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Remedies & Therapies => Symptoms & Illnesses => Food Allergies / Intolerance => : healthybratt October 05, 2006, 08:03:47 AM

: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: healthybratt October 05, 2006, 08:03:47 AM
Okay, I thought there was a food allergy thread somewhere on this board, but I can't find it, so if one of you knows where it is and can point me in the right direction, you have my permission to scold me for duplicating threads.   ::)

Anyway, I think I have developed a food allergy over the last few weeks (or have just recently discovered it).  Either way, I can't seem to figure out what's causing it.  I thought it was cheese and then I thought it was dairy.  I've been keeping track of what I eat in a notebook.  The only things that were the same on the days I got hives were my supplements and dairy (I think), BUT 2 days ago, I had mashed potatoes and gravy, both made with milk and no hives and that day, I took no supplements.  Other days, I've taken my supplements, yet had no dairy and no reactions.  It seems the reactions only occur when I do both.  I'm perplexed.

Could my supplements somehow be reacting with my supplements thus causing the hives?

I am currently taking SuperDad, Odorless Garlic, Cod Liver Oil, B12, Rosehips C, Tummy Tuneup-Ultimate Defense, Yeast Assassin, Glutamine & Evening Primrose Oil.

The other interesting fact is that no matter what time of day I take the vitamins or the dairy products, I always get the hives at night -- sometimes before I go to bed and sometimes after (not related to my bed).  I've yet to suffer any hives during the daylight hours.  I just can't figure it out. 

Any input, thoughts or suggestions would be greatly appreciated as the only treatment that works for me is an anxiety pill and I obviously don't want this to become a regular part of my regimen.  I don't believe the hives are anxiety related, but I'm allergic to antihistamines, including chamomile, so the only alternative for me is to get sleepy to calm the reaction.

Thanks

~hb
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: Pennie October 05, 2006, 08:15:09 AM
I have no idea..... ::)  However, the fact that you said you only get the hives at night was very interesting to me b/c b/f I got married I started taking "the pill" like in NovemberI got married in Jan.  I broke out in hives on my WEDDING NIGHT.  mmmhhhmmm. Real neat.  BUT continued breaking out only at night until I quit taking the pill.  The first night I just thought it was nervousness but it kept happening.  So I quit taking the pill and the hives stopped.  I can't remember exactly when I quit but I was pregnant in April.   ;D  I just thought that was interesting.  I quit taking the pill(and I am so thankful knowing what I know now)b/c other than getting married and moving 1/2 way across the US where I knew no one but my hubby, nothing had changed except for that.  I always thought it was weird that I only started breaking out after the marriage not before.   ???  Could your hives have anything to do with your honey? as in bee honey not hubby honey.   :D  Have you been using the honey or just the wax for candles or whatever?  Just a thought.  I don't know how long you've been breaking out.......but that is kind of a new thing for you. 
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: healthybratt October 05, 2006, 09:05:52 AM
I haven't even been around my wax yet.  I still don't have any containers to form it with so it's still in my yard.  This weekend (I hope).  Also, no honey from the hive.  Nothing new as far as I can tell.  I don't take the pill (I had a tubal).  It might be something like that, but I just can't seem to recall any "nightly" habit that would cause this. 
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: boysmama October 05, 2006, 09:24:16 AM
Are you under unusual stress? My body reacts with hives for alot of things that it doesn't like. I've had times like you are describing. Most of the time I would actually fall asleep only to waken with in 20 minutes with huge welts all over. I have strong adrenal surges. My hypothesis is that under stress- maybe because of the extra hormones- toxins build up in my body. Then when I go to sleep my body relaxes and starts to houseclean... I've sort of tested this theory and find that if I am still under stress or going to face the same stress the next day that my body stays tense all night. Only when the pressure lets off will I have the night time hives reaction.
 I have gone way out on the limb with this post :P You can call it crazy if you want  ;D I do know that those hives are AWFUL and this theory reminds me that if I get stressed out I'll pay for it later. Now I TRY not to stress ;)
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: Pennie October 05, 2006, 09:27:37 AM
Wow, that makes sense.  I got engaged to the wrong guy once and my mom had hives until it was over.  Interesting theory.  :o
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: mexmarr October 05, 2006, 09:48:59 AM
Wow, that makes sense.  I got engaged to the wrong guy once and my mom had hives until it was over.  Interesting theory.  :o

It is an interesting thought!  Your bee problem would be enough to give me hives....  Didn't you also mention that your income was greatly reduced?  That is also very stressful.

: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: healthybratt October 05, 2006, 10:34:28 AM
Wow, that makes sense.  I got engaged to the wrong guy once and my mom had hives until it was over.  Interesting theory.  :o

It is an interesting thought!  Your bee problem would be enough to give me hives....  Didn't you also mention that your income was greatly reduced?  That is also very stressful.


5 years ago, my current situation would have stressed me to no end, but seriously, I've had very little stressing me out (no more than normal anyway  ;D). 

The Lord has really blessed us in our time of need.  He's given us a financial net to keep us afloat, money is not even a factor right now.  We've never wanted for food - we always always have plenty - GOD IS SO GOOD.  We have heat/cooling, shelter, transportation and except for a couple of colds lately - good health. 

We had bees, fleas and lice all at the same time, but that was almost a month ago.  We treated for lice, vacated, killed and cleaned bees and ripped up the carpet and treated the cats and all the bugs are gone and with the cooling trend, there aren't many bugs outside and the hives just started a couple of weeks ago.

If it's stress related, then it must be deep deep subconcious - cuz I'm pretty happy most of the time - except when hubby cheeses me off *snicker*, but if that were the cause of my hives, I would have been suffering from a steady onslaught of hives for the last 12 years.  LOL   ::)

Keep the ideas coming though, please.  I figured with some brainstorming, you might be able to think of something I hadn't already thought of.  My brain hurts from thinking about it too much.   ::)

: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: Maria/NHM October 05, 2006, 10:54:02 AM
Wow, that makes sense.  I got engaged to the wrong guy once and my mom had hives until it was over.  Interesting theory.  :o

Sounds like it might not be the case with you but stress can definitely do strange thing to you. When my hubby told his mom that he was going to marry me she got her period. Not so unusual except that she hadn't had one in years. It's okay though, she likes me now ;D

I was just reading a book on autism. It mentioned how autistic children can start to exhibit allergy symptoms AFTER their diets are cleaned up. I don't know if it would apply to you but it's a thought. Maybe you are developing an allergy to your bed. I know mattress are full of toxins. Hope you figure it out soon!!

: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: StephTallent October 05, 2006, 10:57:10 AM
Allergies can develop at any time.  I would carefully review your pre bed routine, especially the last couple of hours before you head to bed.  Any lotions, cleansers, moisturizers?  Toothpastes? Mouthwash?  Anything with your kids that would be there some evenings and not others?    I know you have eliminated a lot of things due to the detergent sensitivity but is there anything non food related that you could be coming in contact with some evenings?

Hope you are able to find out what it is soon!!  Sounds absolutely miserable.  :-\

: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: boysmama October 05, 2006, 11:00:11 AM
One other thing I thought of is that when stress gets me it is always a time when my immune system was recently low- lack of sleep, bad food, illness, etc. Maybe something normal is causing you to react because your immune system is for some reason extra-sensitized???
Aren't you also treating candida overgrowth?  I know that one of the long term recovery symptms can be hives...
Just brainstorming :)
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: healthybratt October 05, 2006, 02:45:41 PM
Any lotions, cleansers, moisturizers?  Toothpastes? Mouthwash? 
I'm pretty low maintenance (lazy  ::))  I don't use any of that stuff, except toothpaste and I only use it in the mornings.  When I remember  :-[  to brush at night, I use peroxide or baking soda, but I forget alot...I'll keep thinking on this though...

I ate pizza tonight, so if I'm allergic to dairy, I should know pretty soon....

I know for sure it's not the bed, because the hives don't always start after bedtime, just always after dark.

: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: healthybratt October 05, 2006, 02:46:43 PM
One other thing I thought of is that when stress gets me it is always a time when my immune system was recently low- lack of sleep, bad food, illness, etc. Maybe something normal is causing you to react because your immune system is for some reason extra-sensitized???
Aren't you also treating candida overgrowth?  I know that one of the long term recovery symptms can be hives...
Just brainstorming :)
Maybe...it's a thought.
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: healthyinOhio October 05, 2006, 03:01:02 PM
You are definately sure it is hives?  You are probably right, just want to make sure.  Finding the cause for hives is like asking yourself who gave me a cold?  It could be an endless of things.  In my medical book that I read too much,  ;) it states that hives are generally brought on by an allergic reaction for it is the release of histamines in the body that cause it. 
But it does say that certain viruses can cause hives such as hepatitius B and the Epstein Barr Virus.  Is there an outbreak of mono in your neck of the woods? 
It also states that out breaks of Candida Albicans and hives can go hand in hand.  Oh, that's a shock, huh?!
I will list what the book says are some of the most common reasons for hive outbreaks:

