WellTellMe

Natural Health => Nutrition & Food => Recipes, Menus & Diet Plans => : healthybratt March 27, 2006, 04:12:14 PM

: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt March 27, 2006, 04:12:14 PM
I married a half Korean man and for the last 10 years, his mother has been teaching me how to cook for him.  It's a very slow process, as she doesn't measure anything, but here are the recipes I've almost mastered written in actual measurements.

Enjoy.  We sure so. 

NOTE:  Many of these recipes are very healthy.  They contain lots of fresh garlic, onions, ginger and red peppers, all of which are good immune system builders.  We don't get sick very often around here.  My kids maybe get one cold a year while all the neighborhood kids are running around with runny noses.

If you want to see some pics check THIS LINK (http://www.xanga.com/home.aspx?user=zippyboot&nextdate=3%2f6%2f2005+23%3a59%3a59.999)

Traditional Kimchee
Large bowl with sealable lid
1 gallon jar
3 small – medium heads Nappa (Chinese) Cabbage (5 lbs)
5-10 chopped scallions
sea salt (table salt may be substituted)
1/2 cup of ground red pepper
3 Tablespoons minced garlic
½ - 1 tablespoon sugar
1 tablespoon kimchee sauce (also called fish sauce) optional
½ tablespoon minced ginger root (very strong flavor – may want to leave out)
surgical type gloves to protect hands from hot pepper (spoon may be used)

Cut cabbage into 1-2 inch squares.  Spread a layer in large bowl and sprinkle with sea salt.  Continue layers of cabbage and salt until all cabbage is in bowl.  Put lid on bowl and let cure for about 10-15 minutes until cabbage is limp and will not snap when you try to break it in two (about 2-3 hours).  Flip bowl over and let cure for another 10-15 minutes.  With larger batches, may just mix cabbage and salt well and cure for 20-30 minutes. Rinse 3-4 times thoroughly and drain DO NOT SQUEEZE.  Salt again to taste.  Add all other ingredients and mix with gloved hand.  Add hot pepper a little at a time until desired hot (I've practiced with this and we like 1/2 cup but you might like a little less.  If you don't add enough, when the cabbage sours, "sour" is all you will taste). (light orange color).  Put in jar and refrigerate.  Kimchee will taste best after 1-2 days in frige to cure.  Cabbage Kimchee can be stored and eaten for several weeks even after soured.  Beware of the smell.  If it's gotten too sour to tolerate, cook it with some meat.  Makes the meat taste good and no waste.  ;D  We like it in chicken.



Cucumber Kimchee

6 small cucs peeled and sliced (keep seeds)
8 scallions chopped
sea salt (may substitute table salt)
6 cloves minced garlic
1 tablespoon korean hot sauce (bean paste)** - may substitute smaller amount ground red pepper
1 tablespoon vinegar
roasted sesame seeds
surgical type gloves to protect hands from hot pepper (may use spoon, but hands work best)

sprinkle cucumber slices with salt and mix thoroughly.  Let stand until cucumbers are limp and will not snap when you try to break it in two..  Rinse, sqeeze, drain, repeat.  Mix in all other ingredients with gloved hand thoroughly.  If using hot pepper instead of paste add 1/2 teaspoon at a time until kimchee reaches desired hot (light orange color).  Refrigerate and serve.



Bulgogi (Korean Steak)

Also called Pulgogi

All ingredients are approximate

4 lbs Beef (usually roast) sliced thinly
¼ - ¾ cup soy sauce  (careful it's salty)
roasted sesame seeds
3 cloves minced garlic
6-10 chopped green onions (whole)
approx ¼ cup olive oil (or other cooking oil) – you may substitute sesame oil and leave out the sesame seeds if desired.
1 teaspoon sugar
black pepper

Marinate overnight in smallest bowl possible.  Cook in sauce pan, fry pan, broiler or grill until brown.  Serve with rice and Kimchee.



Hot Pork

2-3 lbs pork loin roast (or any pork chop) sliced to bitesize with bone and fat removed
1 tsp sugar
black pepper
6-10 chopped scallion onions
3 cloves minced garlic
heaping tbsp korean hot sauce (hot bean paste)**

Mix thoroughly (may marinate overnight if desired).  Simmer in fry or sauce pan until pork is cooked and tender (about 1/2 hour).  Serve with rice.


**Here's what Korean Hot Bean Paste generally looks like from the Asian Market.

http://www.goldencountry.com/korea.aspx (http://www.goldencountry.com/korea.aspx)

Go to this website and look at items# J086005 & J086023
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: StephTallent March 27, 2006, 07:04:32 PM
Wow.  These look AMAZING!  ;D Can't wait to try some <especially the spicy ones> on my hubby!  Thanks so much for posting. 
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: Charis April 13, 2006, 09:27:12 PM
Do you have any good eggroll/springroll recipes? I love to make them but still perfecting my recipe.
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt April 14, 2006, 04:58:04 AM
Do you have any good eggroll/springroll recipes? I love to make them but still perfecting my recipe.

I just use ground pork.  I fry it in water to reduce as much fat as possible and then drain.  I mix the pork with chopped cabbage, onions and garlic.  I just usually throw stuff in and go,
but 

I think maybe

2 lbs of pork and a head of cabbage maybe?  Sometimes, if I'm feeling lazy, I just buy a couple of bags of coleslaw mix from the produce dept.  I don't have any recipes.  I just kind of made this up.  Something that makes dipping exceptionally yummy tho, is about 1/2 soy sauce and 1/2 white vinegar (play with this, you don't want it too sour or too salty) and then add toasted sesame seeds (about enough to float on top - it really adds flavor to the mix.)  We use this as a dip for Mondu too (don't know how to make it yet).

My Vietnamese friends use vermicelli instead of cabbage and one of them uses jicima.  Their eggrolls were greedily sought after by coworkers at my last job outside the home.
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: Julia November 14, 2006, 04:04:19 PM
Hey Healthybratt, I tried some kimchee! There's a Korean church that meets in our church building and they always have a big meal afterward and we were invited the other day. I realized - that's the stuff that stinks so bad! People actually have come into the church office reporting that they think something has died near the kitchen. Anyway, I wouldn't have eaten it if you hadn't been telling us how healthy it is. I feel healthier already  ;)!
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt November 14, 2006, 04:52:50 PM
It's stinky alright.  We have a stinky kitty and her name is "Kimchee".  LOL   ::)
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: ShabbyChic November 14, 2006, 05:55:56 PM
In college we had 2 Korean girls who'd cook Kimchee and it was SO stinky and SO tasty.  But I think you have to be Korean to cook it correctly.  And I think you have to be a grandma to make good fried chicken or biscuits  ;D
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: KatieMac November 14, 2006, 06:59:39 PM
Thank you so much for posting this!!
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt November 14, 2006, 07:36:47 PM
In college we had 2 Korean girls who'd cook Kimchee and it was SO stinky and SO tasty.  But I think you have to be Korean to cook it correctly.  And I think you have to be a grandma to make good fried chicken or biscuits  ;D
I'm not Korean and I make a darn good Kimchee.  ;)  BTW, it's not cooked.  ;D
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: grc November 15, 2006, 01:33:54 AM
we love Bulgogi, I have that same recipe and make it a couple times a year.  My husband spent a year in Korea and raved about it for years when we got the recipe he was ecstatic. 
I'll have to try the kimchee thanks.

Gina
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: sunflower November 19, 2006, 07:54:51 PM
I am also married to a Korean man.  I also try to cook tasty Korean food for him.  I do understand the non measuring mother in laws.  My mother in law told me to put a cup of sugar in this meat marinate.....it was a coffee cup.  I think things are just past down that they are so use to cooking bulgogi day after day that just by looking at it they know if it is right.  It impresses me. 

