Author Topic: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks  (Read 22991 times)

Offline ladyhen

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Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #30 on: May 08, 2007, 07:20:07 AM »
I am SO very glad that you posted that raw cheese recipe, Nickole!  My darling milk lady gave me (FREE!) 2 extra gallons today because they are getting too much (!!) milk now that the cow is in grass pasture!  Glory!!  She asked me if I would take any extra they have from time to time.  I guess I'll have to.  hee hee

I have used the vinegar queso blanco recipe for many years, and have found that I get a harder cheese and better yeild per gallon of milk by heating the milk past 180* and putting in proportionately less vinegar.  For instance, at 190*, you can put in around 50% less vinegar and still have nice cheese and a little more of it. 

But, I would much prefer a raw cheese.  I'm going to go to Aldi for lemons now.  Sounds like just the right way to use a gallon of this good stuff!  And then I'm going to make my darlings some flan custard for dessert this weekend.  Happy day!  I think I might try adding the lemon whey to the smoothies and see what that tastes like, too.
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Offline Mollyloo

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Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #31 on: June 15, 2007, 10:10:41 AM »
So just to be clear...

Can I used the pasturized milk I bought at the store, let it "spoil" and make it into cottage cheese or curds and whey? Or do I need to use raw milk?

Thanks!

Offline joeswife

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Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #32 on: June 15, 2007, 10:41:06 AM »
I think it has to be raw, right? Because raw milk sours to protect itself and pasturized milk goes rancid.

I am new on this, so someone please confirm?!

Offline Mollyloo

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Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #33 on: June 15, 2007, 02:03:34 PM »
That's what I was thinking. The health food stores in Portland don't carry raw milk. I need a farmer! Thanks all, this is a great forum!!!
molly

Offline nexis777

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Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #34 on: June 15, 2007, 02:22:08 PM »
So, HIO and Nickole,
Those recipes said for goat milk... would that work with raw cow's milk? And we're talking real cheese here right? Like, not cottage cheese? Oh baby, I can't wait to try it out *grin*

Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #35 on: June 15, 2007, 03:51:40 PM »
So, HIO and Nickole,
Those recipes said for goat milk... would that work with raw cow's milk?

I don't see why it wouldn't.  I tried my cheese recipe when I only had access to goats milk.  I would love to make some with raw cow's some day.  Let me know how it tastes.  ;)

Offline Mollyloo

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Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #36 on: June 15, 2007, 03:58:48 PM »
Oh I made the simple cheese recipes (above), one with vinegar and lemon juice and one with kefir (kefir curdles milk, wierd!) AND IT WORKED. Coolio! Y'ladies are a gift-a-God.

Offline txseawater

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Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #37 on: July 06, 2007, 03:34:41 PM »
Making cheese is an art. I hope to simplify what I have learned so far. Start easy with your cultures first. The cultures exist in the raw milk. Thermophyllic ( heat loving) - i.e. yougurt , and mesophyllic ( cool loving) i.e. buttermilk. I have successfully made buttermilk by simply allowing the unpasterurized (raw) milk to sour on the room temp. counter in a large mason jar. It will curd and begin to seperate in 24-48 hrs. Refrigerate and use part for whatever, and use part for a starter for the next batch. It will store in the fridge for several weeks to a month. I make yougurt by placing the same unpasteurized milk in the same type mason jar down in very hot water in a larger plastic container set inside a covered ice chest. This keeps an even warm temp. I check it after several hours for warmth - pouring off the water and adding more hot water. Within 24-48 hrs. I will have yougurt. If you simply want to cheat the process, just add 1/4 cup of plain storebought yougurt or buttermilk to your large mason jar of unpasturized milk. Next time I'll talk about Ricotta. - txseawater       
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Offline txseawater

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Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #38 on: July 09, 2007, 12:36:43 PM »
Is anyone trying to make their buttermilk and yogurt cultures for the first time? Let me know when you do, so I can go on to talk Ricotta!  ;) Best wishes! -txseawater
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Offline Lizzy

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Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #39 on: July 09, 2007, 02:29:24 PM »
Does anyone know of a recipe for mozzarella cheese that doesn't
require putting it in the microwave? The recipe looks so simple, but I
don't have (and really don't want to use) a microware.
Does anyone have a SIMPLE recipe for cheddar cheese. I am one of those
have to see it kind of people. I have such a hard time reading it in a book
and doing it, so I need something really simple.
Thanks!

Offline pelican

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Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #40 on: July 09, 2007, 05:04:46 PM »
I've been interested in learning to make cheese too.  I am especially interested in cheese made of goat's milk.  Here are a couple of sites I've found with recipes I plan on trying myself.
1)  http://fiascofarm.com/recipes/index.html
2)  http://biology.clc.uc.edu/Fankhauser/Cheese/Cheese.html

Let me know how it goes and which ones you try.  I'm hoping to make Fankhauser's Neufchatel this week.
Susan

Offline txseawater

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Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #41 on: July 09, 2007, 06:20:55 PM »
Allow for TIME - let the cheese remain in the whey longer for the mozz. Don't be rough with the curds!! Gentle, gentle...place them in a baking dish and pour your hot water over them to work them. Notice Fankhauser says he allows the curds to remain in the whey another day.