Animals, dander and saliva
Aspirin
A gout medication that I don't want to spell out
Antimony, a metallic element present in various metal alloys
Barbituates
BHA and BHT
Bismuth, another metalic element present in metal alloys
Cancer, especially luekemia
Chloral hydrate, a sedative
Chlorpromazine, a tranquilizer
Cologne or perfume
Enviromental factors, heat, cold, water, sunlight
Eucalyptus
Exercise
Flourides
Food allergies
Food collorings and preservatives
Gold
Griseofulvin, and antifungal medication
Hyperthyroidism
Infections, strep, hepatitis, parasites
Insect bites
Insulin
Iodines
Liver Extract
Makeup
Menthol
Meprobamate, a tranquilizer
Mercury
Morphine
Opium
Para-aminosslicylic acid, an anti-inflammatory drug
Penicillin
Phenacetrin, an ingredient in some pain medications
Phenobabital, a sedative
Pilocarpine, a glaucoma medication
Plants
A polio vaccine
Potassium sulfocyanate, a preservative
Preservatives
Novocain, an anesthetic
Quinine
Reserpine, heart medication
Saccharin
Salicylates
Soaps
Shampoo
Sulfites
Tartrazine, a food dye and an ingredient in Alka-Seltzer
Thiamine hydrochloride, and ingredient in some cough medications

Here is some to get you started, HB.  Hope you figure it out!!
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: healthybratt October 05, 2006, 03:06:02 PM
 :o
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: kamom October 05, 2006, 03:22:26 PM
 I can feel for you :-* I know you think it's not stress related but... few years back after DH started a new business, we started building our own house, he was injured etc. etc I broke out in a bad case of hives, and as you explained they would come in the evening. Huge welts >:( Well someone advised me not to do any allergy testing until I emptied several bottles of B Complex plus extra Pantothenic Acid. after a few weeks on this they cleared up, only to return when I quit the B's. I eventually got over it. It was explained to me that our body's need extra B when under stress.....God Bless You....I hope we're not stessing you with all our questions???? ;)
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: healthybratt October 05, 2006, 04:01:41 PM
I take SuperDads and extra b12.  I don't think I'm deficient in B vitamins. 
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: healthybratt October 05, 2006, 04:02:48 PM
I hope we're not stessing you with all our questions???? ;)
Are you kidding...I live for this stuff.  I never knew that there was a actually a job where being a "know-it-all" would come in handy.   ::)
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: refreshed October 05, 2006, 05:15:03 PM
HB--Could there be some plant that blooms at night (or opens at night) that could be causing this? 

Maybe you're just allergic to the dark. . . ;D
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: SC October 05, 2006, 06:27:19 PM
Okay, I've been reading the symptoms and responses. It could be something super-complex, but I'm one of those that likes to eliminate the simplest things first. My life is complicated enough ::).

This is what I am wondering, HB: you said that this always happens after dark. Do you have a favorite chair that you relax in after supper/before bed? Is there a particular throw/quilt that you use? I'm thinking that you are coming in contact with something that is reacting to your skin. With the spraying and stuff that has gone on around your house, it is possible that some stuff got absorbed into the upholstery and is getting onto your skin. If you bathe in the evening and then sit in your favorite chair, your pores would be open and receptive to whatever is in the chair. This could be anything from chemicals to dust mites or whatever.

While it isn't likely your bedding (because you said it happens before bed sometimes) upholstered furniture is also something to consider.

Let us know what you discover.
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: milmuth October 05, 2006, 06:41:54 PM
You didnt' mention how long you have been taking that list of supplements.  Yes, supplements can interact, but IMO I am not sure those do.  Could it be they are actualy working, detoxing you, and this is how your body reacts to releasing some of those toxins?

The last few weeks- weather changing?  CLosing up windows and such more, something in the house or room that you are allergic too?  Any pets?  pet treatment/shampoos, etc can cause reactions and take time to do so.

Perplexing.  I hope you get to the source and resolve it soon.
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: healthybratt October 05, 2006, 07:16:05 PM
Okay, I had pizza and no hives, but have been a bit on the itchy side.  So, I guess my next question is, how long does an allergy generally take to manifest itself.  Like, if I ate a pizza at 7pm, how long before the cheese would cause me to itch?  I only started itching about 1/2 hour ago.  That's like 4.5 hours.  That seems like too long to me, but I wouldn't really know.  As soon as I'm better from my cold, I was going to drink a big fat glass of milk early in the morning and then avoid dairy for the rest of the day and see what happens.  Then I was going to try milk in the morning without my supplements and then go from there.  I'm really hoping it's not dairy.  I do so love to eat cheese.... :-\

I thought about the furniture, but there is no reason or rhyme to my schedule.  I lay on the couch off and on at no particular time.  Hmmmmm....there's Borax under my couch, I wonder....maybe I should vaccuum that up tomorrow.  I put it there to kill fleas and didn't vacuum it up because it's under the couch, BUT I wash my clothes in Borax and have never had a reaction and I don't remember having any kind of reactions while making the soap or sprinkling it on the floor in the first place.  I'll talk to hubby and see if he thinks we should shampoo the carpet or the couch, but I just don't think that's it.

Maybe I need to just be more organized, so I can have a routine and maybe I could figure it out.  I never do anything by the clock.  I just kinda do whatever, whenever unless someone else is counting on me for something (like lunch and supper ;)).  My husband isn't a very scheduled kind of guy and I just kind of follow his schedule or lack of *snicker*.

I really appreciate everyone trying to help me figure this out, but I'm still stumped.  I just hope it doesn't take me 10 years to figure this one out too.  Ugh.

: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: healthybratt October 05, 2006, 07:26:41 PM
Maybe you're just allergic to the dark. . . ;D

EUREKA!  THAT's IT!   ;D  I need to move where they have more sunshine.  "Guam" here I come!  Oh, wait, I don't fly and I get sea sick, I'm in trouble.  Anyone got a transporter I can borrow - Beam me up Scotty.   ;)
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: mishy October 05, 2006, 07:31:08 PM
I'll pick you up at the airport!  I know I'll be able to pick your eye out of a crowd anywhere! :) 
Hey, did you ever get my email about your son eating my kombucha mushroom?  You can tell him I got another one.  he he

 8)
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: floydian October 06, 2006, 03:57:55 AM
Hey, I forgot where you live, but around here the golden rod is in full bloom.  My mom was highly sensitive to it.  Maybe it's some sort of fall allergy especially if it just started.  Isn't ragweed bad right now.  I know Mom used to have major problems in the fall and in the spring.
l
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: healthybratt October 06, 2006, 06:51:59 AM
Hey, did you ever get my email about your son eating my kombucha mushroom?  You can tell him I got another one.  he he

 8)
???  I don't think so.
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: healthybratt October 06, 2006, 06:53:25 AM
well, newest update.  I ate pizza and ice cream last night - no hives.  I had pizza and glass of milk for breakfast, no hives.  ???
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: JoyfulJen October 06, 2006, 08:03:50 PM
well, newest update.  I ate pizza and ice cream last night - no hives.  I had pizza and glass of milk for breakfast, no hives.  ???

 ;DGood!  We're glad.  Hey, HB, have you thought.... maybe you are just allergic to us!   I haven't posted for a couple of days and that seems to have helped you :D   

 Seriously though, this is big time mosquito season where we live, and the county does areal spraying, as well as some spraying from trucks to try to control them until the cold weather sets in.  Could it be something like that in your locale?  Our county uses pyrethrin (derived from chrysanthemums) to kill the adult mosquitoes.  I have not heard of allergies to it, but it is a pesticide and some people might react.  ??? If they are doing similar control in your county also, it would be worth a look into.  Hope your mystery is solved soon!
Jen
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: floydian October 07, 2006, 07:33:03 AM
Well until this passes, just eat pizza and ice cream every night. :D
What kind of ice cream anyway?
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: SarahK October 07, 2006, 09:44:42 AM
Well until this passes, just eat pizza and ice cream every night. :D
What kind of ice cream anyway?

Oooo... I like this.  First GOOT to cure all and now pizza & ice cream!  Love this site!

Sarah K
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: healthybratt October 07, 2006, 10:50:19 AM
Well until this passes, just eat pizza and ice cream every night. :D
What kind of ice cream anyway?
Um...last time it was somekind of chocolate cherry crunch vanilla stuff.   :o
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: floydian October 07, 2006, 01:53:52 PM
Blech,  :P I think that would cure anything.
Just teasing.
Cherry anything reminds me of having to take cough syrup when I was little.
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: healthybratt October 22, 2006, 10:52:35 AM
I moved the flea info here.

http://welltellme.com/discuss/index.php/topic,3103.0.html
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: healthyinOhio November 09, 2006, 09:32:36 AM
HB,

Did you ever find the culprit?  Did the symptoms leave?  Just curious.
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: healthybratt November 09, 2006, 10:20:04 PM
HB,

Did you ever find the culprit?  Did the symptoms leave?  Just curious.

Dairy seems to be the most suspect, but my symptoms are very inconsistant.  There is some stress in the air right now, so that could be a contributor, but I just am stumped.  Sometimes I have dairy and have no reactions that I'm aware of and other times, I get hives and itchies and I think back and remember I had a big glass of milk or something very cheesy to eat.  Maybe it's all in my head.  I haven't had a case of hives as severe as before, but I've still had some bumps and itching at random.  It's also dry skin weather, so who knows. ???