Try this soup:
Duck Soup (without any real duck meat)/Mandu Soup
Bring to a Boil:
      beef broth
      5/6 pieces of bulgogi meat
      1/3 bag of flat ovalets rice noddle (which is the duck)
      mandu (pot stickers)

Soup Sauce
     soy sauce
     garlic
     green onion
     red bean paste (go che chung)- very spicy
     sugar

Have each person put the amount of soup sauce in their own soup for favor.  We also add rice to all our Korean soups.
Let me know if you like it!  I love most Korean soups.  They are very brothy.
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt November 19, 2006, 09:16:39 PM
I am also married to a Korean man.  I also try to cook tasty Korean food for him.
Any idea how to make the long round rice cakes from scratch?  They look like string cheese.  Hubby likes these cooked with hot bean paste, onions, garlic and sesame seeds/oil.  MIL brings us some from Chicago every now and again, but I'd love to figure out how to make them from scratch.  I've searched high and low on Google, but all I can find is the recipes which include them, but nothing on how to make them. 
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: sunflower November 20, 2006, 09:05:35 AM
I will ask around and see if I can get you any help.  Thanks
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: SC November 20, 2006, 10:21:03 AM
HB is this what you are looking for? It describes the process without really getting into measurements.
http://www.answers.com/topic/mochi-1
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt November 20, 2006, 11:42:38 AM
HB is this what you are looking for? It describes the process without really getting into measurements.
http://www.answers.com/topic/mochi-1
I don't think this is it, but I'm not sure.

Look at these.
http://english.tour2korea.com/05food/LocalFood/su_09.asp?kosm=m5_3&konum=2
http://www.clickasia.co.kr/about/h0101t.htm
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: SC November 20, 2006, 01:53:41 PM
HB is this what you are looking for? It describes the process without really getting into measurements.
http://www.answers.com/topic/mochi-1
I don't think this is it, but I'm not sure.

Look at these.
http://english.tour2korea.com/05food/LocalFood/su_09.asp?kosm=m5_3&konum=2
http://www.clickasia.co.kr/about/h0101t.htm

I think it IS the same thing. If so, it seems that the process involves pounding cooked rice into a paste and shaping it under pressure. Sounds like it's time to break out the lab coat again.
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt November 20, 2006, 02:08:22 PM
HB is this what you are looking for? It describes the process without really getting into measurements.
http://www.answers.com/topic/mochi-1
I don't think this is it, but I'm not sure.

Look at these.
http://english.tour2korea.com/05food/LocalFood/su_09.asp?kosm=m5_3&konum=2
http://www.clickasia.co.kr/about/h0101t.htm

I think it IS the same thing. If so, it seems that the process involves pounding cooked rice into a paste and shaping it under pressure. Sounds like it's time to break out the lab coat again.
I have rice flour.  I figured that's how they were made.  Hmmmmm...I have to cook some sticky rice (I have that too) and then pound on it ???  Food processor?  I've tried that before for baby food and it just breaks it into smaller pieces, but no paste.  When I get ambitious, I may just try it with the flour.  I've made deep fried rice cakes this way with powdered sugar.....unhealthy and yummy.  ;)
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt November 20, 2006, 02:11:09 PM
PS  Thanks SC.  You're still my hero (ine)  ;D
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt November 20, 2006, 02:26:29 PM
PS  Thanks SC.  You're still my hero (ine)  ;D
I found some recipes for Mochi.  They call for glutinous rice flour - yipppeeee!  I have some of this in my freezer.  Although, it calls for potato starch too.  I'll have to pick some of this up, I suppose.   :-\
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: sunflower November 20, 2006, 04:45:14 PM
HB,
That is what I am calling duck.  Those rice noddles is what you use in the soup.  It gives me somemore of what you are looking for.  I can ask our great grandmother over the holidays and get back to you.   :)
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: sunflower November 20, 2006, 05:07:35 PM
HB,
HI once more.  My sister in law (which is Korean) thinks that you sound not try and make the long chesse stick thing, but you can buy them and then make your hot bean paste concoction.  She is going to send me a recipe tomorrow.  I will forward it to you when I get it.  Hope this helps.
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt November 20, 2006, 05:56:39 PM
HB,
HI once more.  My sister in law (which is Korean) thinks that you sound not try and make the long chesse stick thing, but you can buy them and then make your hot bean paste concoction.  She is going to send me a recipe tomorrow.  I will forward it to you when I get it.  Hope this helps.
My MIL says the same thing, but my MIL thinks I'm too dumb to can tomatoes  ::) , so that doesn't mean much.  ;D

The bean recipe would be great, but I don't really make those much.  Hubby likes the cakes fried with hot bean paste.  He eats the sweet ones too, but not as often.

Tonight,  I just made sweet rice dough (too much talking about rice flour) and fried it up and sugared it.  mmmmmmmm..... :o

Thanks.
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt January 22, 2007, 07:08:53 AM
I forgot, I had posted some pics of bulgogi and hot pork on my blog.  Here's the link if you're interested.

Xanga/zippyboot (http://www.xanga.com/home.aspx?user=zippyboot&nextdate=3%2f6%2f2005+23%3a59%3a59.999)
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: boysmama January 29, 2007, 10:00:24 AM
Well we did it!  ;D I made a batch of kimchee (w/ less hot pepper ;)). It was ready to serve today so I made some venison steaks seasoned w/ ginger and soy sauce, sweet-n-sour green beans and rice, and of course, kimchee. DH is not a big cabbage fan so I had my fingers crossed  ;) . His comment was that it was one of my best dinners :o ... He loves rice and that green bean recipe but has them frequently so it was the kimchee that made an impression! I had used a little purple cabbage and my boys were so tickled to eat flowers  :D So... big hit... Thanks HB. I can now use cabbage and have a new string of 'rice lunches' to try out 8) Good thing 'cause my pinto beans are getting low ;)
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt January 29, 2007, 11:03:20 AM
Well we did it!  ;D I made a batch of kimchee (w/ less hot pepper ;)). It was ready to serve today so I made some venison steaks seasoned w/ ginger and soy sauce, sweet-n-sour green beans and rice, and of course, kimchee. DH is not a big cabbage fan so I had my fingers crossed  ;) . His comment was that it was one of my best dinners :o ... He loves rice and that green bean recipe but has them frequently so it was the kimchee that made an impression! I had used a little purple cabbage and my boys were so tickled to eat flowers  :D So... big hit... Thanks HB. I can now use cabbage and have a new string of 'rice lunches' to try out 8) Good thing 'cause my pinto beans are getting low ;)
You used regular cabbage?  Just curious.  MIL and I have never tried this.  (Well she might have, but didn't tell me.  ;))
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: Nickole January 29, 2007, 11:17:40 AM
HB, you think for the Korean Steak, I could use stew meat?  :-\
I am printing out these as we speak, er, um, I mean type.
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt January 29, 2007, 11:22:26 AM
HB, you think for the Korean Steak, I could use stew meat?  :-\
I am printing out these as we speak, er, um, I mean type.
This recipe is designed for the cheap cuts of meat.  I think stew meat qualifies.  I like the roast because if it's cut across the grain, it can actually turn out pretty tender, but we use it for beef ribs, round steak or whatever you can find.  Sometimes it will turn out pretty chewy, but it still tastes good.
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: Nickole January 29, 2007, 11:30:49 AM
Great b/c we just happen to have a ton of stew meat in the freezer!  :)
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: boysmama January 30, 2007, 06:17:41 AM
You used regular cabbage?  Just curious.  MIL and I have never tried this.  (Well she might have, but didn't tell me.  ;))
Yes, I did. I was looking at some prepared stuff in the store. The ing. just said cabbage and it looked like regular and red cabbage  ???. I had reg. cabbage on hand so when I looked at the price of Chinese cabbage I decided to try this first ;)
I'd like to try the authentic version next  ;D . I know I like the chinese cabbage better for eating raw w/ peanut butter :-*
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: Nickole February 01, 2007, 07:28:52 AM
I have some Target brand ground red pepper here which I thought was the same as cayenne, no???  So this is what I am to use 1/2 cup of???
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: Nickole February 01, 2007, 09:34:22 AM
Bump!  Need some help HB!  My cabbage is curing!
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt February 01, 2007, 09:43:03 AM
Bump!  Need some help HB!  My cabbage is curing!
Yes.  The ground red pepper in the seasoning isle is the stuff.  If you don't have enough, you could throw in a pinch or two of the cayenne to spice it up. 
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: Nickole February 01, 2007, 09:53:40 AM
ok.  And can I use honey instead of sugar????  Hurry hurry quick quick!   :-*
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt February 01, 2007, 10:14:54 AM
ok.  And can I use honey instead of sugar????  Hurry hurry quick quick!   :-*
Couldn't hurt but I'm not sure how well it would mix. 
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: Nickole February 01, 2007, 10:46:57 AM
Ok, I used the *GULP!* sugar.  We will be on pins and needles for two days before we may sample this beautiful concoction. 
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt February 01, 2007, 12:19:43 PM
Ok, I used the *GULP!* sugar.  We will be on pins and needles for two days before we may sample this beautiful concoction. 
You don't have to wait that long.  You can eat it now, although it's usually best the next day so the flavors have some time to mingle.  mmmmmm  I think it tastes better fresh, but it's healthier when it's sour.  Go figure.
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: Nickole February 05, 2007, 11:05:57 AM
OH MY GOODNESS THIS KIMCHEE FELT LIKE WE WERE BREATHING FIRE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  :o :o :o :o :o

