Author Topic: What to do for a dog bite while pregnant?  (Read 8565 times)

Offline runnergirl

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What to do for a dog bite while pregnant?
« on: March 15, 2008, 04:05:23 AM »
My friend, who is a around 21 weeks pregnant with her first just got bitten by a dog. They want to give her a tetanus shot, but she is reluctant.
WTM is preventing my search due to a database error. Can anyone give me a recommendation on this?
Thanks.

Offline healthybratt

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Re: What to do for a dog bite while pregnant?
« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2008, 04:34:26 AM »
My friend, who is a around 21 weeks pregnant with her first just got bitten by a dog. They want to give her a tetanus shot, but she is reluctant.
WTM is preventing my search due to a database error. Can anyone give me a recommendation on this?
Thanks.
Why would the doc give a Tetenus shot for a dog bite?  I thought rabies was the main concern in this situation. ???
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Offline Mrs. B

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Re: What to do for a dog bite while pregnant?
« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2008, 04:44:04 AM »
I actually got a dog bite that broke the skin on my due date ( I didn't actually give birth until 2 weeks later) with my first child.  The midwife/MD's didn't really know what to do, and mine also suggested a tetanus shot.
I think that this was pretty much because in medicine you often feel that you have to do something if someone has a complaint, even if it is not necessarily valid.  I think that the tetanus shot falls into this category for dog bites.
I don't believe that there is any way to get tetanus from a dog bite.
I would be more concerned if the dog had rabies.
I would probably decline the tetanus shot.

Offline healthybratt

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Re: What to do for a dog bite while pregnant?
« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2008, 04:45:16 AM »
I actually got a dog bite that broke the skin on my due date ( I didn't actually give birth until 2 weeks later) with my first child.  The midwife/MD's didn't really know what to do, and mine also suggested a tetanus shot.
I think that this was pretty much because in medicine you often feel that you have to do something if someone has a complaint, even if it is not necessarily valid.  I think that the tetanus shot falls into this category for dog bites.
I don't believe that there is any way to get tetanus from a dog bite.
I would be more concerned if the dog had rabies.
I would probably decline the tetanus shot.
That's what I was thinking.  Well said.
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Offline Siege

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Re: What to do for a dog bite while pregnant?
« Reply #4 on: March 15, 2008, 04:53:53 AM »
Tetnus comes from feces, and many believe it is in dog feces. Many dogs eat their feces, so this is the main reason behind tetnus from dog bites. I am not sure about weather they should do the shot or not. This is just to explain why they do tetnus for dog bites. CJ

Offline RunAmokFarm

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Re: What to do for a dog bite while pregnant?
« Reply #5 on: March 15, 2008, 08:58:28 AM »
Ok, I could be wrong, but in all my experiences, I have never heard of dog's transmitting tetanus to humans...   ???  The only reason I could see this happening is because tetanus germs are "everywhere" and it grows in oxygen-poor environments - IE: puncture wounds.

I do not believe this would be caused because "they eat their poop", as eating poop is not typical behavior for healthy dogs.

In my opinion, her real risk is simply of infection in the wound; bite punctures can be filled with bacteria that thrive in a wound environment (warm, dark, and moist).  The risk of infection is fairly high, but keep in mind that even kibble-fed dogs with NASTY plaque have far less bacteria that human mouths - so risk factor would be much higher from a human bite, over that of a dog bite.  *Have seen quite a few dog bites over the years (though have never been seriously bitten myself.)  Most were just fine with home treatment...

That said, dog bites CAN cause serious infections, so the wound should have been cleaned thoroughly.  She should take some natural antibiotics (making sure they are "safe" for pregnancy), vitamin C, etc.  Continue to scrub the area and keep very clean; I would soak in very warm water/Epsom salt to draw any infection out. 

*I am not positive, but I believe a topical application of goldenseal powder would be acceptable, even for a pregnant woman - but would need to double-check to be sure.
J
« Last Edit: March 15, 2008, 09:00:15 AM by RunAmokFarm »
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Offline HelpmeetPlusHelpers

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Re: What to do for a dog bite while pregnant?
« Reply #6 on: March 15, 2008, 09:17:33 AM »
According to DH and seconded last week while seeing a MD about a bad cut on ds face: Tetanus is a bacteria that lives and grows in th soil. It is not "everywhere." The doctor we saw said in most cases other bacterial infections should be prevented and that unless the open wound was the cause of a dirty (from dirt) something, a tetanus shot should not be advisable. So, IMO, the treatment would depend on whose dog, where it lives, how it is cared for, and things like that.

