nut, but hardly drinks it any more. The only time he craves something carbonated  is when we are having pizza. I discovered that he LOVES pomegranite juice mixed about 1/2 and 1/2 with sparkling water. I add a little stevia to mine to make it sweeter. I've also done it with orange juice. You don't have to add as much oj since it's sweeter.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: heatheronthehill November 27, 2006, 05:39:00 PM
I have a MAYO question! 

I made the NT mayo recipe tonight minus the whey.  It seems awfully runny to me!  I know the book says homemade won't be as thick as storebought, but this is more liquid than solid.  Is it supposed to thicken over time?  I followed the recipe carefully...  Everything was room temp...  I did put it directly in the fridge since I didn't add the whey.  My eggs were not organic, would that make a difference?  Ah well, practice makes perfect I suppose.

I've noticed that many of the recipes call for whey.  I need to make some yogurt cheese so I can get some!   :)
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio November 27, 2006, 05:43:11 PM
I have never made the mayo before, but my guess is if you WOULD have added the whey, then it would have been even more runnier.  You really have to wing the NT recipes  A LOT!!  ;)
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: SC November 27, 2006, 06:02:29 PM
I have a MAYO question! 

I made the NT mayo recipe tonight minus the whey.  It seems awfully runny to me!  I know the book says homemade won't be as thick as storebought, but this is more liquid than solid.  Is it supposed to thicken over time?  I followed the recipe carefully...  Everything was room temp...  I did put it directly in the fridge since I didn't add the whey.  My eggs were not organic, would that make a difference?  Ah well, practice makes perfect I suppose.

I've noticed that many of the recipes call for whey.  I need to make some yogurt cheese so I can get some!   :)

If you didn't use the whey, I wouldn't leave it to 'set up' the recommended 7 hours. During that time, the bacteria in the whey feeds on the food and causes the mayonnaise to firm up. Mine starts about the thickness of white school glue and firms up to the store bought consistency after sitting out. Without whey, I'm not sure if there would be good bacteria multiplying.   ???

Also, whey is the easiest thing you'll ever make. Just put some raw milk in a glass container and let it sit on the counter until you see it separate into a yellowish/clear liquid and some solids (3 to 4 days). Pour the contents through a clean cloth and let it drip into a clean glass container (don't squeeze the cloth). When it stops dripping, remove the cloth. Curds are what are inside the cloth -- cream cheese. In the jar is whey. It will keep, refrigerated for 6 months. The cream cheese can be refrigerated and kept in a glass jar also.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: likemanywaters November 28, 2006, 06:58:26 PM
The chicken stock did taste really good!  But I have two questions.

1.)  Why do you have to skim the fat that congeals on the top?  Is this a different kind of fat that is bad?  She promotes a lot of fat eating, so I was surprised to have to skim it.

2.)  I let my stock simmer over night and when I got up in the morning to check it, the whole stock pot was cold and everything in the pot was cold.  The oven was still on and set for med/low so I am wondering if certain stoves have like auto-matic shut-off's?  Or do I need to get a new stove?  It is rather old.

I think she says skim it so you can save it to use for other cooking purposes. Because you might not want a greasy dish in whatever you use the stock for. She does say that when cooking and chilling duck stock that the reserved fat is highly prized in French cooking, so it would make sense that you could save chicken and turkey fat too. I would definitely save it!!

Oh another note, about your carob fudge, when I made mine I used raw local honey, organic cocoa (although I like carob too) and half butter/half coconut oil.  It was solid no problem. The coconut oil gets really hard in the fridge and I think that's what helped mine get nice & solid. & since the coconut oil has kind of a tropical taste (virgin unrefined oil) I added shredded coconut to the fudge & it was delicious  :) And healthy for you too! I think though I would leave the salt out when I do it again. I could tell there was a little salty flavor to it.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Melly December 08, 2006, 06:31:16 PM
I haven't made it all the way through this thread yet so I don't know if someone else said it but, walmart.com is selling NT for $15 with 0.97 cent shipping.  That's better than amazon right now.  I think I'm going to get it but I'm a little nervous because it is such a dramatic change from everything I've always known as "health food!"  I don't know how excited my husband will be about raw lamb for dinner and egg yolks for babys??????  Oh well... :P
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: dara December 09, 2006, 04:59:17 AM
We don't do either of those... you can tailor it to fit your family's preferences!
(Eggs are a common allergen, so I wouldn't recomend that anyway, but then, my kids have allergies.)
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: mexmarr December 09, 2006, 07:13:39 AM
I haven't made it all the way through this thread yet so I don't know if someone else said it but, walmart.com is selling NT for $15 with 0.97 cent shipping.  That's better than amazon right now.  I think I'm going to get it but I'm a little nervous because it is such a dramatic change from everything I've always known as "health food!"  I don't know how excited my husband will be about raw lamb for dinner and egg yolks for babys??????  Oh well... :P

Nobody says that you have to do it all.  I have the book.  I get ideas from it, and have changes around my diet a little, but don't really make their recipes.  I know that they say it is a cookbook.  But the real worth in in the extra information outside of the recipes.  I'd say get it!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: boysmama December 09, 2006, 07:36:21 AM
We don't do it all either. :D Our "deviations" include no shellfish, liver, or lard... but I still am going to keep the book because it has got so much info in one place. Sort through it and keep what you agree with or can manage and leave the rest. It is worth getting!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: FollowingHim December 11, 2006, 07:49:05 PM
About the eggs for babies thing...its just the yolks they recommend, not the whites.  Usually its the whites that cause allergies.  And also, just in case...they do mean COOKED egg yolks, not raw.  Sometimes that message can be missed when you're reading about it on a message board.  They do recommend soft boiling the yolk, but I "almost" hard boil it, just leaving it a teensy bit creamy.  My baby (almost 8 months) makes a funny face while eating it, but she does eat it all.  I usually add a drop of apple cider vinegar, which makes it a bit yummier, I think.  (not sure if baby agrees though! ;) )  When you read about all the good stuff in egg yolks, it does make sense why the recommend it!  Lots of protein, enzymes and other good stuff.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: savedbygrace December 12, 2006, 09:56:13 AM
About the eggs for babies thing...its just the yolks they recommend, not the whites. Usually its the whites that cause allergies. And also, just in case...they do mean COOKED egg yolks, not raw. Sometimes that message can be missed when you're reading about it on a message board. They do recommend soft boiling the yolk, but I "almost" hard boil it, just leaving it a teensy bit creamy. My baby (almost 8 months) makes a funny face while eating it, but she does eat it all. I usually add a drop of apple cider vinegar, which makes it a bit yummier, I think. (not sure if baby agrees though! ;) ) When you read about all the good stuff in egg yolks, it does make sense why the recommend it! Lots of protein, enzymes and other good stuff.

Have you tried the homemade baby formula? I dont have a source of raw milk yet but I am eager to hear if you or anyone else has made this formula for thier baby and at what age did you give it to him? I cannot breastfeed so I am looking into the best alternative. Now I am using Enfamil and just adding a teensy bit of cod liver oil to each bottle. My baby is 3 months old.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: FollowingHim December 12, 2006, 10:10:27 AM
I haven't tried it.  You could probably do a web search for Nourishing Traditions, baby formula and find something.  Or go to the weston price website.  There's tons of info on there about feeding babies with NT. 
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: kaira December 30, 2006, 10:05:48 AM
I was looking at this book in my health food store and I wanted to try to find it cheaper so I didn't buy it.  I saw an enchilada recipe (think it was on the left side of the left page?) and was wondering if anyone might be willing to post it so that I can make these this weekend?  Thanks and if anyone has any idea where I could get the book cheaper I would be interested.  Also, does it come in a hardcover?  Thanks, ladies.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Melly December 30, 2006, 11:48:03 AM
I know some people don't want to support Walmart because of the gay thing but walmart.com is selling NT for 15 dollars with 97 cent shipping.  That's the best deal I've seen so far.  I will post the enchilada recipe later if you still need it!  We made the waffles this morning and they were so good.  Very filling and rich, probably better with fruit and cream rather than syrup. 
Also I've been trying for several days to get a sourdough loaf to rise and it won't.  If anyone has any tips...
Melody
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: RB December 30, 2006, 01:30:55 PM
  Also, does it come in a hardcover?  Thanks, ladies.
This advertisement is in the Wise Traditions magazine. Quote: By Popular Demand  Hardback, Deluxe Edition of Nourishing Traditions Lies Flat Larger Margins Includes Interactive CD-ROM 
Here is where you can buy it.  http://www.newtrendspublishing.com/
Blessing's,
 RB
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: kaira December 30, 2006, 01:46:10 PM
Thanks much for the info.  I try not to support WalMart Corp at all because my husband doesn't want to (funny because we have a free Sam's Club membership yet we pay for one at Costco so as to not support the WalMart Corp) but on ocassion we do purchase things we need.  I also would prefer to purchase a hardcover for durability but when push comes to shove I am pretty frugal.  I would love the recipe if you can post it when you get a chance.  Thanks :) 
Kaira
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: RB December 30, 2006, 03:42:56 PM
Also I've been trying for several days to get a sourdough loaf to rise and it won't.  If anyone has any tips...
Melody
Is it the recipe from the NT  book?   Maybe your starter is not active or something. 
Blessing's,
  RB
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Melly December 30, 2006, 03:57:20 PM
My starter got all bubbly so I assumed it was active.  I also am putting it in the oven with the light on to rise it so it's plenty warm I would think.  I am using the NT recipe but maybe I'll just have to try yeast.

Here is the Enchilada recipe:
meat from 2 chickens
2 med onions, chopped
2-4 small green peppers, seeded and chopped
2 carrots, peeled and grated
1 cup sprouted small seeds: sesame or onion
1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
2 tsp oregano
1 tbls ground cumin
18 corn tortillas
1/2 cup olive oil or lard
2 cups grated cheese
8 cups green or red enchilada sauce
avacados
creme fraiche (or sour cream)
salsa

mix first 8 ingredients. stir in one cup ench. sauce
fry tortillas in oil to soften, not crisp
pat dry
place 2 tbls chicken mixture in center of each tortilla and roll up
bake in pyrex till steaming
serve with toppings

the ench sauce is homemade do you want that recipe too?
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: kaira December 30, 2006, 04:42:30 PM
Oh, thank you ;D  I am excited to try this out tomorrow.  I would love the other recipe as well.  Thanks.
Have a blessed sunday.
Kaira
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: likemanywaters December 30, 2006, 04:53:11 PM
I have a MAYO question! 

I made the NT mayo recipe tonight minus the whey.  It seems awfully runny to me!  I know the book says homemade won't be as thick as storebought, but this is more liquid than solid.  Is it supposed to thicken over time?  I followed the recipe carefully...  Everything was room temp...  I did put it directly in the fridge since I didn't add the whey.  My eggs were not organic, would that make a difference?  Ah well, practice makes perfect I suppose.

I've noticed that many of the recipes call for whey.  I need to make some yogurt cheese so I can get some!   :)

I just made this too using her recipe. I don't think it was your lack of whey or non-organic eggs. Did you you use flax seed oil?  I used Olive Oil instead. It thickened up fairly nicely. I think flax seed oil stays liquid when chilled. Olive oil however, hardens. Try using Olive oil next time. (oh, it does make your mayo taste strongly of olive oil btw. but I kind of like it now ;)
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: RB December 30, 2006, 05:05:19 PM
My starter got all bubbly so I assumed it was active.  I also am putting it in the oven with the light on to rise it so it's plenty warm I would think.  I am using the NT recipe but maybe I'll just have to try yeast.
I have found that the key to making good sourdough bread is that your finished dough should be smooth and  sticky.    I was at a sourdough workshop  done by  a professional bakery and he said, "Most women add too much flour when they make bread.  If its too sticky to knead instead of adding more flour keep dipping  your hands in water  to knead your dough."  I have found this to be the key in making good sourdough bread.  Otherwise it will get to heavy to rise and you will end up with bricks.  Another thing if you are using spelt flour  knead it enough to mix the flour in and thats it, you do not want to over knead it.  I also cover my dough with a wet flour sack towel so it doesn't dry out while rising.
Hope this may help you. :)
Blessing's,
   RB
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: kaira December 30, 2006, 05:10:35 PM
I have covered my dough before and had it rise and stick to my towels.  Has anyone else had that problem?  So, now I leave it uncovered but it does dry out more.  Any suggestions?
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: RB December 30, 2006, 05:20:27 PM
I have covered my dough before and had it rise and stick to my towels.  Has anyone else had that problem?  So, now I leave it uncovered but it does dry out more.  Any suggestions?
I have, it helps if I use a larger container to raise  my dough in,  I like to use a large stainless steel bowl.  I have a friend that lightly sprinkles her dough with flour first before  she covers it with a wet towel.  This should be find as long as you have your dough wet enough.
Blessing's,
  RB
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: herbalmom December 30, 2006, 05:44:42 PM
I have covered my dough before and had it rise and stick to my towels.  Has anyone else had that problem?  So, now I leave it uncovered but it does dry out more.  Any suggestions?

