Author Topic: Fungal-Bacterial Infections  (Read 52129 times)

Offline ForeverGirl

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Fungal-Bacterial Infections
« on: October 30, 2006, 01:35:56 PM »
Read if you have: Vaginal Yeast Infections, Topical Facial Rashes, Topical Skin Rashes/Excema/Psoriasis/Daiper Rash, Foot Rot, Toenail Fungus, Perioral Dermatitus, Skin Ulcers.

For several weeks now I’ve been researching this idea of a synergistic or symbiotic relationship between Candida Albicans/fungi and a bacterial infection. Over and over, on this forum, and through personal experience or relationships, I have come across conditions that do not respond to anti-fungal/anti-yeast, or antibacterial/antibiotic treatments. I’ve cringed over horrid stories of advanced cases of Vaginosis so painful and deteriorating the subject cannot sit down and is facing surgical removal of the vagina! Others who have “rashes” that will not go away no matter how many different salves, balms, creams, and diets are implemented. I am under the impression that this “condition” is becoming more and more prevalent in our society. I’m beginning to miss the good old days when a yeast infection was just a yeast infection.

Some of our research uncovered a “test” done to discover whether or not fungi and bacteria can work together. To make a lot of difficult text short and readable; the doctors doing this experiment discovered that Candida Albicans can circle and “protect” a topical bacterial infection, keeping the area weakened and susceptible to reoccurring bacterial infection. Likewise, the infectious bacteria will feed on, and open the flesh to provide a low-oxygen environment for the Candida fungi to safely maintain. Whether these two are synergistic, or merely opportunistic, is undetermined, but the outcome is clear: a situation that cannot be treated successfully with antibiotics or anti-fungals.

A topical fungal-bacterial infection will usually worsen when coated with a salve or cream which blocks off oxygen exposure. Both fungi and bacteria are considered to be anaerobic; which means, they prefer low oxygen environments.

Aerobic topical flora exist in large numbers on the surface of your skin to maintain skin-health. These flora/natural bacteria flourish in high oxygen environments. Some anaerobic bacteria also exist naturally, but when anaerobic yeast and “bad” bacteria take over an area, it is the aerobic flora that you want to strengthen and aid.
?According to my understanding, when an anti-fungal ointment is applied, the anaerobic fungi are combatted by the anti-fungal chemicals, but the aerobic flora are also killed in the low oxygen environment under the ointment. This leaves the area vacant of natural defenses. And, the bacterial infection is untouched, even worsened, as it can thrive in low oxygen, and now has no aerobic adversaries.

Are you following my war-saga? Keep reading: there is an answer to this problem!

In some situations the doctor will identify the bacterial infection and an antibiotic will be administered. As expected, the infection will die down. However, the fungi is still present, and even stronger as the antibiotics have killed the good bacteria as well, and lowered your immune system. The fungi keep the area weakened and festering so that as soon as the flood of antibiotics is over, the bacterial infection can return, this time more resistant than ever.
Quote

The recovery of Candida albicans along with bacteria from the abdomen in the setting of peritonitis is becoming increasingly common. It is not known whether the interactions between the fungal and bacterial elements of these infections are synergistic, competitive, or neutral. To study this question, we have examined the effects of both the addition of C. albicans to a solely bacterial infection caused by Escherichia coli and Bacteroides fragilis, and the deletion of various components of this system using directed antimicrobial therapy. In a mixed infection, both C. albicans and bacteria contributed to mortality, since only the combination of cefoxitin and amphotericin B improved survival (from 50% to 90%). The addition of C. albicans to the bacterial inoculum increased the recovery of abscesses, but only to the number seen with fungal infection alone, implying two fairly independent processes. Although the number of bacteria recovered from abscesses at 10 days postinfection was unchanged with the addition of fungi, the deletion of the bacterial component of mixed infections led to the overgrowth of C. albicans. We conclude that this model of mixed C. albicans/E. coli/B. fragilis peritonitis is best characterized as two nonsynergistic, parallel infections with incomplete competition, allowing the survival of all three organisms to eventual abscess formation.