Thanks for thinking of me.   ::)
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: keeperathome77 April 02, 2007, 04:12:47 PM
Early on before I had ever introduced my baby to certain foods he would get a hold of someone's spoon and his cheeks would react to foods of whatever they were eating. Didn't take long to tell he was reacting to dairy and eggs. This is my question...has anyone else had this happen? Am I wrong to assume he is allergic because  his mouth and cheeks break out on contact that he would be allergic to the food? Right now he doesn't eat dairy, eggs, or peanut butter because of this...though he hasn't ever really ate any of these foods. I just couldn't imagine allowing him to eat something that makes him break out on his skin. He eats fruits, vegetables, grains, beans, and meat. Any advice would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Kathleen
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: hollyolly123 April 02, 2007, 04:27:29 PM
My question would be, how old is your baby?  I found with my kids that introducing solids early (6 months), if they were high carbs (fruits, esp. bannanas, grains, etc.) it would overload their liver with carbs, and so the liver couldn't process other toxins as well.  Also, according to stuff I've read on here, young children do not have the amylase (digestive enzyme), or have such low levels of it, that they cannot digest grains at all.  My #2 dd became terribly constipated a few weeks after I started giving her grains, around 7 months.  I couldn't figure out why, becaus at that point I thought whole grains whould aid in elimination because of the fiber.  I was wrong though.

This was the case with both my children (ages 1 and 2), and I am now learning how best to feed them.  I thought my 16 month old had an egg allergy/ sensitivity, but when I smartened up and quit giving her grains and cut out all other carbs (fruit, potatoes), she can eat three eggs for breakfast and not break out at all!  Probiotics helped a lot too (which is basically powdered good bacteria for the gut- like in yogurt or kefir).  They aid in digestion and elimination, and your body is not healthy without enough of them.  I opened up the pill and sprinkled it on my kids food.  It tastes like nothing at all.

It turns out young kid's don't need grains.  I have found that the most important foods for kids are healthy dairy, eggs (yolks only for babies under one- although I know of a girl who is still exclusively nursing her 11 month old- wish I'd done that!), and vegetables, and lots of healthy saturated fats.  We use coconut oil, butter, and fatty cuts of meat, for healthy brain development, healthy skin, and etc.

It is possible that he is allergic to the casein in the milk (milk protein), but I don't know that this would cause a reaction just being near it.  If it were me, I would cut out grains and carbs for a while, use probiotics, then try it near his skin again.

I would reccomend the book Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon.  The thread where I got all my info is.....ok, I'll have to find it, then post it. 
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: hollyolly123 April 02, 2007, 04:30:13 PM
Search: Toddler Eczema Poor Carbohydrate and Fat Metabolism and you'll find the info about grain digestion and liver overload that I'm talking about.  Try the last page or couple of pages, they have the best/ most current info.  It's helped me and my girls a lot.  I really believe that most allergy/ sensitivities start in the gut.
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: keeperathome77 April 02, 2007, 04:58:40 PM
My baby is 15 months old...still nurses...started eating solids very late. Even now he really doesn't eat much, just a wide variety. Well, a wide variety without dairy and eggs. Really more fruits and veggis than anything else.

Kathleen :)
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: hollyolly123 April 02, 2007, 05:39:38 PM
 :'(I wish mine still nursed!  Could be just one of those things, but it would be interesting to see what happenes if you took grains out.  I remember on that thread I told you about, the woman I got most of my info from (Likemanywaters) mentioned that she ended up greatly increasing her good saturated fat content in her diet, the way she did with her son, and her daugher started sleeping better at night (who still nurses at 11 months), and I think she mentioned some other benefit but can't remember what.  I think it was digestion or skin related.  but she figured her milk was too lean and that's why.  I did that too and my hands are so baby soft now- used to be badly dry and cracked.  I'm not fatter, either!
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: YoopreMama April 18, 2007, 03:41:37 PM
ALL RIGHT--HERE WE GO!   ;D
I searched for "coconut oil allergy" but couldn't find any answers. I would like to know if anyone else has had allergic reactions to coconut oil. I put some on my hands last night and when I woke up the next time, they were broken out all over(palms included) with little blisters that made my hands feel like they were on fire. I am prone to eczema.

Something else I wonder about is this: If someone has a "contact allergy" (allergic when they touch a certain substance), should they also not eat that substance. For example, I cannot touch fresh tomatoes without my skin erupting, should I be avoiding eating them too? And now should I not ingest coconut oil?

Has it been shown that if a person is allergic to one "tropical" fruit that he may be allergic to others as well? I am allergic to pineapple. Now coconut? Recently when I mentioned to someone that I was allergic to latex, they said I should not eat kiwi fruit. I'm missing the connection there.

Anyway, that turned out longer than I meant it to be initially. Would you please point me in the right direction(s)?  thank you, mrs_zog

I am exploring the possibility of being allergic/intolerant to citric acid (after the Master Cleanse and all of the lemons--my itchy rash)...I also used Emergen-C a lot this winter.   I wonder if my body has had enough of citric acid, given its abundance in so many things as a preservative...added to the 18 day MC....anyone else know of someone w/ citric intolerance/allergy?

Here is some dialogue about it from a new friend... ;) (I'm in red):

Asked new chiropractor about eczema, he said "it is acid leaving the body. avoid eating fruits and vegetables, especially of the nightshade family"--fascinating...slicing tomatoes stings my hands..kiwi, too...growing up I thought oranges bothered the corners of my mouth...  I  decided that it probably wasn't healty to not eat fruits and veggies, so I still do. But that started me thinking about external products I use. I changed the hand lotion I was using to one that did not contain any "[citric, stearic, oleic, lactic, etc.] acid." Immediate positive results!! I have avoided many things in external bodycare, but acids aren't one...m/b that's why Citrus Ginger Burt's Bees bugs me! Since then, I also changed my soap, shampoo, and other lotions.

An Aha! moment came when I read the ingredients of Dial antibac soap. No acids! Without reading the labels, over the years, I had figured out it was the "only" soap(at least of those around while in my parents' house) that didn't make me break out.  Interesting.

I have a contact allergy to fresh tomatoes. I still haven't had anyone say this means I shouldn't eat them, but I rarely do anyway. Processed tomatoes/tomato juice burns my skin to about the same degree as fresh citrus juices. I rarely eat oranges because I don't like to peel them. I know what you mean.   :(  

The handful of times I have used coconut oil on my hands at night, I wake up with tiny oozing blisters covering them (palms included). I wonder if there's anything similar to citric acid in coconuts.  I'm wondering about that, too, b/c I make salves w/ it and it seems to irritate it.  Hmmm...I'm getting excited about these connections!
I also have a contact allergy to latex.

So there's some acecdotal evidence whether any or all of it is relevent. I hope it's helpful. IT IS!

Anyone else hear of this?  Have I finally found the cause of my itchy skin????I am researching like mad and will update... ;D
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: YoopreMama April 18, 2007, 04:45:02 PM
I have heard of allergies to coconut and its products. It can't remember which forum it was. I read a lot about food allergies.

http://www.allergycapital.com.au/Pages/coconut.html

http://www.nutrition4health.org/NOHAnews/NNW90CoconutAllergy.htm

http://www.woodlandherbs.co.uk/acatalog/food_allergy.html#coconut

According to the website of pediatric authors Drs. Sears, berries, buckwheat, chocolate, cinnamon, citrus fruits, coconut, corn, mustard, peas, pork, seeds, sesame, sugar, tomatoes and yeast are also common allergens from:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Food_allergy

http://www.askdrsears.com/html/4/t041800.asp#T041805

Thank you for these links...I'm on them now and am learning much...why m/b coconut oil topically makes a rash but maybe not ingested (years of coconut-derived cleansers ? SLS).  I was looking for the elimination diet, too, and found it there.  AND learning what is in the nightshade family...cayenne and lemons--no wonder the Master Cleanse seemed to provoke this!  Potatoes....tomato-based sauces...:(
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: YoopreMama April 18, 2007, 04:54:37 PM
Has it been shown that if a person is allergic to one "tropical" fruit that he may be allergic to others as well? I am allergic to pineapple. Now coconut? Recently when I mentioned to someone that I was allergic to latex, they said I should not eat kiwi fruit. I'm missing the connection there.

Here is something from herbfever's link
http://www.woodlandherbs.co.uk/acatalog/food_allergy.html#coconut:

Latex-food syndrome
Latex allergy is caused by a reaction to a number of allergens found in natural rubber or latex. In recent years, the number of people with latex allergy has increased, particularly among healthcare workers and people with spina bifida, because they come into contact with lots of latex products. Latex contains lots of allergens that are similar to the allergens in some foods. So people who are allergic to latex might also find they react to foods such as banana, mango, kiwi, chestnut, paprika, celery, apple, carrot, cherry, coconut, strawberry and avocado. This is called latex-food syndrome.
back to table

: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: YoopreMama April 18, 2007, 05:05:27 PM
No problem, when my dc don't have their allergens NO RASH!

That's what I'm hoping for :).  I just showered and read to my dismay, that my "good" shampoos...body soaps, hair shampoo bars all have some variation of citric acid (or coconut oil)...UGGH!  I have greasy hair b/c I refuse to use it.  

But, praise the Lord for this new discovery...now to try an elimination diet.   :(
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: YoopreMama April 18, 2007, 05:15:01 PM
Yoopermama, Have you ever researched food allergies prior to this? Do you have any others?


herbfever--
Eh...I've not known of any...was suspecting possibly gluten w/ this rash, but...switched to raw milk products...this is such of a new thing (itchiness), but have struggled w/ eczema for years, on & off.  I have posts all over this forum on eczema, dead sea salts, SLS, etc.  Never been tested, but maybe it's time now.  Do you recommend the blood tests I've read briefly about (vs. the skin patch)?