Gee, no wonder the baby, whom we fed it to first (mixed with rice and Korean steak, but still...) kept fussing through her meal.  DUH!   ::)

I used the minimum pepper and it was way too hot to eat, and I swear we are used to spicey stuff!  :-\  My husband can eat it - he must be half dragon. 

I  have some Chinese cabbage left over - would it be good just fried in butter and salt???  Any other suggestions?  The Korean steak was delic! 

: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: boysmama February 05, 2007, 11:13:28 AM
 ;D I used only a couple tbsp. of crushed cayenne and it is hot but edible. Next time I am going to use even less cayenne. I also used a little ginger. The flavor is great and dh has taken to eating it straight out of the jar  :P which is quite the breath-enhancer :-X without any other food to tame it down! Glad he likes it though because it is something flavorful to serve w/ plain rice and no-sauce meats...

I love stir fried Chinese cabbage! Go for it. Also like it raw w/ peanut butter smeared on it 8)
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: Nickole February 05, 2007, 11:43:59 AM
;D I used only a couple tbsp. of crushed cayenne and it is hot but edible. Next time I am going to use even less cayenne. I also used a little ginger. The flavor is great and dh has taken to eating it straight out of the jar  :P which is quite the breath-enhancer :-X without any other food to tame it down! Glad he likes it though because it is something flavorful to serve w/ plain rice and no-sauce meats...

I love stir fried Chinese cabbage! Go for it. Also like it raw w/ peanut butter smeared on it 8)

Hey, I didn't ask YOU!  8) ;D  Just kidding, inside joke from another thread, hope you get it, if not read my signature  ;).

Ok, I used almost 1/4 cup ground red pepper b/c I halved the recipe JUST IN CASE it didn't turn out  ;).  Glad I did!!!  I really do want to try again, so maybe I will use less next time.  For tonight we are having the cabbage plain ol' fried then!  Thanks for the help!

Not doin' the peanut butter thing  :P.  I know, you're going to say don't knock it till you try it.  Maybe I will and get back to you.  My kids would probably love it - they like eating weird things.  :P
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: ShabbyChic February 05, 2007, 12:46:15 PM
Peanuts are not weird in that context.  I make peanut sesame sauce all the time, for tempeh mostly.  I also use peanut butter and soy sauce as 2 of many ingredients in hoisin sauce.  It's really tasty. 
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: Nickole February 05, 2007, 01:55:27 PM
Peanuts are not weird in that context.  I make peanut sesame sauce all the time, for tempeh mostly.  I also use peanut butter and soy sauce as 2 of many ingredients in hoisin sauce.  It's really tasty. 

Sauce rather than plain peanut butter seems to me like it would taste totally different.  Those kinds of sauces sound yummy, but I may try the *gulp* plain peanut butter thing too, first on the kiddos.  8)

My husband says the kimchee does not get a star beside it, as in "make it anytime!".   I told him it's so healthy though (still I need to lower the pepper amount) and he said "then find something half as healthy to make, and then we'll eat twice as much."  :D

: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: boysmama February 05, 2007, 02:26:09 PM

Hey, I didn't ask YOU!   8) ;D

[/quote] :P :P  Wait...did I do that  :-[ ;D

just playin'
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: Julia February 05, 2007, 03:33:11 PM
Peanuts are not weird in that context.  I make peanut sesame sauce all the time, for tempeh mostly.  I also use peanut butter and soy sauce as 2 of many ingredients in hoisin sauce.  It's really tasty. 

Can we have the recipe for the peanut sesame sauce?
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: Ami H. February 05, 2007, 04:08:35 PM
OH MY GOODNESS THIS KIMCHEE FELT LIKE WE WERE BREATHING FIRE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  :o :o :o :o :o

Gee, no wonder the baby, whom we fed it to first (mixed with rice and Korean steak, but still...) kept fussing through her meal.  DUH!   ::)

I used the minimum pepper and it was way too hot to eat, and I swear we are used to spicey stuff!  :-\  My husband can eat it - he must be half dragon. 

I  have some Chinese cabbage left over - would it be good just fried in butter and salt???  Any other suggestions?  The Korean steak was delic! 



I know you didn't ask me either..............but I don't care!   8) :D  Healthybratt came over and helped me make her kimchee, so  I know what went wrong.  The red pepper she uses is different than cayenne pepper.  She buys her red pepper from an asian food store and it is not as hot.  I unknowingly bought cayenne pepper too and we used it and wooowheee, it was spicy!   But it was very good for the sinus cold our family got about a week later.  It cleared those sinuses right up.  I still haven't made it with the asian red pepper because I havent gone to an asian food store yet.  But I hope too soon.  Since then, I have made it, but I have just used a couple of tablespoons of cayenne in a full batch.  It still tastes very good, but I don't get that pretty red color.  I tasted healthybratt's kimchee and I thought it tastes better than mine with her kind of red pepper.  Her's has more flavor and mine was just hot.
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: Nickole February 05, 2007, 04:27:05 PM
Yeah, she told me not to use cayenne and she confirmed that my spice that says "ground red pepper" is the correct one... :-\?  OK, WHERE ARE YOU HB????
JK!  I think I just need to use less next time, but I am also wondering if this was Target's (my spice brand) messup and maybe it was cayenne?  Maybe they don't know what stinkin' cayenne is!   :o I am wondering if the ground red pepper is still this hot? 
 