http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=3613079

Quote
In clinical candidiasis, Candida albicans is frequently
found with Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus spe-
cies (2, 7, 10, 11, 14-20, 23). In addition, S. aureus has been
found to be a frequent opportunist in experimentally induced
candidiasis (19). In vitro, C. albicans has been found to
enhance the growth of a number of bacteria, including S.
aureus
(18, 22).
In previous reports from this laboratory, we described
enhancement by C. albicans of S. aureus, Serratia marces-
cens, and Streptococcus faecalis in the establishment of
experimental infection in mice when fungi and bacteria were
inoculated intraperitoneally (i.p.) (4). Moreover, a synergis-
tic effect of C. albicans and S. aureus on mouse mortality (3,
5) has been reported. The present study was designed to
examine further the nature of this synergistic interaction.
The following questions were addressed. Would Candida
stimulation of bacterial infection take place if the two
pathogens were introduced at different sites? Would species
other than C. albicans or heat-inactivated C. albicans ex-
hibit a protective effect on bacteria injected at the same
time? What is the physical relationship and growth pattern of
C. albicans and S. aureus in the tissues when introduced
together i.p.?

http://iai.asm.org/cgi/reprint/50/3/655.pdf

« Last Edit: October 31, 2006, 09:23:03 AM by BeeyoutifulGirl »
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Offline ForeverGirl

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Re: Fungal-Bacterial Infections
« Reply #1 on: October 30, 2006, 01:38:02 PM »
I have personally tried all the anti-fungal herbs, salves, oils, as well as drugstore remedies including topical antibiotics, and anti-fungals. The infected area (around my nose and mouth) only grew larger, more defiant and untreatable. It also spread to other members of the family!

Suspecting the truth, I decided to combat both the bacteria and the yeast simultaneously, while aiding my natural flora and bacteria, instead of killing them. How did I do this?

First I began a strict no-yeast, no-sugar diet for two weeks, while taking pro-biotic supplementation. I took 1 Ultimate Defense, 1 Original Blend, and 2 Acidophilus Blast Tummy Tune-up, twice daily. I also took 1 Yeast Assassin daily (yes, I am pregnant.)
?By doing this, I eliminated any supply of food for the Candida Albicans, and sent reinforcements to my natural flora, aiding them in the fight.

Next, I shook up a quart jar of water and sea salt (about 1/4 cup)  until it was cloudy pink with minerals and salt. This mixture I dabbed on my infection frequently, but otherwise left it uncovered. I expected the sea salt to dry me out badly, but it did not. I did not rinse off the salt, but let it dry in place. Within 24 hours the red bubbling was gone.


When the rash was nearly gone, I applied an anti-fungal herbal salve to help heal the scars. Big mistake! 12 hours later the rash was full blown again. No salves! I washed the area thoroughly and restrained myself from applying anything but salt. The rash began to heal again. Again, when it was nearly healed, I broke my yeast and sugar fast to have a hamburger and apple pie. The rash flared up mildly, but was quickly subdued with the sea salts.

My daughter and son responded more quickly to the salt than I did, and the infected areas on their faces healed within two days.

Having learned the hard, stubborn way, I am now faithful with only the salts, the supplements, and outdoors sunshine and air. My rash appears to be gone, but still some redness remains. I will leave the area uncovered though, and let it heal naturally.

Just the other day, a friend of mine told how his grandfather had been hospitalized during WWII with foot rot. The hospital was full of miserable soldiers, infected with foot rot. The doctors were unable to successfully treat these men with anti-fungals or antibiotics, and watched helplessly as the foot rot worsened. The grandfather in this story had enough of hospital-misery and walked out onto the beach where he waded in the water, and walked barefoot on the sand. He did this every day and his feet began to heal. The doctors questioned him as to what he was doing differently than all the other men. They traced his healing to the ocean salt water, and soon all the soldiers were sent out to walk the beach.
Quote
THE BENEFITS OF THE NORMAL FLORA
The indigenous bacteria of the gastrointestinal tract of an animal, perhaps mainly as a consequence of their great numbers, seem to have the greatest overall impact on their host. The nature of the interactions between an animal host and its normal flora has been inferred from the study of germ-free animals (animals which lack any bacterial flora) compared to conventional animals (animals which have a typical normal flora). Following are the primary beneficial effects  of the normal flora that are derived from these studies.
   1.The normal flora synthesize and excrete vitamins in excess of their own needs, which can be absorbed as nutrients by the host. For example, enteric bacteria secrete Vitamin K and Vitamin B12, and lactic acid bacteria produce certain B-vitamins. Germ-free animals may be deficient in Vitamin K to the extent that it is necessary to supplement their diets.
   2.The normal flora prevent colonization by pathogens by competing for attachment sites or for essential nutrients.  This is thought to be their most important beneficial effect, which has been demonstrated in the oral cavity, the intestine, the skin, and the vaginal epithelium.  In some experiments, germ-free animals can be infected by 10 Salmonella bacteria, while the infectious dose for conventional animals is near 106 cells.
   3.The normal flora may antagonize other bacteria through the production of substances which inhibit or kill nonindigenous species. The intestinal bacteria produce a variety of substances ranging from relatively nonspecific fatty acids and peroxides to highly specific bacteriocins, which inhibit or kill other bacteria.
   4.   4. The normal flora stimulate the development of certain tissues, i.e., the caecum and certain lymphatic tissues (Peyer's patches) in the GI tract. The caecum of germ-free animals is enlarged, thin-walled, and fluid-filled, compared to that organ in  conventional animals. Also, based on the ability to undergo immunological stimulation, the intestinal lymphatic tissues of germ-free animals are poorly-developed compared to conventional animals.
   5. The normal flora stimulate the production of cross-reactive antibodies. Since the normal flora behave as antigens in an animal, they induce an immunological response, in particular, an antibody-mediated immune (AMI) response.  Low levels of antibodies produced against components of the normal flora are known to cross react with certain related pathogens, and thereby prevent infection or invasion.  Antibodies produced against antigenic components of the normal flora are sometimes referred to as "natural" antibodies, and such antibodies are lacking in germ-free animals.
http://www.textbookofbacteriology.net/normalflora.html

