Author Topic: Home Canning  (Read 45282 times)

Offline ~CKMom~

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Re: Home Canning
« Reply #60 on: September 12, 2007, 04:22:25 AM »
Thanks, Sarah K for the tip, too.  I can't wait to try all of this.  Now I just need DH to find our propane single burner so that I can get started.  Come to think of it, if I don't have to cook the chicken first, maybe I could use my sister's stove!  Thanks, Everyone!

Offline Lovin'myHoneyinVT

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Re: Home Canning
« Reply #61 on: September 25, 2007, 05:41:36 AM »
Hi, you probably don't know me...I only talk a little but I have been reading for a long time.  I love to can and store up stuff I've grown...my question is can I substitute sea salt for canning salt when pickling my jalapeņos?  I do have chunky sea salt  :)
 

Offline SarahK

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Re: Home Canning
« Reply #62 on: September 25, 2007, 05:53:49 AM »
Yep.  Canning salt is made w/o iodine cuz the iodine makes the liquid cloudy in the jar.  Your sea salt will probably make things cloudy in there - but I wouldn't expect it to be 'harmful' to the project.

Sarah K
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Offline Lovin'myHoneyinVT

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Re: Home Canning
« Reply #63 on: September 25, 2007, 06:04:57 AM »
Thanks, i can get to it now.   :D

Offline Ruby

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Re: Home Canning
« Reply #64 on: November 09, 2007, 05:33:55 AM »
Has anyone used a Steam Canner?  I saw it on the Back to Basics site and wondered if it was good.  Looks simple.  I think it's used instead of a water bath canner.

Offline Lovin'myHoneyinVT

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Re: Home Canning
« Reply #65 on: November 09, 2007, 05:50:20 AM »
No, but knowing the theory behind it might help.  Steam is hotter than boiling water as it is the gas form so I think it should work as well to remove the air from the jars.  I would try it with one or two and then see how well it seals.  Let us know if you try it.  Lovin'

Offline SarahK

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Re: Home Canning
« Reply #66 on: November 09, 2007, 05:56:01 AM »
Has anyone used a Steam Canner?  I saw it on the Back to Basics site and wondered if it was good.  Looks simple.  I think it's used instead of a water bath canner.

I got one 2 summers ago and have had no problems with it.  We did some searching and (though I can't find the info now) we found that the testing done by "the steam canner tester folks" didn't meet USDA testing standards to gain the USDA approval.  From our understanding, the food being canned was in a cool or raw state before canned in their tests.  USDA testing standards require hot food temps as designated by some guideline somehow.  The food, tested as it was, did meet all the intermal temperatures required by USDA for approval as 'safe', but since the procedure did not follow the 'heated food' guideline, the method was not approved. 

I will continue to re-investigate where we found the exact info and post it as I find it. 

I have canned all my BWB can-able stuff with my steam canner.  I have fewer spoiled jars w/ my steam canner.  I won't go with the BWB anymore.  Too much time, heat, water, popped jar bottoms when adding your 2nd/3rd batch of jars to the pot, etc.

Sarah K
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Offline SarahK

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Re: Home Canning
« Reply #67 on: November 09, 2007, 06:53:58 AM »
FOUND IT!


I will continue to re-investigate where we found the exact info and post it as I find it. 


It's in PDF format here.

http://www.agls.uidaho.edu/fcs/extension/news/May05.pdf

 The article starts on page 5 of this document.  This info, along with our experiences in the last 2 years, makes us comfortable with the steam canner as a safe method.


Sarah K
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Offline SarahK

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Re: Home Canning
« Reply #68 on: November 09, 2007, 12:07:21 PM »
« Last Edit: November 12, 2007, 07:31:26 AM by healthybratt »
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Offline Lovin'myHoneyinVT

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Re: Home Canning
« Reply #69 on: November 10, 2007, 02:04:46 PM »
Has anyone used a Steam Canner?  I saw it on the Back to Basics site and wondered if it was good.  Looks simple.  I think it's used instead of a water bath canner.

I got one 2 summers ago and have had no problems with it. 
----
I have canned all my BWB can-able stuff with my steam canner.  I have fewer spoiled jars w/ my steam canner.  I won't go with the BWB anymore.  Too much time, heat, water, popped jar bottoms when adding your 2nd/3rd batch of jars to the pot, etc.