Thanks again for your time and thoughts!   :-*
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: YoopreMama April 18, 2007, 05:24:29 PM
I will warn you that as you do an elimination diet it is possible for other allergens to show up.  It was a long road that had bumps but the Lord saw us through!

What are you removing?

If you have severe eczema common allergens are citrus, tomato, chocolate, eggs, shellfish, wheat, peanuts and dairy( I know not popular since kefir is so popular).


Do you think raw milk products are "safe"?  :-\ I'm doing some extensive one...will try and link the site...it was in your list somewhere...here it is:
http://www.fpnotebook.com/ENT5.htm
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: YoopreMama April 18, 2007, 05:41:45 PM
The allergist we saw didn't recommend blood test. Our children were too young and they aren't accurate enough. I am not saying you shouldn't have one though. We followed an elimination diet and been successful. I have also read and read about food allergy.

If you are allergic to casein raw milk will still be a problem. I am not saying that you are but I have found that after Nourishing Traditions became popular raw milk has been touted as a cure. If you are intolerant to milk raw milk will help and of course it the best choice if you have no problems with dairy products. If you have an allergy it can aggravate the problem. My children get sick again even having acidophillus. I am just mentioning this in case you find it aggravating you. I have found it true personally and in reading allergy info.

If you have Unraveling the Mystery of Autism it also helpful to those with allergy.

That book is incredible!  It's been a few years since I read it.

No acidophilus, hey?  Wow.  I know eczema is often linked w/ dairy...I guess I should do a true elimination diet since that's one of the big 8...sigh..I love my yogurt!  I guess I hate my skin more.  Thanks again! 
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: YoopreMama April 18, 2007, 06:13:34 PM
When I started out I thought 7-10 days I can do that for my childrens health. You can do it!!!!

Thanks for the encouragement...I guess if I could do the Master Cleanse, I can do this :) (as a I eat sweet potato fries--glad they're not in the nightshade family!). ;D
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: mercy April 18, 2007, 06:55:19 PM
I had a rash on my ankles first, then my wrists, and finally my hands for over 25 years before I found out what was causing it:  milk!  I got off all milk right away, and the rash went away.

Until about two years ago....then suddenly it was back, even though there is no milk whatsoever in my diet.  I figured it was coming from something else, but what?  I did not have all the information presented here. 

The citric acid and nightshade stuff rings a bell with me.  Several years ago, a naturopath told me I was allergic to vitamin C.  I never went back to her because I thought, "How can I be allergic to something my body must have to survive?"  Also, after a really bad bout with candida about 10 yrs ago., I had the blood test done.  It did not show that I was sensitive to dairy (???), but it did show that I was sensitive to every kind of pepper they tested me for.  The literature accompanying the test report said that if you are sensitive to two or more foods in the same food family, you should stay away from all the others in that family too.  Peppers are, of course, in the nightshade family--as are tomatoes, potatoes, eggplant, and tobacco (so I had to give up chewing-- ;D haha!)  And it is as you said--cutting up fruit and vegetables makes my hands feels raw, especially when I am doing potatoes!

But here is what confuses me:  the only thing that I have done that gives me any lasting relief from this rash, i.e., it doesn't come back till a couple of weeks later, is to rub my hands with mangosteen juice, put on latex gloves to keep it from evaporating, and sleep with them on overnight.  In the morning, no rash.  This doesn't seem possible, but I have done it several times, with the same result each time. 

That seems backwards if I am allergic to citric...
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: YoopreMama April 18, 2007, 07:00:21 PM
*I* would remove ALL dairy because of my personal experience.  I'm resigning myself to it.   :-\

The elimination diet looks good.

I would also remove oats due to cross contamination with gluten. It was also take gluten longer than 7 days to leave your system. 2 weeks of no gluten  would be a minimum a month better. It looks like peanut butter is on the ok list. I would remove that also.  OK..no oats...PB will be missed a bit

I wouldn't bother reintroducing food coloring/ dye HUGE no no for food allergy sufferers plus its not good for anyone That's easy--been avoiding THAT for years!  ;D  Whew!

eta: Since you have been having problem so long I would do the elimination a minimum of 10 days to get it all out of your system. Can I give it a powerful name like the Master Cleanse has?  Like, The Supreme Elimination Cleanse?   :D

I will pray for you. Withdrawal of allergens can be tough. Your body will be screaming for them.Thank you for the prayers--they will be appreciated and coveted and effectual beyond anything I can do in the physical.

I missed these tips earlier--very good advice...thank you!   :-*
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: YoopreMama April 18, 2007, 07:03:42 PM
I had a rash on my ankles first, then my wrists, and finally my hands for over 25 years before I found out what was causing it:  milk!  I got off all milk right away, and the rash went away.  Thank you for sharing your experience! I'm starting to wonder about milk, too.   :-\

The citric acid and nightshade stuff rings a bell with me.  Several years ago, a naturopath told me I was allergic to vitamin C.  I never went back to her because I thought, "How can I be allergic to something my body must have to survive?" I'm thinking that, too, and hoping it's just an intolerance due to me overloading my system w/ it these past 3 months.   Also, after a really bad bout with candida about 10 yrs ago., I had the blood test done.  It did not show that I was sensitive to dairy (???), but it did show that I was sensitive to every kind of pepper they tested me for.  The literature accompanying the test report said that if you are sensitive to two or more foods in the same food family, you should stay away from all the others in that family too.  Peppers are, of course, in the nightshade family--as are tomatoes, potatoes, eggplant, and tobacco (so I had to give up chewing-- ;D haha!)   :D  And it is as you said--cutting up fruit and vegetables makes my hands feels raw, especially when I am doing potatoes!  I forgot about potatoes! OUCH!  >:(

But here is what confuses me:  the only thing that I have done that gives me any lasting relief from this rash, i.e., it doesn't come back till a couple of weeks later, is to rub my hands with mangosteen Must check that out--I think mango stings me, too...is it like mago?juice, put on latex Really? gloves to keep it from evaporating, and sleep with them on overnight.  In the morning, no rash.  This doesn't seem possible, but I have done it several times, with the same result each time. 

That seems backwards if I am allergic to citric...

Thanks again!   ;D
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: mercy April 18, 2007, 07:21:05 PM
But here is what confuses me:  the only thing that I have done that gives me any lasting relief from this rash, i.e., it doesn't come back till a couple of weeks later, is to rub my hands with mangosteen Must check that out--I think mango stings me, too...is it like mago?juice, put on latex Really? gloves to keep it from evaporating, and sleep with them on overnight.  In the morning, no rash.  This doesn't seem possible, but I have done it several times, with the same result each time. 

Mangoes and mangosteen is not the same thing.  Mangoes tear up my hands too.  Don't know why the mangosteen juice works--and it sure doesn't seem like it ought to!  :D
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: YoopreMama April 19, 2007, 05:11:50 AM
bump
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: abbilynn April 19, 2007, 05:35:50 AM
Hey Yooper!  ;D  Remember me telling you about citric acid coming from aspergillus niger?  What if you're actually allergic to that?  I know my son is allergic to it, but I've never tried removing citric acid from his diet.  :-\  (Agh!  So many things to think about!!)  Anyway, found this on wikipedia.

"In this production technique, which is still the major industrial route to citric acid used today, cultures of Aspergillus niger are fed on sucrose to produce citric acid. After the mold is filtered out of the resulting solution, citric acid is isolated by precipitating it with lime (calcium hydroxide) to yield calcium citrate salt, from which citric acid is regenerated by treatment with sulfuric acid.

Alternatively, citric acid is sometimes isolated from the fermentation broth by extraction with a hydrocarbon solution of the organic base trilaurylamine, followed by re-extraction from the organic solution by water."


"Information about citric acid intolerance is difficult to find but anecdotal evidence suggests that symptoms may include excess gas production, stomach cramps, diarrhea, headache, skin rashes, and acne. Since the body already contains citric acid it may be that the mold grown variety, that is an additive in many foods, is suspect in precipitating many reactions."
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: mercy April 19, 2007, 06:46:05 AM
Hey Yooper!  ;D  Remember me telling you about citric acid coming from aspergillus niger?  What if you're actually allergic to that?  I know my son is allergic to it, but I've never tried removing citric acid from his diet.  :-\  (Agh!  So many things to think about!!)  Anyway, found this on wikipedia.

"In this production technique, which is still the major industrial route to citric acid used today, cultures of Aspergillus niger are fed on sucrose to produce citric acid. After the mold is filtered out of the resulting solution, citric acid is isolated by precipitating it with lime (calcium hydroxide) to yield calcium citrate salt, from which citric acid is regenerated by treatment with sulfuric acid.

Alternatively, citric acid is sometimes isolated from the fermentation broth by extraction with a hydrocarbon solution of the organic base trilaurylamine, followed by re-extraction from the organic solution by water."


"Information about citric acid intolerance is difficult to find but anecdotal evidence suggests that symptoms may include excess gas production, stomach cramps, diarrhea, headache, skin rashes, and acne. Since the body already contains citric acid it may be that the mold grown variety, that is an additive in many foods, is suspect in precipitating many reactions."

I have indeed experienced ongoing problems with all these symptoms, but especially the last three.  I never would have thought, at the age of 50, that I would STILL be having problems with acne.  I rarely get the little pimples; for me, it is big ones that swell and are painful to the touch.  They seem to come up in a matter of hours, and are deep--they never seem to have a head on them.