« Last Edit: October 30, 2006, 02:32:06 PM by BeeyoutifulGirl »
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Offline ForeverGirl

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Re: Fungal-Bacterial Infections
« Reply #2 on: October 30, 2006, 01:41:48 PM »
Why Salt the Wound?

Quote
And here goes my incredibly long bout with ringworm. I worked at the airport for a good year and in March 2005, I noticed a small patch of scaly skin developping on my arm right on the part of my arm where I would lean on my counter where I worked. I thought it odd, but assumed it would go away... It didn't and after a month, I went to see a doctor who prescribed me a hydrocortisone cream which she said would clear it right up. Which it did, until it started to come back, larger and scalier than before. Not to mention that I managed to spread it from the original spot on my arm to my other arm in 6 spots, both shoulders, both sides of my neck, my forehead, both cheeks and a couple spots on my legs. I couldn't believe it! I felt like a leper. You
couldn't cover it up! So, after going back again to see the doctor numerous times, it turned out to be ringworm. I couldn't believe that I had basically caught ringworm from work, AND had managed to spread it to my face. So, the doctor prescribed me Lamisil 1% which he said wouldclear it right up... Well, it's be 5 tubes so far and it was still on my face, albeit it managed to eradicate the other spots after months... So, since this ringworm was about to celebrate a birthday, I was beginning to lose all hope. Until I saw a little remedy speaking of using sea salts to dry up the patches... It was fairly cheap, but I was desperate thinking of course that it would never work. So, I went out to my drug store, bought some bath salt which had a high concentration of sea salt in it, came home, wet my face and applied the bath salt directly to the affected areas on my cheeks and forehead. It stung a little, but it was tolerable. I left the salt on for a good 30 minutes and then would re-apply... being sure to mist my face with regular water to moisten my skin and re-wet the salt. After 3 days of doing this, the ringworm completely dried up and I look like myself again! I couldn't believe it! How could something so simple work where my hundreds of dollars worth of drugs and creams didn't? - Sombody on the Web

9/21/2006: Vince from Philadelphia, PA writes, "I cured the fungus by applying cayenne in salt water under the nail. I applied it and cleared any dead skin, and applied it again. working it under. I only applied it once, and it hasn't been back in 3 yrs. VF"
[/size]

The Dead Sea is the world’s lowest and most saline lake. Its 30% salt composition has proportionately more calcium, magnesium, bromine, and potassium and less sodium, sulfate, and carbonate than any ocean.[1] The Dead Sea brine is characterized by a unique chemical composition. Unlike any other sea salt in the world the Dead Sea salt’s dominant cation is magnesium.[2] The Dead Sea salts comprise about 35% of magnesium salts.