The pizza place around the corner from where we used to live would spray the rising dough w/water from a spray bottle set to a very fine mist. They didn't oil the surface of the dough or cover the dough. I asked them & they said that it worked really well, but I'm trying to get away from plastic so I haven't tried it. Maybe oiling the surface of the dough really well? If you have a large container (canning kettle maybe?) you could put it upside down over the bowl to help keep the moisture in. HTH ~herbalmom
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Melly December 31, 2006, 08:31:04 AM
My starter got all bubbly so I assumed it was active.  I also am putting it in the oven with the light on to rise it so it's plenty warm I would think.  I am using the NT recipe but maybe I'll just have to try yeast.
I have found that the key to making good sourdough bread is that your finished dough should be smooth and  sticky.    I was at a sourdough workshop  done by  a professional bakery and he said, "Most women add too much flour when they make bread.  If its too sticky to knead instead of adding more flour keep dipping  your hands in water  to knead your dough."  I have found this to be the key in making good sourdough bread.  Otherwise it will get to heavy to rise and you will end up with bricks.  Another thing if you are using spelt flour  knead it enough to mix the flour in and thats it, you do not want to over knead it.  I also cover my dough with a wet flour sack towel so it doesn't dry out while rising.
Hope this may help you. :)
Blessing's,
   RB

Thank you, RB
I will have to keep trying.  I must have added too much flour.  I will also try the wet towel.  We live in a high and dry climate so that might also be a problem.


here is the enchilada sauce recipe
4 oz whole dried New Mexico(milder) or Ancho chiles
1/4 c olive oil
1 med onion, chopped
1 tsp ground cumin
2 c beef or chicken stock
2 cloves garlic, peeled chopped
2 small cans tomato paste
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
sea salt
clean chiles, remove stem and seeds.  Wear gloves!
saute onion in oil.  Add cumin and cook, stirring until well mixed
Add stock and chiles, boil and skim surface reduce heat and simmer
whisk in garlic, vinagar and tomato paste
simmer covered for 45 min or so
pass the sauce through a food mill (what's this?)  maybe blend it in blender
season with salt

this makes three cups
you can make huge batches and freeze
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio January 03, 2007, 03:36:14 PM
I have a NT chicken stock question:

I have made this three times and am wondering if there is a trick to removing the scum that rises to the top.  It seems my celery and onion pieces float and makes it very difficult to remove the "yuckies".  Does anyone else have this problem?  I am making this now and would like to find an easier way to do this. Thanks!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: herbalmom January 03, 2007, 03:53:34 PM
I have a NT chicken stock question:

I have made this three times and am wondering if there is a trick to removing the scum that rises to the top.  It seems my celery and onion pieces float and makes it very difficult to remove the "yuckies".  Does anyone else have this problem?  I am making this now and would like to find an easier way to do this. Thanks!

Hey HIO,
I always use a small FINE mesh strainer to skim the surface of broths. You can use it to push the pieces of veg out of the way & it traps the scum. Just be sure you rinse the strainer off before the scum dries on, it's a pain to get off if it dries on. Not that any of us would get distracted & forget to rinse it off, right? ::) ::) That NEVER happens at my house-how about yours? ;) ;) ;) HTH Blessings ~herbalmom
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio January 04, 2007, 09:09:58 AM
Not that any of us would get distracted & forget to rinse it off, right? ::) ::) That NEVER happens at my house-how about yours? ;) ;) ;) HTH Blessings ~herbalmom

Actually, the last time I didn't!!  :P  But not because I forgot. I just didn't know of a good way to do it without losing a lot of veggies, so I just left it in there.  I hope that isn't too gross!!!  It tasted the same as the others, so I am wondering if it really needs to be done at all?
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Melly January 04, 2007, 10:23:40 AM
I have found that if you let the stock boil for an hour or so before you add the veggies then the scum rises to the top and easily skims off then you can add your veggies and simmer away!  Yummy!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio January 04, 2007, 10:26:00 AM
I have found that if you let the stock boil for an hour or so before you add the veggies then the scum rises to the top and easily skims off then you can add your veggies and simmer away!  Yummy!

See, now I was thinking the same thing, but....the recipe says to let the veggies, chicken, and vinegar sit for up to an hour first.  Is this imperative, or can my vinegar soak without the veggies?  I would think it would since the vinegar is for the chicken and not veggies.  Did I just answer my own question?  :D
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Melie January 04, 2007, 11:57:26 AM
I just got this book for Christmas and I am intrigued!  I made some cream cheese and whey and then used the whey to make Pineapple chutney.  There was a little extra and I gave it raw to my husband because he's got a little sinus infection and I read that Bromeliad is good for sinus probs.  It tasted great - Pinapple Salsa! 
Here's my question:  I've always been really REALLY nervous about canning.  I've only done it a couple times and once it didn't really work and I ended up with mold in some things.  I have had food poisoning and that was the worse I have ever felt in my life.  So, the book says that if you have done the process wrong that it will smell so bad you would not be tempted to eat the food.  Tonight is the night that I am to put the Chutney in the fridge.  If I have botched it, would I know right away and would it make us sick this quickly.  I really want to merge this new discovery into our family meals but I am thinking that I might make the food then be too chicken to eat it. 

Anyone had any bad experiences with the lacto-fermenting?  Are there any tell tale signs, other than odor, that it hasn't worked?  What should the difference in the flavor be?  More tart?
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: queentea January 04, 2007, 01:25:08 PM
I made the NT saurkraut and it turned out yummy.  I made three quarts, and one quart just didn't seem to smell right, and tasted a bit different, so rather than chance it, I threw that one out.  HTH
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Melly January 04, 2007, 02:07:35 PM
I also made the pineapple chutney and it's been in the fridge for several days now.  I haven't tried it and I'm not sure what to eat it with!  Any ideas?  Just pour it over some plain chicken or something?
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Melie January 04, 2007, 02:35:53 PM
I also made the pineapple chutney and it's been in the fridge for several days now.  I haven't tried it and I'm not sure what to eat it with!  Any ideas?  Just pour it over some plain chicken or something?

I think I will try it tonight with some steamed rice with carrots and green onions and chicken.  I think I will sort of saute the chicken in some sweet chili sauce. 
My chutney looks good but it has definitely changed color a little, kind of muted.  Has your done that.  Let me know when you come up with some ideas on how to use it also. 
Oh, I have loved fresh pineapple salsa and chips.  I'm sure it would taste great on chips or nachos.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: likemanywaters January 04, 2007, 03:47:59 PM
I've made the Papaya Chutney before and let me tell you it was Dee-lish  :D  Great with chips.

However, I've also tried the Fruit Chutney using Pears and it was so acidic we could barely stand it. Tasted like stomach acid.  I think the sweeter the fruit the faster and more tart the fermentation. I think I'll try stopping the sweet fruit stuff a day early instead of risk creating something totally unpalatable.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Melie January 06, 2007, 08:16:52 PM

However, I've also tried the Fruit Chutney using Pears and it was so acidic we could barely stand it. Tasted like stomach acid.  I think the sweeter the fruit the faster and more tart the fermentation. I think I'll try stopping the sweet fruit stuff a day early instead of risk creating something totally unpalatable.

Mmmmm.... stomach acid!

Is there any reason these chutneys couldn't be prepared in the food processor like salsa?  The reason I ask is that she does suggest using the food processor with some things, but doesn't mention it with these.  The only reason I could think of for not doing it would be that you do get way more juice when you use it but maybe that would take away some of the necessary pounding.  Maybe it makes too much juice. 

By the way the Pineapple Chutney is excellent.  I used it with nachos today and loved it.  The only thing I wasn't crazy about was the ginger.  I love ginger but this is so much like salsa and I'm not used to the ginger flavor with the salsa.  I wonder if I could use garlic instead?  I think that would taste better.

I have some carrots on top of my fridge.  Should be ready Monday night, slimy or yummy?  The verdict is still out....
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Melly January 07, 2007, 07:00:00 AM
To whomever has made sourkraut:
Did you use whey or extra salt?  I made carrots with extra salt ( and pounded them so much that they only filled half a quart jar) and they were SO salty that we couldn't even swallow them!  I want to try the sourkraut but I'm worried about the saltiness if I don't use whey. 
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: queentea January 07, 2007, 10:09:50 AM
To whomever has made sourkraut:
Did you use whey or extra salt?  I made carrots with extra salt ( and pounded them so much that they only filled half a quart jar) and they were SO salty that we couldn't even swallow them!  I want to try the sourkraut but I'm worried about the saltiness if I don't use whey. 

I made the saurkraut with the whey, not the salt and it was just right!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio January 07, 2007, 11:15:48 AM
To whomever has made sourkraut:
Did you use whey or extra salt?  I made carrots with extra salt ( and pounded them so much that they only filled half a quart jar) and they were SO salty that we couldn't even swallow them!  I want to try the sourkraut but I'm worried about the saltiness if I don't use whey. 

I have made the carrots and sauerkraut both with salt and whey.  I actually prefer the taste of the salt to the whey.  The whey makes it taste way too slimy for me.  In fact, I just made a batch this week with whey and used 3 TBSP, instead of 4, and it was still to slimy for me.  Smelled funny, too. 
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthybratt January 07, 2007, 11:18:21 AM
To whomever has made sourkraut:
Did you use whey or extra salt?  I made carrots with extra salt ( and pounded them so much that they only filled half a quart jar) and they were SO salty that we couldn't even swallow them!  I want to try the sourkraut but I'm worried about the saltiness if I don't use whey. 

I have made the carrots and sauerkraut both with salt and whey.  I actually prefer the taste of the salt to the whey.  The whey makes it taste way too slimy for me.  In fact, I just made a batch this week with whey and used 3 TBSP, instead of 4, and it was still to slimy for me.  Smelled funny, too. 
Miss Muffet you're not.  ;D
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: herbalmom January 07, 2007, 12:19:15 PM
I haven't tried any of the NT recipes yet but I don't like heavily salted food either & my kids & I are allergic to dairy. Has anyone tried the sourkraut starter culture from Body Ecology? I don't think it would take much, the smaller amount of salt could be used, & I am thinking that some of the brine could be saved to use as starter for the next batch so you don't have to keep buying the packets. Has anybody tried anything like this? I want to make cultured vegetables but can't stand highly salted food. I'm hoping someone has some info or ideas. Thanks everyone. Blessings ~herbalmom 
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio January 07, 2007, 04:10:13 PM
Miss Muffet you're not.  ;D

No, I probably would have enjoyed the spider's company!  ;)
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Melie January 08, 2007, 09:09:05 AM
Does anyone know if you can use the cream on the top of the non-homogenized milk for the dairy recipes?  Or do you just by the store bought cream? 
Also, I was able to find a source for raw milk but I am nervous, their was a bad e-coli outbreak in Washington State a while back and I was wondering if this happens very often?  How do you all feel about consuming it?  Is it any safer when it is cultured?
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: makingchanges January 08, 2007, 09:20:41 AM
I used to get raw cow's milk and I used the cream all the time. I now use goat's milk, so I miss the cow's cream. I personally never worried about the raw milk.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Melie January 08, 2007, 09:31:13 AM
I used to get raw cow's milk and I used the cream all the time. I now use goat's milk, so I miss the cow's cream. I personally never worried about the raw milk.

How did you get the cream?  Do you just scoop it off the top?  Does that make the rest of the milk less nutritious?  Why did you switch to goats milk?  I have tried pasturized goat's milk but my kids did not like it at all and they are NOT picky eaters.  I have heard that fresh goat's milk tastes way better.  Do you like it?

: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthybratt January 08, 2007, 10:04:15 AM
I used to get raw cow's milk and I used the cream all the time. I now use goat's milk, so I miss the cow's cream. I personally never worried about the raw milk.

How did you get the cream?  Do you just scoop it off the top?  Does that make the rest of the milk less nutritious?  Why did you switch to goats milk?  I have tried pasturized goat's milk but my kids did not like it at all and they are NOT picky eaters.  I have heard that fresh goat's milk tastes way better.  Do you like it?


There's lots more information about milk and cream in the following threads.

Homogenized Milk/Dairy Products (http://www.welltellme.com/discuss/index.php/topic,992.0.html)
Cream:  What Do I Use it For? (http://www.welltellme.com/discuss/index.php/topic,978.0.html)
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Melie January 15, 2007, 03:27:35 PM
Does anyone know if you can vary the lacto-fermented fruit/veggie recipes?  I am making the Pineapple Chutney again (very good!) I would love to add garlic and I did add jalepeno.  I don't know if the recipes are certain formulas and if certain ingredients would mess them up.

Also, I made the Ginger Carrots and they look like someone sneezed on them.  From other comments I have read, this seems normal.  I have used them but not alone.  If you mix them with pasta or other dishes where they mix in well, you don't notice the slime at all.  I plan to use them up that way but I don't think I will make them again with the whey.  They are pretty yucky!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: linemansgirl January 15, 2007, 04:28:20 PM
Does anyone know if you can vary the lacto-fermented fruit/veggie recipes?  I am making the Pineapple Chutney again (very good!) I would love to add garlic and I did add jalepeno.  I don't know if the recipes are certain formulas and if certain ingredients would mess them up.

Also, I made the Ginger Carrots and they look like someone sneezed on them.  From other comments I have read, this seems normal.  I have used them but not alone.  If you mix them with pasta or other dishes where they mix in well, you don't notice the slime at all.  I plan to use them up that way but I don't think I will make them again with the whey.  They are pretty yucky!

I wouldn't think that it would be a problem to vary the ingredients.  JMHO.

My opinion on the ginger carrots with whey -  :P :P :P :P :P
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: savedbygrace January 17, 2007, 06:02:43 PM
More eyes! Big brother is watching!  :o  I think I will post a picture of my tongue! :P
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Melie January 17, 2007, 06:39:04 PM
More eyes! Big brother is watching!  :o  I think I will post a picture of my tongue! :P

He he, that's not big brother, it's little sister!  And, yes, she is always watching so I gotta be careful  :)
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: likemanywaters January 19, 2007, 03:57:01 PM
Does anyone know if you can vary the lacto-fermented fruit/veggie recipes?  I am making the Pineapple Chutney again (very good!) I would love to add garlic and I did add jalepeno.  I don't know if the recipes are certain formulas and if certain ingredients would mess them up.