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Offline boysmama

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Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #42 on: July 10, 2007, 06:21:04 AM »
Does anyone know of a recipe for mozzarella cheese that doesn't
require putting it in the microwave? The recipe looks so simple, but I
don't have (and really don't want to use) a microware.
I am guessing you are talking about the 30 minute mozzarella that uses citric acid. Here is a quote from Home Cheesemaking by Ricki Carroll.
" No microwave?.....heat reserved whey to 175* Add 1/4 cup cheese salt to the whey...shape curd into one or two balls....put ball in a strainer and dip in the hot whey for several seconds. Knead the curd, dip and repeat until curd is smooth and pliable."
I really like www.cheesemaking.com because some of the recipes come w/ pictures and extra tips. Check it out!

Offline Maria/NHM

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Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #43 on: July 31, 2007, 07:10:40 AM »
Here's an old recipe for cottage cheese that doesn't need a starter. I'm trying it now and will let you know how it turns out.

http://www.oznet.ksu.edu/pr_histpubs/Pubs/SC146.PDF
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Offline ...JeSsE™...

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Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #44 on: August 15, 2007, 08:35:30 AM »
uM, hI mOm. lOl ;D
...JeSsE™... rocks...lol

Offline ...JeSsE™...

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Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #45 on: August 15, 2007, 08:37:46 AM »
i dont get the thing about the cheese recipe...is the 175* supposed to be in a pot on the stove?...or the oven...?...please explain a little better! :-\
...JeSsE™... rocks...lol

Offline boysmama

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Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #46 on: August 19, 2007, 08:15:39 AM »
i dont get the thing about the cheese recipe...is the 175* supposed to be in a pot on the stove?...or the oven...?...please explain a little better! :-\
If you mean the 175* for the citric acid mozrella recipe..... I was only briefly stating alternate heating methods to the microwave. If you look up an original recipe on cheesemaking.com it should make more sense...You heat the whey (after the curd is formed and removed)in a pot, double boiler, or in a very hot water in the sink, however works best for you. I would say not the oven because you are needing to work in the whey off and on while maintaining 175* temp. A stovetop or sink- bowl water bath would be a simpler choice.

Offline Alicia

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Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #47 on: August 19, 2007, 08:56:19 AM »
I don't have a microwave either to make my mozzarella. You can use the basic recipe, but instead of putting it into the microwave, you dip it into the reheated whey. Reheat the whey to about 190* then form your mozzarella into several small balls, dip the cheese into the whey with a slotted spoon for about 30 seconds, take out, knead and stretch, and repeat two or three times until the cheese is nice and stretchy. I wear a pair of kitchen gloves since the cheese can get quite hot. This works very nicely! Good luck!
« Last Edit: August 19, 2007, 09:02:51 AM by Alicia »

Offline Isaacsmama

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Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #48 on: August 26, 2007, 07:46:44 PM »
so, I want to get a book about cheese making.  Is ricki carrol "the" book the get.  Those of you that have cheese books and use them often, which do you really like and recommend?  I want to make sure I get a good one!
I was going to get the cheese making starter kit from lehmans.com, anyone ever bought that?

also, tjmjfamily, how did your cottage cheese turn out?

Offline Maria/NHM

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Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #49 on: August 27, 2007, 06:23:49 AM »
Here's an old recipe for cottage cheese that doesn't need a starter. I'm trying it now and will let you know how it turns out.

http://www.oznet.ksu.edu/pr_histpubs/Pubs/SC146.PDF

Smelled very nasty after sitting out :P I tossed it.
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Offline Isaacsmama

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Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #50 on: August 27, 2007, 10:26:29 AM »
so, I want to get a book about cheese making.  Is ricki carrol "the" book the get.  Those of you that have cheese books and use them often, which do you really like and recommend?  I want to make sure I get a good one!
I was going to get the cheese making starter kit from lehmans.com, anyone ever bought that?


bump

Offline boysmama

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Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #51 on: August 27, 2007, 03:22:12 PM »
so, I want to get a book about cheese making.  Is ricki carrol "the" book the get.  Those of you that have cheese books and use them often, which do you really like and recommend?  I want to make sure I get a good one!
I was going to get the cheese making starter kit from lehmans.com, anyone ever bought that?

I have borrowed several cheese books and hope to add some to my collection, but I only own Ricki's books and always recommend them to start out with. I would recommend going with some of cheesemaking.com  (Ricki's site) kits and starters/cultures while you start out. I know that her stuff is a little bit more expensive than some, but I have always had it turn out when I followed the directions explicitly.