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: Ami H. February 05, 2007, 04:39:58 PM
Yea, I don't know about the target brand either.  There are lots of different kinds of pepper out there.  I grew about 6 diffent kinds of red peppers in my garden this past summer.  I thought it would be fun this summer to put some fresh red pepper in it and see how that turns out.  HB's kimchee wasn't overly spicy in my opinion, of course that is all relative.  But my seven year old ate her's with rice and he loved it.  And he doesn't eat a ton of hot stuff.  Her kimchee was very red too.  BTW, my son didn't like my kimchee with the cayenne, even though I thought it was ok.
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: Nickole February 05, 2007, 04:47:46 PM
I think then that this red pepper was cayenne.  It was totally unbearable.  Need to find an Asian market then!  Or use less "ground red pepper" wink wink.
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: ShabbyChic February 05, 2007, 05:03:01 PM
I feel so dumb because I got this by googling "hoisin sauce" so I can hardly take credit for it.  I only modified it a little.  I spread it on home made pizza dough and then top with pineapple tid bits, chicken, and a little finely sliced green onion (chives) or red onion; whatever is on hand.  It's SO good.

Everything is approximate!

Hoisin Sauce
4 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons peanut butter
1 tablespoon honey
2 teaspoons white vinegar
1/8 teaspoon garlic oil*
2 teaspoons sesame oil
20 drops hot sauce (I use tabasco or what this site calls tonic)
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
A dash of white sugar

*I buy minced garlic in the big jar, so it has a lot of garlic oil juice in it, so I just use that.  

Using all natural smooth peanut butter is best as long as it isn't too oily, but JIF would probably work, too.  It doesn't look like it's going to mix at first, but just keep stirring and stirring and it'll come together.  And it tastes best after it cooks (I think) but my husband says it tastes the same...

Sesame Peanut Sauce
1/4 cup broth*
1/2 cup peanut butter
1/2 cup coconut milk
1/8 cup soy sauce
1 T honey
1/2 cup sesame seeds
1/2 cup toasted peanut pieces

* I use broth from whatever I am cooking (usually chicken) or just coconut milk or canned broth if I am serving it over tempeh or something without broth.  

This is modified from Food Network.  For this one, just make sure you mix all the ingredients and then stir in the sesame seeds and peanuts last.  Toast regular plantars (or whatever brand) peanuts under the broiler for a few seconds.  And this is very good on a cold chinese noodle salad (or spaghetti), with water chestnuts and mandarin oranges and cabbage.

And on a side note, sometimes I just slather tempeh in all natural peanut butter and fry it and serve it over rice.  I add a little ACV sometimes.  Y'all enjoy!
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt February 06, 2007, 04:42:19 AM
I feel so dumb because I got this by googling "hoisin sauce" so I can hardly take credit for it.  I only modified it a little. 
I get recipes from Google all the time.  I use whatever knowledge I have to make sure it's gonna be a good one, but there's hardly any shame in locating, using and creating a masterpiece from someone else's recipe.  ;)
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt February 06, 2007, 04:47:09 AM
Yeah, she told me not to use cayenne and she confirmed that my spice that says "ground red pepper" is the correct one... :-\?  OK, WHERE ARE YOU HB????
JK!  I think I just need to use less next time, but I am also wondering if this was Target's (my spice brand) messup and maybe it was cayenne?  Maybe they don't know what stinkin' cayenne is!   :o I am wondering if the ground red pepper is still this hot? 
 
It's supposed to be the one, but maybe you're right and Target doesn't know the difference.  ;)

I do get mine at the Asian Market.  It comes in a big vaccuum packed plastic bag.  I buy 3 lbs at a time.  If you buy it, keep it in the freezer or it will mold.  I know it's not supposed to, but it does.  I kept some in a coffee can outside the freezer and it took several months, but I had to throw it away.  There's no "scraping it off".  ;D
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: Nickole February 19, 2007, 04:58:18 AM
I HAVE TO SHARE A PRAISE ON BEHALF OF THIS MAGIC KIMCHEE!!!!

The attempt alone at making this stuff (er, fine delicacy) has led us to the perfect church for our family!  Yes, while talking cabbage to a total stranger (while shopping at my local Food Lion for the ingredients) I happened to find out about a church fellowship which we attended last night.  It is a miracle because:
1) It is less than 20 minutes from our house
2) It is the exact kind of fellowship we have been looking for
THOSE ARE TWO MIRACLES, BELIEVE YOU ME!!!!

WE ARE SO EXCITED!!!

SO, lesson for today:  Eat (or at least prepare) some KIMCHEE.  And all of your dreams will come true.

Then you can throw it away.  No, kidding, HB.  I'm determined to try again.  Heck, I can't afford NOT to with all the luck it brings! 
 ;D
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt February 19, 2007, 06:31:14 AM

Then you can throw it away.  No, kidding, HB.  I'm determined to try again.  Heck, I can't afford NOT to with all the luck it brings! 
 ;D
Why would you throw it away?  Did it taste bad?
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: Nickole February 19, 2007, 06:38:02 AM

Then you can throw it away.  No, kidding, HB.  I'm determined to try again.  Heck, I can't afford NOT to with all the luck it brings! 
 ;D
Why would you throw it away?  Did it taste bad?

Remember?  I made it way too spicey?  Luckily we didn't have to throw it away b/c hubby managed to eat it.  I'll try again I promise!     
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt February 19, 2007, 07:02:49 AM

Then you can throw it away.  No, kidding, HB.  I'm determined to try again.  Heck, I can't afford NOT to with all the luck it brings! 
 ;D
Why would you throw it away?  Did it taste bad?

Remember?  I made it way too spicey?  Luckily we didn't have to throw it away b/c hubby managed to eat it.  I'll try again I promise!     
hee hee.  If I get it too salty or too hot, I usually just try to whip up another batch and mix them together.  This only works if you have more stuff on hand, but it's better than throwing it away.  You can also cook with it.  You can throw it in a pot with some bland chicken or beef or something (chicken is the best) and boil it until the chicken is done and eat it together.  Cooking dulls it down a bit and spices up the meat.
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: Nickole February 19, 2007, 07:06:02 AM
You know, I did have more cabbage on hand....duh.

That is so great to hear about cooking it!  My husband actually commented that he thought it would be better cooked.  In fact, he started heating it up!  Thanks for the idea about cooking it with meat.  That sounds yummy!   
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: Nickole March 07, 2007, 01:00:32 PM
I just read on another forum today, totally not health related at all, that someone was cured from their upper resperatory infection in two days by eating (store bought) kimchee.  Interesting!

: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt March 07, 2007, 01:53:31 PM
I just read on another forum today, totally not health related at all, that someone was cured from their upper resperatory infection in two days by eating (store bought) kimchee.  Interesting!


I suppose, I should have mentioned that we all dose up on Korean food when we have colds.  Clears the sinuses and bronchial tubes.  Helps boost the immune system and drain the airways.
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: Nickole March 07, 2007, 03:15:38 PM
I just read on another forum today, totally not health related at all, that someone was cured from their upper resperatory infection in two days by eating (store bought) kimchee.  Interesting!


I suppose, I should have mentioned that we all dose up on Korean food when we have colds.  Clears the sinuses and bronchial tubes.  Helps boost the immune system and drain the airways.

Yeah, I think you mentioned that on this thread earlier.  Makes sense with all those spices.   :o 
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: jaemom March 07, 2007, 03:40:47 PM
Bulgogi (Korean Steak)

Also called Pulgogi

All ingredients are approximate

4 lbs Beef (usually roast) sliced thinly
¼ - ¾ cup soy sauce  (careful it's salty)
roasted sesame seeds
3 cloves minced garlic
6-10 chopped green onions (whole)
approx ¼ cup olive oil (or other cooking oil) – you may substitute sesame oil and leave out the sesame seeds if desired.
1 teaspoon sugar
black pepper

Marinate overnight in smallest bowl possible.  Cook in sauce pan, fry pan, broiler or grill until brown.  Serve with rice and Kimchee.