Also, I made the Ginger Carrots and they look like someone sneezed on them.  From other comments I have read, this seems normal.  I have used them but not alone.  If you mix them with pasta or other dishes where they mix in well, you don't notice the slime at all.  I plan to use them up that way but I don't think I will make them again with the whey.  They are pretty yucky!

I was just reading on Dom's Kefirkraut website that a certain "bacteria" is what makes the slime form & how to avoid it... 

http://users.sa.chariot.net.au/~dna/kefirkraut.html  Look down under "Kefirkraut Cultured with the Addition of Sea Salt":

"The reason kefirkraut with the addition of 1% to 2% salt may be cultured to a lower pH value of 3.5, instead of pH 4 to 4.5 [when no salt is used], is because 1% to 2% salt inhibits slime forming bacteria responsible for producing soft or slimy sauerkraut. On the other foot, either salt less kefirkraut or kraut with less than 1% salt has a greater tendency to become soft and mushy, if left to culture to pH 3.5 at ambient room temperature. This can be considered as over fermentation in this case. This is why salt less kefirkraut is cultured for only 4 to 5 days [or pH 4.5 to 4] at ambient temperature, then it is best refrigerated and left to mature for some time. Ripening under cold storage prevents the slime forming bacteria from spoiling the cultured-vegetables. As kefirkraut matures under refrigeration, acidity increases until it reaches approximately pH 3.5"

Apparantly the ammount of salt used and how long it ferments is key in whether or not it is slimey.  Wouldn't it be so for the Gingered Carrots too?  Seems like the longer mine sat in the fridge the slimer they got.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio January 20, 2007, 01:54:05 AM
My fermented foods with salt were NEVER slimey, but all mine made with whey were.  In fact, they just didn't taste very appitizing.  I am wondering if one used her suggestion for lemon juice or ACV if it would be as slimy as the whey?  Anyone tried the other two mediums?
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: bakermom January 20, 2007, 03:02:31 AM
We drink our frend's raw milk.  From what I have read and heard, e-coli would be a worry if you were getting the milk from a huge dairy that fed their cows mostly corn etc .  If the cows are mainly grass fed and not too crowded, there is way less worry about illness.  Our friend is not getting new cows from other farmers constantly and he feeds his cows corn, but they eat a lot of hay.  They are healthy.  The cow's stomachs are made to digest food that is meant for them to eat but when fed the wrong things, like chicken waste etc they can'tproperly digest and things like e-coli become a problem because the bacteria is not digested.  It comes out in the meat or milk.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: likemanywaters January 20, 2007, 03:57:06 PM
My fermented foods with salt were NEVER slimey, but all mine made with whey were.  In fact, they just didn't taste very appitizing.  I am wondering if one used her suggestion for lemon juice or ACV if it would be as slimy as the whey?  Anyone tried the other two mediums?

Yes, the salt is supposed to inhibit the slime-forming bacteria. I wonder if I add more salt to the whey-veggies?  Only my carrots turned slimey. The saurkraut I made with whey just as in the book turns out great!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio January 20, 2007, 04:02:41 PM


Yes, the salt is supposed to inhibit the slime-forming bacteria.

Is this supposed "slime" bacteria the healthy bacteria?  If so, then why does she recommend using salt at all?  That would be a bummer if I am eating a salt lick and getting no benefits.  ;D
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: likemanywaters January 21, 2007, 09:10:58 AM


Yes, the salt is supposed to inhibit the slime-forming bacteria.

Is this supposed "slime" bacteria the healthy bacteria?

I don't think so, but I'm not sure. I'm fairly new to the "cultured foods" world.  Dom's page as a good explanation if you can decipher it all...
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Melie January 21, 2007, 09:16:08 AM
We drink our frend's raw milk.  From what I have read and heard, e-coli would be a worry if you were getting the milk from a huge dairy that fed their cows mostly corn etc .  If the cows are mainly grass fed and not too crowded, there is way less worry about illness.  Our friend is not getting new cows from other farmers constantly and he feeds his cows corn, but they eat a lot of hay.  They are healthy.  The cow's stomachs are made to digest food that is meant for them to eat but when fed the wrong things, like chicken waste etc they can'tproperly digest and things like e-coli become a problem because the bacteria is not digested.  It comes out in the meat or milk.
The farm we get our milk from has the cows roaming around with the chickens.  The farmer said the animals eating eachothers waste actually improves the nutrients in the food she sells.  She talked about this in terms of the chickens eating the cows poop.  She didn't talk about the cows eating the chicken waste.  These cows are almost 100% pasture fed.  She feeds them a little grain at milking to get them to enjoy the milking process.  I think that is what most people do. Do you think this is a potentially dangerous situation?  She seems to really know her stuff and her place is clean and nice.  I just really don't know what to look for and it's not like there are many, if any, other options for us.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Whiterock January 21, 2007, 09:52:57 AM
The chickens scratch thru the cow manure and eat any undigested seeds or grain. In doing so, they expose to the elements or eat any parasite eggs. The parasites common to cows aren't likely to survive in the chickens and so they are doing the cows a great service by "cleaning up" the eggs and keeping the cows from re-infecting themselves by eating the eggs when grazing that spot later. The chickens also fertilize the pasture by spreading the cow manure and adding their own, so, the grass, and therefore the cows' food source, improves.

It used to be that any family with a working farm ran the chickens, cows, and goats or sheep, together because it was healthier for all the animals, it helped to maintain and improve the pasture land, and it was just plain convenient.

WR
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Melie January 21, 2007, 04:11:44 PM
The chickens scratch thru the cow manure and eat any undigested seeds or grain. In doing so, they expose to the elements or eat any parasite eggs. The parasites common to cows aren't likely to survive in the chickens and so they are doing the cows a great service by "cleaning up" the eggs and keeping the cows from re-infecting themselves by eating the eggs when grazing that spot later. The chickens also fertilize the pasture by spreading the cow manure and adding their own, so, the grass, and therefore the cows' food source, improves.

It used to be that any family with a working farm ran the chickens, cows, and goats or sheep, together because it was healthier for all the animals, it helped to maintain and improve the pasture land, and it was just plain convenient.

WR

Thank you for the reassurance!  I was a little worried.  It was sort of a mental obstacle for me to get over the brainwashing of raw milk being sooooo dangerous I don't know if I would recover if I purchased some E.Coli milk and poisoned my family with it!  I have had food poisoning and it was the worst 2 days of my life.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: mishy January 28, 2007, 07:58:34 PM
Ya know, it seems I am being slowly conditioned that the things of the earth don't gross me out anymore. 
Chickens eat cow poop?  No big deal!! 
My son is drinking water from the toy dumptruck out on the sandbox- aw, hope he gets some good bacteria in the deal! 

Dropping food on the ground has never been an issue for me.  Pick it up brush it off, eat it.  yum yum.  The other day we were at the beach and my 16 mo old dropped his sandwhich in the sand, picked it up and to the astonishment of the 7 year old nearby happily ate it.  There was a chorus of "EEEEWWWS" 
What should I say?   Well, I am sure there is good fiber in that sand! 

Has anyone read the James Herriot books?  Do you remember where he talked about the butcher's son who was always walking around the carcassas, which died of who knows what.  He was amazed that this kid was probably the healthiest around. 
Sooo, live in harmony with the bacteria, embrace it, right...... 

heee heee   ;D


: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthybratt January 28, 2007, 08:05:36 PM
Sooo, live in harmony with the bacteria, embrace it, right...... 

heee heee   ;D



A little dirt won't hurt and lot might help.  ;)
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio January 29, 2007, 07:29:20 AM
A little dirt won't hurt and lot might help.  ;)

I think the saying as kids was:

God made dirt and dirt don't hurt.
How true.  We were such geniuses.  ;D
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: joeswife February 08, 2007, 11:08:58 AM
I just made the lacto fermented pickles. They taste yummy, but give a slight burning feeling on the tongue for a moment. My kids liked them and didn't complain, I just want to make sure it is OK. Anybody else experience this?
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Whiterock February 08, 2007, 11:38:56 AM
The guy we buy grass-fed beef from just gave me a bag of soup bones! I want to make beef stock and was going to use the recipe in NT. But before I do I wanted to ask if any of you have used her recipe, if it worked well, or if you had to make changes, etc. I've got one chance at this and don't want to ruin it.
WR
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: boysmama February 08, 2007, 11:56:02 AM
The guy we buy grass-fed beef from just gave me a bag of soup bones! I want to make beef stock and was going to use the recipe in NT. But before I do I wanted to ask if any of you have used her recipe, if it worked well, or if you had to make changes, etc. I've got one chance at this and don't want to ruin it.
WR
I put the bones in a pot of water, bring to a boil and drain. That gets rid of almost all the junk that comes to the top and I don't need to skim. Saves time   and doesn't sacrifice nutrients IMO. I then do pretty much as the NT recipe. I cook all day w/ vinegar and onion, salt and just reg. cracked black pepper. No carrots and most of the time no celery. I don't add parsley 'cause most of my other recipes include that later on. Sometimes I only cook for 12 hrs other times I do it all night and the second day on the woodstove.
I absolutely love beef stew based on this broth/stock!!!  HTH
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Myjoy February 08, 2007, 12:17:07 PM
The guy we buy grass-fed beef from just gave me a bag of soup bones! I want to make beef stock and was going to use the recipe in NT. But before I do I wanted to ask if any of you have used her recipe, if it worked well, or if you had to make changes, etc. I've got one chance at this and don't want to ruin it.
WR

We get bones from the place we buy beef from as well and I use them for making the stock. Actually, I first make a sort of stew with them that my MIL taught me to make. We then eat most of meat off the bones when we eat the stew and they give the stew an incredible flavor. Then, I take the bones and make the stock. I do it in my 4 quart crock pot, using just the bones, some water, vinegar, onion, carrot, celery, but no fresh thyme or parsley, or pepper. I never have any fresh thyme, though I may have put dried in before. Then, I leave it probably 24 hours in my crock pot on low adding more water as needed. Then, I actually drain out the broth, add new veggies, and do it again. The resulting broth isn't as brown, but I mix the first and second batches and it makes 4 quarts for me. The broth is great for the Pot Roast recipe and making soups and stews. We love it!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: crystal February 10, 2007, 01:42:50 PM
I just got this book from the library for the second or third time.  I am always experimenting with ways to improve our health.  (My family calls my methods "kill or cure."  Lovingly said, of course!!! ::) ) I just want to know if any of you have truly seen a difference in the health of your family since adopting and implementing the ideas in this book.  I don't want to "torture" my family, unnecessarily.  Also, have any of you lost or gained weight from these methods?  (We tend to be a bit on the portly side in this household, so I don't want to pack the pounds on anyone.)  Thanks for your input.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: crystal February 10, 2007, 04:29:15 PM
bump
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Whiterock February 10, 2007, 04:52:03 PM
I hadn't been following the advice of the book very well or for very long before getting pregnant, but once I found out that I was pregnant I have been much more careful about what I eat. I still can't say that I have done everything the book recommends but I have avoided most of the "bad" foods (high fructose corn syrup, white sugar, soy, transfats, commercial meats, processed milk, etc.) and eat many more of the "good" foods (CLO, VCO, grass-fed meats, eggs, raw milk, organic veggies, organic fruits, whole grain foods, soaked grains when I can, lacto-fermented foods, etc.). And, other than hip trouble, I think this has been the healthiest pregnancy I've had.

Also, even though I have been eating more fat, I have not been gaining weight. Because I am pregnant, this worried me for a while but the baby is gaining weight just fine so now I just try to enjoy it.  :)

I have also been able to get my problems with candida mostly under control. I think this has a lot to do with taking good probiotics (Tummy TuneUp8) but I really believe that this style of eating has helped a lot too.

WR
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: crystal February 10, 2007, 05:08:23 PM
Does anyone else have experiences with the NT "way" that you would be willing to share?  Thanks!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: kimberlee February 10, 2007, 05:09:25 PM
Hi Myjoy,

Do you mind posting your stew recipe? I have a few soup bones we received with our meat order this month and I have no idea what to do with them. I would love to make stew. Thank you!

Kim
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: mom24boys February 10, 2007, 10:34:12 PM
We have been trying to impliment the NT way of eating but haven't found a good source of raw milk so everything having to do with milk (making butter, culturing sour cream, butter milk, lacto-fermenting and the rest) has not been tried.
None of us has gained weight on the diet.  I have actually lost but that is because I eat practically no grain or starch or sugars (natural or otherwise) of any kind. [I have diabetes Melitis (type 2) and eliminating those types of foods keeps me from having to use oral meds or insulin.]

Oh, and another thing we don't and won't do is eat raw meats and absolutely NO LIVER!

Anyway, I do really think it is worth at least using as a guide to achieve better health and eating practises.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: crystal February 11, 2007, 01:16:38 PM
We have been trying to impliment the NT way of eating but haven't found a good source of raw milk so everything having to do with milk (making butter, culturing sour cream, butter milk, lacto-fermenting and the rest) has not been tried.
None of us has gained weight on the diet.  I have actually lost but that is because I eat practically no grain or starch or sugars (natural or otherwise) of any kind. [I have diabetes Melitis (type 2) and eliminating those types of foods keeps me from having to use oral meds or insulin.]

Oh, and another thing we don't and won't do is eat raw meats and absolutely NO LIVER!

Anyway, I do really think it is worth at least using as a guide to achieve better health and eating practises.

Thanks for responding.  Anyone else?  What is your experience with the Nourishing Traditions lifestyle?  Weight gain or loss?  Better health?
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Pastorswife2B February 11, 2007, 02:29:51 PM
Ok this is our experience.  I was raised in the healthy eating mode of life (fresh milk from the dairy, homemade wwbread no hydrogenated oils, most things made from scratch, etc, etc) but when I got married I had to establish my own mode of cooking and I kept some principles; making most things from scratch, limited hydrogenated oils, etc. 