Offline Alicia

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Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #52 on: September 21, 2007, 06:49:29 AM »
I have used the cheese recipes out of "The Country Encyclopedia"  by Carla Emery. Those are some good recipes. I also found the recipes inside the Junket Rennet box to be very nice.  HTH :)

Offline pljammie

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Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #53 on: November 01, 2007, 02:37:47 AM »
I have another cheesemaking book that has not been mentioned.  I love everything I've tried so far.  It is called "Goats Produce Too!  The Udder Real Thing"  Volume 2.  It is by Mary Jane Toth.  It is recipes for use with goat milk and meat, ice cream, custards, soap, paint, etc.  Pretty much anything you could do with goat milk or meat.  She has a recipe for orange sherbet that is dead on the same as the grocery store sherbet...not the most healthy as it uses kool-aid and jello for flavoring, however.  Also, keep in mind that when making goat and cow milk into cheese that the goat milk curds are more fragile.  If using a cow milk recipe, just reduce the heat about 4-5 degrees and everything should work out fine.  With mozarella, I have to let the curd sit for an hour and rest...a step that isn't necessary with cow milk...so basically play around a bit and you'll have every bit as good of cheese with goat milk as with cow milk. 

I think I'm going to try the kefir cheese posted earlier...yum. 

Happy Cheesemaking,
Jammie
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Offline ~esposita~

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Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #54 on: December 26, 2007, 09:29:42 AM »
We (DH)  and I made some cheese yesterday - heated milk, wht vinegar, then salt, garlic, & oregano.  Yummy on homemade bread!  Here are a couple pics.  Thats my man, 'man handling' the cheese to squeeze out the whey.  Today I made potatoe soup with the leftover whey.

(Oh yeah, about the clothspin on his ear...he has a cut on his ear and it wouldn't stop bleeding.  ::))




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Offline ladyhen

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Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #55 on: December 26, 2007, 09:57:44 AM »
Sounds so yummy, Licia!  I am currently without a milk supplier - again - so there hasn't been any good cheese here for awhile.  I like your idea of using the whey for potato soup, have to remember that.   
Looking for that blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of the great God and our Saviour Jesus Christ;    Titus 2:13

Offline Kitten Kisses

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Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #56 on: December 26, 2007, 10:00:16 AM »
Nice!  We ate ours yesterday. . .w/ some homemade butter and some 2 week kombucha and that tej I was telling you about.  It was a fermented Christmas!  :)  

Offline ~esposita~

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Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #57 on: December 26, 2007, 10:10:16 AM »
HI SHAINA!!!!!  WE MISS YOU!!!!   ;D ;D
I like your idea of using the whey for potato soup, have to remember that.   

Actually, the idea was shainalorraine's (she's my friend that I miss SOOO much!  :'()

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Offline LoveSunflowers

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Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #58 on: January 20, 2008, 02:34:29 PM »
Here is the recipe I use for cottage cheese. It is super easy and always comes out yummy!
-Warm one gallon of skimmed raw milk to room temperature (About 72 degrees)
-Stir in four ounces of mesophilic culture*
-Let sit until curdles (it looks like one solid curd)**
-Cut the curd into small pieces and let rest for 15 mins. I take a long knife and  cut the curd into 1 inch blocks. I then stir the curds to break them up before we like smaller curd cheese.
-Put on stove and slowly raise the temperature to 120 degrees
-Hold at 120 degrees for 45 mins. Stir frequently.
-Drain the cruds using a colander lined with cheesecloth
-To remove the sour taste rinse the curds and cloth with cold water***
-Hang cheese to let drain until no longer dripping, this take about an hour.
-After dry, put in bowl and add 1 tsp. of salt for every gallon of milk used.
-Pour a generous amount of cream over curds and mix and refrigerate
*I'm don't know of the source to get this culture but it is easy to find and once you buy it you can make your own. I got my culture from my Aunt.
**This takes anywhere from 12-24 hours depending on the room temperature. I place my pan of milk on the over so it is warmer.
***You want to rinse A LOT if you don't enjoy a sour cottage cheese.

I have never liked cottage cheese but LOVE this. I've been making about 3 gallons of milk worth for a month now. Each batch is gone by the end of the week. I keep the whey for beet kvass, cabbage juice and soaking of grains and beans. I have had to throw so much away since making cheese but it's good for the pipes. :)
If you have any questions on making your own culture after purchasing let me know. ;)
Jess

Offline Kati*did

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Re: Cheese Making: Recipes, Tips & Tricks
« Reply #59 on: January 20, 2008, 02:48:45 PM »
Here is the recipe I use for cottage cheese. It is super easy and always comes out yummy!
-Warm one gallon of skimmed raw milk to room temperature (About 72 degrees)


Do you know if it matters if the milk isn't skim?
"...plain Kate, and bonny Kate, and sometimes Kate the curst..."