This gives me a little hope though.  I was really bummed out last night after reading a lot of this thread.  I'm already milk and cane sugar free, and was thinking I might need to eliminate gluten too---and now this!  If I eliminated fruit and vegetable from my diet, the only thing left to eat would be meat and beans and rice.  No pepper to season it with either!  Suddenly the future was looking pretty grim...

But if it is the aspergillus niger, then maybe to answer is just to eat nothing but whole foods.  What do you think, friends?
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: abbilynn April 19, 2007, 07:08:20 AM
This is just an opinion, but if you would be allergic to citric acid, it seems to be the kind that is produced from a.niger, not the kind in the fruit.  So, if you were actually intolerant to a.niger, that would be easier to avoid.  For my son, we either peel the fruit, or wash it in natural fruit and veggie wash to get the a.niger off.  Apspergillus niger is a mold found on fruit, veggies, peanuts, etc.  It came up on his IgG test that he was allergic to it, that's how we found out.  HTH

abbilynn
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: abbilynn April 19, 2007, 07:12:01 AM
Found more stuff on wikipedia.  :)

"Aspergillus niger is a fungus and one of the most common species of the genus Aspergillus. It causes a disease called black mold on certain fruits and vegetables such as grapes, onions, and peanuts, and is a common contaminant of food. It is ubiquitous in soil and is commonly reported from indoor environments, where its black colonies can be confused with those of Stachybotrys (species of which have also been called "black mold").[1]

Some strains of A. niger have been reported to produce potent mycotoxins called ochratoxins,[2] but other sources disagree, claiming the latter report is based upon misidentification of the fungal species. Recent evidence suggests some true A. niger strains do produce ochratoxin A.[1]"

"A. niger causes black mold of onions. Infection of onion seedlings by A. niger can become systemic, manifesting only when conditions are conducive. A. niger causes a common postharvest disease of onions, in which the black conidia can be observed between the scales of the bulb. The fungus also causes disease in peanuts and in grapes. The spore comes to common trees such as maple."
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: mercy April 19, 2007, 07:33:44 AM
No problem to avoid peanuts--don't care for them that much anyway.  But no onions in my cooking??  And no grapes?  I might can live without grapes, though I sure will miss them.  But no onions in my cooking is almost inconceivable!  Help me out here, some of you who do this all the time....WHAT do you eat? 
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: abbilynn April 19, 2007, 07:44:29 AM
No problem to avoid peanuts--don't care for them that much anyway.  But no onions in my cooking??  And no grapes?  I might can live without grapes, though I sure will miss them.  But no onions in my cooking is almost inconceivable!  Help me out here, some of you who do this all the time....WHAT do you eat? 

You don't have to avoid the food, just wash it or peel it.  If the onion had the a.niger, you would see black spots inside it.  Otherwise, peel the outer layer like usual and use it.  With the grapes and such, I soak them in the fruit wash to remove any mold or junk, then rinse and eat.  My son does fine with them.  He also cannot have peanuts so I don't worry about those.  We soak raw veggies like broccoli also (you only need to soak for about 30 seconds).  We peel everything else and just make sure there's no black spots or apparent mold.  I know it can seem overwhelming!  It's like allergy central at our house! heehee  :D ;D ;)

abbilynn
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: mercy April 19, 2007, 11:08:50 AM
Thanks, Abbilynn!  I was starting to panic for a minute there. 
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: YoopreMama April 20, 2007, 05:35:45 AM
Thanks abbilynn for the quotes   :)

I am hopeful that it would just be the mold, but I was talking w/ my mom about my reactions to oranges in childhood and my great grandma who had sensitivities to potatoes/eczema, too...

I'm on Day 2 of the elimination diet, and the itchiness has greatly decreased.  The rash is slowly improving, too, on my legs.  Arms are still bad.   :( I'm SO HUNGRY!   >:(  I can't have tea, PB, coconut oil, oatmeal, butter and nothing's keeping me full.   :(

Will research more...but we have a BEAUTIFUL WEEKEND finally predicted (60s-70), so I will NOT be here at WTM (much).  ;D
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: abbilynn April 20, 2007, 05:58:23 AM
Thanks abbilynn for the quotes   :)

I am hopeful that it would just be the mold, but I was talking w/ my mom about my reactions to oranges in childhood and my great grandma who had sensitivities to potatoes/eczema, too...

I'm on Day 2 of the elimination diet, and the itchiness has greatly decreased.  The rash is slowly improving, too, on my legs.  Arms are still bad.   :( I'm SO HUNGRY!   >:(  I can't have tea, PB, coconut oil, oatmeal, butter and nothing's keeping me full.   :(

Will research more...but we have a BEAUTIFUL WEEKEND finally predicted (60s-70), so I will NOT be here at WTM (much).  ;D

If you've had reactions to citrus fruits before, I would guess it to be the citric acid I suppose.  :-\  But I'm hoping for the best for you!  I know how frustrating it can be to try and figure these things out - I have two boys I'm still struggling with, each with different issues.  :-\ :o  Sometimes you open one door just to find a thousand more to explore.  But I know the Lord will give you wisdom and bless your efforts.  ;D  Glad the elimination diet is helping.  You should definitely check out an intolerance to gluten.  Let us know how this all goes, and enjoy this awesome weather!!  ;D

abbilynn
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: YoopreMama April 21, 2007, 01:51:20 PM
Glad the elimination diet is helping.  You should definitely check out an intolerance to gluten.  Let us know how this all goes, and enjoy this awesome weather!!  ;D abbilynn

This particular ED is gluten free, I believe, b/c I'm taking the recommendation to omit oats. The weather is beautiful; the results are less than expected so far (but it's only Day 3).  I sure hope it's "only"a mold allergy.  :-\

I think my foundation has citric acid in it (or some variation thereof).  ::) Found some good Burt's Bees Shampoo, and ridded myself of products w/acids. Skin is still poor.   >:( :'( :( How's yours doing?

I will pray for you. Withdrawal of allergens can be tough. Your body will be screaming for them.
Thanks again!  My body IS screaming!   :(

I think I may start an elimination diet thread--there seems to be many variations.   ???
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: mercy April 21, 2007, 02:24:41 PM
I think I may start an elimination diet thread--there seems to be many variations.   

Please do!
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: YoopreMama April 24, 2007, 07:48:06 AM
Well, I'm on Day 6 of the ED and I'm learning lots.  :) Accidently took a supplement w/ citric acid last night and this morning...I'm itchier now... :-\ Not conclusive, by any means, but I will continue w/ this ED and learn more...and avoid citric acid as much as I can.  It really is in a lot of stuff.

Took a sauna today--hopefully that got rid of some stuff :D.  The weight loss is a nice fringe benefit    ;D

Taking zinc to help heal skin is something I'm trying to do--w/o the added fillers that are a no-no on the ED!   :(
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: YoopreMama April 24, 2007, 10:47:50 AM
http://www.juicingbook.com/fruits/

Citric acid is found in citrus fruits such as lemons, limes, grapefruit and oranges. In addition, citric acid is found in cranberries, strawberries, pineapples, peaches and even tomatoes!

Citric acid, when taken in excess, is said to make the blood too acidic. As such, it is said that the body tries to alkalize the blood by leaching alkalizing nutrients from the body such as calcium and magnesium.

As a result, you want to make sure you are not having too much citric acid in your diet.

Age, metabolic rate and how much exercise are 3 factors which can determine how much citric acid your body can handle without causing problems. Your health care professional can best determine how much is a safe amount for you.

What's a safe or appropriate amount of citric acid for you is only a question that your medical doctor or naturopathic doctor can answer for you. The answer to this question will vary from person to person.

The keyword here is "excess". Just as you normally will eat oranges, pineapples and other fruits which contain citric acid in your daily life, so can you drink the juice of fruits containing citric acid. You simply want to avoid excess citric acid.

Use common sense and if you have any concerns about citric acid, then consult your health care professional. The older you are, the more serious this problem can be as with age, we all begin to loose calcium in our bones.

I think I'll link this to the Master Cleanse site... :)

Here is a link and some of the foods w/ citric acid:
http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~vclarke/citric_foods.html#natural

List of Foods That Contain Citric Acid In Their Natural State
This list is growing all the time as I do more research!

Citrus fruits: all of 'em. It's strongest in lemons and limes, which are up to 8% citric acid by weight and can even be used to extract the chemical from; sour oranges can also be used, so we assume that the more sour the fruit the higher the citric acid content.

Berries and soft fruit: Almost all berries with the possible exception of blueberries. Certainly found in: strawberry, raspberry, gooseberry, cranberry, red currant, blackcurrant. Red currants are one of the worst offenders - red currant juice can be used to replace lemon juice in jam recipes!

Exotic fruits: Pineapple, tamarind

Stone fruits: Cherries (apparently only a small amount)

Vegetables: Tomatoes, cayenne peppers (not the same as sweet peppers), Jerusalem artichoke, lettuce (!)

Wine - as a by-product of fermentation, and to improve clarity

Cheese - Citric acid is used in the manufacturing process to help clot the milk faster. It may be an integral part of making certain cheeses, especially mass-produced mozzarella, but appears to be a by-product of industrialisation for most British cheeses: the traditional method of adding bacterial culture to the milk and allowing it to act slowly does not use added citric acid as far as I know. I don't, however, know whether citric acid also appears naturally in cheese as a by-product of the bacterial reactions. Conclusion: traditional (read: expensive) cheeses are likely to be safer, but the jury's out overall.