Sarah K

Thanks SarahK, I was wondering if anyone had tried it.  I hate to hear that crack noise just after I place the jars in the water.  I have noticed that it is the older jars that tend to break.  Rats!  They are the pretty ones.  I would get a steamer if I knew where and it wasn't too expensive.  Maybe next year.  I am done for this year.  Have you ever canned pumpkin?  I think I would need to pressure cook it.  Let me know if anyone has done this.  Thanks, Lovin'

Offline herbalmom

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Re: Home Canning
« Reply #70 on: November 10, 2007, 03:15:33 PM »
Have you ever canned pumpkin?  I think I would need to pressure cook it.  Let me know if anyone has done this.  Thanks, Lovin'

I have never pressure canned but I do know that pumpkin is low acid & has to be pressure canned. HTH Blessings ~herbalmom

Offline mhsmama4

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Re: Home Canning
« Reply #71 on: November 10, 2007, 03:28:29 PM »
I am done for this year.  Have you ever canned pumpkin?  I think I would need to pressure cook it.  Let me know if anyone has done this.   Thanks, Lovin'

Pumpkin chunks can be safely canned in a pressure canner.  Pumpkin puree or pumpkin butter cannot.  I learned this after the fact and had to dump all my pumpkin butter.   :(

Offline Lovin'myHoneyinVT

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Re: Home Canning
« Reply #72 on: November 14, 2007, 02:19:45 PM »
Pumpkin butter has to work somehow!  How else would the big companies be able to can it?  Perhaps it needs something extra.  If you come across anyone who can can pumpkin puree, let me know how they accomplished this please. 

Lovin'

Offline makingchanges

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Re: Home Canning
« Reply #73 on: December 16, 2007, 04:39:59 PM »
Has anyone canned different soups? Any good recipes? I want to can some for Christmas presents to different people.

Offline *MommaJo*

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Re: Home Canning
« Reply #74 on: December 16, 2007, 04:46:27 PM »
Has anyone canned different soups? Any good recipes? I want to can some for Christmas presents to different people.

Ditto!



Offline makingchanges

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Re: Home Canning
« Reply #75 on: December 18, 2007, 11:38:57 AM »
Has anyone canned different soups? Any good recipes? I want to can some for Christmas presents to different people.

bump

Offline SarahK

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Re: Home Canning
« Reply #76 on: December 18, 2007, 12:13:15 PM »
Chili

5 pounds gr. beef (I use 75% venison)
2 c chopped onions
1 clove garlic, minced
6 c cooked or canned tomatoes and juice
1/2 c chili powder
1.5 Tb salt
1 hot red pepper, finely chopped
1 t cumin seed

Brown meat.  Drain excess fat. Add onion & garlic & Cook until onions are tender.  Add remaining ingredients and simmer 20 min.  Skim fat before canning.  Ladle hot chili into hot jars. 1 inch headspace.  Pints 1 hr 15 min or quarts 1 hr 30 min at 10 pounds pressure. (4 quarts)

Chicken soup
4 qt chicken stock
3 c chicken, diced
1.5 c diced celery
1.5 c sliced carrots
1 cu diced onion

Bring all to boil.  Simmer 30 min.  1 inch headspace.  pints 1 hr 15 min and quarts 1 hr 30 min at 10 pounds. (4 quarts)

But nearly all non-thickened soups can be canned.  Do you have something you want to can up - give me your recipe and I'll look up what I need to find out to tell you how to can it.  (In my humble opinion, based on personal experience w/o any guarantees about your own personal results.  I'm not a Post Hole Digger either.)

Sarah K
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Offline SarahK

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Re: Home Canning
« Reply #77 on: December 18, 2007, 12:21:26 PM »
I forgot I have done this one too.  Only did it once as it went over like a lead balloon - except with me and the few other bean lover I know.  We were outnumbered.


10 bean soup

1/2 cup each: 
black beans
kindey bens
navy beans
pinto beans
Great Northern beans

1/4 cup each:
blackeye peas
split peas
chick peas
lentils

1.5 cup diced ham (optional)
1/2 c fresh cut green beans
2 bay leaves
1 Tb  tarragon
1 Tb summer savory

cover beans with water and soak 12-18 hrs.  Drain.  Cover with water by 1 inch in large saucepot.  Add ham, gr beans and spices.  Bring to boil & boil 30 min.  Remove bay leaves.  1 inch headspace.  pints and quarts both 1 hr 30 min at 10 pounds pressure.  (6 qts)
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Offline boysmama

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Re: Home Canning
« Reply #78 on: December 18, 2007, 02:02:19 PM »
Pumpkin butter has to work somehow!  How else would the big companies be able to can it?  Perhaps it needs something extra.  If you come across anyone who can can pumpkin puree, let me know how they accomplished this please. 

Lovin'
OK,  I can pumpkin puree 10 lbs. 45 min. HTH  This is plain puree; no need to add anything extra. I usually cut a washed pumpkin into just small enough pieces to fit in my largest kettle, steam/cook until soft, cool enough to handle to get the peel off, and then run through a sieve or the blender to make it nice and smooth. Jar and process.