Fast forward a couple of years, we have two boys that are about 14 months apart, the first one had one cold his first year and that was it, no antibiotics nothing, but after he turned a year he got a bad sinus infection and we went through a round of antibiotics which was immediatly followed by almost a month of nasty diahrea which he got over about a week before his brother was born (and the development of some allergies and the worsening of others can all be traced to this point).  so to compress things, both of the boys spent allot of time sick, not allot of dr's visits, but each had one round of antibiotics for strep.  But in short they were catching every bug that came along and taking a LONG time to get over it.  So thanks to a friend (shout out here to SarahK!) I became familiarized with the concept of good bacteria and this website when my youngest was about 5 months (so read here 6 months of almost solid sick kids  :o).  I have made the attempt to keep my good habbits and add an emphasis on anything that has fermentation in it.  I aquired NT because it seemed the best source for recipes using and making fermented foods.

Since my youngest turned 6 MO (he is 9MO now) and these three months were the biggest disease months of the year, the oldest has had a cold and a virus he shared with his little brother.  The virus has been taking at least 5-7 days for most people to get over, I did not get it and neither did my husband and the kids got over it in 3-4 days!

I have not tried to integrate the massive soaking (although I do soak oatmeal and beans) nor have I done the organ meats, but I have tried to up my families intake of fats.  This has led to a great stabealization of my blood sugar ( Itend to be a bit hypoglycemic) and nobody has gained much in the way of weight. 

heh soo that took a little longer than I thought it would... HTH

-Heather
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: crystal February 11, 2007, 04:06:35 PM
Ok this is our experience.  I was raised in the healthy eating mode of life (fresh milk from the dairy, homemade wwbread no hydrogenated oils, most things made from scratch, etc, etc) but when I got married I had to establish my own mode of cooking and I kept some principles; making most things from scratch, limited hydrogenated oils, etc. 

Fast forward a couple of years, we have two boys that are about 14 months apart, the first one had one cold his first year and that was it, no antibiotics nothing, but after he turned a year he got a bad sinus infection and we went through a round of antibiotics which was immediatly followed by almost a month of nasty diahrea which he got over about a week before his brother was born (and the development of some allergies and the worsening of others can all be traced to this point).  so to compress things, both of the boys spent allot of time sick, not allot of dr's visits, but each had one round of antibiotics for strep.  But in short they were catching every bug that came along and taking a LONG time to get over it.  So thanks to a friend (shout out here to SarahK!) I became familiarized with the concept of good bacteria and this website when my youngest was about 5 months (so read here 6 months of almost solid sick kids  :o).  I have made the attempt to keep my good habbits and add an emphasis on anything that has fermentation in it.  I aquired NT because it seemed the best source for recipes using and making fermented foods.

Since my youngest turned 6 MO (he is 9MO now) and these three months were the biggest disease months of the year, the oldest has had a cold and a virus he shared with his little brother.  The virus has been taking at least 5-7 days for most people to get over, I did not get it and neither did my husband and the kids got over it in 3-4 days!

I have not tried to integrate the massive soaking (although I do soak oatmeal and beans) nor have I done the organ meats, but I have tried to up my families intake of fats.  This has led to a great stabealization of my blood sugar ( Itend to be a bit hypoglycemic) and nobody has gained much in the way of weight. 

heh soo that took a little longer than I thought it would... HTH

-Heather

Thank you, Heather.  Thank you to Whiterock and Mom24boys, also.  I take it that simply applying SOME (maybe not ALL) of the principles is quite "doable" and will have a very positive effect on my family's health.  Is anyone out there "all out" on Nourishing Traditions, meaning you do the entire thing all the time?  I'll ask again, too, if these changes brought weight gain or loss in you and yours?  Thanks, gang!  I have learned soooo much from everyone of you on this site.  You are truly a HUGE blessing to me and my family.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: crystal February 12, 2007, 07:00:16 AM
Ok this is our experience.  I was raised in the healthy eating mode of life (fresh milk from the dairy, homemade wwbread no hydrogenated oils, most things made from scratch, etc, etc) but when I got married I had to establish my own mode of cooking and I kept some principles; making most things from scratch, limited hydrogenated oils, etc. 

Fast forward a couple of years, we have two boys that are about 14 months apart, the first one had one cold his first year and that was it, no antibiotics nothing, but after he turned a year he got a bad sinus infection and we went through a round of antibiotics which was immediatly followed by almost a month of nasty diahrea which he got over about a week before his brother was born (and the development of some allergies and the worsening of others can all be traced to this point).  so to compress things, both of the boys spent allot of time sick, not allot of dr's visits, but each had one round of antibiotics for strep.  But in short they were catching every bug that came along and taking a LONG time to get over it.  So thanks to a friend (shout out here to SarahK!) I became familiarized with the concept of good bacteria and this website when my youngest was about 5 months (so read here 6 months of almost solid sick kids  :o).  I have made the attempt to keep my good habbits and add an emphasis on anything that has fermentation in it.  I aquired NT because it seemed the best source for recipes using and making fermented foods.

Since my youngest turned 6 MO (he is 9MO now) and these three months were the biggest disease months of the year, the oldest has had a cold and a virus he shared with his little brother.  The virus has been taking at least 5-7 days for most people to get over, I did not get it and neither did my husband and the kids got over it in 3-4 days!

I have not tried to integrate the massive soaking (although I do soak oatmeal and beans) nor have I done the organ meats, but I have tried to up my families intake of fats.  This has led to a great stabealization of my blood sugar ( Itend to be a bit hypoglycemic) and nobody has gained much in the way of weight. 

heh soo that took a little longer than I thought it would... HTH

-Heather

Thank you, Heather.  Thank you to Whiterock and Mom24boys, also.  I take it that simply applying SOME (maybe not ALL) of the principles is quite "doable" and will have a very positive effect on my family's health.  Is anyone out there "all out" on Nourishing Traditions, meaning you do the entire thing all the time?  I'll ask again, too, if these changes brought weight gain or loss in you and yours?  Thanks, gang!  I have learned soooo much from everyone of you on this site.  You are truly a HUGE blessing to me and my family.

BUMP
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: KatieMac February 12, 2007, 08:11:20 AM
I FINALLY got my copy of Nourishing Traditions. What a Johnny Come Lately!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: lotsaboys February 12, 2007, 11:32:48 AM
We have been trying to impliment the NT way of eating but haven't found a good source of raw milk so everything having to do with milk (making butter, culturing sour cream, butter milk, lacto-fermenting and the rest) has not been tried.
None of us has gained weight on the diet.  I have actually lost but that is because I eat practically no grain or starch or sugars (natural or otherwise) of any kind. [I have diabetes Melitis (type 2) and eliminating those types of foods keeps me from having to use oral meds or insulin.]

Oh, and another thing we don't and won't do is eat raw meats and absolutely NO LIVER!

Anyway, I do really think it is worth at least using as a guide to achieve better health and eating practises.

Thanks for responding.  Anyone else?  What is your experience with the Nourishing Traditions lifestyle?  Weight gain or loss?  Better health?

We have implemented a lot of NT style cooking, although not what you could call "all out". We raise our own meat- basically grass-fed, make lots of things with raw milk, soak grains when I think about it ahead of time :P, make fermented things like sauerkraut, salsa, and ketchup, use lots of chicken and beef stock, and like others have mentioned use more good fats and only natural sugars. We stay away from white sugar and all processed foods. In fact that leaves very little to actually buy at the grocery store!  ;) We've  used the Sources in the back of the book to order things like sprouted ww tortillas and a few other weird things. :)

As far as our health, we've had NO colds for nearly a year (and that is saying a LOT because we have 3 little ones who used to have asthma problems in winter and dh would get 3 or 4 cases of a BAD chest cold per winter) and only one small touch of flu this winter. My hubby has lost some pounds he wanted too and overall I very rarely hear any complaints from the children of stomach or otherwise.

I attribute our good health success to NT combined with Beeyoutiful products! Ya-ay!! ;D

Oh, and I should mention- we really haven't had to "torture" our children with eating this way. There are only a few things they have turned their noses up at. In fact, they gross out at store bought foods, cold cereal, boughten pizza, etc. and it is hard to get them to enjoy eating out!! ??? They read labels and make a big deal about all the gross stuff in foods now days. Hubby and I don't make as big a deal about processed foods, etc. as they do. :)
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: 4my3rascals February 12, 2007, 11:46:48 AM
When I began implementing a restriced carb diet (no white flour, no white sugar, etc.) last July my husband and I were hungry all the time until about 3 weeks had passed (less for him, longer for me).  Since then, I am not as susceptible to shakes mid-morning, get less headaches, and have returned to my pre-pregnancy weight.  My husband lost about 10 pounds (mostly in his belly - carb belly that is), has more energy and a lot less gas (he used to win contests for the longest duration).  We did not get the Nourishing Tradition cookbook until we began the restricted carb diet; however, I find it quite beneficial for information and I am gradually implementing the recipes into our diet.  I started with the curds and whey (since so many recipes use whey), followed my the salsa, bean paste, soaked oatmeal for breakfast, smoothies, raw milk warmer (hot choc), and we love the spicy meatloaf.  I have not embarked on the grains yet.  I am working more around the milk aspect.  All that being said, I would not part with this valuable resource and look forward to using more recipes this summer with veggies from our 1st ever garden!!!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: diaperswyper February 15, 2007, 05:59:34 AM
  Has anyone tried the carrot cake with cream cheese icing in NT? I'm supposed to make dessert for sunday lunch and this looks good.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: RB February 15, 2007, 06:20:05 AM
  Has anyone tried the carrot cake with cream cheese icing in NT? I'm supposed to make dessert for sunday lunch and this looks good.
I have made the carrot cake with cream cheese icing and we really liked it!  If you are making it for combany that isn't used to eating whole foods they may not care for it though.  I do have another carrot cake recipe that uses sprouted grain flour that is lighter and goes over better with combany.  If you are interested I can try to find the recipe.
Blessing's,
  RB
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: diaperswyper February 15, 2007, 06:56:30 AM
  Thank you for the offer, but i don't have any sprouted grain flour nor do i have a flour mill. I think i'm going to make it, our company is very interested in the way we eat. They'll get a taste of "real" food.  :)
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: smileyface February 15, 2007, 08:56:21 AM
Does anyone know where I can buy this book? Is there a website I can go to that sells it?
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Melly February 15, 2007, 08:59:41 AM
amazon.com
walmart.com
barnesandnoble.com
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: amazonmama2five February 15, 2007, 09:34:16 AM
Does anyone know where I can buy this book? Is there a website I can go to that sells it?
amazon.com
walmart.com
barnesandnoble.com

I will add to the list www.half.com (http://www.half.com)  This is a division of ebay.  I have had many successful transactions with sellers from this site.  HTH.
Lisa
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: amazonmama2five February 15, 2007, 09:39:53 AM
HEY!  Looky what I found!  Check this out.  And the price is great!  http://product.half.ebay.com/Nourishing-Traditions_W0QQprZ2156978QQitemZ12366241679QQtgZvidetails (http://product.half.ebay.com/Nourishing-Traditions_W0QQprZ2156978QQitemZ12366241679QQtgZvidetails)

Have fun shopping!
Lisa
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Anneatheart February 20, 2007, 01:24:18 AM
I've had the book for almost a year now, and have kinda gone off and on the diet a few times. It's time consuming and I don't have access to raw milk products yet. I started back 'on' it again and am really enjoying cooking this way. I am making kombucha, soaking grains, flour, beans, I made the sourdough starter and bread and it was great! I was really psyched about that because I expected the bread to be a brick, but it's good. I just made the ginger ale recipe and was rather disappointed because it tasted salty and not gingery at all. I've tried twice to do lacto-fermented veggies, but don't care for the texture. (I used whey in one and only salt in the other-ginger carrots and the cucumbers) I would like try again though. I also have made chicken stock as well. I don't have access to organic meats, or can't afford them and many organic products. I do the best I can with what I have. We do eat a fair amount of sugar, usually raw honey and sucanat, and some unbleached organic flour.

I do the best with what I have available to me, and my goal is to make the healthiest choices I can for our family. Sometimes we eat regular boxed macaroni and cheese or ramen noodles, I don't freak out about it. The majority of the time, we eat good healthy meals. My kids haven't been sick much at all. (although hubby and I have been catching things, not sure why...) We are faithful in giving our kids their vitamins and supplements, but I'm not as consistant with myself, maybe that's the problem.

Anyways, sorry to ramble, but I've taken making traditional foods slowly over the past year, getting used to the processes of making them and adjusting my life to the time it takes to prepare them.
Definitely worth buying the book!

: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: oneblessedwoman February 20, 2007, 03:39:38 AM
I have just started reading this book.  In paging through it I saw a couple recipes that use brains.... I don't know where you can buy brains.... I really don't think my husband will ever eat that.  How do you handle these types of recipes?
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Nickole February 20, 2007, 03:41:14 AM
I have just started reading this book.  In paging through it I saw a couple recipes that use brains.... I don't know where you can buy brains.... I really don't think my husband will ever eat that.  How do you handle these types of recipes?

We skip that part of the book - it's the one part that has very clean, non-stained pages.  ;)
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: linemansgirl February 20, 2007, 03:42:26 AM
I have just started reading this book.  In paging through it I saw a couple recipes that use brains.... I don't know where you can buy brains.... I really don't think my husband will ever eat that.  How do you handle these types of recipes?