I had a Korean aunt while I was growing up and they lived close to us for a while.  She always was making Kimchee and it stunk up the house sooo bad.   :P  ;D  Several times she made Korean steak and I loved it.  I don't eat spicy foods much, but I have been wondering for years what the meat was, but couldn't find anything about it.  I asked my mom and she didn't know.  I never thought of looking up Korean steak.  ha ha  I knew it had a Korean name, but didn't know what it was.  Since my aunt and uncle are no longer married, and I have no contact with that side of the family since my Dad's death, I didn't know who else to ask.  Thank you so much for this recipe!!!  I am definitely going to try it, and I can't wait.  :)
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt September 03, 2007, 09:51:06 AM
A friend of mine recently gave me a bag of various greens.  Spinach, kale, swiss chard and tot soy.  I really didn't have a chance to cook them the standard way so I made kimchi out of them using the same recipe as I do for the cabbage.  I would also add just a splash of vinegar because these greens didn't "juice up" the way cabbage does, so it was a little dryer.

But hubby liked it and it's very good simmered with canned salmon (about equal parts) and some onions, salt and pepper thrown in.  Simmer until greens are somewhat tender and salmon is hot.  Serve with rice.
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt November 07, 2007, 05:19:44 PM
KIMCHI UPDATE:

I was just discussing the nuances of kimchi making with my MIL and I guess she has discovered what's wrong with my kimchi.  I guess I haven't been curing it long enough, so for anyone who is following my previous recipe, she told me to cure it until it wilts.  If you try to break it and it snaps, then it's not done.  It should bend like rubber.  She estimates about 2 hours for cabbage, but less for cucumbers.

I had a batch go moldy on me and she decided that this was the reason for my problem.

I'm working on getting recipes written for turnip kimchi and dorage (bell flower root) and also turnip soup and cooked greens.  I'll post them when I get them perfected.

Happy eating.   ;D
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt November 12, 2007, 12:06:58 PM
This recipe from my MIL is good for most greens including:  spinach, lamb's quarter, dandelion (leaves & stems only) & swiss chard.

Clean and chop greens to desired size.  Blanch until they turn bright green (about 30-60 seconds).  Drain and rinse with cold water to suspend cooking.  Add (don't have measurements because I haven't made it yet), to taste, toasted sesame seeds, sesame oil (just a little, this stuff is strong), Korean hot sauce [bean paste] (Chinese ground red pepper could be substituted, but the consistency won't be the best), chopped garlic, chopped green onions and sea salt.
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt November 12, 2007, 12:31:56 PM
Ingredients listed are for 1 Gallon of finished product

Doraje (Bell Flower Root) Kimchi

This root is usually obtained dry.  Soak dry root for 1-2 days (else it will be bitter).  The 2nd day drain and refill the water.  No need for regular curing with salt, just salt to taste when ingredients are added.

Drain.  Using a small knife split the roots lengthwise until they resemble shredded pieces.

Add

5-10 chopped scallions
sea salt (table salt may be substituted)
1/2 cup of ground red pepper
3 Tablespoons minced garlic
½ - 1 tablespoon sugar
1 tablespoon kimchi sauce (also called fish sauce) optional
½ tablespoon minced ginger root (very strong flavor – may want to leave out - I don't use it)
4 tsp white vinegar
Generously sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds

surgical type gloves to protect hands from hot pepper (spoon may be used)



Korean Turnip Kimchi

(http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y16/zippyboot/WellTellMe/th_IMAG0008.jpg) (http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y16/zippyboot/WellTellMe/IMAG0008.jpg)
click to enlarge

(Diakon radish may be substituted)
NOTE added 10/19/08:  I also helped a friend make up some shredded turnip kimchi out of diakon radish.  It was good, but tasted very radishy.  The Korean turnips are better, but the diakon worked.

(http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y16/zippyboot/WellTellMe/th_daikon.jpg) (http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y16/zippyboot/WellTellMe/daikon.jpg)
click to enlarge

Clean and shred or cube turnip (2 of these listed in picture should make about 1 gallon).  The shredded and diced taste quite different and the diced sours and keeps longer than the shredded (not sure why, but MIL said so).  There is no need to cure these either.  Salt to taste and allow to sit for a few minutes because they will produce lots of juice.  Drain the juice before you add other ingredients.

Ingredients listed are for a gallon, but MIL suggests making only 1 quart at a time.

Add

5-10 chopped scallions
sea salt (table salt may be substituted)
1/2 cup of ground red pepper
3 Tablespoons minced garlic
½ - 1 tablespoon sugar
1 tablespoon kimchi sauce (also called fish sauce) optional
½ tablespoon minced ginger root (very strong flavor – may want to leave out - I don't use it)


[ONLY FOR THE SHREDDED:  4 tsp white vinegar, Generously sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds which is supposed to be eaten fresh.  The cubed can be soured and stored for much longer]

(http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y16/zippyboot/WellTellMe/th_IMAG0004.jpg) (http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y16/zippyboot/WellTellMe/IMAG0004.jpg)     (http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y16/zippyboot/WellTellMe/th_IMAG0008-1.jpg) (http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y16/zippyboot/WellTellMe/IMAG0008-1.jpg)
CUBED/DICED                        SHREDDED
(click to enlarge)                                  (click to enlarge)



Turnip Green Kimchi

Tops of the turnips in above pictures.  If harvested early, MIL puts turnips in whole with the greens, the turnips for this are only about 2-3 inches long or smaller.

This is made the same way as nappa cabbage.

Large bowl with sealable lid
1 gallon jar
3 small – medium heads Nappa (Chinese) Cabbage (5 lbs)
5-10 chopped scallions
sea salt (table salt may be substituted)
1/2 cup of ground red pepper
3 Tablespoons minced garlic
½ - 1 tablespoon sugar
1 tablespoon kimchee sauce (also called fish sauce) optional
½ tablespoon minced ginger root (very strong flavor – may want to leave out)
surgical type gloves to protect hands from hot pepper (spoon may be used)

Cut greens into 1-2 inch squares.  Spread and layer in large bowl and sprinkle with sea salt.  Put lid on bowl and let cure until greens are limp and will not snap when you try to break it in two (about 2-3 hours).  Rinse 3-4 times thoroughly and drain DO NOT SQUEEZE.  Salt again to taste.  Add all other ingredients and mix with gloved hand.  Add hot pepper a little at a time until desired hot (I've practiced with this and we like 1/2 cup but you might like a little less.  Put in jar and refrigerate.  Kimchi will taste best after 1-2 days in frige to cure.

This can be eaten like regular kimchi, but we seldom eat it this way - it's bitter.  My favorite is to boil this kimchi with chicken.  I fill the pot with layers of chicken and kimchi and add enough water to cover and boil until chicken is done.  The greens taste fabulous when flavored with the chicken fat and the chicken becomes flavored with the kimchi.  This also works well simmered for about 20 minutes with canned salmon.  Yum Yum.

NOTE added 10/19/08:  I have used this recipe last summer on chard, swiss chard, mustard greens, brocorob greens, and various other American greens that were given to me by a friend.  They were all delicious cooked with chicken.  The mustard greens were hubby's and my favorite.




: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt November 12, 2007, 12:35:29 PM
Turnip soup.

See previous post (http://www.welltellme.com/discuss/index.php/topic,44.msg125557.html#msg125557) for pictures of turnips and diakons.  Either of these may be used.  Slice turnip into thin bite sized pieces (like fried potatoes).  Use about 1/2 of one of the large turnips in the pics to 3 quarts of water. 

For beef:  Cut 1/2 lb roast or equivalent into bite size pieces and bring to boil in about 3 quarts of water.  Add sliced turnips and boil again until turnips are tender.

For fish:  Boil turnips with 1 lb of pollack (or any other white fish) until turnips are tender.

Add salt, pepper and Chinese ground red pepper to taste.