Offline makingchanges

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Re: Home Canning
« Reply #79 on: December 19, 2007, 05:22:39 AM »
Sarah, am I understanding you that you should not add any flour to thicken the soup. I made homemade tomato soup last summer with flour in it to thicken it. They are for Christmas presents so I haven't eaten them. Will they taste bad? Of my.

I wanted to can something like Chicken tortilla soup, vegetable soup. What do you think?

Offline SarahK

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Re: Home Canning
« Reply #80 on: December 19, 2007, 06:11:03 AM »
Sarah, am I understanding you that you should not add any flour to thicken the soup. I made homemade tomato soup last summer with flour in it to thicken it. They are for Christmas presents so I haven't eaten them. Will they taste bad? Of my.

I wanted to can something like Chicken tortilla soup, vegetable soup. What do you think?

The flour or cornstarch thickened soups have 2 problems in the canning jars.  First - the thickener can act as a growth medium for bacteria.  It's thick, so it increases the chances of 'cool spots' in the center of the canning jar while it's being processed that can harbor bacteria that will grow later as the rest of the jar cools.

Second - the thickener is often altered on the edges of the jar where it gets the hottest so it's lumpy or weepy or the like.  The end product is just not very appealing most of the time.

Now, your pre-thickened soup on the shelf might not have a problem with either of these.  But the chances of having these sorts of problems are much higer with a thickened soup.  It just plain is not likely at all with a thin soup that you thicken after opening/before serving.

As for Chicken tortilla soup or veggie soup - both sound fine unless you intend to put the tortillas in the jar - then I would say 'not a good idea' to that one for the same reason as the thicken soups.  The tortilla is flour or corn flour based and will likely be a mushy paste when you are opening the jar.

Veggie soups w/o meat or meat broth may require less canning time.

Make sense?

Sarah K
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Offline makingchanges

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Re: Home Canning
« Reply #81 on: December 19, 2007, 08:07:45 AM »
I really appreciate your advice. I have never heard this info. and I am so blessed by some added knowledge. It sure makes sense.

Offline Lovin'myHoneyinVT

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Re: Home Canning
« Reply #82 on: December 21, 2007, 05:38:24 AM »
Thanks boys mama!  I have a pressure cooker that is ...okay, I don't have one anymore (I just looked all over my house).  It was only big enough to hold maybe three pint jars...I don't even remember if it was tall enough.  I never pressure cooked anything so I guess I gave it away.  My MIL gave it to me since she had two...I have yet to see or hear of her using that one (which was exactly the same as the one she gave me).  What would I look for in a Pressure cooker if I were to buy one?  Size, brand, # of Quarts it holds?  Thanks and Merry Christmas. Lovin'

Offline boysmama

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Re: Home Canning
« Reply #83 on: December 21, 2007, 06:46:13 AM »
The All American metal to metal seal is by far the best pressure canner. I can between 600-800 quarts a year (and more as our family grows :)). A rubber seal needs to be replaced every two years at that rate of use.
 The All American also has automatic pressure control. This is a huge safety and time saving feature. Of course you don't want to turn your heat high and go to town or anything, but you don't have to watch it as closely because it has the adjustable metal weight instead of a just a single weight which needs to be controlled manually by frequent heat adjustments.
The All American has both the adjustable weight and a pressure gauge.
As far as size... choose according to your needs. I don't do many two quart jars, but it is nice to have one tall enough for that. The size that holds 7 quarts fits nicely on a standard stove element, can do several two quart jars, or (11 I think) pints at a time by double stacking. Lots of my recipes  and methods of gardening are gauged to the 7 quart capacity. You can run fewer than 7 quarts if you need to.
Here are some pictures and more info.
www.homesteadhelpers.com/get_item_aapc_all-american-pressure-canners.htm

All that said it is possible to pressure can with a cheap Presto canner from Walmart ;) My mom did over 1000 quarts a year for 18 years and I borrowed one for the first year I was married, but when it comes down to really getting into home canning it is well worth the $ 200- $ 250 for the All American. It will last a lifetime!
« Last Edit: December 21, 2007, 06:50:13 AM by boysmama »

Offline SarahK

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Re: Home Canning
« Reply #84 on: December 21, 2007, 04:28:19 PM »
I agree.  All-American is a more expensive variety, but the benefit of almost zero maintenance is a great plus.  You can do lots of canning with a regular rubber-gasketed variety, but it is more maintenance.

And the usual amounts of jars are 7 quarts or 10 pints per layer.  Some extra tall canners allow stacks of pints so that would be more jars through in one time allowance, but it would be in pint jars only - which would be too small for some families I know....