Just go past them & apply the things that really will work for your family.  My family will definitely not go for all of the raw meat recipes (including me), so we just apply what is useful to us.  There is SO much great info in NT.  Love the book!!!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: momofkings February 20, 2007, 03:52:27 AM
You mentioned that you had good success with the sourdough bread in Nourishing Traditions.....we tried it for the first time recently and, although it wasn't a brick, the taste wasn't the greatest either.  Did you use the rye berries or all wheat?  It was our first attempt, but most of my children were NOT fans of it.  (I used all hard red wheat flour thinking it would be a milder taste.)
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: lotsaboys February 20, 2007, 04:10:34 AM
I have just started reading this book.  In paging through it I saw a couple recipes that use brains.... I don't know where you can buy brains.... I really don't think my husband will ever eat that.  How do you handle these types of recipes?

We skip that part of the book - it's the one part that has very clean, non-stained pages.  ;)

LOL!! Our books must look the same!  ;D
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Nickole February 20, 2007, 04:17:21 AM
You mentioned that you had good success with the sourdough bread in Nourishing Traditions.....we tried it for the first time recently and, although it wasn't a brick, the taste wasn't the greatest either.  Did you use the rye berries or all wheat?  It was our first attempt, but most of my children were NOT fans of it.  (I used all hard red wheat flour thinking it would be a milder taste.)

I just use the rye for the starter, and feed it rye every day.  For the flour, I use Prairie Gold wheat or Spelt.  Sometimes I mix them.  The bread does have a sour taste, but we absolutely love it.  At first it was ok, but now I crave it.  It may be something that takes some getting used to.  It is the only bread we make - so darn easy for one thing!  Maybe you can use it all sorts of ways and get the family used to it?  We even like it for PB &J, French toast, you name it.  It is REALLY good as toast with butter and garlic powder to eat with pasta.  Cinnamon toast.  Bread crumbs in recipes....I feel like Forest Gump's friend talking about his shrimp.
Anyway, I get the same reaction from people who taste my sourdough bread, like family visiting: "Hmmm....(munch munch)....interesting.....(make a funny face) ".  By the end of the visit they want to take a loaf home!   ;D  So I think it grows on you.  Hope this helps!   :)

    
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Nickole February 20, 2007, 04:19:07 AM
I have just started reading this book.  In paging through it I saw a couple recipes that use brains.... I don't know where you can buy brains.... I really don't think my husband will ever eat that.  How do you handle these types of recipes?

We skip that part of the book - it's the one part that has very clean, non-stained pages.  ;)

LOL!! Our books must look the same!  ;D

Ha - and same with the raw meats section.  I may as well rip those sections out!  Maybe I could sell 'em....
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: linemansgirl February 20, 2007, 04:22:31 AM
You mentioned that you had good success with the sourdough bread in Nourishing Traditions.....we tried it for the first time recently and, although it wasn't a brick, the taste wasn't the greatest either.  Did you use the rye berries or all wheat?  It was our first attempt, but most of my children were NOT fans of it.  (I used all hard red wheat flour thinking it would be a milder taste.)

I just use the rye for the starter, and feed it rye every day.  For the flour, I use Prairie Gold wheat or Spelt.  Sometimes I mix them.  The bread does have a sour taste, but we absolutely love it.  At first it was ok, but now I crave it.  It may be something that takes some getting used to.  It is the only bread we make - so darn easy for one thing!  Maybe you can use it all sorts of ways and get the family used to it?  We even like it for PB &J, French toast, you name it.  It is REALLY good as toast with butter and garlic powder to eat with pasta.  Cinnamon toast.  Bread crumbs in recipes....I feel like Forest Gump's friend talking about his shrimp.
Anyway, I get the same reaction from people who taste my sourdough bread, like family visiting: "Hmmm....(munch munch)....interesting.....(make a funny face) ".  By the end of the visit they want to take a loaf home!   ;D  So I think it grows on you.  Hope this helps!   :)

   

The first time I made it the bread turned out like a brick.  I'm not sure where I went wrong, the starter was bubbly & everything.  Since others do have success with it I guess I will have to try it again soon.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Nickole February 20, 2007, 04:31:16 AM
linemansgirl, I have been making this bread for a while and yet have made bricks here and there accidentally too  ::).  I have seen that two things could constribute to that:  the starter not bubbly enough, which you say wasn't a problem (but I think was for me sometimes).  But maybe the other thing: adding too much flour?  I follow the recipe exactly (well, I half it exactly, to make two loaves at a time) but sometimes it works best using 1/2 cup less flour.  Basically, when it's done kneading, I want it to be somewhat sticky still, hard to explain, but not sticky enough to stick to my hands, but not too dry.  I hope this makes sense.  I guess what I'm saying is the more you make it, and have success, the more you will know what "looks" right.  You will know you did it right if it rises well!  I sit mine to rise overnight - a long time.  Almost all the time now it's nice and big to bake in the morning.  Cutting the slits in it helps too.  And if it hasn't risen well, I still bake it and we have dense bread for a week!  ;D.  Or I use it in recipes, like the bread crumbs.  HTH!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: linemansgirl February 20, 2007, 04:46:43 AM
linemansgirl, I have been making this bread for a while and yet have made bricks here and there accidentally too  ::).  I have seen that two things could constribute to that:  the starter not bubbly enough, which you say wasn't a problem (but I think was for me sometimes).  But maybe the other thing: adding too much flour?  I follow the recipe exactly (well, I half it exactly, to make two loaves at a time) but sometimes it works best using 1/2 cup less flour.  Basically, when it's done kneading, I want it to be somewhat sticky still, hard to explain, but not sticky enough to stick to my hands, but not too dry.  I hope this makes sense.  I guess what I'm saying is the more you make it, and have success, the more you will know what "looks" right.  You will know you did it right if it rises well!  I sit mine to rise overnight - a long time.  Almost all the time now it's nice and big to bake in the morning.  Cutting the slits in it helps too.  And if it hasn't risen well, I still bake it and we have dense bread for a week!  ;D.  Or I use it in recipes, like the bread crumbs.  HTH!

Thanks for the tips & encouragement Nickole!  I will make it again soon & see if I have greater success. :) 
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Anneatheart February 20, 2007, 06:42:03 AM
For the bread I used the rye flour and filtered water, just like the recipe. It was bubbling within a day! (I kept it on top of my dryer) We (dd and I) fed it rye flour and water everyday, Monday-Sat. I then used the bread recipe in the book, but cut it in half to make two loaves. I didn't want to 'commit' to three loaves in case it was bad, ha ha. I used Bob's Red Mill whole wheat pastry flour and about 2.5 cups unbleached all purpose flour. (an organic brand, can't remember what though) Anyways, the only thing I changed was adding about 2 T of sucanat. I was surprised the bread wasn't that sour. I really like the sour taste in bread and it wasn't really strong- my kids ate it.

I kneaded it till it wasn't super sticky then put it in loaf pans; it rose in about 3.5-4 hrs. (sitting on the dryer) A very easy way to make bread, especially if you tend to forget about rising bread dough...:)
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: lotsaboys February 20, 2007, 06:54:15 AM
linemansgirl, I have been making this bread for a while and yet have made bricks here and there accidentally too  ::).  I have seen that two things could constribute to that:  the starter not bubbly enough, which you say wasn't a problem (but I think was for me sometimes).  But maybe the other thing: adding too much flour?  I follow the recipe exactly (well, I half it exactly, to make two loaves at a time) but sometimes it works best using 1/2 cup less flour.  Basically, when it's done kneading, I want it to be somewhat sticky still, hard to explain, but not sticky enough to stick to my hands, but not too dry.  I hope this makes sense.  I guess what I'm saying is the more you make it, and have success, the more you will know what "looks" right.  You will know you did it right if it rises well!  I sit mine to rise overnight - a long time.  Almost all the time now it's nice and big to bake in the morning.  Cutting the slits in it helps too.  And if it hasn't risen well, I still bake it and we have dense bread for a week!  ;D.  Or I use it in recipes, like the bread crumbs.  HTH!

Nickole, do you knead it by hand or use a mixer or processor? And how long?
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Nickole February 20, 2007, 07:06:27 AM


Nickole, do you knead it by hand or use a mixer or processor? And how long?
[/quote]

I use my Kitchenaid mixer, and I knead half of the dough at a time (so, one loaf at a time) on speed 2 for about 2 minutes maybe.  I also oil the bread pans a LOT and roll the loaf in it as well, to let it rise.   
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: boysmama February 20, 2007, 12:24:06 PM
Ha - and same with the raw meats section.  I may as well rip those sections out!  Maybe I could sell 'em....
I'm not buying  ;) ;D
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: oneblessedwoman February 21, 2007, 03:48:08 AM
I have just started reading this book.  In paging through it I saw a couple recipes that use brains.... I don't know where you can buy brains.... I really don't think my husband will ever eat that.  How do you handle these types of recipes?

We skip that part of the book - it's the one part that has very clean, non-stained pages.  ;)

awesome   ;)   Thanks.  I will just read it and smile.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: diaperswyper February 21, 2007, 07:14:31 AM
   Does anyone have a good soaked pizza recipe outside of NT? I've made the yogurt dough and biscuit dough recipe's but would like to make pizza with some white flour and whole wheat.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: diaperswyper February 28, 2007, 10:25:13 AM
   Since no one answered my last question, ;D what can i do with fish stock? I made a whole bunch and it's now sitting in my freezer and i don't have a clue what to do with it. The fish stew's in NT take way to many kinds of seafood and i'm not having much luck with google. Help anyone?
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: boysmama February 28, 2007, 12:52:22 PM
   Since no one answered my last question, ;D what can i do with fish stock? I made a whole bunch and it's now sitting in my freezer and i don't have a clue what to do with it. The fish stew's in NT take way to many kinds of seafood and i'm not having much luck with google. Help anyone?
I would try a fish chowder...yummy. You could also make some pasta or rice dishes. Use the stock to cook the noodles and then serve w/ some kind of prepared fish...
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Pastorswife2B March 01, 2007, 06:19:03 AM
If you do any Asian cooking you can always replace the required chicken stock with fish stock and it will actually taste much more authentic.  (or so I've been told)

-Heather
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: diaperswyper March 08, 2007, 03:54:22 PM
   Another question. Has anyone tried the raw cheesecake in the NT? I want to try it but am a little nervous making it for company without first knowing if it's good.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: JenWorch March 08, 2007, 05:05:43 PM
I have also been reading NT and have thoroughly enjoyed all the information.  I was especially floored by all the info on cholesterol.  I would like to read more about that.

I have not attempted any of the recipes yet (my 1st trimester, not much is appealing) but I have been making kefir for some time.  We also use raw goat milk, and it sure has helped the health of my little ones, especially the one who had digestive problems--he doesn't have those problems anymore.

BTW, I always check for books on www.campusi.com (http://www.campusi.com).  They list many booksellers, including all the ones I have previously seen on the posts.  The only thing to watch for is that they list the prices in the order which includes shipping, and if you get them from buy.com or amazon.com, etc., you often don't have to pay the shipping if you order another book.

Thanks for all those tips and tidbits.  I'm looking forward to trying some of those recipes.  And I'd especially like to get my hands on one of those chicken foot balls.  :)
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: diaperswyper March 29, 2007, 08:18:58 AM
  I've been making the soaked bread for awhile and am having a problem. It rises beautiful but when i go to bake it, it falls in the middle. I grind my own flour and use the yeasted buttermilk recipe in NT. What am i doing wrong?
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: diaperswyper March 29, 2007, 10:10:04 AM
  bump
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: K.I.S.S. April 07, 2007, 06:16:06 AM
  I've been making the soaked bread for awhile and am having a problem. It rises beautiful but when i go to bake it, it falls in the middle. I grind my own flour and use the yeasted buttermilk recipe in NT. What am i doing wrong?

Could it be your oven? I was having troubles like that and I bought an oven thomometer and come to find out my oven was not keeping its heat level. It was way off and we got it fixed and now my bread is turning out fine.

Recentley I started using the really small loaf pans and making the tiny loaves and they turn out beautifully. I am using the sourdough starter from NT.

I couldnn't get my bread to turn out well with the big loaf pans but with these tiny ones the bread cooks through and through and comes out  like sandwich bread. I still think it might be my oven.

: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Melly April 07, 2007, 08:59:08 AM
I gave up on all that soaked flour stuff.  My loaves never rose with either the sourdough starter or the yeasted buttermilk. 
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: mommyoftwins April 07, 2007, 09:27:10 AM
I gave up on all that soaked flour stuff.  My loaves never rose with either the sourdough starter or the yeasted buttermilk. 

I just started making bread, so I didn't really know what I was doing with grinding and soaking for bread. I haven't tried the NT recipe, but I did try this recipe and have loved it, even when I messed it up during rising. Many others on WTM have also had luck with it. Go here: http://www.welltellme.com/discuss/index.php/topic,310.msg3274.html#msg3274 (http://www.welltellme.com/discuss/index.php/topic,310.msg3274.html#msg3274)

I had to use regular active dry yeast instead of instant, so I just proofed it in a little warm water before adding it. Then, I let it rise in the bowl, and a second time in the pans. I have soaked it for around 7-9 hours up to almost 24 hours. The longer you soak it, the longer it takes to rise. When you soak over 12 hours, it seems like forever. It is also a little more sour, but not yucky.

I have had to make 4 loaves at a time to keep from having to make it more than once a week. DH can't get over how good it is. I hope you have some luck with it. It really isn't too much work, either, especially if you have a Bosch or something similar!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Melly April 12, 2007, 04:24:22 AM
I gave up on all that soaked flour stuff.  My loaves never rose with either the sourdough starter or the yeasted buttermilk. 