Reduce heat to very low and add chopped green onions and minced garlic to taste (about 6-10 green onions and 3-5 cloves garlic).

This is usually served with rice in it (white precooked separately) and a dab of Korean bean paste mixed in.  Very tasty and guaranteed to kick any cold.

Turnips may be frozen for future use in soup.  Slice and boil until slightly tender but not fully cooked.  Drain well and freeze in airtight container for later use.
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt November 27, 2007, 06:21:07 AM
I added pictures for the two types of turnip kimchi if you're interested.
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: Nickole January 08, 2008, 04:50:36 AM
I got a huge bag (16 oz.) of "coarse hot pepper powder" at an Asian market yesterday (that was a very interesting field trip).  They said there that this is indeed used to make kimchi.  So hopefully this go around will work.   I only got one head of cabbage though.   :-\
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt January 08, 2008, 06:04:48 AM
I got a huge bag (16 oz.) of "coarse hot pepper powder" at an Asian market yesterday (that was a very interesting field trip).  They said there that this is indeed used to make kimchi.  So hopefully this go around will work.   I only got one head of cabbage though.   :-\
Put your pepper in the freezer after you open it to prevent mold.
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: blondiegreen January 08, 2008, 08:25:01 AM
My DH LOVES kimchi! We both taught in Korea for a spell, so we love their food.
I tried to make it once with a prepackaged spice mix thingy but it didn't work too well. I left it out in the garage so the smell wouldn't fumegate my house, but it froze and is useless now.
Nowadays, we make the 7hr trip every few months to the nearest Asian superstore to pick up huge jars of kimchi.
Definitely worth it as it helps DH's digestive system and guts!
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: ShabbyChic January 08, 2008, 08:26:16 AM
Make sure you check the expiration dates on the foods at the Asian Markets in Raleigh/Cary.  My friend Ashlee and I have both experienced buying out of date food there.  I'm sure it happens at all markets; just glad we caught it before we ate it.
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt January 08, 2008, 09:20:50 AM
My DH LOVES kimchi! We both taught in Korea for a spell, so we love their food.
I tried to make it once with a prepackaged spice mix thingy but it didn't work too well. I left it out in the garage so the smell wouldn't fumegate my house, but it froze and is useless now.
Nowadays, we make the 7hr trip every few months to the nearest Asian superstore to pick up huge jars of kimchi.
Definitely worth it as it helps DH's digestive system and guts!
It's not hard to make.  The hardest part for me was getting the ingredients and directions out of my MILs head.  Once I did that, the rest wasn't any different than learning to make pickles or a casserole.
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: Nickole January 08, 2008, 09:41:47 AM
HB, oh Kimchi Queen:

I am thinking of making this recipe for kimchi:

http://koreanfood.about.com/od/vegetarian/r/Kimchi.htm

Ingredients are:
2 Chinese cabbages, cut in quarters or two-inch wedges
1 cup salt
1/2 gallon water
1 medium white radish
1/4 cup scallions, cut into one-inch pieces
1/2 cup Korean ground red pepper
1 head garlic, finely chopped
2 teaspoons fresh ginger, finely chopped
1/4 cup fish sauce or Korean salted shrimp, optional

I have only one head of cabbage so should I half everything else?  Also, what is one "medium" white radish?  I got a daikon radish but it is HUGE!  How much of it should I use?  I have all the other ingredients.  If I do NOT use all that radish, what are other ways to use it?  That was just too long a trip to the Asian market to waste anything!   :o     
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt January 08, 2008, 10:32:32 AM
yes, I'd probably just 1/2 your ingredients; however, that looks like alot of fish sauce.  it has a very strong "fishy" taste and it's very salty (Korean shrimp paste is even saltier  :P).  you might want to add this to "taste" rather than all at once.

that's also alot of ginger unless you really like the taste.  i don't like my kimchi to taste like ginger, so I rarely add it.  It's very strong and my MIL uses maybe 1 tsp for 1-2 Gallons of kimchi.  Just a warning for the more delicate palates.  ;D

I would estimate on the radish.  You probably want more radish than sauce, but not so much that your cabbage doesn't get the benefits of the sauce marinade.  Check my pics above and you'll get the idea.  It's not an exact science and you'll find that one batch may not taste exactly like the last, but you'll get the hang of what you like and what you don't. ;D

Here are some pics that your recipe will most likely resemble.

(http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y16/zippyboot/WellTellMe/th_kimchi-1.jpg) (http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y16/zippyboot/WellTellMe/kimchi-1.jpg)  (http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y16/zippyboot/WellTellMe/th_kimchi.jpg) (http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y16/zippyboot/WellTellMe/kimchi.jpg)  (http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y16/zippyboot/WellTellMe/th_korean-kimchi.jpg) (http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y16/zippyboot/WellTellMe/korean-kimchi.jpg)


For the extra radish, check my recipe for Turnip soup above.  Or use one of my turnip kimchi recipes - the shredded is the most popular around here, but you'll need to roast some sesame seeds.
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthyinOhio January 08, 2008, 10:43:51 AM
http://www.lovethatkimchi.com/

Found a neat website that might help.  From what I have found with Kimchi is everyone has a different recipe.  Some recipes even have oranges and apples in it? :P Trial and error is probably the best way.  Fix one recipe and keep it if you like it.  I made the NT kimchi, but it wasn't hot enough for my liking. 
So, this summer I hope to experiment some more. Or just visit all my WTM friends and eat theirs.  ;D
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: SimplyPut January 08, 2008, 10:49:49 AM
This is definitely more mild than kimchee  :D....it is a very thick rice dish (think oatmeal consistency).  I like the mild, smokey flavor...it is good for breakfast too! (Could be made in crockpot as well, I imagine.)

JOOK

All you do is put two cups of rice in a large stockpot and add a ton of water. Add a couple of pieces of fresh ginger and a few garlic cloves, chopped.
I also add a smoked ham shank. You can also use chicken or even left-over turkey.
You then just let it simmer for a LONG time (a couple hours) until it is REALLY thick. Make sure you stir it often so it doesn't stick to the bottom of the pan. When it is done, remove the bones of the meat and shred the meat and add it back to the pot.
Serve it in individual bowls with a splash of soy sauce(it is generally bland, so, you season it with soy sauce instead of salt) and a few drops of sesame oil on top...you can also sprinkle top with chopped green onion, if you like.



: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: blondiegreen January 11, 2008, 01:30:55 PM
Back to the kimchee topic - does it get all its health benefits by making it like this? Doesn't traditional kimchee have to cure for months? I lived in Korea for awhile and know that November is traditionally kimchee making month, but I can't remember details.
I will DEFINITELY have to try out all the recipes. Mmmm, I love bulgogi and galbi.
Anyone have a good recipe for galbi?
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthyinOhio January 12, 2008, 08:43:43 AM
Doesn't traditional kimchee have to cure for months?


I believe it does.  I read that they blend all their ingredients, put it in a pot, and place it in the ground for months.  I am not sure I would remember where I put it.  :D
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: Nickole January 13, 2008, 05:09:10 PM
Ok, I finally made some good kimchi, thanks to HB!!!  :-*
See my pic?  Aren'tchya proud, aren'tchya proud, aren'tchya proud?  *wag* *wag*

HB helped me "fix" the NT recipe (yes, HIO, a NT recipe was actually a little "off"  ::) ;)) and so here is what I did:  This makes a very small batch of kimchi, so a nice size to try it out. 

1 head  Napa cabbage
1/2 cup grated daikon radish (optional, but I used it)
1 cup grated carrot
1 t. grated fresh ginger
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 bunch green onions, chopped
1/4 - 1/2 cup coarse hot pepper powder (comes in 1 lb. bag from the Asian grocery store) - I cannot remember how much I used.  Sorry! I provided the pic though, b/c I think that is the color it is supposed to be.  It was REALLY REALLY SPICEY!!!!   