The role of intravenous magnesium sulfate for acute asthma is well established.[3] Asthma is an allergic-type reaction, known to have increased amounts of eosinophils. This is a similar reaction to allergic rhinitis. Other studies by Rolla et al. demonstrate magnesium sulfate inhibits histamine effects.[4] Magnesium has been shown to significantly improve Asthma treated at the Dead Sea. Asthmatic conditions treated at the Dead Sea for 4 weeks have shown 36.8% of them suspended their medications, and those who continued with medical treatments reduced the frequency of their puffs by 43%.[5]

The successful treatment for Psoriasis by the Dead Sea salts has also been well established. The German health care system will pay for patients to travel to the Dead Sea for treatment. Numerous treatment sites have been set up in Europe. It has been shown that the inhibitory effects of magnesium bromide and magnesium chloride on cell growth were significantly stronger than those of their corresponding potassium salts or sodium chloride.[6] This is why greater than 94% of psoriatic patients respond to the Dead Sea salt treatment and not to other sea salt [7]. This is important because other sea salts have more potassium and sodium salts than do the Dead Sea salts. German studies have shown Dead Sea salts have lead to reduced amounts of Langerhans’ cells in the epidermis; however, salts of sodium chloride were without effect at all.[8] Schempp et al, not only confirmed these findings, but also showed functional relevance by using magnesium ions from the Dead Sea salt to significantly reduce the capacity of epidermal cells to activate allogeneic T cells, suppressed Langerhans cells function, reduced expression by Langerhans cells of HLA-DR and costimulatory B7 molecules, and with a suppression of the constitutive tumor necrosis factor-alpha production by epidermal cells in vitro.[9]

In addition, the anti-inflammatory effect of hypertonic Dead Sea solutions on atopic dermatitis via magnesium ions is well established.[10] Other studies show Dead Sea solution significantly reduced inflammation in allergic contact dermatitis. This was borne out in 5 patients with a known nickel allergy, in whom magnesium chloride but not sodium chloride, suppressed nickel sulfate-induced contact dermatitis.[11] Again the cutaneous anti-inflammatory action of the Dead Sea salt is thought to be due to magnesium ions. Leukotriene B4, produced from eicosanoids by enzyme 5-lipoxygenase, is a potent regulator in diseases involving inflammatory reactions. In human polymorphonuclear leukocytes in vitro, high concentrations of magnesium not only abrogate or annul the liberation of arachidonic acid (eiconosoid precursor) but also directly inhibit the activity of 5-lipoxygenase, thereby reducing leukotriene B4 production [12]. Further studies have shown the Dead Sea salt solution to be an effective treatment for allergic rhinitis and significantly better than saline solution. This study has not been published, but will be in the near future.
http://www.oasisnasalspray.com/dead_sea.html
 A good site on salt benefits, how to use:
http://www.saltworks.us/salt_info/si_DeadSeaSaltBathing.asp
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Offline ForeverGirl

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Re: Fungal-Bacterial Infections
« Reply #3 on: October 30, 2006, 01:45:36 PM »
Summary:

Not all rashes are fungal-bacterial. Many are allergic reactions, or strictly yeast infections, or...

But, if you have a rash/infection that only seems to worsen under treatment, consider the fungal-bacterial connection, and try the approach recommended in my second post.

Okay... I think I'm done...

Rebekah
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Offline DawnsEarlyBirds

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Re: Fungal-Bacterial Infections
« Reply #4 on: October 30, 2006, 02:16:31 PM »
Great timing Rebekah!  There is another post "a rash I can't figure out" that could be greatly helped by your research.  I will post your thread there.  Just yesterday I suggested she try Dead Sea salt baths and she replied they had, but then put other stuff on the  and the rash returned.  I suggested trying the salt bath without anything after, thinking maybe what they put on was "feeding" (for lack of any better idea of what to call it), the reason for the rash.  Your post here is very very helpful.  I know the salt works for our daughter, but had no idea just why.  I still don't know what her problem was, but for now it is gone.

Can I ask where you got your Dead Sea salts?  We bought from the SanFransisco Bath Salts Co..  Also, I have seen lots of DSS with added herbs or oils, and was wondering if your research showed that helpful, or unnecessary.

Offline ForeverGirl

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Re: Fungal-Bacterial Infections
« Reply #5 on: October 30, 2006, 02:22:54 PM »
One more:

These are my recommendations for various conditions that you may suspect as being bacterial-fungal because they are not responding to anti-yeast or antibiotic treatments.

Vaginosis:
Yeast cleanse and fast as described in post #2.
Douche and bath with Dead Sea Salts.
Douche with Acidophilus Blast.
New underwear and bleached sheets.

Perioral Dermatitus: (Facial rashes)
Yeast cleanse and fast as described in post #2.
Sea salt in water applied topically several times daily allowed to dry naturally.