I just started making bread, so I didn't really know what I was doing with grinding and soaking for bread. I haven't tried the NT recipe, but I did try this recipe and have loved it, even when I messed it up during rising. Many others on WTM have also had luck with it. Go here: http://www.welltellme.com/discuss/index.php/topic,310.msg3274.html#msg3274 (http://www.welltellme.com/discuss/index.php/topic,310.msg3274.html#msg3274)

I had to use regular active dry yeast instead of instant, so I just proofed it in a little warm water before adding it. Then, I let it rise in the bowl, and a second time in the pans. I have soaked it for around 7-9 hours up to almost 24 hours. The longer you soak it, the longer it takes to rise. When you soak over 12 hours, it seems like forever. It is also a little more sour, but not yucky.

I have had to make 4 loaves at a time to keep from having to make it more than once a week. DH can't get over how good it is. I hope you have some luck with it. It really isn't too much work, either, especially if you have a Bosch or something similar!

Thank you for the help.  I'll try that recipe!

Another question to whomever has soaked nuts and then dehydrated them:
How long do you leave them in the oven until they're dry and crisp?  I keep tasting my walnuts but I'm not sure what I'm tasting for.  They're good for sure, but the center still seems like that smooth walnut center.  I'm not sure if they need to bake until they're like corn nuts! 
If anyone has any advice...!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: lotsaboys April 12, 2007, 05:52:10 AM
I think every oven will dry at a different rate. Mine takes over 24 hours depending on the amount of nuts I put in at a time. I have to use the "warm" setting because the lowest I can set my oven on "bake" is 170 degrees.

HTH!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Isaacsmama April 18, 2007, 12:21:24 PM
I was wanting to make the bonito broth from NT, but cant seem to find bonito anywhere.  Even at asian markets in town.  Anyone on here ever use bonito, or have any suggestions when bonito can not be found.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio April 27, 2007, 02:57:01 AM
Has anyone made the Sweet Potato Soda, yet?  Well, if you haven't you MUST try it!!  It is soooo good, and I am NOT a sweet potato fan.  Tastes nothing like it!  I got the recipe from Wild Fermentation and will write it out in case someone who doesn't have either book(NT or WF) would like to make it. 
It tastes BETTER than Kombucha!!!

SWEET POTATO FLY(SODA)

1 tsp powdered mace
2 large sweet potatoes
2 cups sugar
1/2 cup whey
2 lemons
Cinnamon
Nutmeg
1 egg shell

1. Boil 1 cup of water with mace.  Remove from heat and cool.

2.  Grate the sweet potatoes, and rinse well through a strainer to remove starch.

3.  In a large bowl, combine the grated sweet potatoes, 1 gallon of water, sugar, whey, the juice and grated peel of the lemons, and a pinch each of cinnamon and nutmeg.

4.  Crush the clean eggshell into the mixture(I halved my whole recipe into two separate containers).

5.  Add the cooled boiled mace.

6.  Stir, cover with cloth and leave in a warm spot for 3 days to ferment.

7.  Strain into a container or glass jars and refridgerate.

YUMMY!!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: ArmyWife April 27, 2007, 03:48:57 AM
Where could I find the whey?  Also, I am new to this site, and when reading came across the Maple seaweed candy.  Is that recipe here on the site somewhere?  If not, could someone post it for me, please?  Thanks!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Chickory Chick April 27, 2007, 04:21:41 AM
You can get whey from a couple of sources:

Buy a container of plain yogurt - the yellow liquid that comes to the top is whey.

If you make kefir, let it totally separate...you will have a yellow liquid on the bottom and the "curds" will rise to the top.....I believe you can do the same with regular raw milk (unpasteurized & unhomogenized).

HTH

Kay
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Isaacsmama April 27, 2007, 05:41:46 AM
I was wanting to make the bonito broth from NT, but cant seem to find bonito anywhere.  Even at asian markets in town.  Anyone on here ever use bonito, or have any suggestions when bonito can not be found.


Just wanted to add that I finally found the bonito and made the broth.  Used it to make a soba noodle bowl.  It was GREAT!  I think I will use the extra flakes in the garden.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Isaacsmama April 27, 2007, 05:43:13 AM
Has anyone made the Sweet Potato Soda, yet?  Well, if you haven't you MUST try it!!  It is soooo good, and I am NOT a sweet potato fan.  Tastes nothing like it!  I got the recipe from Wild Fermentation and will write it out in case someone who doesn't have either book(NT or WF) would like to make it. 
It tastes BETTER than Kombucha!!!

SWEET POTATO FLY(SODA)

1 tsp powdered mace


this may be a dumb question, but what it mace?
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio April 27, 2007, 07:47:47 AM


this may be a dumb question, but what it mace?

Ha ha!  It's that stuff that police spray on an out of control suspect!
NO!  It is a spice.  Really easy to find.  You know, one time my husband and I were eating those Barnum and Baily animal crackers and the ingredients were like:  wheat flour, sugar, mace(a spice) No, really?! :D LOL!  Sorry, just pickin' on ya!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: LoveSunflowers April 27, 2007, 10:05:26 AM
I haven't read through this whole thread but I wanted to let everyone know that the red enchilada sauce is super yummy! The only change I made was I used pork gravy (we butchered this pig ourselves and use extra bones for the juice) and home froze tomato juice. Oh, and more garlic! :) I make a huge batch and freeze what we don't use. We also use dried cayennes from our garden. It is not very hot. I do add extra chiles to make it hotter.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: ArmyWife April 27, 2007, 10:52:28 AM
You can get whey from a couple of sources:

Buy a container of plain yogurt - the yellow liquid that comes to the top is whey.

If you make kefir, let it totally separate...you will have a yellow liquid on the bottom and the "curds" will rise to the top.....I believe you can do the same with regular raw milk (unpasteurized & unhomogenized).

HTH

Kay

Thanks for the reply.  I buy plain yogurt regularly anyways.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthybratt April 28, 2007, 10:10:28 AM
Does the sweet potato stuff get fizzy like kombucha?  What's it taste like?

Also, I know fresh is always best, but do you think you could substitute canned yams and leave out the sugar?  I just happen to have some of these in the pantry.  Of course, I don't have any mace.  Don't even know what it is.  Don't have lemons either.  :(
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthybratt April 28, 2007, 10:13:33 AM
All about mace from McCormick.

http://www.mccormick.com/content.cfm?id=8220 (http://www.mccormick.com/content.cfm?id=8220)
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: herbalmom April 28, 2007, 10:34:43 AM
Does the sweet potato stuff get fizzy like kombucha?  What's it taste like?

Also, I know fresh is always best, but do you think you could substitute canned yams and leave out the sugar?  I just happen to have some of these in the pantry.  Of course, I don't have any mace.  Don't even know what it is.  Don't have lemons either.  :(

I doubt you could use canned- my guess is that the enzymes in the raw sweet potatoes is part of it.

Mace is supposed to be VERY good with sweet potatoes & I wouldn't be surprised if it helps keep it from spoiling before it's done fermenting. It's the outside layer of a nutmeg so I wonder if nutmeg would work instead.  I'm going to experiment with this- I'll have to see what I can use instead of sugar- honey maybe? HTH Blessings ~herbalmom
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Melly April 28, 2007, 05:52:45 PM
Has anyone made the Sweet Potato Soda, yet?  Well, if you haven't you MUST try it!!  It is soooo good, and I am NOT a sweet potato fan.  Tastes nothing like it!  I got the recipe from Wild Fermentation and will write it out in case someone who doesn't have either book(NT or WF) would like to make it. 
It tastes BETTER than Kombucha!!!

SWEET POTATO FLY(SODA)



Does this recipe call for white sugar or just some form of sweetener?  I know that kombucha needs the sugar but there's no SCOBY in this recipe!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio April 29, 2007, 01:32:57 AM
Does the sweet potato stuff get fizzy like kombucha?  What's it taste like?

Also, I know fresh is always best, but do you think you could substitute canned yams and leave out the sugar?  I just happen to have some of these in the pantry.  Of course, I don't have any mace.  Don't even know what it is.  Don't have lemons either.  :(


The soda will get fizzy if you bottle it and leave it on the counter for a couple days.  It has some fermentation in it from the whey.

I would just stick to fresh sweet potatoes. 

I suppose you could substitute a different sweetener, but I really didn't think it called for a lot of sugar, anyways.  But I understand if someone has a candida problem. 

The taste is likened to a cream soda, but with a zesty kick to it.

Umm....no lemons, no mace, no fresh sweet potatoes.....why don't you just drink water for awhile, HB!  :D

And yes, the mace smells very similar to nutmeg, so I am sure you could substitute it.  I have organic evaporated cane juice and that is what I used.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Isaacsmama May 10, 2007, 05:40:37 AM
does anyone know why the book says to peel the skin off of soaked chickpeas before cooking.  I like these but peeling takes forever and I figured if it doesnt really matter, I wouldnt keep spending the time.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Isaacsmama June 09, 2007, 12:10:13 PM
BUMP

cooking chickpeas again and thought Id see if anyone knows the answer.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: born-an-okie June 09, 2007, 12:25:57 PM
I don't know why you are supposed to peel them, except for a texture issue.  We cooked some just this afternoon.  I think they would be easier to peel after cooking.  We didn't peel ours to make hummus, just used a food processor.  You could feel a texture difference though with the peels still in it.  I can't think of any other reason for peeling them.  ???
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Nickole June 10, 2007, 01:41:18 AM
does anyone know why the book says to peel the skin off of soaked chickpeas before cooking.  I like these but peeling takes forever and I figured if it doesnt really matter, I wouldnt keep spending the time.

Oh, I know, it is SO tedious.  I still do it though.  I thought it was b.c of the phytates, but now I can't find that in the book.  If it's just texture, I would like to know too, b/c that is such a pain!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthybratt June 11, 2007, 06:55:13 AM
I know that my MIL says when they cook red or mung beans for rice cakes, they don't peel them.  They mash them through a strainer and the beans come out and the peels stay in.  Maybe this would help?
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: mommyoftwins June 15, 2007, 12:46:15 PM
Can I use kefir instead of buttermilk in the NT recipes calling for buttermilk? I want to try the biscuits, but only have kefir.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Melie June 15, 2007, 01:57:47 PM
We use keifer in place of buttermilk all the time and it works great.  I've done it in buiscuits, pancakes, cakes, you name it!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: mommyoftwins June 15, 2007, 03:07:30 PM
Great! Thanks, hhmom!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: queentea June 16, 2007, 01:14:13 AM
Can I use kefir instead of buttermilk in the NT recipes calling for buttermilk? I want to try the biscuits, but only have kefir.

I've even used it in quick bread recipes for the oil portion (I was low on oil), turned out very moist and yummy!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: lotsaboys June 16, 2007, 04:55:03 PM
Can I use kefir instead of buttermilk in the NT recipes calling for buttermilk? I want to try the biscuits, but only have kefir.

I've even used it in quick bread recipes for the oil portion (I was low on oil), turned out very moist and yummy!

We use it every chance we can in baked things because they turn out so moist!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthybratt June 17, 2007, 02:09:10 PM
Can I use kefir instead of buttermilk in the NT recipes calling for buttermilk? I want to try the biscuits, but only have kefir.
I don't know about the NT recipes, but I've successfully (and quite deliciously) substituted kefir for buttermilk using the recipe from Better Homes and Gardens cookbook for Buttermilk Drop Biscuits.  They come out soooo crisp on the outside and fluffy in the middle.  MMMMMMM
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Isaacsmama June 22, 2007, 07:32:56 AM
has anyone here made the baking powder she suggests in the into to the baking section?  Ive made it before and used baking soda but when I went to make more today, I saw that it called for 'potassium bicarbonate' not ''sodium bicarbonate'.  I had OK results before.  Does it really matter?  Does anyone know the difference when using these two bicarbonates in cooking?  Thanks
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: healthyinOhio June 23, 2007, 06:37:21 AM
For those that have made NT bread, I have a question.  I am making the yogurt herb bread and the directions say to process in a food processor for a couple min. to knead.  I don't have one, so do I just knead this by hand?  For how long would you say?  Thanks!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Isaacsmama June 23, 2007, 12:26:23 PM
'till smooth and elastic'   kidding...that is what every bread recipe says.  I dont like needing in the the food processor cause it makes a mess.  I usually do it by hand till I get tired of it (Ive got bad wrists)  about 8 minutes I guess.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Mrs. Visionary June 30, 2007, 07:13:59 PM
I have to recommend the Weston Price Foundation local chapters. In looking for a source for raw milk, I stumbled the chair of our local chapter.  After talking with her on the phone for some time I decided to attend the next meeting which happened to be today. It was really fun and informative. I am so happy to have found a group of people who share my love of nutrition. For those who love studying nutrition and also would enjoy the company of others who share this interest I recommend checking out a meeting.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Isaacsmama July 12, 2007, 01:59:17 PM
I was making the buttermilk biscuits from NT and covered my bowl with plastic so it wouldnt get hard on top.  When I went to finish them today, the plastic was all puffed up (like fermentation going on inside) and it sells very sour.  Will these be like sourdough biscuits or have I ruined them?  Any opinions please.  I dont want to tke the time to make them if they are unsafe.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: likemanywaters July 12, 2007, 04:18:50 PM
I think it may be the plastic. A better trick I learned is to cover it with a damp dish towel. Then it can breathe and won't get hard on top. But I think the baking time would kill off anything you would worry about.