I cut up the cabbage in big chunks and spread it in layers in a casserole dish with salt in between the layers.  I put the lid on and it did not wilt after may hours, so I put a LOT more salt in and then finally added water, which I heard was good to use.  SO it seems that very salty water worked best.  I soaked it about 12 hours, seriously, in all, for it to get that "bend like rubber" quality HB mentioned is important.  You want the cabbage not crunchy anymore.  Then I rinsed (and did not squeeze) and placed that and the other ingredients, plus a little more salt, maybe a half a teaspoon, in a glass jar, loosely, and placed a lid on.  After 3 days in the fridge we ate it tonight with the NT Korean Beef recipe which I think is just like HB's Korean steak recipe, and some rice.  We all loved it.  The kimchi was eaten cold next to the rice and beef but the kids mixed it all up b/c that kimchi is VERY spicey.  And SO SO yummy!  Hubby was about in heaven.  I loved it too.  So, yay, success!!!  Thanks HB! (Does it look like the right color?)

 
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt January 14, 2008, 07:00:04 AM
Back to the kimchee topic - does it get all its health benefits by making it like this? Doesn't traditional kimchee have to cure for months? I lived in Korea for awhile and know that November is traditionally kimchee making month, but I can't remember details.
I will DEFINITELY have to try out all the recipes. Mmmm, I love bulgogi and galbi.
Anyone have a good recipe for galbi?

It only takes about 3 hours to "cure" (treated with salt) and a few days to a few weeks for fermentation to occur.  Eating it fresh is also healthy just because of the large amounts of raw veggies & garlic in the mix.

The traditions of making kimchi have very little to do with "nutrition" and more to do with available facilities.  My MIL, said most families or family groups owned a large pot big enough for a person to climb down into, buried in the ground.  The purpose of this technique was to keep the jar from breaking, make it more accessible to humans and keep the kimchi from freezing in the wintertime.  Kimchi was made in "layers" throughout the harvest season in this jar.  Each batch was just thrown in on top of the last batch.  In the freezing months, a lid was placed on the jar and it was covered with dirt or straw for insulation.
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt January 14, 2008, 07:01:57 AM
Thanks HB! (Does it look like the right color?)
Looks like kimchi to me, but mine would probably be a bit darker.  We like it HOT.  ;D 
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: blsd2bhome January 14, 2008, 08:37:10 AM
I just made some Kimchi last night, before I read this thread :-\
I used the NT recipe, which calls for 1T salt for a quart?

It seems like your recipe, HB calls for much less, especially if it is "to taste".  I bet mine is going to be REALLY salty,  :P  but everyone I have asked so far, said it was supposed to be like that.

Is is supposed to me more spicy than salty?  I think I need to make a new batch with your recipe to see.

Do you think that the NT recipe is just Sally Fallon's version of kimchi?  Yours really sounds delic!  :D
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt January 14, 2008, 08:51:32 AM
I just made some Kimchi last night, before I read this thread :-\
I used the NT recipe, which calls for 1T salt for a quart?

It seems like your recipe, HB calls for much less, especially if it is "to taste".  I bet mine is going to be REALLY salty,  :P  but everyone I have asked so far, said it was supposed to be like that.

Is is supposed to me more spicy than salty?  I think I need to make a new batch with your recipe to see.

Do you think that the NT recipe is just Sally Fallon's version of kimchi?  Yours really sounds delic!  :D
Kimchi is salty, but not too salty in my opinion.  You need more than enough salt "to taste" as you need it to cure the cabbage.  The cabbage should be well coated with salt during the curing process.  By well coated, I don't mean like a sugar coated donut, but that salt will touch all sides and parts of the leaves or will draw out enough liquid from the leaves to have them soaking in a naturally salty solution. 

After curing, the leaves are rinsed very well.  Depending on the amount of "salty" taste left behind from the curing you may or may not need to add more salt for taste.

I would guess that I use somewhere between 1/8 to a 1/4 cup of salt to cure 1-2 gallons of kimchi.  I don't measure, I just sprinkle and watch the curing to make sure that the leaves are responding (wilting) as they should.  If it's taking to long to cure (more than 2-3 hours), I would add more salt and stir or flip the leaves to make sure they are coated well.  The darker greens could take from 3 hours to overnight even with enough salt to cure properly.
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: blsd2bhome January 14, 2008, 08:56:27 AM
I just made some Kimchi last night, before I read this thread :-\
I used the NT recipe, which calls for 1T salt for a quart?

It seems like your recipe, HB calls for much less, especially if it is "to taste".  I bet mine is going to be REALLY salty,  :P  but everyone I have asked so far, said it was supposed to be like that.

Is is supposed to me more spicy than salty?  I think I need to make a new batch with your recipe to see.

Do you think that the NT recipe is just Sally Fallon's version of kimchi?  Yours really sounds delic!  :D
Kimchi is salty, but not too salty in my opinion.  You need more than enough salt "to taste" as you need it to cure the cabbage.  The cabbage should be well coated with salt during the curing process.  By well coated, I don't mean like a sugar coated donut, but that salt will touch all sides and parts of the leaves or will draw out enough liquid from the leaves to have them soaking in a naturally salty solution. 

After curing, the leaves are rinsed very well.  Depending on the amount of "salty" taste left behind from the curing you may or may not need to add more salt for taste.

I would guess that I use somewhere between 1/8 to a 1/4 cup of salt to cure 1-2 gallons of kimchi.  I don't measure, I just sprinkle and watch the curing to make sure that the leaves are responding (wilting) as they should.  If it's taking to long to cure (more than 2-3 hours), I would add more salt and stir or flip the leaves to make sure they are coated well.  The darker greens could take from 3 hours to overnight even with enough salt to cure properly.

Mine is so salty, my tongue curls up when I taste it! :P :P :P :P
I am glad to know it does not need to be that way in order to ferment!  I will definitely try your method--I have enough ing.  to try again! ;D

thanks HB!
Kindly,
blsd2bhome
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: joyful_mommy03 January 21, 2008, 09:20:07 AM
Okay - I was reading the hummus thread and saw that HB has a recipe for bulgogi!!!!  Can you please please please post that recipe?  I LOVE bulgogi and the only restaurant I've ever had it at is now out of business!!

serious cravings are starting ....
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt January 21, 2008, 09:26:29 AM
Okay - I was reading the hummus thread and saw that HB has a recipe for bulgogi!!!!  Can you please please please post that recipe?  I LOVE bulgogi and the only restaurant I've ever had it at is now out of business!!

serious cravings are starting ....
Go back to page 1 of this thread.  ;D
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: joyful_mommy03 January 21, 2008, 10:59:22 AM
Okay - I was reading the hummus thread and saw that HB has a recipe for bulgogi!!!!  Can you please please please post that recipe?  I LOVE bulgogi and the only restaurant I've ever had it at is now out of business!!

serious cravings are starting ....
Go back to page 1 of this thread.  ;D

DOH!!  Sorry about that!!  I did a search for bulgogi before posting but didn't see the recipe.  Is there such a thing as "pregnancy eyes"  kinda like "pregnancy brain"!!??!!

Thanks a ton HB!!
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt January 21, 2008, 11:02:25 AM
Okay - I was reading the hummus thread and saw that HB has a recipe for bulgogi!!!!  Can you please please please post that recipe?  I LOVE bulgogi and the only restaurant I've ever had it at is now out of business!!

serious cravings are starting ....
Go back to page 1 of this thread.  ;D

DOH!!  Sorry about that!!  I did a search for bulgogi before posting but didn't see the recipe.  Is there such a thing as "pregnancy eyes"  kinda like "pregnancy brain"!!??!!