Sourdough breads eg. rye bread - as a by-product of fermentation.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Foods which often contain added citric acid
Stock cubes and concentrates, especially chicken. Check carefully as some brands are fine and others aren't.

Soft drinks - almost all of them, especially any fruit-flavoured ones. The only citric-free canned soft drinks I've discovered are Rubicon brand, which come in flavours like mango and guava.

Jams and fruit preserves - including fruit yoghurts and desserts. Chutneys and pickles are much less likely to contain it as they use vinegar (acetic acid) to preserve and acidify intead.

Canned tomatoes (NB tomatoes also contain a small amount of citric acid naturally). If you want to use canned tomatoes try organic varieties, which may be citric-free.

Canned fruit

Fruit flavour sweets - especially fizzy or sour ones. Citric acid is a major
ingredient in sherbet!

Some ice creams - Only some brands contain it, and they're often the cheaper ones which use vegetable fats. Citric acid in ice cream acts as an emulsifier to keep the globules of fat separate - this isn't necessary with "real" ice cream since the milk and cream are emulsified in and of themselves. As a rule, the more expensive the ice cream the less likely it is to contain citric acid; it's such a terrible hardship to only be able to eat very nice expensive ice cream ;-)

Convenience foods: especially tomato-based sauces.

Crisps: Only certain flavours, but often the more "complex" ones such as prawn cocktail and cheese and onion. Check the packet as brands vary.

Mayonnaise - Can be made with vinegar alone, but is most often made with lemon juice.


And this doesn't cover things like shampoo...toothpaste, etc.
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: cjanderin April 24, 2007, 12:37:24 PM
What about it being a salicylate intolerance rather than citric acid?  My dd (3yrs) has had major constipation up until two weeks ago but ever since getting completely cleared out she is suddenly reacting to berries, plums and last night to tomatoes.  My friend developed an intolerance to salicylitate a few years ago and it took months to discover what it was and then it was a really long time on a limited diet before she was better again.  Now and again it crops back up if she eats too much of the 'wrong' foods combined with being stressed or sick and she has to really watch what she eats for a week or so before she is ok again.
I'm now starting to research it for my dd and will go and get a test done at the doctor to see if that is the problem.  The trigger to whatever she is intolerant to seems to be having her digestive system all cleaned out.  Strange...

Here's some info about it :

Salicylate sensitivity is the body’s inability to handle more than a certain amount of salicylates at any one time. A salicylate sensitive person may have difficulty tolerating certain fruits, vegetables, or any products that contain aspirin.

What are salicylates?

Salicylate is a natural chemical made by many plants. It is chemically related to aspirin, which is a derivative of salicylic acid. It is believed the plant uses it as protection from insects, and they are everywhere around us.

Although natural salicylates are found in wholesome foods, some individuals have difficulty tolerating even small amounts of them. The reaction to a natural salicylate can be as severe as that to a synthetic additive if the person is highly sensitive. Some people are troubled by only a very few, but some are troubled by all of them.

Drugs that contain salicylates include aspirin, analgesics (painkillers), and muscle relaxants, cough mixtures, antacids, cold and flu medication and acne lotions.

What is salicylate sensitivity?

Some adults and children have a low level of tolerance to salicylates and may get symptoms that are dose-related. The tolerated amount varies from one person to another. This is an example of food intolerance.

What are some of the symptoms of Salicylate Intolerance?

• Chronic Urticaria & Angioedema

• Trigger for Eczema

• Asthma

• Nasal Polyps

• Sinusitis

• Rhino conjunctivitis

• Stomach aches and upsets

Foods containing Salicylates

Salicylates occur naturally in many fruits, and vegetables as a preservative, to prevent rotting and protect against harmful bacteria and fungi. They are stored in the bark, leaves, roots, and seeds of plants. Salicylates are found naturally in many foods and its compounds are used in many products.

• The salicylate level in food can vary, with raw foods, dried foods and juices containing higher levels than the same cooked foods.

• Salicylates are used in many flavoured products — sweets, toothpaste, chewing gum

• Some artificial food colourings and flavourings such as peppermint and strawberry

All fresh meat, fish, shellfish, poultry, eggs, dairy products, cereals, bread are low in salicylates

Foods with very high Salicylate content

Fruits:

Apricots
Blackberry
Blackcurrant
Blueberry
Boysenberry
Cherry
Cranberry
Currants
Dates
Grapes
Guava
Loganberry
Oranges
Pineapple
Plum
Prunes
Raisins
Raspberry
Redcurrant
Rockmelon
Strawberry
Tangelo
Tangerines
Youngberry

Vegetables:

Capsicum
Champignon
Chicory
Courgette
Endive
Gherkins
Hot Peppers
Olives
Radish
Tomato
Tomato based foods
 
Nuts, sweets, and snacks to avoid:

All jams, except pear
All jellies
All marmalade
Almond
Chewing gum
Fruit flavours
Honey and honey flavours
Liquorice
Mint flavoured sweets
Muesli bars
Peppermints
Savoury flavoured items
Water chestnuts

Herbs, spices, and condiments

Aniseed
Cayenne
Commercial gravies
Commercial sauces
Curry
Dill
Thyme
Fish paste
Meat paste
Tomato paste
White vinegar
Worcester sauce
 
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: YoopreMama April 24, 2007, 01:01:52 PM
Erin-
Thanks for the information.  :) I look forward to hearing what you come up with. These unusual allergies are beginning to frustrate me--feels like a wild goose chase!  >:(

I don't have any of the symptoms listed but the eczema.  :-\ I will keep this in mind should my theory on citric acid fail.   ;D

That is strange that the trigger is being all cleaned out... ??? I would think the opposite...What do I know?   :D
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: mercy April 24, 2007, 04:01:00 PM
I am allergic to milk.  I suffered with an itchy, scaly rash on my hands and sinusitis for over 20 years before I found out I was allergic to milk.  Within three days of getting off all milk, I was rash free for the first time.  Within two weeks, my sinusitis was gone.  After about 6 months, I wondered if I would be able to have milk in small doses.  My first try was with half a teaspoon of ice cream (hey, if you're going to take a risk, make it taste good!); no go--I not only  got the rash on my hands much worse than I would have expected, I got a sinus infection to boot.  It took the rash at least a week to go away.

I am so sensitive to it now, that I know within thirty minutes if I have inadvertantly eaten some because certain spots on my hands start itching.  By the next day, I will have a rash and a stuffy nose.  These symptoms will last for a week or more.  I don't understand it either; seems backwards, I know, but that's the way it is.
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: YoopreMama April 25, 2007, 02:24:38 AM
Mercy-
Thank you for sharing your experience w/ milk.  Did I see another post by you w/ numbers by symptoms of milk allergies?  THAT was helpful for my ds...the bright red ears...other things...he maybe joining me on the ED! Today is better, skin-wise. Still some residual itching, but the skin is clearing. I think that EVOO is really helping.

I've been loving my mint tea! And made some FABULOUS leek soup...turkey broth and other veggies.  WOW! My fist time using leeks...

I also saw that berries were full of citric acid (sans blueberries, possibly).  Bummer for now.  :(
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: mercy April 25, 2007, 08:22:59 AM
Did I see another post by you w/ numbers by symptoms of milk allergies?  THAT was helpful for my ds

Yep, you did.  The numbers were how many in my immediate family have suffered that particular symptom.  Glad it was helpful to you.

I also saw that berries were full of citric acid (sans blueberries, possibly).  Bummer for now. 

Yeah, I was bummed out to see that too. :-\
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: likemanywaters May 03, 2007, 07:06:10 AM
Saw citric acid on the list of ingredients for my son's Miracle Bubbles. Heads up for all trying to avoid it. It may be in other bubbles as well, but that one happened to have an ingredient list. Also it is mainly "detergent (a surfactant blend)", probably SLS and other petroleum based products we are trying to avoid as well...  Sooo anyone have any ideas about homemade bubble stuff? (not using liquid dish soap either).
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: likemanywaters May 05, 2007, 07:34:34 AM
My son LOVES lemons. He loves eating them plain right out of his water, just like orange slices.
Any clue why??  I know there has been much research by YooperMama on citric acid and eczema and all that. So I don't know whether him wanting them is a good or bad thing. I was thinking of keeping him off acidy fruits like lemons, citrus, tomatoes, but suppose he's craving them b/c his body needs them. I know a squirt of lemon juice in your water is supposed to help out your liver. Why? If lemons stimulate the body to release toxins, then maybe I should be giving him more? But I've read several places that acidy foods can agrivate eczema. Here's a thought. If lemons (or citrus) stimulate the body to release toxins and help the liver perhaps what some people would think is an allergic reaction, like an increase in rashes, is really an increase of the rate the body is releasing toxins... ??? Any thoughts anyone??

The lemons stimulate the body to release toxins
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: likemanywaters May 05, 2007, 11:13:41 AM
I really suppose I ought to get him an allergy test done, but I dread having to deal with doctors again.  :(  Casein would be a bummer though, b/c he loves his raw milk, butter, & cheese. Besides that, I've been not feeding him complex carbs b/c of the gluten thing, so if I took out dairy too, I feel like I'd have nothing to feed him. Thanks for the thoughts.
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: YoopreMama May 14, 2007, 04:40:08 PM
Ummm...just wanted to share something  ::)  :-[ ...