Sometimes it smells different depending on what you use. Did you use store bought buttermilk? homemade? kefir? yogurt? I seriously had to modify the buttermilk biscuit recipe as written and I posted it here: http://www.welltellme.com/discuss/index.php/topic,4921.msg49058.html#msg49058 This worked great for me as I am more use to light and fluffy biscuits rather than dense ones.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Isaacsmama July 12, 2007, 04:44:25 PM
thanks, Ill try your method next time(I use homemade buttermilk)  I have heaps of it so will probably make again soon.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Whiterock July 31, 2007, 07:34:37 AM
Found this NT online mag. Passing it along.
http://nourishedmagazine.com.au/
WR
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Whiterock August 03, 2007, 04:57:37 AM
Traditional Foods (Nourishing Traditions) Weekly Menu Mailer (http://www.welltellme.com/discuss/index.php/topic,10928.0.html)

WR
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: SagorFamily1611 August 29, 2007, 11:27:14 AM
I finally got a copy of NT, now I am trying to figure out if I can still make some of the recipes when I don't have a source of fresh milk. I can only get regular store bought pasteurized. The only plus is I can get it organic. Do I have to have unstrained fresh from the cow milk to make the creams, whey and others that she talks about?

Also everyone is talking about Rapadura (I only read 4 pages) and I wasn't sure if anyone knows but as far as I know evaporated cane sugar that is sold for cheap at Wal-mart and other stores is the same thing. Or better, to me you cannot get anything better than good organic evaporated cane sugar. My hubby says it is actually good for you because there is no cooking involved and all it is is the juice of the cane sugar pressed out and the liquid allowed to evaporate, and you are left with sugar.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Pastorswife2B August 30, 2007, 05:03:20 AM
On the milk, you can definatly make your own cultured milk drinks from store bought milk as many ladies on here will testify!  If you want to join the discussion on what kind of milk (skim, whole, etc) is best to buy from the store there is plenty of discussion on the homogenized milk thread with links and good info.  The one caveat to this is to get whey you will have to culture the milk into kefir, yogurt, etc. you won't be able to just let it sit out and seperate that only happens with raw milk and if you want to make cottage cheese you'll have to get rennet tablets to make it seperate, but you can still get high quality whey that will do all kinds of cool fermenting and culturing doing the yogurt/draining process.  I even get raw milk but always do the yogurt/draining method as I find it much more reliable.

On the Rapadura, I've heard the reason she was big on that particular brand is because she trusted their processing method of getting the cane juice from the cane as not adding anything bad.  I would think (and this is just my opinion) that the regulations on something making it organic would do a pretty good job of limiting or aliminating offensive processes, so I would be ok with buying wal-mart brand dehydrated cane syrup crystals.  If you were interested on doing some more research WWW.westonaprice.org (http://WWW.westonaprice.org) would be a good starting place.  HTH

-Heather
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Gigi September 27, 2007, 12:42:00 PM
Has anyone else tried the "Punch" recipe in NT under "Beverages?"

She calls it "Hindu Lemonade."  It's just water, fresh-squeezed lemon juice, whey, sugar and nutmeg.  It is very tart, but I really like tart/bitter stuff.  When you let it sit for around 5-6 days it really develops such good flavor!

Anyone like it?  I LOVE THIS STUFF!!!  Anyone tried any variations?  I'm debating oranges to replace the lemons.

I don't find lots of recipes I truly like in NT (shocking, I know!   :o), but for some reason I have really liked this stuff lots.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: grocerygetter October 12, 2007, 06:50:03 AM
For those who already own this book (I'm considering ordering it) How is NT on recipes for those with allergies? We have a milk allergy that's why I'm curious. Thanks!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: lotsaboys October 12, 2007, 07:30:26 AM
For those who already own this book (I'm considering ordering it) How is NT on recipes for those with allergies? We have a milk allergy that's why I'm curious. Thanks!

I'm not familiar with other milk allergy-friendly cookbooks, but I've noticed a lot of NT recipes have an option (substitute) for milk for those with sensitivity to milk.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: lynn November 17, 2007, 02:05:23 PM
Has anyone made the venison stock recipe?  I love venison but have never made stock from it (I'm fairly new to NT :))  Well,  anyway Sally Fallon calls for the deer hooves and part of the antler. I understand the rationale behind this but do you just chop them off the deer and throw them in the pot or how would you go about making sure they are nice and clean? I know this sounds silly but I've never but the feet of any critter in something I'm cooking for my family to eat :-\ 
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: grocerygetter March 11, 2008, 10:32:03 AM
Has anyone made the venison stock recipe?  I love venison but have never made stock from it (I'm fairly new to NT :))  Well,  anyway Sally Fallon calls for the deer hooves and part of the antler. I understand the rationale behind this but do you just chop them off the deer and throw them in the pot or how would you go about making sure they are nice and clean? I know this sounds silly but I've never but the feet of any critter in something I'm cooking for my family to eat :-\ 
Bump
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: mommyoftwins March 12, 2008, 02:47:38 PM
Has anyone made the venison stock recipe?  I love venison but have never made stock from it (I'm fairly new to NT :))  Well,  anyway Sally Fallon calls for the deer hooves and part of the antler. I understand the rationale behind this but do you just chop them off the deer and throw them in the pot or how would you go about making sure they are nice and clean? I know this sounds silly but I've never but the feet of any critter in something I'm cooking for my family to eat :-\ 
Bump

I haven't tried the venison stock, but mentioned it to DH when he was butchering his deer this fall. He kind of looked at me in disgust & basically said "no way." I don't know if I could put the hooves & antler in (assuming you have a buck!), but I know I would scrub them a long time before I put them in the pot if I were using them! Let us know if you try it out. I would like to tell DH how it is!

Brooke
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: boysmama March 12, 2008, 05:26:30 PM
We are collecting antlers for a clothes hook bar. Even if they were not pre designated... :P
I do use chicken feet after scrubbing and dumping the first boil. That would probably work for other feet as well.  Beef and venison bones all the way to the hoof but never the hoof - yet. I've helped butcher plenty of pigs in my life and adding the hoof adds so much gelatin the broth is slicable when cold.
I've joked about saving hoof trimmings from the goats - NO WAY!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: doddsgirl May 15, 2008, 04:11:12 PM
yippee! yippee! hooray for me! i just got my copy of nourishing traditions in the mail! i got a really good deal on ebay! i'm so excited!!!! ;D ;D ;D
i can't wait to read it! (i hugged the book to my chest and closed my eyes in bliss...my neices and nephew looked at each other worriedly! ::)) they are always making fun of my concoctions...just wait till i get into this book! :D  it may be awhile before i can put much into practice but hopefully i will be prepared when the time comes...
rhonda
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: lotsaboys May 16, 2008, 05:12:47 AM
Yay Rhonda! Have fun!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: StephTallent May 16, 2008, 06:57:14 AM
I just made a batch of Salsa and tweaked it around to be something that my hubby would like.   ;D  Thought I would post share my altered NT recipe on here. 

4 medium Tomatoes, peeled, seeded (I didn't seed mine, too lazy) and diced
2 small onions, finely chopped
3/4 cup chopped chile pepper, hot or mild (I used frozen mild Green Chille from NM)
6-8 cloves garlic, peeled and finely chopped
1 tsp dried mexican Oregano
1 tsp freshly ground Cumin
Small Dash of Cayenne
Juice of 2 lemons
1 tablespoon sea salt
4 tablespoons whey (un pasturized "live" whey)
1/4 cup filtered water

Mix all ingredients and place in a quart-sized, wide-mouth mason jar. Press down lightly with a wooden pounder or a meat hammer, adding more water if necessary to cover the vegetables. The top of the vegetables should be at least 1 inch below the top of the jar. Cover tightly and keep at room temperature for about 2 days before transferring to cold storage. Will stay good in cold storage for up to 6 months.

**The original recipe called for a bunch of Cilantro which I left out and did not call for either the Cayenne or the Cumin. In my opinion the Cumin is what made the salsa.   :-*
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: cecac May 16, 2008, 01:31:48 PM
I was just telling my dh that I was going to make this for him after my babe is born, and I am also going to make a milder version for the rest of us.  Thank you for the alteration.

Is that much garlic going to work?  I always have to cut the spices, salt, and garlic in the NT recipes......I wonder how hot that is going to be?
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: StephTallent May 16, 2008, 05:29:24 PM
I was just telling my dh that I was going to make this for him after my babe is born, and I am also going to make a milder version for the rest of us.  Thank you for the alteration.

Is that much garlic going to work?  I always have to cut the spices, salt, and garlic in the NT recipes......I wonder how hot that is going to be?

Well, we are garlic lovers around here so I don't know how qualified I am to make an unbiased call on whether or not that is too much garlic...  ;D  I will say that I do NOT like super hot/spicy stuff at ALL.  This is ended up being mildly warm but absolutely bursting with flavor.  The hottest thing in it was the garlic, I put such a small amount of cayenne it didn't really do much except as a very faint background flavor. 

It would be very easy to "taste test" as you make it. Keep in mind that the flavors get deeper the longer it's left but you can get a good feel for how it's going by tasting as you mix it in.  That'll give you the leeway to hold back if you think you need to.  Have fun!  This is by far our favorite NT recipe thus far.  But that is probably just cuz Hubby is a salsa junkie.   ;) :D
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: lotsaboys May 19, 2008, 03:18:51 AM
I was just telling my dh that I was going to make this for him after my babe is born, and I am also going to make a milder version for the rest of us.  Thank you for the alteration.

Is that much garlic going to work?  I always have to cut the spices, salt, and garlic in the NT recipes......I wonder how hot that is going to be?

We found the chile pepper amount to be plenty for us but everything else was about right. I'd say that what I make would be called mild.

And I really like Steph's idea for cumin! I'll try that next time.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: cecac May 19, 2008, 05:19:39 AM
Thank you ladies!!  I'm looking forward to trying this as my hubby is a salsa junkie too--the only thing I worry about is what I worry about with bucha--that man likes a pint a day of bucha!!  I think I'm going to have to go to making six to eight batches at a time if I want the kids to have bucha benefits daily too (oh yeah, and the two year old could down as much as dh :o).  Anyway, I bet I better start with a gallon or something of this salsa the way you all are talking--it'll be piled on every serving of beans and rice or eggs that  is served during the week. ;D

I like the idea of taste testing!!  But I'm glad I'm waiting till baby is born.  Oh my goodness the heartburn if I did it now. :D

Thank you,
Cara
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: lotsaboys May 19, 2008, 08:50:45 AM
I hear ya Cara! Its hard to keep enough on hand around here and its one thing I find to be more time consuming to make than most things. So, yeah, a big batch is a brilliant idea. :D
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: StephTallent May 19, 2008, 09:52:33 AM
I have decided that through the summer we are going to have a couple of "Salsa Making Parties" as our tomtoes start to come in.   ;D  I hate working on a big time consuming project like this by myself so figured I could have a couple of people over and we could turn it into a fun group activity and get a LOT done at one time.  The only thing I'll have to do is make sure I have enough whey and other materials on hand to make several gallons. 
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: lotsaboys May 19, 2008, 10:34:54 AM
I have decided that through the summer we are going to have a couple of "Salsa Making Parties" as our tomtoes start to come in.   ;D  I hate working on a big time consuming project like this by myself so figured I could have a couple of people over and we could turn it into a fun group activity and get a LOT done at one time.  The only thing I'll have to do is make sure I have enough whey and other materials on hand to make several gallons. 
Good idea. :) How do you plan to store it?
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: StephTallent May 19, 2008, 11:34:07 AM
I have decided that through the summer we are going to have a couple of "Salsa Making Parties" as our tomtoes start to come in.   ;D  I hate working on a big time consuming project like this by myself so figured I could have a couple of people over and we could turn it into a fun group activity and get a LOT done at one time.  The only thing I'll have to do is make sure I have enough whey and other materials on hand to make several gallons. 
Good idea. :) How do you plan to store it?

We are blessed to have an extra refrigerator (cheap! off of Craigslist) in our basement.  I use it to store all of my cultured projects these days.  It is just so much easier for me to actually get some of the projects done if I can do it in large enough amounts to last us a little while.  The extra cold storage has been fantastic.   :)
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: lotsaboys May 19, 2008, 01:42:49 PM
I have decided that through the summer we are going to have a couple of "Salsa Making Parties" as our tomtoes start to come in.   ;D  I hate working on a big time consuming project like this by myself so figured I could have a couple of people over and we could turn it into a fun group activity and get a LOT done at one time.  The only thing I'll have to do is make sure I have enough whey and other materials on hand to make several gallons. 
Good idea. :) How do you plan to store it?

We are blessed to have an extra refrigerator (cheap! off of Craigslist) in our basement.  I use it to store all of my cultured projects these days.  It is just so much easier for me to actually get some of the projects done if I can do it in large enough amounts to last us a little while.  The extra cold storage has been fantastic.   :)
Oh perfect! That's what I plan to do with an extra fridge we're receiving from a client who is getting all new appliances for their kitchen and giving her perfectly fine, high quality ones to us. 8)
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: cecac May 19, 2008, 02:15:25 PM
Do you think several gallons will get hotter with time, even in the fridge?  Just curious here, I likely will only do 1 gallon at a time.  I do the sauerkraut that way--and it takes longer to eat than salsa will.  It doesn't get nippy or anything, pretty much stays the same.  But I would wonder about several gallons.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: MQM June 17, 2008, 08:48:43 AM
Wondering if anyone has made the yoghurt dough. I am wanting to try it for pizza crust since someone else mentioned it in the Whole Wheat & Wheat Grinders thread.  Any experience and/or tips for this?

It calls for plain whole yoghurt?  I don't have raw milk just yet, but I thought I might try the Stonyfield Cream on Top yogurt.  Do you think this will work along with commercial butter?  I can get organic butter, but again, no raw milk, and therefore, no fresh butter.

Any advice...  Please help!  ;) Thanks!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: cecac June 17, 2008, 09:05:51 AM
I think your plan will work.

Just the past couple of weeks I began fixing the NT quick breads--I've made the corn spoon bread today and also cornbread.  I have not tried the yeast breads, though, but we are pleased with the cornbread.  I even made alterations to make it wheat free, and it is great.