Thanks a ton HB!!
no sweat.  glad I could help. ;D
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: SarahLaRae February 06, 2008, 03:45:06 AM
I made your Cucumber kimchee last night.  It was so tasty.  DH and I both love Korean so this was fun.  I also made bulgogi and it was great!  I'm very excited about the Kimchee though.  I know what I'll be doing with all my cucumbers from the garden this year.  ;D  Thanks HB!
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthyinOhio March 06, 2008, 08:03:18 AM
HB's and Nickole's recipe for Kimchi is the BEST, you have to try it!  Much better than NT's recipe.  My new favorite way to eat Kimchi is over a baked potato. Also, I have found that a couple teaspoons of ranch dressing over it makes it WAY too tasty.  I could eat this stuff all day long!
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: Melie March 10, 2008, 10:24:11 AM
HB or someone, I am looking for a recipe and I think it's Korean.
It is called Bahn Ma or something like that.  It's a sandwich with ground meat and some pickled something or other.  It was very spicy and delicious.  Our natural market had it as a special and I am intrigued and would love to know how to make it or at least to know what the real name of it is so I can order it if I ever come across a Korean restaurant.
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: Melie March 10, 2008, 01:45:27 PM
HB or someone, I am looking for a recipe and I think it's Korean.
It is called Bahn Ma or something like that.  It's a sandwich with ground meat and some pickled something or other.  It was very spicy and delicious.  Our natural market had it as a special and I am intrigued and would love to know how to make it or at least to know what the real name of it is so I can order it if I ever come across a Korean restaurant.
bump
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt March 10, 2008, 03:28:32 PM
HB or someone, I am looking for a recipe and I think it's Korean.
It is called Bahn Ma or something like that.  It's a sandwich with ground meat and some pickled something or other.  It was very spicy and delicious.  Our natural market had it as a special and I am intrigued and would love to know how to make it or at least to know what the real name of it is so I can order it if I ever come across a Korean restaurant.
bump
Never heard of it, but I think if you Google "bahn mi", you might find what you're looking for.

http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&q=bahn+mi&btnG=Search+Images&gbv=2 (http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&q=bahn+mi&btnG=Search+Images&gbv=2)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B%C3%A1nh_m%C3%AC (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B%C3%A1nh_m%C3%AC)
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: Melie March 10, 2008, 03:33:55 PM
HB or someone, I am looking for a recipe and I think it's Korean.
It is called Bahn Ma or something like that.  It's a sandwich with ground meat and some pickled something or other.  It was very spicy and delicious.  Our natural market had it as a special and I am intrigued and would love to know how to make it or at least to know what the real name of it is so I can order it if I ever come across a Korean restaurant.
bump
Never heard of it, but I think if you Google "bahn mi", you might find what you're looking for.

http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&q=bahn+mi&btnG=Search+Images&gbv=2 (http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&q=bahn+mi&btnG=Search+Images&gbv=2)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B%C3%A1nh_m%C3%AC (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B%C3%A1nh_m%C3%AC)

That's it!  It is soooooo good.
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt March 11, 2008, 05:08:30 AM
More on hot bean paste.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kochujang (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kochujang)
http://www.trifood.com/kochujang.html (http://www.trifood.com/kochujang.html)
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: Melie March 11, 2008, 05:53:47 AM
HB or someone, I am looking for a recipe and I think it's Korean.
It is called Bahn Ma or something like that.  It's a sandwich with ground meat and some pickled something or other.  It was very spicy and delicious.  Our natural market had it as a special and I am intrigued and would love to know how to make it or at least to know what the real name of it is so I can order it if I ever come across a Korean restaurant.
bump
Never heard of it, but I think if you Google "bahn mi", you might find what you're looking for.

http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&q=bahn+mi&btnG=Search+Images&gbv=2 (http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&q=bahn+mi&btnG=Search+Images&gbv=2)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B%C3%A1nh_m%C3%AC (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B%C3%A1nh_m%C3%AC)

Ha ha!  I guess the reason you've never heard of it is because it's Vietnamese and not Korean!!! ;D
Still, you should try it.
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: still*learning August 04, 2008, 02:20:45 PM
Bethany has an awesome step-by-step process on how to make kimchee.

http://bethany.preciousinfants.com/2008/08/03/kimchi-making.aspx
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt August 05, 2008, 04:31:50 AM
Bethany has an awesome step-by-step process on how to make kimchee.

http://bethany.preciousinfants.com/2008/08/03/kimchi-making.aspx
Nice pics.  I never add the salt brine back to the mix.  Seems to me this would make it awful salty.  My MIL has even gotten the leaves too salty even after rinsing so she's taken measures to make it less salty.  One method she uses is adding a thin flour and water paste to the kimchee when it's all finished.  Everything else in the method mimics my MILs technique - except for the choice of containers.  She always uses steel bowls and glass jars. 
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt October 19, 2008, 06:19:23 AM
I have used the turnip green kimchi recipe (http://www.welltellme.com/discuss/index.php/topic,44.msg125557.html#msg125557) last summer on chard, swiss chard, mustard greens, brocorob greens, and various other American greens that were given to me by a friend.  They were all delicious cooked with chicken.  The mustard greens were hubby's and my favorite.

I also helped a friend make up some shredded turnip kimchi (http://www.welltellme.com/discuss/index.php/topic,44.msg125557.html#msg125557) out of diakon radish.  It was good, but tasted very radishy.  The Korean turnips are better, but the diakon worked.
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthybratt November 19, 2008, 05:27:56 PM
Yaki Mandoo ;D {yaw kee' mon' doo}

(Korean Dumplings - very similar to fried wontons)

I love these things, but have only ever had them frozen from the Asian Market.  I tried my hand at them today and they were fantastic.

2 lbs ground beef
1 cup water
1/2 cup white flour

3-4 cups of sour kimchi rinsed 

(MIL uses the stuff that's too sour to eat)
I would surmise you could substitute any veggies you like but haven't tried it.  I used sour cucumber kimchi and some sour Korean bean sprouts I had in the back of the fridge.

Put the beef, flour and water in a frying pan and stir constantly until brown.  The flour, water and stirring make the meat a nice smooth consistency quite different than just plain browned ground beef.

My MIL says that she makes the filling with raw burger and no flour, but she also shallow pan fries them which takes longer and is more likely to cook the meat. 

Chop veggies finely.  I threw mine in the food processor and blended into mush.  Don't forget to rinse your sour kimchi.  Honestly, I don't think you have to, but the flavor is quite different and MIL told me too.  ;D  Mix well with the meat.  Spoon about 1 teaspoon of meat mixture into middle of wanton wrappers (round or square).  Wet edges of one half of wrapper and fold over (if using squares, fold to make triangles).  Crimp with fork or pinch with fingers to seal. 

Deep fry at 400 degrees for 3-4 minutes. 

Mix 1/2 white vinegar with 1/2 soy sauce for dipping.

You can spread on a cookie sheet (not touching) and put in the freezer for a couple of hours.  Then take them off the sheet and put into a freezer container.  This prevents them from sticking together so that you can just take a few out of the bag and fry them up without breaking or tearing the wrappers.


: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: boysmama November 19, 2008, 05:42:15 PM
Those sound awesome! Thanks to you I can impress my friends and gross some of them out with sneaking fermented veggies into their food.   ;D
: Re: Anyone for Korean?
: healthyinOhio February 06, 2009, 10:01:40 AM
Here is a state by state directory for asian markets!  How cool!!
http://www.melroseflowers.com/mkic/asian_markets/asian_markets_7.html#Ohio%20Area

They have one in the next city over and I NEVER knew it!  YES!! ;D