Body rashes of any type/label:
Yeast cleanse and fast as described in post #2.
Consider allergens and/or bowel cleansing with enemas to clear out toxins.
Sea salt baths, allowed to dry on the body.



Note: Yeast Assassin is not necessary, but may help. Avoid any topical oil or salve which may inhibit oxygen circulation to the area.

Avoid applying oils, salves, make-up, etc... in the future after healing occurs.

Post your experience on WellTellMe.com!

Thanks for your post, DawnsEarlyBirds, I got my salt at the local healthfood store, but have been looking for a great bulk source to share with everyone. I'm not sure about the oils in the salts. I'd have to experiment, and I'd sure love to have a Rife microscope to look at all these little critters!

Rebekah
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Offline Whiterock

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Re: Fungal-Bacterial Infections
« Reply #6 on: October 30, 2006, 02:37:19 PM »
Vaginosis:
Yeast cleanse and fast as described in post #2.
Douche and bath with Dead Sea Salts.
Douche with Acidophilus Blast.
New underwear and bleached sheets.


I've always heard, "Don't douche while you're pregnant", so is this ok to do this while pregnant? Also, the garlic clove suppository, that I read about in another thread, sounds like it may have a place in treating vaginal problems. Is that something you would do while pregnant and/or would it kill the probiotic? My OB-GYN prescribed a cream to use vaginally but after reading the information on the little paper they include when you get a prescription filled (stuff about crossing the amniotic membrane, bone abnormalities in mice babies, fetal toxicity, etc, etc.) I decided not to use it. So, I am counting on natural remedies but am still iffy about what's safe during pregnancy.
WR
« Last Edit: October 30, 2006, 02:42:48 PM by Whiterock »
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Offline ForeverGirl

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Re: Fungal-Bacterial Infections
« Reply #7 on: October 30, 2006, 02:44:23 PM »
I would agree with the "don't douche" mantra in general, however, sea salt is about as close to natural human liquids as possible. I would personally have no hesitation in doing a sea salt douche, or a probiotic douche during pregnancy. I WOULD have qualms about a salve!

If you're not sure, just try a nice long soak every evening in the bath with salts, making sure the area gets plenty of salt topically.

I tried garlic - massive amounts - internally and externally for a bacterial-fungal infection. It did seem to kill the bacteria and fungus briefly, however, it must also kill the good bacteria, because the infection flared up within two hours after each treatment. If it is immediately followed with a probiotic douche, it may work.

I think the key to winning a battle with bacterial-fungal infection is to "do no harm." This means aiding your natural flora, increasing the good bacteria to fight for you. An empty building is easy to take. You need it to be filled with "friendlies" in order to keep it.

-Rebekah
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Offline Whiterock

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Re: Fungal-Bacterial Infections
« Reply #8 on: October 30, 2006, 03:51:00 PM »
Thanks!
WR
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Offline titus2wam

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Re: Fungal-Bacterial Infections
« Reply #9 on: October 31, 2006, 06:48:02 AM »
Beka, i am using the sea salt water on the rashes and i do have to say the rashes seem better. They are not itchy, but really feel dry. It is hard not to put lotion on  :-[ ;D!

Thank you for all your hard work!
Jeri in NM
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Offline SC

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Re: Fungal-Bacterial Infections
« Reply #10 on: October 31, 2006, 07:23:36 AM »
Sea salt is our new shoe and foot powder. Feels like you are walking on the beach!  :)
I'm no doctor . . .             I'm not even a Post hole Digger! ;)

Offline mrsnoah

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Re: Fungal-Bacterial Infections
« Reply #11 on: October 31, 2006, 09:00:37 AM »
Beka, do you know if food grade sea salt would work for the douche? I still have all the symptoms of bv that i posted in another thread  and would like to try this.
~mary

Offline ForeverGirl

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Re: Fungal-Bacterial Infections
« Reply #12 on: October 31, 2006, 09:19:04 AM »
It may, and if it's all you have, I'd definitely try it right away. However, if you can purchase some Dead Sea Salts soon - I believe they are the best, and highest in toxin-binding minerals. Celtic Sea Salt also is highly recommended.

Make sure you are staying off of sugars and yeasts 100%! This is a really tough combo to beat and takes some real persistence and diligence in the diet.