Sarah K
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Offline mhsmama4

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Re: Home Canning
« Reply #85 on: December 21, 2007, 06:23:18 PM »
Pumpkin butter has to work somehow!  How else would the big companies be able to can it?  Perhaps it needs something extra.  If you come across anyone who can can pumpkin puree, let me know how they accomplished this please. 

Lovin'

I was told when I asked this on another message board that home canning equipment cannot reach the same temperatures as commercial canning equipment.  I believe home equipment reaches only 240 or something like that.  Also there is some info here about other reasons why you should not home can pumpkin:  http://www.pumpkinpatchesandmore.org/pumpkinprecautions.php
Believe me, I was disappointed to read this, especially as I had just canned a whole batch of yummy pumpkin butter about two days previously.  If I'd read this a little sooner I could have at least refrigerated the jars and saved it.
« Last Edit: December 21, 2007, 08:02:21 PM by mhsmama4 »

Offline herbalmom

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Re: Home Canning
« Reply #86 on: December 21, 2007, 06:56:28 PM »
Its not safe to pressure can in 2 quart jars. The only thing 2 quart jars were ever recommended for was juices. 2 quart jars are too large for the heat to penetrate properly to the center of the jar in anything denser than juices. I believe that current recommendation is to not even use them for juice. What they are really good for is dry food storage.

This link from has more info:

12 Life-Saving Canning Safety Rules

I don't do many two quart jars, but it is nice to have one tall enough for that. The size that holds 7 quarts fits nicely on a standard stove element, can do several two quart jars, or (11 I think) pints at a time by double stacking.

Thanks boys mama!  I have a pressure cooker that is ...okay, I don't have one anymore (I just looked all over my house).  It was only big enough to hold maybe three pint jars...I don't even remember if it was tall enough.  I never pressure cooked anything so I guess I gave it away.  My MIL gave it to me since she had two...I have yet to see or hear of her using that one (which was exactly the same as the one she gave me).  What would I look for in a Pressure cooker if I were to buy one?  Size, brand, # of Quarts it holds?  Thanks and Merry Christmas. Lovin'

It's probably a good thing that you never used it for canning. That size pan is a pressure cooker, not a pressure canner. That size pan cools down too quickly to be used for canning. Here's a quote & link I found:

"Pressure canners come deep enough for one layer of quart or smaller size jars, or deep enough for two layers of pint or smaller size jars. The USDA recommends that a canner be large enough to hold at least 4 quart jars to be considered a pressure canner for its published processes."

http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/publications/uga/using_press_canners.html

HTH. Blessings ~herbalmom

Offline SamsGirl

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Re: Home Canning
« Reply #87 on: December 22, 2007, 03:33:29 AM »
The All American metal to metal seal is by far the best pressure canner. I can between 600-800 quarts a year (and more as our family grows :)). A rubber seal needs to be replaced every two years at that rate of use.
 The All American also has automatic pressure control. This is a huge safety and time saving feature. Of course you don't want to turn your heat high and go to town or anything, but you don't have to watch it as closely because it has the adjustable metal weight instead of a just a single weight which needs to be controlled manually by frequent heat adjustments.
The All American has both the adjustable weight and a pressure gauge.
As far as size... choose according to your needs. I don't do many two quart jars, but it is nice to have one tall enough for that. The size that holds 7 quarts fits nicely on a standard stove element, can do several two quart jars, or (11 I think) pints at a time by double stacking. Lots of my recipes  and methods of gardening are gauged to the 7 quart capacity. You can run fewer than 7 quarts if you need to.
Here are some pictures and more info.
www.homesteadhelpers.com/get_item_aapc_all-american-pressure-canners.htm

All that said it is possible to pressure can with a cheap Presto canner from Walmart ;) My mom did over 1000 quarts a year for 18 years and I borrowed one for the first year I was married, but when it comes down to really getting into home canning it is well worth the $ 200- $ 250 for the All American. It will last a lifetime!

Thank you for sharing - that is a great site.  What size do you have?

We've never canned in are 2 quart jars, but they make great milk jars for our goats milk!
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Offline Lovin'myHoneyinVT

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Re: Home Canning
« Reply #88 on: December 31, 2007, 06:26:04 AM »
Thank you for sharing - that is a great site.  What size do you have?


I saw that the smallest that website had was a 10 quart canner.  Is that tall and round enough to hold ten quart jars?!

Offline Simply Kristen

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Re: Home Canning
« Reply #89 on: January 09, 2008, 07:08:35 PM »
SarahK gives a lesson in canning here:

www.backtobasicspodcast.com

Under: Podcasts
Topic: Canning and Herb Storage
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