For those allergic to citric acid, there is a pop w/o it...A & W Root Beer is citric acid-free.   ;D

When I want a pop, it's nice to know I can have one!   ;D
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: likemanywaters May 15, 2007, 09:27:02 AM
YooperMama,

You really should re-read the "Unraveling the Mystery of Autism" book. I just ordered it and did for the first time and couldn't put it down. DH forced me to sleep for a few hours, but I got it last night and finished it by noon today. Its all in there!!! The connection to eczema. She actually lists that as one of her son's symptoms. Casein, gluten, fruits containing phenolics (apples, bananas), salycites (citrus), potatoes, rice, digestive issues my son has had, constipation, diahrrea, sinus infections, vomiting, constant "snack" cravings for the very food he is addicted to...  I'm beginning to put even more stuff together I had not already.  PS - I've tried, per suggestion in the book an epsom salt bath with him and I can tell those definitely have a different effect on him than the Dead Sea Salt ones. He prefers them! and I can see a different sort of activity & itchiness going on at his rashes that doesn't happen during a DSS one. It's something to do with the body not producing Phenol sulphur transferase (PST) and I guess epsom salts (magnesium sulfate) somehow stimulates. Anyway, it's all in there!! The pancreas and enzyme deficiency. And something I want to research further. Something about this "Secretin" given to them to stimulate pancreatic enzyme release to test their stools for it. Given this, alot of kids really improved directly as a result of the massive release of pancreatic enzymes. I KNOW something has been going on with DS's pancreas and common bile duct opening! Things she describes in the book, like swelling of the ileum, perhaps the duodenum too? Seems to be bacterial in nature. After EVERY TIME my son has had one of his digestive "episodes" with throwing up, then diahrrea, even fever, his skin improved as soon as the common bile duct opened back up (swelling went down? got unconstricted?) and bile was flowing again, his skin cleared up immediately. Anyway, I'm starting him on the diet like she says, with the addition of he reacts to ANYTHING sweet, fruits, honey, and potatoes and rice.... more later I could go on and on.

Blessings,
April

PS - How are you doing??
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: YoopreMama May 15, 2007, 11:21:25 AM
I DID read the book a few years ago. :)  It IS fabulous.  Sounds like I could read it again w/ a different perspective and goal!   ;D
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: likemanywaters May 15, 2007, 03:42:05 PM
Found this and thought all the good tips on citric acid fit here too:

My son developed eczema at age 2 months (our story was exactly like 'alittlemore' described in her post).  We discovered quite by accident that one thing he was very sensitive to was polyester and acrylic fabrics.  Cotton, rayon and nylon did not bother him so we switched  clothes and bedding to cotton.  Made a big difference! 

Two other things to menion:  He and I both have food sensitivies and we have found that taking pancreatic enzymes with meals have helped a lot.  I think they help break down the food more quickly so it doesn't escape out the leaky gut as easily.  We are also taking probiotics and flax seed (an ER doctor recommended the flax seed for asthma/breathing issues - it helped his son and I've seen excellent results with my son as well).

The other thing is we are sensitive to peanuts and corn, specifically the mold on them.  So we don't eat anything with corn or peanuts (no Chic-Fil-A for us) -- including corn syrup and  CITRIC ACID, which is commercially produced from corn mold and is in SO many food and beauty products.  READ LABELS - citric acid is in shampoo, lotions, liquid soaps, beverages, prepared foods, even "health" foods.  The only liquid soaps I have found I can use are some of the Suave bath gels and Dawn Plus (Complete) dish soap.

And get this: pet food is made primarily from corn, and citric acid is in the fat that is sprayed on the outside of dog food chunks (I know - I work as a shipping clerk in a pet food factory!) - if a dog licks my son, or he touches a dog or cat's fur, or if he puts his hand in the dog's water bowl, he IMMEDIATELY breaks out in itchy rash.  My sister in law has a dog that is allergic to almost everything, so she makes homemade food for her consisting of rice, chicken, and vegetables.  My son played with her dog and he never once broke out! So that seems to confirm my suspicion that corn is the main culprit for him.

I have found that prayer for wisdom and discernmnet has helped us find solutions to my son's problem and I know it will help your husband as well!
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: YoopreMama May 15, 2007, 04:37:27 PM
YooperMama,
PS - I've tried, per suggestion in the book an Epsom salt bath with him and I can tell those definitely have a different effect on him than the Dead Sea Salt ones. He prefers them! and I can see a different sort of activity & itchiness going on at his rashes that doesn't happen during a DSS one. It's something to do with the body not producing Phenol sulphur transferase (PST) and I guess Epsom salts (magnesium sulfate) somehow stimulates.
Blessings,
April 
PS - How are you doing??
Oh, April, thanks for thinking of me and for checking in w/ such interesting information!  I was reading that book at a time when I didn't know 1/2 of what I know now, so I was missing a lot, I'm sure.  ::) Sounds like some summer reading for me!   :D

The Epsom Salts info is particularly interesting b/c after I bought a big shipment of DSS earlier this winter, I slacked on Eppies and I can't recall the last time I had them.  I was alternating, but now I'm out of both.  Time to pick up some more I think!

God has healed my skin amazingly...I posted about it in the Elimination Diet and Prayer Request/Praises threads.  I did the diet for 2 weeks and am convinced the allergies (or what degree of intolerance, I'm not sure) are related to citric acid or the mold affiliated w/ it.  I have allergy testing next Wednesday, so I'll be curious to see what happens.  I suspect I have a dairy problem, if it's homogenized/pasteurized, but not if it's untreated.   :-\

I was told silk, b/c it's "natural" is OK to wear, too.  And that powdered laundry detergent is particularly harsh on skin...my homemade soap also has coconut-derived cleansers in it, so I'm on All-Free for now. 

Thanks again!   :-*
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: boysmama July 04, 2007, 06:01:33 AM
Just reading this thread now. Very interesting about the difference between naturally occurring citric acid and the commercially grown form.
My ds (2 yrs) has an almost instant reaction (red rash around the mouth and flushing) to any item that includes citric acid on the label, but is fine with whole foods that contain it or all natural prepared foods - that have something like real lemon juice added. I knew there had to be a difference between the natural and the additive!!!
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: Mommyof4 July 29, 2007, 07:21:18 PM
OKAY, Tomatoes and coconut have naturally occurring chemical that MANY people have intolerance or allergies to.
If the citric acid isn't from the company NOW then it is probably corn derived, meaning, allergy! MANY people have corn intolerance or allergies.
I have food chemical charts with this info if anyone wants me to share, contact me privately.
Look at this site www.fedupwithfoodadditives.info/
Lindsey
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: handsful l--l_ August 03, 2007, 05:54:44 AM
I believe I possibly have a dairy allergy.  For the first 14 years of my life we ate healthy and got milk and cheese from a dairy farm. (unpasteurized) Then we move to another state when I was 14.  We got milk from the store.  Suddenly I developed a constant cold.  This went on for 2-3 years.  Finally my mother suggested I might have a dairy allergy.  I didn't think so, but I went off dairy for a while.  When I tried to have milk products I would immediately develop a stuffed up nose and would feel like my tonsils were swelling.

Since reading Unraveling the Mystery of Autism and reading a lot on this site I realized that the brain fogginess and random diarrhea were probably the result of the dairy.  Am I right?  Do I have a dairy allergy or could there be something else going on?  I don't take anything for it - I only remember vitamins when I'm sick. :)  It seems to help after I've had ice cream to drink a lot of water.  Thanks, handsful
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: diaperswyper August 03, 2007, 06:52:14 AM
   Whenever my dh drinks pasturized milk his sinus's start clogging up. We went on raw milk and it cleared up.
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: handsful l--l_ August 03, 2007, 07:22:24 AM
Whenever we go back to our previous state we get the milk and cheese. I still have a reaction to it though. >:( It is very frustrating to say the least!
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: jennyrose August 11, 2007, 04:40:05 AM
I am getting so much good information here.  But I have a question about Epsom salt baths....Good or bad???  They seem to help my son 3 yr old son w/ eczema and insomnia  but I took him off thinking they were bad.  I was adding 2 parts Epsom salt to 1 part baking soda(to keep toxins from reentering his body).  Could someone help me better understand this? Thanks so much!
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: YoopreMama August 11, 2007, 07:21:38 AM
I am getting so much good information here.  But I have a question about Epsom salt baths....Good or bad???  They seem to help my son 3 yr old son w/ eczema and insomnia but I took him off thinking they were bad.  I was adding 2 parts Epsom salt to 1 part baking soda(to keep toxins from reentering his body).  Could someone help me better understand this? Thanks so much!
If I remember correctly, the Epsom salts comment was re: a specific situation...I think the DSS were preferred in that situation.  I have never heard of Epsom salt baths being bad, though...there's a thread somewhere that describes what exactly they do...I have NO idea where it is, though...???
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: amazonmama2five August 11, 2007, 07:31:14 AM
Under the thread Epsom salts there is a reference to a NGJ article.  Maybe this is what you were looking for?
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: likemanywaters August 11, 2007, 02:31:44 PM
I've never heard of Epsom salts bath being bad for any reason. I use them for my son's skin. I know they help the body gain extra sulfur & magnesium (which is good) because that's what they are - magnesium sulfate. I know I've read that they really help some kids who have digestive issues and/or autism. I also use Dead Sea Salt too.
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: Mommyof4 August 11, 2007, 04:08:32 PM
We use epsom salts and baking soda for baths when we are reacting to a food issue, it does help pull the toxins out of our system.
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: janns February 17, 2010, 08:40:50 AM
You are definately sure it is hives?  You are probably right, just want to make sure.  Finding the cause for hives is like asking yourself who gave me a cold?  It could be an endless of things.  In my medical book that I read too much,  ;) it states that hives are generally brought on by an allergic reaction for it is the release of histamines in the body that cause it. 
But it does say that certain viruses can cause hives such as hepatitius B and the Epstein Barr Virus.  Is there an outbreak of mono in your neck of the woods? 
It also states that out breaks of Candida Albicans and hives can go hand in hand.  Oh, that's a shock, huh?!
I will list what the book says are some of the most common reasons for hive outbreaks:

Animals, dander and saliva
Aspirin
A gout medication that I don't want to spell out
Antimony, a metallic element present in various metal alloys
Barbituates
BHA and BHT
Bismuth, another metalic element present in metal alloys
Cancer, especially luekemia
Chloral hydrate, a sedative
Chlorpromazine, a tranquilizer
Cologne or perfume
Enviromental factors, heat, cold, water, sunlight
Eucalyptus
Exercise
Flourides
Food allergies
Food collorings and preservatives
Gold
Griseofulvin, and antifungal medication
Hyperthyroidism
Infections, strep, hepatitis, parasites
Insect bites
Insulin
Iodines
Liver Extract
Makeup
Menthol
Meprobamate, a tranquilizer
Mercury
Morphine
Opium
Para-aminosslicylic acid, an anti-inflammatory drug
Penicillin
Phenacetrin, an ingredient in some pain medications
Phenobabital, a sedative
Pilocarpine, a glaucoma medication
Plants
A polio vaccine
Potassium sulfocyanate, a preservative
Preservatives
Novocain, an anesthetic
Quinine
Reserpine, heart medication
Saccharin
Salicylates
Soaps
Shampoo
Sulfites
Tartrazine, a food dye and an ingredient in Alka-Seltzer
Thiamine hydrochloride, and ingredient in some cough medications

Here is some to get you started, HB.  Hope you figure it out!!


I'm new here and hope this is the correct way to get some info. I searched for hives and allergies and found this thread. I have had a cough for about a week and hives for about 3 days. I'm generally healthy. I have an allergy to penicillin products (broke out in hives last time I took them). I believe that I'm allergic to mold as well (got a horrible cough and congestion when my mattress got moldy). These things were years ago. Currently, a few family members have had colds. I got a cough and figured I had the cold too. Then I broke out in hives. I have not eaten differently or done anything else differently either. I am not on any medications (except the Benadryl for the hives). We do have some mold on the windowsills and windows in our house. I was thinking that maybe the cough and the hives were mold related and then I found this list. Mold is not listed as one of the reasons for hives. Maybe the hives are a result of a cold virus...? Does anyone have any ideas or advice? I have no idea what to do and the Benadryl is a pain because it makes me so sleepy.
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: healthybratt February 17, 2010, 11:27:33 AM
Does anyone have any ideas or advice? I have no idea what to do and the Benadryl is a pain because it makes me so sleepy.
Read these.

http://bulkherbstore.blogspot.com/2009/11/dermographism-what-on-earth-is-that.html
http://bulkherbstore.blogspot.com/2009/06/lou-gehrigs-disease-and-help-for-other.html

while you're considering all of this, try a couple of charcoal capsules.  i found that a couple of these right after eating an allergen trigger often helped rid my body of the trigger's toxins and the hives would go away.

: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: HappyWifey February 17, 2010, 02:00:08 PM
I'm glad this came up as those of you on Rebars know I am eliminating gluten to see if I am allergic to it. It makes me wonder though if I might be allergic to anything else. What are common symptoms of allergies? I don't ever have any hives or anything, except this past winter I have had on my knees and elbows spots that are just like bug bites (only no bugs) they are itchy, puffy, red. And as soon as I start putting any moisturizer on them they go away. I think that is just from the dry winter air though.

Anyways I'm wondering if any of the odd symptoms I have every now and then might be allergic reactions to something and I not know it.

I have HORRIBLE memory, and it is getting worse. Sometimes I feel like I am in a fog as far as my thinking. I forget things people ask me to do ALL the time. I'm only 23!

Every now and then I itch, down there, but I never develop a yeast infection. (I haven't ever had one since I was a little girl and didn't wash properly)

I always used to get about 2 pimples any time in the week before I started my cycle. Now all of the sudden for the last three months they have been coming mid cycle.

I get bad side pains, non gas related at times.

For the last 3 months or so I have had a really odd reaction to caffeine, my heart feels like it is beating wildly, but it is not, the feeling actually comes from my lung area, and breathing deep becomes difficult, and I have panic attacks. (never had a panic attack before until this happened)

My eyes are SUPER sensitive. While reading Dr. Shultzes book on Cayenne he mentioned how he had a bunch blown into his eyes, and immediately after I read that my eyes started "smarting" and I had to cover them with a pillow. My eyesight has gotten worse really fast in the past year.


I had a whole bunch but now I can't think of them... *sigh* My memory is the worst thing, if I could get a good memory back I would be happy. And so would my DH...  ::)
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: boysmama February 17, 2010, 03:30:30 PM
 Read this! (http://www.drrind.com/therapies/metabolic-therapy) Your symptoms are classic. I think you have every one.  :o The caffeine reaction kind of confirms it.
The other joint issues and such also indicate an immune and inflammation issue in your body.
You will also find that if you can take care of the endocrine issues it will help with the immune system sensitivity and that will resolve most food intolerances. (and reduce other allergies such as hay fever, chemical, and animal).
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: boysmama February 17, 2010, 03:42:45 PM
Actually, anyone who has food intolerances and allergies needs to read that link. I don't see the link between immune and endocrine system imbalances and allergies mentioned anywhere else in this thread. May have missed it, but it won't hurt to bring it up again.

Recently I've become aware of some research that is correlating the recent surge in GMO to increased immune function disorders....from autism to allergies, DNA disruption diseases...You don't actually have to plant GMO seed or even eat GMO product to suffer from side effects. Since exposure is almost unavoidable proactive immune system defense is important to preventing intolerances from developing.

Of course there is already awareness of possible immune system damage from things like vaccines, pharmacueticals, and other enviromental toxins such as mercury in amalgams and the new light bulbs they've mandated on us.
Since diabeties and fatty liver syndrome are also metabolic diseases the list of related and intertwined illness is unending.  :o

Allergies are an effect, a symptom; NOT a cause. Check it out!  If you stop at avoiding allergens it won't ultimately lead you to health. Got to go deeper.

It just goes on and on.  >:( Anyway... here is the link again.
http://www.drrind.com/therapies/metabolic-therapy (http://www.drrind.com/therapies/metabolic-therapy)
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: janns February 18, 2010, 04:45:00 AM
Thank you. I have plenty to think about now! :) I am pretty convinced that the cough and hives are a result of mold growing on our windows. I don't know anything about charcoal capsules. I better start researching!
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: HappyWifey February 18, 2010, 01:05:06 PM
Read this! (http://www.drrind.com/therapies/metabolic-therapy) Your symptoms are classic. I think you have every one.  :o The caffeine reaction kind of confirms it.
The other joint issues and such also indicate an immune and inflammation issue in your body.
You will also find that if you can take care of the endocrine issues it will help with the immune system sensitivity and that will resolve most food intolerances. (and reduce other allergies such as hay fever, chemical, and animal).

Wow I have quite a few of those symptoms, some are ones I didn't even mention. I'm pretty sure my thyroid is working ok (can't get it tested) but my hormones very likely are messed up. I have the herbal formulas to fix them, if I could only just get myself to remember to fix up the capsules and take them. Also another problem though is that I am going GF for 30 days and I recently learned that those two formulas will NOT work if I am not taking Wheat Germ Oil with them. :/
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: mykidsmom February 18, 2010, 02:09:11 PM
Read this! (http://www.drrind.com/therapies/metabolic-therapy) Your symptoms are classic. I think you have every one.  :o The caffeine reaction kind of confirms it.
The other joint issues and such also indicate an immune and inflammation issue in your body.
You will also find that if you can take care of the endocrine issues it will help with the immune system sensitivity and that will resolve most food intolerances. (and reduce other allergies such as hay fever, chemical, and animal).

Wow I have quite a few of those symptoms, some are ones I didn't even mention. I'm pretty sure my thyroid is working ok (can't get it tested) but my hormones very likely are messed up. I have the herbal formulas to fix them, if I could only just get myself to remember to fix up the capsules and take them. Also another problem though is that I am going GF for 30 days and I recently learned that those two formulas will NOT work if I am not taking Wheat Germ Oil with them. :/

HW,  I found that the longer I was GF , the better my memory has gotten.  I've always had a horrible memory way back to highschool and it's actually getting better the longer I stay away from my food allergens.   As far as hormone formulas go, when I find I can't add something to it because of an allergy, I just do all of the other portions of a formula and leave out what I can't have.  It's better to do that, then nothing at all. 

patti
: Re: Recognizing & Avoiding Allergens [Intolerances]
: HappyWifey February 18, 2010, 04:37:54 PM
Thanks Patti, I actually feel less fuzzy brained today. Not sure if it's the placebo effect or not though. :)

I will go ahead and start taking the pills, asap. :)