God bless,

Rebekah
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Offline Simply Kristen

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Re: Fungal-Bacterial Infections
« Reply #13 on: October 31, 2006, 11:31:37 AM »
Does anyone have a Dead Sea Salt product they recommend?

Quote
DawnsEarlyBirds
I suggest, from years of experience, make sure what you buy is pure and simple Dead Sea salts.  Otherwise, if there are other added things, like herbs, oils, anticaking agents, etc., you will not know for sure if the salts work or not.  So often when something happens, sickness, or such, we attack it will all kinds of stuff, and we never know for sure what is was that helped (or not.)

It may be hard to resist trying all kinds of stuff at once, but in the long run, knowing what works will make things happen more quickly in the future.
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Offline DawnsEarlyBirds

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Re: Fungal-Bacterial Infections
« Reply #14 on: November 01, 2006, 07:19:53 AM »
When I originially bought ours it was from the health food store, and was called Masada or something.  I wanted to try something right away, so paid the $16 for a pound of it.  It worked well, but was pricey.  But then I got online and ended up buying from the San Fransisco Salt company.  I am sure it was the best price I could find for what was called the purest salts on earth.  I can't tell you how much I bought, whether it was 5 or 10 pounds, but I know I spent about $35 dollars and had a large glass pickle jar plus another quart jar full of it.   They do carry much larger quantities that become very inexpensive, if you think you could use that much.   I didn't know anyone else trying them, so I went for the smaller amount.

We buy Celtic Sea salt in the grocery store - they just started carrying it for the same price as online, but no shipping.  And we also use the Redmond sea salts that are mined in Utah, which I only find at the health food store.  Celtic salt is grey and "wet" , the Redmond salt is dry and looks pink, though is a combination of colored bits of salts and minerals.  The celtic salt and Redmond salt (which I believe is  also called RealSalt) are much more expensive then the Dead Sea Salts I bought from SanFran. co.  As I understand, Dead Sea salts are NOT for consumption, the others are.  But I never thought about using the celtic or redmond salts for bathing, I guess because of the price.

Another question for Rebekah:  you talk about doing the YA and TT, but what about the salt cure that was much talked about months ago? 


 

Offline Whiterock

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Re: Fungal-Bacterial Infections
« Reply #15 on: November 01, 2006, 07:47:40 AM »
I buy Celtic Sea Salt from The Grain & Salt Society [http://www.celticseasalt.com/index.cfm]. If you become a member you get discounts. A Junior Membership only cost about $15 dollars and lasts a year. With the discount we can buy a pound of light grey Celtic Sea Salt for $4.50, but we usually get the five pound bag for $20.25.

HTH,
WR
« Last Edit: November 01, 2006, 09:04:25 AM by Whiterock »
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Offline ForeverGirl

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Re: Fungal-Bacterial Infections
« Reply #16 on: November 01, 2006, 09:27:06 AM »
Just an update,

I checked into the Big Lots Dead Sea salt sale today. It's the real stuff, bad taste and all. I mixed some in a spray bottle to use topically. It's a good deal too - $3.00 a bag, so if you have a Big Lots nearby, go get some DS salt!  The Milk and Honey with Dead Sea salt Body Butter smells great and has a nice texture, and the Dead Sea Mud mask looks good, although I haven't tried it yet.

Quote
Another question for Rebekah:  you talk about doing the YA and TT, but what about the salt cure that was much talked about months ago?

I'm not sure I understand this question since all we've been talking about lately is Salt???

Could you mean the Water Cure? If so, what are you asking about it? I still do the Water Cure whenever I "need" it. Like, today. I use regular sea salt that is for consumption in my drinking water. Dead Sea Salt is for topical use only.

-Rebekah
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Offline Mama Sita

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Re: Fungal-Bacterial Infections
« Reply #17 on: November 01, 2006, 11:48:15 AM »
Yahoo! Thanks for the update, Beeyoutiful! I do have a Big Lots near me--now, just wish I had that Sunflower Market that you guys talk about. That would be quite a road trip for us.
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Offline mommyoftwins

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Re: Fungal-Bacterial Infections
« Reply #19 on: November 01, 2006, 04:34:50 PM »
I was going to go to Big Lots today, but my plans got changed. Hopefully, I can get there tomorrow.