BTW, this doctor did not recommend the injection for our son and the tetanus shot is the only one this doctor is willing to administer. He doesn't agree the benefit outweighs the risk of the others.

Offline Wing

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Re: What to do for a dog bite while pregnant?
« Reply #7 on: March 15, 2008, 09:25:08 AM »
This is something I posted on another thread:

Here are some quotes from the following link with studies and personal experiences: http://vaclib.org/email/autismom.htm

Dr. Edward Yazbak has done a lot of work with mothers who received live virus vaccines either just before and during pregnancy, and postpartum. He found that rubella virus is transmitted to the infant in breastmilk, and can heighten a baby's risk of developing autism spectrum disorders if he/she is subsequently vaccinated. Our recent newsletter reported on his lecture on this topic given at the NVIC Conference last September.

Dr. Yazbak devised a questionnaire that was posted on the internet by Dawn Richardson, president of PROVE (Parents Requesting Open Vaccine Education). He received 400 responses in a few weeks. " Very quickly I realized that some women had been vaccinated just around pregnancy with disastrous results." His research has focused on what happens to children whose mothers have been vaccinated before or during pregnancy and shortly after birth. The vaccine challenge to the mother's immune system can subsequently impact on her children, predisposing them to immune and neurological insult when they themselves are then vaccinated in infancy and childhood.

He talked about immune fragility around pregnancy. Women whose rubella titers have declined are told they should get rubella vaccine after birth but are not told that the live rubella virus is secreted in her milk. The immunological consequences to infants exposed to live rubella virus during breastfeeding, and who are then subsequently vaccinated with live virus vaccine has not been studied, until Dr. Yazbak began to investigate these cases. Not a single woman of the 400 he studied was informed that rubella virus passes through to the baby in her breast milk. According to Merck's product monograph, it is not known whether live measles and mumps virus is also secreted during lactation, but caution is urged during nursing.

"What happens to women that are vaccinated postpartum? This is what I have found - totally new findings. Several healthy mothers get vaccinated and horrible things begin to happen. They develop symptoms of arthritis, of thyroid, and other immune difficulties, but more importantly they start having still births and miscarriages. I'm saying this for the first time. I'm relating obstetrical failure to immune insults from a vaccine. After all this is said and done, they are still rubella and measles susceptible and even worse, they have an unbelievable incidence of autism in their children, plus other disabilities. So we have to have serious studies that look at the immune fragility of women around pregnancy. This is not a good time to give vaccines to anybody. She has enough on her mind having a baby."

Offline RunAmokFarm

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Re: What to do for a dog bite while pregnant?
« Reply #8 on: March 15, 2008, 10:57:39 AM »
Great info posted above...  I too would be very concerned about vaccinating a pregnant woman...  Below is part of an article concerning transmission of disease.  It is much longer than the part I post, so you could do a search and find the entire article I believe.  (I have it in PDF format, for anyone interested.)

ZOONOSES: HOW REAL THE THREAT?
Richard B. Ford, DVM, MS, DACVIM and DACVPM
College of Veterinary Medicine
North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC

(snipped from mid-article)

“Although dogs appear to inflict more bite wounds than cats, the likelihood of infection developing subsequent to a bite wound is greater in cats than in dogs. Wound infection is most common in those victims who are more than 50 years of age, when wounds are not properly nor adequately cleansed, when there is more than a 24 hour delay in seeking treatment, and when wounds occur on the hands.

While an animal bite to a human is not, per se, a zoonotic disease, the potential for significant injury or infection does exist. Recently, renewed concern has developed over the ability of the dog to cause severe, even fatal, sepsis in humans following the inoculation of resident oral bacteria via bite into human tissue. It is interesting to note that, although infections from dog bites are a major concern, cat bites and human bites are much more likely to become infected. The likelihood of infection following a dog bite is only 3 to 5% (gram negative, aerobes) while infection rates following human or cat bites can be as high as 50% (esp. Pasteurella multocida).
 
The DF-2 organism, now recognized as Capnocytophaga canimorsus, has surfaced as one of the resident organisms in dog saliva that, following bite-wound contamination, can cause sepsis in humans leading to severe morbidity or death. At particular risk are individuals who have experience splenectomy or are otherwise immune compromised. This group of gram-negative rods has a propensity to cause disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and symmetric peripheral gangrene in asplenic patients. True incidence of bacteremia after dog bite is considered to be underestimated. Penicillin is the treatment of choice in affected patients. “
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