: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: MQM June 17, 2008, 10:53:59 AM
Wondering if anyone has made the yoghurt dough. I am wanting to try it for pizza crust...

Thanks, cecac.  When you get a chance can you share your alterations on the cornbreads? I haven't even looked at those yet, but it would be nice to know some pointers.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: skelliott2 June 17, 2008, 11:52:25 AM
Wondering if anyone has made the yoghurt dough. I am wanting to try it for pizza crust since someone else mentioned it in the Whole Wheat & Wheat Grinders thread.  Any experience and/or tips for this?

It calls for plain whole yoghurt?  I don't have raw milk just yet, but I thought I might try the Stonyfield Cream on Top yogurt.  Do you think this will work along with commercial butter?  I can get organic butter, but again, no raw milk, and therefore, no fresh butter.

Any advice...  Please help!  ;) Thanks!

I made this a couple of years ago.  It was really yummy, but VERY rich.  A little of this dough goes a long way.  We also just used organic, commercial yogurt.  It works fine.  Hope it turns out well!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: MQM June 18, 2008, 05:28:06 AM
I don't want to be too meticulous here, but I have a few very basic questions about basic things in the book. Some of my questions might sound ridiculous, but since I have read in this thread that you have to be precise about the directions, I just want to be sure I have been doing it right for the most healthful benefits and so that things turn out correctly. That and since I have had NO training in any cooking, my entire cooking career has been one huge experiment. So please bear with my ignorance, as these questions have plagued me for awhile and I finally made the time (and found the courage) to ask. ;D  Here goes:

1) When soaking beans, do you need to simply "cover" the beans with no regard to the water that will be absorbed or evaporate. Should it be just barely enough to cover with no excess to account for what is absorbed or evaporated?  When I have soaked my beans in the past, most of the water mixture evaporates. This is what should happen, correct?

2) She doesn't say to cover the soaking beans. So, no covering?

3) When you are instructed to cover something soaking, as in oatmeal, I have assumed it should not be seal-tight to prevent rancidity?  Just cover with a towel, not a tight lid or plastic wrap?

4) "Cover with WARM water"?  With my neurotic little mind, "warm" is too vague? ;D Unless the temperature isn't that crucial.  How crucial IS the temperature for soaking purposes? When I soak things, I usually leave things in the oven with no heat, or sometimes in the garage. I live in FL and our thermostat setting ranges from 75 to 78.  Would the oven be warm enough if it is turned off or should I put them in the garage where it is warmer, probably 80 - 90 degrees.

Thanks for your patience, ladies!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: cecac June 18, 2008, 06:39:32 AM
Hey MQM,

I can tell you what I do, because I soak grains and beans as well.  Don't apologize for asking, though, NT type cooking is kinda foreign to us and so I wonder about it too like many others, I"m sure.

I do not cover any of my soaking things, I leave in a glass or stainless steel bowl to soak for the time recommended.  I don't worry about temp either.  I would think that with some things (like fermented sauerkraut and kombucha) the temperature is more important than with the grains and beans.

For beans, I cover them with water and throw in some whey.  Let's see, I soaked 5 cups of kidney beans for 24 hours before cooking for dinner last night, and so I covered with distilled water and put in about 1/4 cup whey.  I walked by one time in the 24 hours and the beans had soaked up all the water, so I just poured some more in to cover again.

For the flours, I follow the directions in the recipe.  I use kefir instead of buttermilk because we make kefir every week anyway.  For the corn flour recipes I have been adding the water with the kefir altogether right now because I do not have the pickling lime. 

I soaked some rice with water and whey overnight for cooking.  She does not recommend soaking rice, but we like it better that way.  I think we soaked equal portions of water/rice and I had my daughter put about 1/4 cup whey for 5 cups of rice (to be eaten twice by a large family).  We then rinsed the rice and cooked it in fresh water.

I follow the recipe for the oatmeal.

I think you asked for my recipe modifications to the cornbread.  Here that is:

I put in 3 cups of cornmeal to soak with kefir as opposed to the other flours.  Right now I add the water and kefir altogether for 24 hours as opposed to soaking for 7 hours in pickling lime first.  I won't do that until I get ahold of that lime.

I follow the rest of the directions, and then as I'm stirring in all the ingredients to bake the cornbread, I also add about 1/3 cup of organic unsweetened applesauce.  We find that helps with a little more moisture. 

HTH some,
Cara
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: mom24boys June 18, 2008, 07:34:24 AM
I don't want to be too meticulous here, but I have a few very basic questions about basic things in the book. Some of my questions might sound ridiculous, but since I have read in this thread that you have to be precise about the directions, I just want to be sure I have been doing it right for the most healthful benefits and so that things turn out correctly. That and since I have had NO training in any cooking, my entire cooking career has been one huge experiment. So please bear with my ignorance, as these questions have plagued me for awhile and I finally made the time (and found the courage) to ask. ;D  Here goes:

1) When soaking beans, do you need to simply "cover" the beans with no regard to the water that will be absorbed or evaporate. Should it be just barely enough to cover with no excess to account for what is absorbed or evaporated?  When I have soaked my beans in the past, most of the water mixture evaporates. This is what should happen, correct?

2) She doesn't say to cover the soaking beans. So, no covering?

3) When you are instructed to cover something soaking, as in oatmeal, I have assumed it should not be seal-tight to prevent rancidity?  Just cover with a towel, not a tight lid or plastic wrap?

4) "Cover with WARM water"?  With my neurotic little mind, "warm" is too vague? ;D Unless the temperature isn't that crucial.  How crucial IS the temperature for soaking purposes? When I soak things, I usually leave things in the oven with no heat, or sometimes in the garage. I live in FL and our thermostat setting ranges from 75 to 78.  Would the oven be warm enough if it is turned off or should I put them in the garage where it is warmer, probably 80 - 90 degrees.

Thanks for your patience, ladies!

When it says to cover beans or whatever with water, you can be pretty generous *IF* you will be draining the soak water.  I always drain my beans and add fresh water before I cook.

If you are soaking things in your oven, you don't really have to cover with a towel or whatever because it is a closed environment and dust, bugs and such won't get in it.

Warm usually means it feels warm enough to keep your hand in indefinitely but hot enough for it to feel "hey, that's nice and warm!"

When I soak oatmeal, I do it in my crock pot with the glass lid on.  It doesn't seal so any built up gasses can escape.  When I soak flours (and I will use the "soak" in the recipe - no draining), I either cover with a towel or or just a plastic lid set over the top.  My sister uses a mesh "splatter screen" and then a towel because she has had her towel drop down in and get all goopy.

Hope these things help.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: skelliott2 June 18, 2008, 02:29:10 PM
Those questions aren't ridiculous at all!  This is a very weird way of cooking, so, like Cara said, we all had to learn it.  I don't always use warm water for soaking.  Sometimes my filtered water is a little cold.  I use it anyway.  I think that, as long as you soak it for a longer time, the temp. of the soak water isn't terribly important.  At least, that's been my experience.

Thanks to my inspiring sister-in-law, who just got her first Nourishing Traditions book, I've been going back through mine.  We had the muesli-style oatmeal this morning.  It was so YUMMY!  Soaked oatmeal is so much better for us than unsoaked, since it doesn't cause any digestive trouble.  :)

I've soaked some navy beans, and am making her baked beans recipe in the crock pot overnight, to have for lunch tomorrow.  I'll let you all know how they turn out!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: skelliott2 June 20, 2008, 05:13:18 PM
The beans turned out OK.  They were kind of bland.  they needed bacon or green peppers or something.  Also, even though I cooked them in the crock pot all day, they were pretty hard.  So, next time I make them, I'll cook them in a pot with water for several hours to soften them.  Then, I'll put them in the crock pot or casserole dish with her baked bean recipe plus some bacon and green peppers.  I guess we girls from the south expect baked beans to taste better than the ones in the can.  :)

They were, easier to digest, though.  So, soaking with lemon water overnight is here to stay!!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: lotsaboys June 22, 2008, 12:19:51 PM
The beans turned out OK.  They were kind of bland.  they needed bacon or green peppers or something.  Also, even though I cooked them in the crock pot all day, they were pretty hard.  So, next time I make them, I'll cook them in a pot with water for several hours to soften them.  Then, I'll put them in the crock pot or casserole dish with her baked bean recipe plus some bacon and green peppers.  I guess we girls from the south expect baked beans to taste better than the ones in the can.  :)

They were, easier to digest, though.  So, soaking with lemon water overnight is here to stay!!

Bland is how mine turned out too, but the bacon and/or gr. peppers sounds like a great idea!
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: cecac June 22, 2008, 01:53:58 PM
Using distilled water for soaking and cooking may help with the hard bean problem.  We have Very hard well water here, and I don't think beans would ever cook in it, and so distilled water has been my solution.

In my experience, if I soak the beans 24 hours, then when I cook them it only takes 2-3 hours to finish.   

One thing I like to fix with beans:  a purple or yellow onion and a bell pepper sauteed in olive oil.  And then I add the meat.  In white beans, we really enjoy sausage with a can of diced tomatoes and the onion and bell pepper (sometimes only put in to simmer the end until soft, sometimes sauteed in olive oil). 

HTH,
Cara
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: southmom2k June 26, 2008, 05:15:18 PM
I forgot to add when cooking beans, they need to come to a boil and then turn the heat down low. Yes, they will eventually boil in the crockpot. I think that is one of the keys to good soft beans!
Speaking of that...I need to get my beans soaking now...
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: mommyoftwins August 30, 2008, 03:06:13 PM
Has anybody made the apple cider? I have loads of apples & was thinking of trying it.
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: mommyoftwins September 01, 2008, 05:46:44 AM
bump
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: hi_itsgwen September 01, 2008, 05:30:17 PM
http://bethany.preciousinfants.com/search.aspx?q=apple%20peel&sc=t&dt=3m&al=none

I remember seeing a mention of making acv on this blog...hth!

Gwen
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: Lovin'myHoneyinVT October 28, 2008, 01:52:20 AM
Has anybody made the apple cider? I have loads of apples & was thinking of trying it.

Yes, I've made it using a natural mother from organic, live acv i got at the hfs.  When processing my apples for dried apples, I kept the peels and cores and added them to the water with the mother and vinegar.  Kept it in a brown bag with a cheesecloth over the mouth, near my woodstove.  It was a perfect temp and worked well.  I guess you have to keep moving it around so the top doesn't get moldy before it becomes acv, and my first batch was beautiful.  The second batch, we won't talk about ;D

hth, Lovin'
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: WellTellMommy February 06, 2009, 06:13:46 PM
I read on WTM some where that you can make live culture ACV from bragg's and generic ACV but I can't find it now and we have our bi-monthly stock-up trip tomorrow so could some one tell what to buy to do that?
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: ladyhen February 07, 2009, 06:16:25 AM
I read on WTM some where that you can make live culture ACV from bragg's and generic ACV but I can't find it now and we have our bi-monthly stock-up trip tomorrow so could some one tell what to buy to do that?

I was told that you can use acv from, say, walmart to make a live culture vinegar by either inoculating it with culture from 'good', live vinegar or by leaving it open for a wild catch.  Once the culture begins to grow, you will be able to see a cloudy mass, or mother, floating in the bottom. 

When I have done this it has taken about 2 ro 3 weeks to see growth in inoculated acv and it took about a month or more for a wild catch. 

hth
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: WellTellMommy February 11, 2009, 11:31:18 AM
I found this in my "Wild Fermentation" book.
Pineapple Vinegar
1/4c. sugar
Peel of 1 Pineapple(organic)

Step1
Dissolve Sugar in 1qt. Water.
Coarsely chop and add peel. 
Cover with Cheesecloth, and leave to ferment at room temp.

Step2
After liquid darkens (about 1 week) strain out peel and discard.

Step3
Ferment the liquid 2-3 weeks more, stirring or agitating periodically, and your pineapple vinegar is ready.


Fruit Scrap Vinegar
 Most fruit scraps can be used with the same recipe as above.
Honey can be substituted, but the process may take longer. 


I'd like an opinion on what I've done and if you think it'll make vinegar.
1/4c. sugar dissolved in qt jar of warm water w/ 1/4c. Braggs and apple cores lightly covered and setting behind my wood stove.  ???
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: daisey July 21, 2010, 01:38:47 PM
I have used some of the NT principles but I finally got the book and have a few questions.   When it says to soak your cornmeal in Lime Water..........there is no way you can drain that off is there?   That means you have lime water in your finished cornbread, right?   Is that good for you?
Also, when you Marinate..........in the book it says to save your marinate and use it later either in the sauce or to brush on the meat.   I have always heard that you should never save marinate sauce and reuse it.   Anyone????
I am thinking I will try some of these recipes but that if they aren't good like some have said I will use the principles with my own recipes.   
I could also not find recipes on that site that some of you mentioned earlier in this thread  www.cookingnt.com   Is it still active?
Thanks
: Re: Nourishing Traditions
: brightspot July 23, 2010, 01:15:14 PM
I have used some of the NT principles but I finally got the book and have a few questions.   When it says to soak your cornmeal in Lime Water..........there is no way you can drain that off is there?   That means you have lime water in your finished cornbread, right?   Is that good for you?
Also, when you Marinate..........in the book it says to save your marinate and use it later either in the sauce or to brush on the meat.   I have always heard that you should never save marinate sauce and reuse it.   Anyone????
I am thinking I will try some of these recipes but that if they aren't good like some have said I will use the principles with my own recipes.   
I could also not find recipes on that site that some of you mentioned earlier in this thread  www.cookingnt.com   Is it still active?
Thanks

If I were going to use the marinate sauce later or on cooked meat, I would boil the sauce first to be sure it is ok. Usually when I marinate something, I try to use only a little more than needed to coat the meat so there isn't any left over.