I have been using sea salt in dd's bath for skin rash. She acts pretty itchy after the bath because her skin feels sooo dry. It does look much better, but she still scratches a lot. We have an allergy test appointment in 2 weeks. It was funny that they asked for a list of all medications, supplements, and herbal treatments being taken. I had a long list of Beeyoutiful stuff she's getting, but with no medications. They're going to think I am crazy, I'm sure. :D

Offline Whiterock

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Re: Fungal-Bacterial Infections
« Reply #20 on: November 02, 2006, 05:27:59 AM »
Thanks ever so much for the heads-up, Beka!!! I went to Big Lots yesterday and found the Dead Sea collection. I got a bag of the salt, lotion, body butter, and mask for my sister and my Mom for Christmas (and got two bags of the salt for myself). What great gift for such a good price!

Now all I need to do is print a small pretty "herb lesson" style info page to add to the gifts. I want them to know what they can do with the salt and what the benefits are. My sister has psoriasis so I hope this will help.
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Offline DawnsEarlyBirds

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Re: Fungal-Bacterial Infections
« Reply #21 on: November 02, 2006, 10:17:59 AM »

Quote
Another question for Rebekah:  you talk about doing the YA and TT, but what about the salt cure that was much talked about months ago?

I'm not sure I understand this question since all we've been talking about lately is Salt???

Could you mean the Water Cure? If so, what are you asking about it? I still do the Water Cure whenever I "need" it. Like, today. I use regular sea salt that is for consumption in my drinking water. Dead Sea Salt is for topical use only.

-Rebekah
DUH (meaning, Dumb Und Humbled!) yes, I meant the Water Cure!!!   ::) :) ;)  I haven't seen it mentioned lately. 

heatlh85

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Re: Fungal-Bacterial Infections
« Reply #22 on: November 03, 2006, 03:18:00 AM »
Hi Everyone,
  This is my first time posting a message on this forum. Thank you for all the helpful info as I have suffered from eczema and two years ago from recurring yeast infections/vaginal problems. To make a long story short I changed my lifestyle somewhat(more exercise, no more fast food/eating out a lot, plenty of water,less sugar, etc) This helped with the vaginal yeast infections, but I still have severe eczema. It was under control actually until this past summer. My husband and I are stationed overseas and it is usually windy and cold, but this summer was pretty warm and I think this made it worse. Plus, we went on a missions trip to the Phillippines for ten days and the humidity must have caused a major flare up because my skin was itching and inflamed the entire time. While we were there I used natural soap, coconut oil, olive oil and nothing worked  to stop the inflammation and itching.
  Anywhoo, I have since then battled this problem. I finally went to the doctor after getting a virus infection and later got seen for my skin. They put me on predisone the stopped the inflammation, but not itching. After being treated like this I got a yeast infection a few weeks later after two years of not having one. I took diflucan and garlic for this and then got a UTI. I treated this naturally with consuming garlic with water and for the most part it has cleared up. I also started supplementing with good bacteria from beeyoutiful.com and YA for my skin. So I am just waiting and hoping and doing what I know to do.
   After all the research and reading the post on this site I do believe I have a yeast problem and that the predisone just made it worse.  I do have a question for beeyoutifulgirl or anyone who knows the answer. I am going to purchase some sea salts and bathe in them and was wondering if the water needs to be filtered for this to work on my skin?
  Thanks for listening to my history with this problem.
Sincerely,
LaMeisha (misspelled health when I was signing up. Can someone tell me how I can go back and change that? Thanks!) ;D

Offline ForeverGirl

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Re: Fungal-Bacterial Infections
« Reply #23 on: November 03, 2006, 05:30:37 AM »
LaMeisha,

Wow, it sounds like you've had a miserable time of it! One recommendation I would make is that you try to buy Dead Sea Salt instead of just Sea Salt. I've tried both in the last week, and although Sea Salt helps, Dead Sea Salt seems to be quite a bit more potent and effective. It also does not dry out my skin, but rather leaves it baby-soft. Regular tap water in a bath should be sufficient, though I'm sure pure, non-floridated water would be better. Try a spray bottle of water and salt. There are lots of other threads that deal with Yeast, Candida, cleansing, etc... Look around, use the search box, and you'll fill in all the blanks you may have on this issue.
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Offline dara

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Re: Fungal-Bacterial Infections
« Reply #24 on: November 03, 2006, 05:51:10 AM »
The sea salt will help neutralize chlorine in the bath water, since you asked about the water... adding some ascorbic acid (vitamin C) to the water helps neutralize it too.
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heatlh85

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Re: Fungal-Bacterial Infections
« Reply #25 on: November 04, 2006, 12:05:40 AM »
Thanks for the advice. I ordered the Dead Sea Salts today and looking forward to my skin being baby soft again. It has been awhile since my skin has been soft.

Offline mommyoftwins

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Re: Fungal-Bacterial Infections
« Reply #26 on: November 08, 2006, 10:59:16 AM »
Dd's rash continues to get better. The rash is actually pretty much gone. We are now just waiting for the skin to heal up after such a major rash.  We have been giving her dead sea salt baths & only using aloe every once in a while when she seems itchy from the dryness. I was using my aloe plant, but it's so small & we didn't want to kill it, so now we are using Banana Boat clear aloe vera gel. It does have other ingredients like alcohol, but it hasn't seemed to cause any problems.

She goes for an allergy test next Tues. Will let you know what we find out.

The Dead Sea salts made the bath water an awesome pale bluish tint. Could this be from the chlorine? :-\

Offline DawnsEarlyBirds

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Re: Fungal-Bacterial Infections
« Reply #27 on: November 08, 2006, 11:55:12 AM »
OK, I've been thinking about this for days now, and finally am ready to ask my questions.

Since May my husband has had a problem with redness, swelling, itching, seeping around his eyes.  My initial research came up with Sebhorric Dermatitis, which with further digging turns out to be a yeast infection.  This was when I first got on welltellme and yeast infections, master clease, water cure, and leaky gut syndrome, were the major topics.  A visit to the ER late May and another to our alternative  dr. both said, allergies, mold and pollen.  This has been the wettest year on record here, so, the mold made sense.  We gave up on the yeast idea because everyone kept saying, no it is not yeast.

Later we went back to the yeast idea when allergy stuff didn't help.  He did YA, TT, several liver cleanses and on and off water cures.  All this helped, but never really got rid of the problem.  The confusing part was every time it rained, it flared up again.  That made sense for mold.  But yet we couldn't completely be satisfied with that answer, plus nothing gave him real relief.

Days ago, after reading more of Rebekah's posts on fungal-bacterial infections, I was driving down the road and the light bulb went on!!!  Could this be the problem?  Could it be that the dampness makes the fungal stuff flare up?  I have  believed him to have yeast problems for years (he CRAVES bread, will buy a loaf on the road and eat the whole thing) plus another thing I read about yeast is that it can appear that you are lactose intolerant (which he was.)   He also had recent problems with athletes foot and has one of those yellow toe nails develop. 

What I originally read about sebhorric dermatitis was to wash it with coal tar (ingredient in dandruff shampoo) but that didn't help.  Aloe also didn't help.  The only thing that he can do is put a salve I made from beeswax and coconut oil.  It makes it feel better but am wondering if it does any good in the long run.  Last night while eating a apple  cake he said he could feel it start to heat up, and "bloom" was the way he put it.  Benedryll helps a little, but very little.

We will be trying Rebekah's suggestions, but any other ideas?
« Last Edit: November 09, 2006, 02:42:52 PM by DawnsEarlyBirds »

Offline DawnsEarlyBirds

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Re: Fungal-Bacterial Infections
« Reply #28 on: November 10, 2006, 09:44:11 AM »
Bump
I've never done this before! :D
BumpBumpBump   ;D :D ;D

Offline ForeverGirl

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Re: Fungal-Bacterial Infections
« Reply #29 on: November 10, 2006, 03:15:02 PM »
Your husband's condition sounds just like what I've been fighting. With me it was around the nose and mouth mostly, and somewhat around my left eye. Everything I used only made it worse. The salt water stopped the progress and began healing the troubled skin, but I also had to stay off of yeast and sugar faithfully. When the rash seemed almost well, I broke the yeast/sugar fast, and the rash came back. I think that once yeast is systemic, you have to change your diet long term, while taking supplements to restore your natural bacterial balance. In my case, I believe my Estrogen levels were so high, they contributed to the sugar levels in my body, and allowed my normally healthy system to give into mycelial yeast.

Sometimes the fungus can work symbiotically with a bacteria, this is where the sea salt comes in handy. It fights both the yeast and bacteria without inhibiting your "good" bacteria. My best recommendation would be for your husband to go on a yeast/sugar diet and take Yeast Assassin and Tummy Tune-Up - or the equivalent - and to rinse his face with Dead Sea Salt water a couple times a day.

-Rebekah
Honey Sunny in complete exasperation:
"JOE!!! You DOUGHNUT COCONUT COCONUT COCONUT!!!"